17 Episode results for "Marie bonner"

Dana Cahn: Co-Parenting Tips for Back to School Season

Business Scale Insights

27:02 min | 11 months ago

Dana Cahn: Co-Parenting Tips for Back to School Season

"Welcome to business scale insights with kimberly kimberly marie bonner listen for commentary interviews and information on how to grow your business for all the details contact business scale insights network dot com so empire-builders argue ready peers kimberly marie bonner hello and welcome empire-builders to another episode of business skill insights. I'm your host kimberly. Marie bonner and i'm so excited. I can't believe it's august number one. Can you dana now and august means back to school time for a lot of people for most people that i know particularly here in south florida and i wanted to shift and pivot the business skill insights <hes> series as to really focus on businesses and <hes> organizations that provide services to children and their families and so last weekend i had john limpets who is a great entrepreneur providing great <hes> services to children and their families in the washington. DC area and today hey i am <hes> focusing on parenting and co-parenting services and here. I am with dana khan and for those those of you who don't know dana. I don't know why they would know you because you're a rockstar right. Thanks can really seriously dana is the founder of family the and co-parenting enrichment services and the mission of faces <hes> is to enhance family communication and functioning using an educational approach focus on healing family relationships they collaborate with community judges lawyers and mental until health professionals to promote healthy family interactions by giving evidence based parenting programs anger management strategies and conflict resolution skills and so by reading that mission statement. You have an idea as to why dana on the broadcast because a lot of you are dealing with a lot of transitions and kids going back to school and crazy parenting and co-parenting. I don't wanna say drama can be it can't it can't be the case and so consider this. <hes> this episode of business skill insights a public service is too many of you who are going through that transition right now so i want dana to introduce herself and give more information about about who she is her background and how this wonderful organization called faces got off. The ground started but welcome to the show first of all. Thanks for for having me. I'm really excited. I'm talking to you about all this because it is my passion so thanks for having me on the show <hes>. I don't know where to begin at such a <hes> full story but i can start off with me. I've been divorced for <hes> since two thousand nine so <hes> <hes> going on ten years. I have three children. They're all teenagers. Now will thank you <hes> get it. They're all getting back to school <hes> last week and this week which i think it's like getting earlier and earlier. I thought it was like the end of august it's like the middle of audio so ooh that's exciting and everybody getting back to the routines <hes> but having three teenagers and being a single mom divorced trying and to keep it all together and amicable with that person who you don't wanna be with anymore their dad who they love very much. It's like a lot of juggling with <hes> communication and your thoughts and things that i even had i had to learn <hes> and so i just know that it's needed in the community and that's how faces got started so was more because i wasn't sure about this. I thought maybe your so your background and in social work spawned faces but it was really more of a personal story hey was because my background in social work is more working with mental health and that's actually where faces kind of originated from one after i got my divorce after not working for <hes> twelve years i went back to work and i i was working. <hes> one of my jobs was at the mental health association which is a nonprofit in the community for sixty years and <hes> we they had a program already a co parenting program that they did and a parenting program <hes> and so i started with the board without doing these co parenting parenting classes where you're with other parents and you're learning communication on how to <hes> have a co parenting relationship more of a business like relationship <hes> together leaving the emotions out because co-parenting is really hard. I can't even imagine it's very hard enough in my opinion yeah but trying into co parent with someone that you you know we'll even communicating together. When you're in a marriage related it's hard. It's very hard because nobody teaches us these things and so <hes> we started doing these classes and i <hes> was marketing them and they just became became really popular with the courts. That's pretty much how i started. It was within the courts. <hes> and nobody was really doing that in the south florida area and it just took off. I think because it's just so needed. Let's let's pause right there because i want you to unpack this concept of co co parenting because i've heard it bound bandied around and a lot of people have different. You know <hes> different concept of what co-parenting is. I think some people people are like oh. We have shared custody. That's one <hes> but in your mind based on your experience. What really is copernican all about co-parenting. Obviously you have children. You're being co parents like you're like when you chair an event. You're you have co chairs. So you have your coat per person parent the other parent and you have to provide parenting for your child together. He's still your children's. Children's still need both parents <hes> i believe in there's tons of research on children need both parents in their lives and it's your responsibility i think as parents and when you have children to be able to co parent meaning being child focused communicating about child focused issues only only because that's pretty much why the only reason you're in touch are really should be in touch. Just because of your children not not tying to get involved in other aspects of in each other's lives that is hard so we also did yes <hes>. Tom and i have not forgotten. Go ahead more. You want to tell the other person to do it your way right right <hes> so you want to remain child child focused you wanna take the emotions out of it. He wanted to have it be like a business relationship. Okay stop you totally do some serious areas psychological intervention in order for the emotions to be taken out of it depending on just how dramatic matic and or traumatic the divorce was so i 'cause i know there's somebody listening in the car or somebody. That's going to listen to this podcast like how the world cannot be emotional about. This was somebody who i've had a negative experience with so. Can you in that's true. It's really hard. I had a pretty amicable divorce goodell hard because nobody teaches you how to communicate. You know there's not like a school. We went to so if you didn't come from the what's pretty much. I don't know a lot of people that have come from teaches. You these things about communication indication and <hes> it. It's really difficult and you do have to play a lot of emotional <hes> not games but the up to learn the skills. I had to learn to use. I messages how to be a flexible thinker. How to manage your emotions ocean's. These are all things that we teach in the class and <hes> you even you can even understand them intellectually when they're being it then forget it all those skills go out the window so you need to practice them over and over and over and is that what you all <music> enable people to do the literally practice that in a classroom teaching them skills and the other part that you want to say that you know the emotional part is not every most people really love. Their kids of course really wanna do right. It's just hard for them to do the right things sometimes and so oh that's what we really play into is how the how to see it from the kid's perspective <hes> so we really get into with the kids <hes> we ask all the parents how old their kids are what their names are what they love about them. The parents can kind of see how they have in common. Oh man these things that they like about love about their kids and then um what it does to the children when parents are in conflict because a lot of us aren't thinking about that yeah absolutely and all the stuff we're going through because divorce or getting separate. It is a really hard thing to go through. It's like a death early is and so we're not thinking maybe all the time about what our kids are feeling so we really put it in perspective of will show. Let's say an example a little vignette of what when might do as parents to put our kids in the middle. Maybe not realizing it and then we'll say all the the child will be there also then we'll say well. How do you think the child's feeling watching this witnessing this and then what do you think that would happen to the child if she kept or he kept witnessing this year after year after year ear and we teach them what it does to the children when they're growing up in these environments of conflict you know it causes them anxiety and emotional distress and they might not do well in school and they're going to have problems with their relationships. Maybe down the road. Absolutely all kