18 Burst results for "Marielle Segarra"

"marielle segarra" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"marielle segarra" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Marketplaces Marielle Segarra reports the law does a few things it requires. The New York State Department of Labor to come up with workplace standards basically rules to prevent airborne infectious diseases. Those rules aren't out yet, but they will address things like Social distancing, mask Wearing and ventilation. David Michaels at the George Washington University School of Public Health says. To protect people from Covid, you need to use what's called the Swiss cheese model where you have different protections, and the combination of them is the most effective masking makes a big difference. But Sometimes the virus gets beyond the mask. Same goes for distancing and ventilation. None of them is 100% effective. The law also says that workers have the right to refuse to work in unsafe conditions and that it's illegal to retaliate against them for raising safety concerns. And it requires companies to allow workers to form safety committees. Kobe Berman is a labor and employment lawyer. They're going to have to make sure that these workplace safety committees are able to meet without reduction of pay, attend training without reduction of pay. And the committees have to be made up of at least two thirds non management employees. So you know, unlike any other business feature where it's you know, management runs all this is now suddenly very democratized. One concern about the law is that it's not specific enough. Ken Pawlikowski at the Business Council of New York State, says. For example, it's not clear how those safety committees will be formed. Would you need a majority vote? Sama of setting was between 50 and 100 employees. And three of them want to create committee in 97. Don't what happens? It's also unclear how the law will apply to other airborne infectious diseases like the flu, and in the case of covid whether the rules will stay in place as vaccination rates increase in case numbers dropped further. Once the rules are published, businesses that don't follow them can face fines starting at $50 a day. I'm Marielle Segarra for marketplace. Time.

Ken Pawlikowski David Michaels Marielle Segarra 100% Kobe Berman George Washington University S New York State Department of L 50 three 100 employees Business Council of New York S One concern 97 Swiss $50 a day two thirds them Covid
"marielle segarra" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"marielle segarra" Discussed on KCRW

"Marketplaces Marielle Segarra reports the law does a few things it requires. The New York State Department of Labor to come up with workplace standards basically rules to prevent airborne infectious diseases. Those rules aren't out yet, but they will address things like Social distancing, mask Wearing and ventilation. David Michaels at the George Washington University School of Public Health says. To protect people from Covid, you need to use what's called the Swiss cheese model where you have different protections, and the combination of them is the most effective masking makes a big difference. But Sometimes the virus gets beyond the mask. Same goes for distancing and ventilation. None of them is 100% effective. The law also says that workers have the right to refuse to work in unsafe conditions and that it's illegal to retaliate against them for raising safety concerns. And it requires companies to allow workers to form safety committees. Kobe Berman is a labor and employment lawyer. They're going to have to make sure that these workplace safety committees are able to meet without reduction of pay, attend training without reduction of pay. And the committees have to be made up of at least two thirds non management employees. So you know, I'm like any other business feature where it's you know, management runs off. This is now suddenly very democratized. One concern about the law is that it's not specific enough, Ken Pawlikowski at the Business Council of New York State says, for example. It's not clear how those safety committees would be formed. Would you need a majority vote Sam of setting with you know between 50 and 100 employees. And three of them want to create a committee in 97, don't what happens. It's also unclear how the law will apply to other airborne infectious diseases like the flu, and in the case of covid whether the rules will stay in place as vaccination rates increase in case numbers dropped further. Once the rules are published, businesses that don't follow them can face fines starting at $50 a day. I'm Marielle Segarra for marketplace. Time to do the numbers. The S.

David Michaels Ken Pawlikowski Marielle Segarra $50 100% Kobe Berman 50 George Washington University S New York State Department of L three 100 employees Business Council of New York S One concern Sam Swiss two thirds 97 day Covid
"marielle segarra" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"marielle segarra" Discussed on WBUR

"Monday, the 24th of May Good to have you with us. We start today with a forecast from a closely watched survey in the business world. The National Association for Business Economics expects the U. S economy to grow by 6.5% this year. That's up from its prediction of just under 5% a few months ago, and it would be the fastest growth since 1984 as the country recovered from another severe recession. With more people getting vaccinated and pandemic restrictions. Lifting the hope is that consumers will return to old habits and then some shopping, taking vacations going to movie theaters. We have some clues about that last part from the UK theaters there, reopened a week ago and the Cinna world chain of theaters had a strong weekend here in the states. The upcoming Memorial Day weekend will be a big box office test marketplaces, Marielle Segarra reports. When movie theaters were open this past year, they didn't sell many tickets, and that created a downward spiral studios didn't want to release their big movies to empty theaters. So then the theaters had no new films to draw people in. It's been a real chicken and egg situation for quite a while that Shawn Robbins, chief analyst with Box office pro He says. Things are looking up. Now, More than half of Americans have gotten at least one dose of the covert vaccine and studios are committing to releasing major films again, essentially on a weekly basis for the rest of the year, starting this Memorial Day weekend with crew Ella, the Disney Origin story and a quiet place part to the horror movie with Emily Blunt and John Krasinski. Sisters Movie House, An independent theater in Oregon that just reopened at 50% capacity will be showing both films owner Drew Caza isn't worried. I'm pretty sure we'll be pushing those capacity constructions, but it that way right now, People are eager to do anything that feels like going back to normal. Jason Esquire at the USC School of Cinematic Arts says that's especially true for movies. This enormous pent up emotional need to go to movie theaters to enjoy movies. You know, in the exciting circumstance of the dark room with strangers around you. This is a time honored entertainment experience. Theaters will have competition. A lot of people have gotten used to streaming movies from home. True Caza at sisters Movie House says he thinks the crowd will keep coming, though. Well, we're pretty optimistic about this year for the main reason is we look at this as being the most solid year product wise, maybe in my lifetime, So if that doesn't draw people out, I don't know what will. But I think it will some other movies out this summer in the Heights, Black widow and fast and furious nine Marielle Segarra for Marketplace. On Wall Street today. Traders seem pretty optimistic about the recovery will have the details when we do the numbers. Tomorrow. It will be one year since the murder of George Floyd.

Jason Esquire John Krasinski George Floyd Shawn Robbins Drew Caza Marielle Segarra Oregon 6.5% USC School of Cinematic Arts 50% Emily Blunt Tomorrow 24th of May today UK Monday 1984 National Association for Busin this year a week ago
Retailers Try to Hire Tens of Thousands of Workers

All Things Considered

02:02 min | 1 year ago

Retailers Try to Hire Tens of Thousands of Workers

"We're looking for a big jump in retail sales as consumers who got him cashed those $1400 virus relief checks. High retail sales, of course, could mean will be seeing a whole bunch more retail job openings, which would be a good thing. Dollar general in point of fact. Just announced it's looking to hire up to 20,000 people. Other chains IHOP, Taco Bell and McDonald's among them are on hiring sprees as well. But even with the labor market as loose as it's been retailers or having a hard time finding people marketplaces, Marielle Segarra explains, what's going on. We talked a lot about pent up demand this idea that people will spend more money when they get vaccinated that they'll go to restaurants and buy clothes to wear those restaurants and on vacations. Andy, Challenger, Challenger, Gray and Christmas, says retailers are preparing for this. These employers are clearly anticipating a huge surge in demand through the summer through the end of the year as people start to feel safe. But that doesn't mean potential Retail workers feel safe, Shawn Ashworth AlixPartners says. A lot of people are worried about getting sick and they're asking themselves Do I want to go back into retail and work in an environment with high contact with other employees and customers? Or do I want to consider work from home job? A lot of people who used to work in retail have probably found other jobs at home or not. Jed Kolko is chief economist at indeed, during insured when retail wasn't hiring many people, other sectors were manufacturing, warehousing, driving, jobs, Pharmacy and other help Your lady jobs. One obvious way for retailers to attract workers would be to offer more money. And Andy Challenger says some are giving bonuses. But when you look at like small retailers, small restaurants, those businesses have been under enormous pressure for a year. It's been a really, really difficult environment. It's easier for the big retailers. Mariel Sierra for

Marielle Segarra Ihop Shawn Ashworth Alixpartners Taco Bell Mcdonald Jed Kolko Andy Andy Challenger Mariel Sierra
"marielle segarra" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:53 min | 1 year ago

"marielle segarra" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Wind works is committed to offering food friendly pinot noir, Pinot agree and chardonnay. A fizzy wine works the essence of Oregon in Los Angeles. Some kind of riddle it is Wednesday. Today, the third day of February. It is always to have you along, everybody. You know, there are days we try to keep them relatively few and far between on this program. But there are days when we got to do what are called process stories. How the economic sausage gets made if I can mix my metaphors The subject at hand is the Bible administration's plan to spend $1.9 Trillion propping up this economy. The president told congressional Democrats today He is willing to compromise on some parts of it, but that he wants most of the money out and out fast and that if they have to Democrats in the White House are going to pass it themselves. That is without Republicans. That would be using a process. There's that word again that's called budget. Reconciliation marketplaces. Marielle Segarra is on the Explainer desk today to pass a bill in the House of Representatives. You need a majority of the vote. In the Senate, though it's a little more complicated. Kelly Whitener is an associate professor at Georgetown. The final vote on any piece of legislation does pass with a simple majority. But under Senate rules, you can't get to that vote unless at least 60 senators agreed to end debate. And if you don't have the 60 votes than members can filibuster and just, you know, offer lots of amendments. Protract the debate, do anything really to the stall and make it so You can't move forward budget. Reconciliation is a way around all this. It's a process created in the 1974 budget law that allows senators to bring a bill to a vote. Just a regular old majority. But they can't use it for just any bill. There are lots of rules like can affect Social Security and whatever they're trying to pass has to have a direct impact on the budget to cost money or save money. L. Hoagland at the bipartisan Policy Center says, for instance, sending out relief checks that would qualify also, any kind of tax reforms that have a tax impact would be included. Case in point, Republicans used budget reconciliation to pass the 2017 tax overhaul law. And during the Obama administration, Democrats used it to pass a companion bill to the affordable Care act before that, during the Bush years, Republicans used it to pass tax cuts. I Marielle Segarra for marketplace. All right, Everybody say it with me. Now We're number 1 11 were number 11. That's our spot in Bloomberg 11. It's our spot in Bloomberg's annual ranking of the most innovative countries. In this global economy and bad is falling outside the top 10 is what's perhaps more concerning is that when Bloomberg began doing this index, we were actually number one spot right now occupied by South Korea MARKETPLACE Scott Tongue is on that one. Bloomberg, in next finds that the US is lagging in science, technology, engineering and math graduates, advanced degrees and workers and are indeed and all those air linked to the high cost of education. Here. The U. S could subsidize stem degrees to create a degree. Alex Tanzi compiles the innovation rankings of Bloomberg, he says, when the world's best and brightest do come study here, increasingly, they then leave. There's been talk of when people get a PhD in the U. S. It should come with a green card. There's policies like that. That would induce people to stay in the U. S. It also matters what train workers do in this country. Youngjun You teaches digital innovation at Case Western Reserve University. He says. Big American companies hardly conduct long term research anymore. We're living off the innovations of sixties and seventies, you know, like, you know, Cold War. Lot of innovation activities going on now is like a consumer experience consumer experiences with short term payoff, he says. Like social media, I would almost argue that these are frivolous innovations. You says the government should focus more on our indeed and human capital, citing his native South Korea, which tops the Bloomberg rankings there. If you work for science and engineering are in the area, then you don't have to go to the military service or full and a lot of research suggests that innovation is the main driver of long term economic growth. I'm Scott tongue for marketplace, Not a whole lot of innovating on Wall Street today kind of a wash. Actually, we'll have the details when we do the numbers. Shares of Amazon down about 2% today, probably not on the Jeff Bezos news, though, because While he is not going to be the CEO, starting this summer Bay Zoe's is gonna become The executive chairman of his company this summer, which means What exactly? Marketplaces. Eric embarrass as that one to find out what an executive chair even is. I reached out to Warren Professor Mary Hunter McDonnell. She says the executive chair is a strategic advisor to the CEO. The chair is also head of the company's board of directors. Who the CEO is accountable to, McDonnell says Becoming executive chair allows the former CEO to have a lot of say in the company's direction, but also not be the person who's ultimately accountable for the strategic success or failures of the company going forward. And since Jeff Bezos already owns millions of Amazon shares, he'll really have a lot of say in this role, says Matthew Slaughter, Tina the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth. This is having One of the most unique ones in terms of the chair, having been the founding CEO and also having such a large ownership stake in the organization, the CEO to executive chair switches called the apprenticeship model of succession. Bill Gates did it at Microsoft. Eric Schmidt at Google. Bob Iger at Disney, Sometimes the executive chair, doubts moves the new CEO is making, says Robert Kelly, a management professor at Carnegie Mellon. You start to then see Power struggles between the current CEO who might think that the executive chair is exerting too much influence or holding them back too much. There could be battles for the board's favor and the new CEO is fate. But Kelly says since Bezos owned so much of Amazon, whatever he wants, his chair will probably still happen. America. Paris for Marketplace..

Bloomberg founding CEO CEO executive Jeff Bezos Marielle Segarra Senate Amazon South Korea Bill Gates Oregon Pinot Democrats Los Angeles Warren Professor Mary Hunter M Eric Schmidt Kelly Whitener Case Western Reserve Universit Robert Kelly
"marielle segarra" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:26 min | 1 year ago

"marielle segarra" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of riddle it is Wednesday. Today, the 13th Day of January. It is always to have you along, everybody. Not for the first time in the last week or 10 days or so we begin this program with a sidelong glance at the politics of this economy. History, of course, being made today in the House. Our Elaine, though, is where we shall stay with a couple of items to note the part that businesses are playing right now and then on to the economics of this economy. How about that? Item number one Airbnb. Short term rental company said today it is canceling all of its short term rentals in Washington, D. C. During inauguration week, refunds and reimbursements in full will be paid to hosts and travelers. The rationale there. Hopefully, self explanatory item number two corporate political donations. Boeing today joined Hallmark and Wal Mart a bunch of Wall Street banks and smothers in suspending all political donations. The question, of course. Is how long that lasts on the topic of how long things are gonna last. We turn now to the gains to be had from those $600 relief checks that started going out a couple of weeks ago, and when we might expect to start seeing them show up in this economy. Marketplaces. Marielle Segarra has been talking to some people about how they're spending or not spending that money. When Austin Flannery in Greenville, South Carolina, got his $600 check. He decided to splurge first on a barbecue dinner with his girlfriend. Breasts get beans, potato salad iced tea. That meal was like 70 bucks, then on some clothes like a $50 pair of pants. Then he saw a painting at a local store of some French actor from the 18 hundreds who's all dressed up and smoking a pipe. About that, too. And then I went home and I was like, man, he needs to be tattooed on me. He looks so elegant. So I got a tattoo of them on his forearm. Another 400 bucks. In flattery, got the first check in the spring. He used it to pay off medical bills, but he had just lost his job at an insurance company. Since then, he's gotten a new job. Luckily enough, I'm in a financial place right now. Where I could afford toe have a little bit of fun, so I did. One reason the government is sending out checks is so that people like Flannery will spend money. Another is economic relief. I heard from people today who used the money to pay for necessities like rent and heating oil. In San Diego, Katherine Alinsky and her husband got $1200 some of that weight towards just still just trying to survive, specifically gas and electric. They save the rest. Alinsky's a hairstylist and her salon is currently shut down. Honestly, who knows what 2021 is gonna look like for work for me, and we always just going to be more prepared than lash. A lot of people are using the money to set themselves up financially like Hector M. Rico in Chicago. Me and my fiance. We plan to buy a house soon. So definitely trying to pay off some debt to, uh, you know, build the credit, getting better interest rate on a mortgage. And he's using some of the money to buy raffle prizes for his students. He teaches phys ed at a pre k through eight public school. I like to give out like little predominate. Ear's I get on that, like target sometimes 30 20 bucks jump ropes at the dollar store. One thing I heard over and over, a lot of people are giving a portion of their check away to neighbors, family members and charities like food banks. Marielle Segarra for MARKETPLACE In tomorrow's News of this economy today, President elect Biden's expected to announce his plans for another round of covert relief tomorrow. Likely to include $2000 checks to individuals extended unemployment benefits more money to cities and states and some Democratic members of Congress are pushing for Biden to include baby bonds $1000 for every newborn child as a way to help close the racial wealth gap. Marketplaces. Smithfield has that one. The idea is that every baby in the U. S. Would get a savings account at birth that the federal government would add to every year how much would depend on the family's income? Once kids turn 18. They could use it to pay for college, Buy a house or start a business. Derrick Hamilton is an economics professor at the new school. It will ensure that regardless of the family, you're born into regardless of your race or your gender, you have some asset foundation by which to accumulate assets. Security white families in the U. S. Typically have 10 times more wealth than black families, according to a study from the Brookings Institution. And William Elliot, a social work professor at the University of Michigan, says baby bonds would help close that gap. We can't make racism go away easily. We can't make gender inequality go away easily right, but we can provide people resource is And it has tangible effects on people's lives. Those effects are more than just financial, says Michael Sharad, in he directs the Center for Social Development at Washington University. Because we'll do better educationally. Their social development will be higher at an earlier age, the parents arm or engaged with their Children's future. Programs like this already exist in some states, including main Pennsylvania and Nebraska. The federal proposal would cost roughly $60 billion a year. David Neuville at the nonprofit Prosperity now says more stimulus and unemployment should be the government's first priorities. But if we really want to transform the economy in the long run, I think an investment like this is absolutely necessary to really begin to close that divide. And with Democrats about to be in control in Washington, Neuville says he thinks Baby Bond stand a real chance of passing. I'm Samantha Fields for marketplace little bit mixed on Wall Street today, not a whole lot of enthusiasm. Either direction will have the details when we do the numbers. Netflix has a new strategy for 2021. It's kind of ambitious, even for a company known to throw money at its content problems. A new movie every single week..

Marielle Segarra Austin Flannery Biden Katherine Alinsky David Neuville professor Airbnb Washington Elaine federal government Netflix Brookings Institution Derrick Hamilton Greenville Wal Mart South Carolina Congress Samantha Fields
"marielle segarra" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

06:15 min | 1 year ago

"marielle segarra" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Have you along, everybody. Not for the first time in the last week or 10 days or so we begin this program with a sidelong glance at the politics of this economy. History, of course, being made today in the House. Our Elaine, though, is where we shall stay with a couple of items to note the part that businesses are playing right now and then on to the economics of this economy. How about that? I'm number one Airbnb short term rental company said today it is canceling all of its short term rentals in Washington, D. C. During inauguration week, refunds and reimbursements. In full will be paid the hosts and travelers the rationale there, hopefully, self explanatory item number two corporate political donations. Boeing today joined Hallmark and Wal Mart a bunch of Wall Street banks and smothers in suspending all political donations. The question, of course, is how long that lasts on the topic of how long things are gonna last. We turn now to the gains to be had from those $600 relief checks that started going out a couple of weeks ago, and when we might expect to start seeing them show up in this economy. Marketplaces. Marielle Segarra has been talking to some people about how they're spending or not spending that money. When Austin Flannery in Greenville, South Carolina, got his $600 check. He decided to splurge first on a barbecue dinner with his girlfriend breast, Get beans, potato salad iced tea. That meal was like 70 bucks, then on some clothes like a $50 pair of pants. Then he saw a painting at a local store of some French actor from the 18 hundreds who's all dressed up and smoking a pipe. About that, too. And then I went home and I was like, man, he needs to be tattooed on me. He looks so elegant. So I got a tattoo of them on his forearm. Another 400 bucks. In flattery, got the first check in the spring. He used it to pay off medical bills, but he had just lost his job at an insurance company. Since then, he's gotten a new job. Luckily enough, I'm in a financial place right now. Where I could afford toe have a little bit of fun, so I did. One reason the government is sending out checks is so that people like Flannery will spend money. Another is economic relief. I heard from people today who used the money to pay for necessities like rent and heating oil. In San Diego, Katherine Kolinsky and her husband got $1200 some of that weight toward just still just trying to survive. Specifically gas and electric. They save the rest. Alinsky's a hairstylist and her salon is currently shut down. Honestly, who knows what 2021 is gonna look like for work for me? And we always gonna be more prepared than last. A lot of people are using the money to set themselves up financially like Hector M. Rico in Chicago. Me and my fiance. We plan to buy a house soon, so definitely trying to pay off and that, you know, build the credit get a better interest rate on a mortgage. And he's using some of the money to buy raffle prizes for his students. He teaches phys ed at a pre k through eight public school. I like to give out like little predominate. Ear's I get on that, like target sometimes 30 20 bucks. Jump ropes at the dollar store. One thing I heard over and over. Ah, lot of people are giving a portion of their check away to neighbors, family members and charities like food banks. Marielle Segarra for MARKETPLACE In tomorrow's News of this economy today, President elect Biden's expected to announce his plans for another round of covert relief tomorrow. Likely to include $2000 checks to individuals extended unemployment benefits more money to cities and states and some Democratic members of Congress are pushing for Biden to include baby bonds $1000 for every newborn child as a way to help close the racial wealth gap. Working places. Smithfield has that one. The idea is that every baby in the U. S. Would get a savings account at birth that the federal government would add to every year. How much would depend on the family's income? Once kids turn 18? They could use it to pay for college, Buy a house or start a business. Eric Hamilton is an economics professor at the new school. It will ensure that regardless of the family, you're born into regardless of your race or your gender. You have some asset foundation by which to accumulate assets Security. White families in the U. S. Typically have 10 times more wealth and black families, according to a study from the Brookings Institution. And William Elliot, a social work professor at the University of Michigan says baby bonds would help close that gap. We can't make racism go away easily. We can't make gender inequality go away easily, right? But we can provide people with a resource is it it has tangible effects on people's lives. Those effects are more than just financial, says Michael Sharad, in he directs the Center for Social Development at Washington University will do better educationally. Their social development will be higher at an earlier age, the parents arm or engaged with their Children's future programs like this already exist in some states, including main Pennsylvania and Nebraska. The federal proposal would cost roughly $60 billion a year. David Neuville at the nonprofit Prosperity now says more stimulus and unemployment should be the government's first priorities. But if we really want to transform the economy in the long run, I think an investment like this is absolutely necessary to really begin to close that divide and with Democrats about to be in control in Washington, Neuville says he thinks baby Bond stand a real chance of passing. I'm Samantha Fields for marketplace little bit mixed on Wall Street today, not a whole lot of enthusiasm. Either direction will have the details when we do the numbers. Netflix has a new strategy for 2021. It's kind of ambitious, even for a company known to throw money at.

Marielle Segarra Austin Flannery David Neuville professor Airbnb Biden Washington Elaine federal government Netflix Brookings Institution Greenville Wal Mart South Carolina Eric Hamilton Congress Samantha Fields
"marielle segarra" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:25 min | 1 year ago

"marielle segarra" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is Wednesday. Today, the 13th Day of January. It is always to have you along, everybody. Not for the first time in the last week or 10 days or so we begin this program with a sidelong glance at the politics of this economy. History, of course, being made today in the House. Our Elaine, though, is where we shall stay with a couple of items to note the part that businesses are playing right now and then on to the economics of this economy. How about that? I'm number one Airbnb short term rental company said today it is canceling all of it. Short term rentals in Washington, D. C. During inauguration week, refunds and reimbursements. In full will be paid the hosts and travelers the rationale there, hopefully, self explanatory item number two corporate political donations. Boeing today joined Hallmark and Wal Mart a bunch of Wall Street banks and smothers in suspending all political donations. The question, of course. Is how long that lasts on the topic of how long things are gonna last. We turn now to the gains to be had from those $600 relief checks that started going out a couple of weeks ago, and when we might expect to start seeing them show up in this economy. Marketplaces. Marielle Segarra has been talking to some people about how they're spending or not spending that money. When Austin Flannery in Greenville, South Carolina, got his $600 check. He decided to splurge first on a barbecue dinner with his girlfriend. Breasts get beans, potato salad iced tea. That meal was like 70 bucks, then on some clothes like a $50 pair of pants. Then he saw a painting at a local store of some French actor from the 18 hundreds who's all dressed up and smoking a pipe. About that, too. And then I went home and I was like, man, he needs to be tattooed on their. He looks so elegant. So I got a tattoo of them on his forearm. Another 400 bucks. Inflator. He got the first check in the spring. He used it to pay off medical bills. But he had just lost his job at an insurance company. Since then, he's gotten a new job. Luckily enough, I'm gonna financial place right now. Where I could afford toe have a little bit of fun, So I did. One reason the government is sending out checks is so that people like Flannery will spend money. Another is economic relief. I heard from people today who used the money to pay for necessities like rent and heating oil. In San Diego, Katherine Alinsky and her husband got $1200 some of that weight towards just still just trying to survive, specifically gas and electric. They saved the rest. Alinsky's a hairstylist and her salon is currently shut down. Honestly, who knows what 2021 is gonna look like for work for me, and we always just going to be more prepared than less. A lot of people are using the money to set themselves up financially like Hector M. Rico in Chicago. Me and my fiance. We plan to buy a house soon. So definitely trying to pay off some debts. Uh, you know, build the credit get a better interest rate on a mortgage. And he's using some of the money to buy raffle prizes for his students. He teaches phys ed at a pre k through eight public school. I like to give out like little predominate. Ear's I get on that, like target sometimes 30 20 bucks jump ropes at the dollar store. One thing I heard over and over, a lot of people are giving a portion of their check away to neighbors, family members and charities like food banks. Marielle Segarra for MARKETPLACE In tomorrow's News of this economy today, President elect Biden's expected to announce his plans for another round of covert relief tomorrow. Likely to include $2000 checks to individuals extended unemployment benefits more money to cities and states and some Democratic members of Congress are pushing for Biden to include baby bonds $1000 for every newborn child as a way to help close the racial wealth gap. Working places. Samantha Field has that one. The idea is that every baby in the U. S. Would get a savings account at birth that the federal government would add to every year how much would depend on the family's income? Once kids turn 18. They could use it to pay for college, Buy a house or start a business. Derrick Hamilton is an economics professor at the new school. It will ensure that regardless of the family, you're born into regardless of your race or your gender, you have some asset foundation by which to accumulate assets. Security white families in the U. S. Typically have 10 times more wealth and black families, according to a study from the Brookings Institution. And William Elliot, a social work professor at the University of Michigan, says baby bonds would help close that gap. We can't make racism go away easily. We can make gender inequality go away easily right, but we can provide people resource is And it has tangible effects on people's lives. Those effects are more than just financial, says Michael Sharad, in he directs the Center for Social Development at Washington University. The kids will do better educationally. Their social development will be higher at an earlier age, the parents arm or engaged with their Children's future. Programs like this already exist in some states, including main Pennsylvania and Nebraska. The federal proposal would cost roughly $60 billion a year. David Neuville at the nonprofit Prosperity now says more stimulus and unemployment should be the government's first priorities. But if we really want to transform the economy in the long run, I think an investment like this is absolutely necessary to really begin to close that divide. And with Democrats about to be in control in Washington, Neuville says he thinks Baby Bond stand a real chance of passing. I'm Samantha Fields for marketplace little bit mixed on Wall Street today, not a whole lot of enthusiasm. Either direction will have the details when we do the numbers. Netflix has a new strategy for 2021. It's kind of ambitious, even for a company known to throw money at its content problems. A new movie every single week..

Marielle Segarra Austin Flannery Katherine Alinsky David Neuville Airbnb Biden Washington Elaine federal government professor Netflix Samantha Fields Brookings Institution Derrick Hamilton Greenville Wal Mart South Carolina Congress
"marielle segarra" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:27 min | 1 year ago

"marielle segarra" Discussed on KCRW

"In Los Angeles. I'm kind of riddle it is Wednesday. Today, the 13th Day of January. It is always to have you along, everybody. Not for the first time in the last week or 10 days or so we begin this program with a sidelong glance at the politics of this economy. History, of course, being made today in the House. Our Elaine, though, is where we shall stay with a couple of items to note the part that businesses are playing right now and then on to the economics of this economy. How about that? I'm number one Airbnb short term rental company said today it is canceling all of its short term rentals in Washington, D. C. During inauguration week, refunds and reimbursements. In full will be paid the hosts and travelers the rationale there, hopefully, self explanatory item number two corporate political donations. Boeing today joined Hallmark and Wal Mart a bunch of Wall Street banks and smothers in suspending all political donations. The question, of course, is how long that lasts on the topic of how long things are gonna last. We turn now to the gains to be had from those $600 relief checks that started going out a couple of weeks ago, and when we might expect to start seeing them show up in this economy. Marketplaces. Marielle Segarra has been talking to some people about how they're spending or not spending that money. When Austin Flannery in Greenville, South Carolina, got his $600 check. He decided to splurge first on a barbecue dinner with his girlfriend breast, Get beans, potato salad, iced tea that meals like 70 bucks. Then on some clothes like a $50 pair of pants. Then he saw painting at a local store of some French actor from the 18 hundreds who's all dressed up and smoking a pipe about that, too. And then I went home and I was like, man, he needs to be tattooed on me. He looks so elegant. So I got a tattoo of them on his forearm. Another 400 bucks. Inflator. He got the first check in the spring. He used it to pay off medical bills. But he had just lost his job at an insurance company. Since then, he's gotten a new job. Luckily enough, I'm gonna financial place right now. Where I could afford toe have a little bit of fun, So I did. One reason the government is sending out checks is so that people like Flannery will spend money. Another is economic relief. I heard from people today who used the money to pay for necessities like rent and heating oil. In San Diego, Katherine Kolinsky and her husband got $1200 some of that weight toward just still just trying to survive, specifically gas and electric. They save the rest. Alinsky's a hairstylist and her salon is currently shut down. Honestly, who knows what 2021 is gonna look like for work for me, and we always just going to be more prepared than last. A lot of people are using the money to set themselves up financially like Hector M. Rico in Chicago. Me and my fiance. We plan to buy a house soon. So definitely trying to pay off some debts. Uh, you know, build the credit get a better interest rate on the mortgage. And he's using some of the money to buy raffle prizes for his students. He teaches phys ed at a pre k through eight public school. I like to give out like little predominate. Ear's I get on that, like target sometimes 30 20 bucks. Jump ropes at the dollar store. One thing I heard over and over, a lot of people are giving a portion of their check away to neighbors, family members and charities like food banks. Marielle Segarra for MARKETPLACE In tomorrow's News of this economy today, President elect Biden's expected to announce his plans for another round of covert relief tomorrow. Likely to include $2000 checks to individuals extended unemployment benefits more money to cities and states and some Democratic members of Congress are pushing for Biden to include baby bonds $1000 for every newborn child as a way to help close the racial wealth gap. Working places. Smithfield has that one. The idea is that every baby in the U. S. Would get a savings account at birth that the federal government would add to every year how much would depend on the family's income? Once kids turn 18. They could use it to pay for college, Buy a house or start a business. Derrick Hamilton is an economics professor at the new school. It will ensure that regardless of the family, you're born into regardless of your race or your gender, you have some asset foundation by which to accumulate assets. Security white families in the U. S. Typically have 10 times more wealth and black families, according to a study from the Brookings Institution. And William Elliot, a social work professor at the University of Michigan, says baby bonds would help close that gap. We can't make racism go away easily. We can't make gender inequality go away easily, right? But we can provide people resource is it It has tangible effects on people's lives. Those effects are more than just financial, says Michael Sharad, in he directs the Center for Social Development at Washington University will do better educationally. Their social development will be higher at an earlier age, the parents arm or engaged with their Children's future. Programs like this already exist in some states, including main Pennsylvania and Nebraska. The federal proposal would cost roughly $60 billion a year. David Neuville at the nonprofit Prosperity now says more stimulus and unemployment should be the government's first priorities. But if we really want to transform the economy in the long run, I think an investment like this is absolutely necessary to really begin to close that divide. And with Democrats about to be in control in Washington, Neuville says he thinks Baby Bond stand a real chance of passing. I'm Samantha Fields for marketplace little bit mixed on Wall Street today, not a whole lot of enthusiasm. Either direction will have the details when we do the numbers. Netflix has a new strategy for 2021. It's kind of ambitious, even for a company known to throw money at its content problems. A new movie every single week..

Marielle Segarra Austin Flannery Biden David Neuville professor Los Angeles Elaine Airbnb federal government Washington Netflix Brookings Institution Derrick Hamilton Greenville Wal Mart South Carolina Congress Samantha Fields
"marielle segarra" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"marielle segarra" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Much higher than in the holiday season of 2008 in the thick of the last recession when sales fell by more than 2%. Marketplaces, Marielle Segarra explains. What's different this time around. Steve State of is a senior adviser to MasterCard. But back in December 2000 and eight he was CEO of the department store chain sacks. It had been a terrible fall starting in September. Had the Lehman bankruptcy. Then the market crashed and you had in one fell. Swoop of 25% decrease exact, for example, in our consumption As the holidays approached, retailers were sitting on a ton of inventory that they needed to sell, so they offer deep discounts. That cut into their sales numbers for the season, this time around the recession hit in the spring, so retailers had time to plan and they took a different approach to the holidays. They stopped fewer items. So that inventory is coming into this holiday season. We're very lean, but they held the line on discounts, which, if you're a retailer is a way to protect your sales numbers. Sure you won't be selling as many T shirts, but you'll sell them at a higher price. Greg Rally, a Korn Ferry says another thing that's different is the last recession in 2000 and eight hit more broadly that impacted people in every level of economic scale. This recession was driven by the decision to close the economy. It's hit service People who work in restaurants, hotels, hospitality, retail harder than everyone else. But he says many Americans still have disposable income and they're spending it. We've seen that reflected in the government's retail sales numbers, which in November despite the pandemic were 4% higher than the year before. I'm Marielle Segarra for Marketplace. Our colleagues over at the marketplace morning report had even more coverage of the new economic relief package. It's in our podcast feed from this morning and tune in tomorrow morning for the.

Marielle Segarra Greg Rally Steve State MasterCard senior adviser Korn Ferry
"marielle segarra" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"marielle segarra" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Retail sales jumped by 3% this holiday season more than forecast and much higher than in the holiday season of 2008. In the thick of the last recession when sales fell by more than 2% marketplaces, Marielle Segarra explains. What's different this time around. Steve State of is a senior adviser to MasterCard. But back in December 2000 and eight he was CEO of the department store chain sacks. It had been a terrible fall starting in September. Had the Lehman bankruptcy. Then the market crashed and you had in one fell swoop of 25% decrease at Saks, For example, in our consumption as the holidays approached, retailers were sitting on a ton of inventory that they needed to sell, so they offer deep discounts. That cut into their sales numbers for the season, this time around the recession hit in the spring, so retailers had time to plan and they took a different approach to the holidays. They stopped fewer items. So that inventory is coming into this holiday season. We're very lean, but they held the line on discounts, which, if you're a retailer is a way to protect your sales numbers. Sure you won't be selling as many T shirts, but you'll sell them at a higher price. Greg Rally, a Korn Ferry says another thing that's different is the last recession in 2000 and eight hit more broadly, it impacted people in every level of economic scale. This recession was driven by the decision to close the economy. It's hit service People who work in restaurants, hotels, hospitality, retail harder than everyone else. But he says many Americans still have disposable income and they're spending it. We've seen that reflected in the government's retail sales numbers, which in November despite the pandemic were 4% higher than the year before. I marry Elsa Gara for marketplace. Our colleagues over at the marketplace. Morning report had even.

Greg Rally Steve State Marielle Segarra Elsa Gara MasterCard Saks senior adviser Korn Ferry
"marielle segarra" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"marielle segarra" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Forecast and much higher than in the holiday season of 2008 in the thick of the last recession when sales fell by more than 2%. Marketplaces, Marielle Segarra explains. What's different this time around. Steve State of is a senior adviser to MasterCard. But back in December 2000 and eight he was CEO of the department store chain sacks. It had been a terrible fall starting in September. Had the Lehman bankruptcy. Then the market crashed and you had in one fell swoop of 25% decrease at Saks, For example, in our consumption as the holidays approached, retailers were sitting on a ton of inventory that they needed to sell, so they offer deep discounts. That cut into their sales numbers for the season, this time around the recession hit in the spring, so retailers had time to plan and they took a different approach to the holidays. They stocked fewer items. So that inventory is coming into this holiday season. We're very lean, but they held the line on discounts, which, if you're a retailer is a way to protect your sales numbers. Sure you won't be selling as many T shirts, but you'll sell them at a higher price. Greg Rally, a Korn Ferry says another thing that's different is the last recession in 2000 and eight hit more broadly that impacted people in every level of economic scale. This recession was driven by the decision to close the economy. It's hit service People who work in restaurants, hotels, hospitality, retail harder than everyone else. But he says many Americans still have disposable income and they're spending it. We've seen that reflected in the government's retail sales numbers, which in November despite the pandemic were 4% higher than the year before. I'm Marielle Segarra for Marketplace. Our colleagues.

Marielle Segarra Steve State Greg Rally MasterCard senior adviser Saks Korn Ferry
"marielle segarra" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"marielle segarra" Discussed on KCRW

"Estimates US retail sales jumped by 3% this holiday season more than forecast and much higher than in the holiday season of 2008 in the thick of the last recession when sales fell by more than 2%. Marketplaces, Marielle Segarra explains. What's different this time around. Steve State of is a senior adviser to MasterCard. But back in December 2000 and eight he was CEO of the department store chain sacks. It had been a terrible fall starting in September. Had the Lehman bankruptcy. Then the market crashed and you had in one fell swoop of 25% decrease at Saks, For example, in our consumption as the holidays approached, retailers were sitting on a ton of inventory that they needed to sell, so they offer deep discounts. That cut into their sales numbers for the season, this time around the recession hit in the spring, so retailers had time to plan and they took a different approach to the holidays. They stocked fewer items. So that inventory is coming into this holiday season. We're very lean, but they held the line on discounts, which, if you're a retailer is a way to protect your sales numbers. Sure you won't be selling as many T shirts, but you'll sell them at a higher price. Greg Rally, a Korn Ferry says another thing that's different is the last recession in 2000 and eight hit more broadly impacted people in every level of economic scale. This recession was driven by the decision to close the economy. It's hit service People who work in restaurants, hotels, hospitality, retail harder than everyone else. But he says many Americans still have disposable income and they're spending it. We've seen that reflected in the government's retail sales numbers, which in November despite the pandemic were 4% higher than the year before. I'm Marielle Segarra for Marketplace. Our colleagues over at the marketplace. Morning report had even more coverage of the new.

Marielle Segarra Greg Rally Steve State MasterCard US Saks senior adviser Korn Ferry
"marielle segarra" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"marielle segarra" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Fun. Holiday clothes, festive ties, perhaps glittery gowns. Behind. All those closed, though, are lots and lots of companies, sequin manufacturers and fabric suppliers and dressmakers. And this year with in Person party's pretty much out of the question. It's a challenge Marketplaces. Marielle Segarra has that one. There's a company in New York City's garment district, called Shine Trim. It sells elaborate embellishments like sequined red bows and gold beads to fashion designers and dressmakers, and we also get a lot of people just coming in. You know, I'm going to a New Year's Eve party and I want to bring it out. Owner Helen Lin says she's noticed something this year. Clothing makers are coming to her saying, I need to make my customers a really fancy blouse. It's got to be off sequin and all crystals and we want to do it so shiny, but nothing for the waist down. Because if you're going on a holiday party this year, it's probably on zoom or face time. I've not heard anything about like I'm wearing even maybe you can't but I need to get Kinds of Ryan Stone for the People who are buying fancy clothes for virtual parties are the exception. Lin says sales are down by about half and the company had to close one of its stores. Michael on. Dragan is a professor at the fashion business College. L am Holiday attire took a major hit this year. He's actually going to a virtual holiday party for his college today, but he didn't buy anything new to wear just pulled out an ugly sweater. His words, not mine. It's red and green very bright, and it has a polar bear, who was wearing a scarf that's actually like a tie. There is a possible silver lining here for the suppliers and makers of sparkly dresses and the like. David. German owns Agh! Trim source in Manhattan, which sells about 4000 kinds of decorative trim. He says his sales have dropped by at least half, but I think they're from London's pumped up mad that we're going to see when the vaccine really Get this under control, And once it's safe, he thinks people are really gonna want to celebrate in person,.

Helen Lin Dragan Marielle Segarra Michael New York City Ryan Stone fashion business College London Manhattan David professor
"marielle segarra" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"marielle segarra" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To buy fun. Holiday clothes, festive ties, perhaps glittery gowns. Behind. All those closed, though, are lots and lots of companies, sequin manufacturers and fabric suppliers and dressmakers. And this year with in Person party's pretty much out of the question. It's a challenge Marketplaces. Marielle Segarra has that one. There's a company in New York City's garment district, called Shine Trim. It sells elaborate embellishments like sequined red bows and gold beads to fashion designers and dressmakers. And we also get a lot of people just coming in. You know, I'm going to a New Year's Eve party and I want to bring it out. Owner Helen Lind says she's noticed something this year. Clothing makers are coming to her saying I need to make my customers a really fancy blouse. It's got to be all sequin and all crystals and we want to do it so shiny, but nothing for the waist down because if you're going on a holiday party this year It's probably on zoom or face time. I've not heard anything about like I'm wearing even maybe you can't. But I need to get tons of Ryan Stone. For the people who are buying fancy clothes for virtual parties are the exception. Lin says sales are down by about half and the company had to close one of its stores. Michael on. Dragan is a professor at the fashion business College. L AM Holiday attire took a major hit this year. He's actually going to a virtual holiday party First college today, but he didn't buy anything new to wear just pulled out an ugly sweater. His words, not mine. It's red and green is very bright, and it has a polar bear, who was wearing a scarf that's actually like a tie. There is a possible silver lining here for the suppliers and makers of sparkly dresses and the like. David. German owns Agh! Trim source in Manhattan, which sells about 4000 kinds of decorative trim. He says his sales have dropped by at least half, but I think there's a tremendous pumped up mad that we're going to see when the vaccine really Get this under control, And once it's safe, he thinks people are really gonna want to celebrate in person. I'm Ariel Segarra for marketplace. This final note on the way out today in which you pay your money, You take your chances and you can pay in Bitcoin if you like. Coin base, which is the biggest U. S. Based exchange for crypto currencies, filed paperwork with the Securities and Exchange Commission today for an initial public offering. It would be the first major Crypto company to do that in the next year. Probably 2021 here, though, is the caveat emptor portion of this item Bitcoin topped $20,000 yesterday that is per Bitcoin. Granddaddy of all crypto currencies has tripled in value this year. So you know nothing speculative happening there at all..

Helen Lind Bitcoin Securities and Exchange Commis Dragan Marielle Segarra Michael Crypto Ariel Segarra New York City Ryan Stone Lin fashion business College Manhattan professor David
"marielle segarra" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"marielle segarra" Discussed on KCRW

"And chances to buy fun. Holiday clothes, festive ties, perhaps glittery gowns behind all those closed, though, or lots and lots of companies, sequin manufacturers and fabric suppliers and dressmakers. And this year with in Person party's pretty much out of the question. It's a challenge Marketplaces. Marielle Segarra has that one. There's a company in New York City's garment district, called Shine Trim. It sells elaborate embellishments like sequined red bows and gold beads to fashion designers and dressmakers. And we also get a lot of people just coming in. You know, I'm going to a New Year's Eve party and I want to bring it out. Owner Helen Lind says she's noticed something this year. Clothing makers are coming to her saying I need to make my customers a really fancy blouse. It's got to be off the queen and all crystal but and we want to do it so shiny, but nothing for the waist down, because if you're going on a holiday party this year It's probably on zoom or face time. I've not heard anything about like I'm wearing these amazing can't but I need to get tons of Ryan Stone. For the people who are buying fancy clothes for virtual parties are the exception. Lin says sales are down by about half and the company had to close one of its stores. Michael on. Dragan is a professor at the fashion business College. L AM Holiday attire took a major hit this year. He's actually going to a virtual holiday party First college today, but he didn't buy anything new to wear just pulled out an ugly sweater. His words, not mine. It's red and green is very bright, and it has a polar bear, who was wearing a scarf that's actually like a tie. There is a possible silver lining here for the suppliers and makers of sparkly dresses and the like. David. German owns Agh! Trim source in Manhattan, which sells about 4000 kinds of decorative trim. He says his sales have dropped by at least half, but I think there's a tremendous pumped up mad that we're going to see when the vaccine really Gets this center control, and once it's safe, he thinks people are really gonna want to celebrate in person, Um, Aerial Segarra for marketplace. This final note on the way out today in which you pay your money, You take your chances and you can pay in Bitcoin if you like. Coin base, which is the biggest U. S. Based exchange for crypto currencies, filed paperwork with the Securities and Exchange Commission today for an initial public offering. It would be the first major Crypto company to do that in the next year. Probably 2021 here, though, is the caveat emptor portion of this item Bitcoin topped $20,000 yesterday that is per Bitcoin. The granddaddy of all crypto currencies has tripled in value this year, so You know nothing speculative happening there at all..

Bitcoin Helen Lind Securities and Exchange Commis Dragan Marielle Segarra Michael Crypto Aerial Segarra New York City Ryan Stone Lin fashion business College Manhattan professor David
"marielle segarra" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"marielle segarra" Discussed on KCRW

"Angeles. I'm kind of riddle it is Wednesday. Today, the 16th of December. Good is always to have you along, everybody. Venture, Jay Powell said a bunch of stuff today about this economy what Congress auto maybe should be doing about it. And what the next 4 to 5 months are gonna be like the way he sees it. The case for fiscal policy right now is is very, very strong, and I think that is Widely understood. Fiscal policy, of course, is Congress and the White House, deciding to spend money or, you know not. But with the expiration of unemployment benefits, some of the unemployment benefits the expiration of Eviction moratoriums with the virus spreading the way it is. There's a need for households and businesses to have have fiscal support. And I do think that again, and I think that is widely understood. He keeps using that word. Understood. I'm not sure it means what he thinks Congress thinks it means Of course, it's the rise in virus cases. The Fed chair says. That is really running this economy. The general expectation is you're seeing some slowing now and you'll see that the first quarter could well be what we said. Is that coming months are gonna be challenging. First quarter will will certainly show significant effects from this, but at the same time people are getting vaccinated. Now they're getting vaccinated. And by the end of the first quarter into the second quarter, you're going to be seeing significant numbers of people vaccinated. And so then what will be how will that play into economic activity? Well, here is the skinny from the guy running America's Central Bank. Second half of next year is when things start to start. Getting back to normal. Mr Powell mentioned retail sales in his press conference today to numbers out this morning show. They fell a bit more than 1% in November, which matters Is that most likely includes the first wave of holiday shopping and retailers are doing what they can to encourage us to keep on buying. Walmart, for instance, just announced its deadline for free shipping to get there before Christmas. Going to be December. 21st is their deadline, which I don't know. Seems tight to me. If you want to risk it marketplaces, Marielle Segarra has more now on shopping for the holidays. In this very strange.

Jay Powell Congress Marielle Segarra Fed Angeles. Walmart White House
"marielle segarra" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"marielle segarra" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hopes her remaining brick and mortar studio will survive the winter in Chicago, Candace Pals who owns hair salon come cc me where she makes custom wigs and weaves for her clients. Hopes she's prepared before the pandemic clients would bring her hair bundles and sheets. 1000 shop Now Kyle's buys the hair, spouse it since it's a customers and then virtually walks them through how to do it themselves. We don't even have to touch each other, see each other Anything. So now I actually the profits are higher. Kyle's is optimistic, but her business depends on clients with disposable income and how they weather the covert 19 Winter America. Barris for Marketplace we talked on Friday if you remember about the holiday shopping season and how retailers are outfitting their warehouses to get ready for a pandemic induced Serge in online sales. There's a whole bunch of logistics they have to worry about and staffing and I t stuff Also, though, some simpler things is marketplaces, Marielle Segarra reports in a pandemic Retailers kinda have to take the sales they can get. But this whole shift online shopping over the holidays is going to cost them. They have to spend money on things like cardboard boxes. If it's a very small box, it could be in the sense. If it's a very large box. It can be dollars. Brian Smith is an executive at Georgia Pacific. It makes corrugated cardboard boxes, he says box orders for online retail are up by more than 30% compared to last year. It's certainly been a challenge because we're taking extraordinary steps to keep all of our employees say which can slow production down considerably. So sometimes it involves running extra hours and into the weekends to keep up with demand. Also, the company's paper mills are running at full capacity, and Georgia Pacific has been buying paper from small suppliers when it can't make enough. In recent earnings calls. Other cardboard box makers have also said demand is off the charts. David Mark odd, a Cantar says. We're not seeing a shortage of cardboard boxes in the US at this point, but with covert related shipping delays, it might be tough to get all the boxes to retailers when they need them. The boxes have to be shipped from the manufacturer to whoever is going to be using them. The Amazon target WalMart dissenter. One scenario. If a worker in a warehouse doesn't have the right sized box, they could use the wrong size ever order a bottle, a hand soap online, and it shows up rolling around in a box that could fit a pair of knee high boots. When things are getting pressed and things are going quickly, and they can't grab the box that's really suited for a box of soap. So grab whatever box because I got to keep the line moving, which costs a little more. Doesn't always go over so well with customers who see it is wasteful. I'm Ariel Sierra for marketplace. This was one of those days on Wall Street where you knew right from the jump that the algorithms we're going to go wild. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. Number one app yesterday for both Android and iPhone users was the social media platform parlor. It is geared distinctly to conservatives, right wing conservatives, We should say. Who say they do without grounding in any kind of fact that Twitter and Facebook are censoring them. Well, we learned over the weekend in the pages of The Wall Street Journal. That parlor is supported by one wealthy benefactor, Republican mega donor, Rebecca Mercer, who has also bankrolled GOP political action committees. And think tanks. But in the oh so crowded world of social media is one deep pocketed investor enough. Marketplaces. Scott Tom looked into parlors business model. The parlor up right now has hit postings on fake news, Aaron voting machines and a coup against President Trump. In the past week, its users rocketed to eight million and Libby Hemphill at the University of Michigan School of Information says having money from GOP donor Rebecca Mercer can insulate parlor from critics in the media market. They don't have to be as responsive necessarily if they have somebody who's willing to pay for them to whether Challenges from advertisers or critiques from the media or critiques from users. In addition to Mercer's money parlor plans to earn revenue by having Social.

Rebecca Mercer Kyle Georgia Pacific Candace Pals Brian Smith GOP Chicago US Marielle Segarra Barris David Mark odd Libby Hemphill Also Scott Tom The Wall Street Journal Amazon Ariel Sierra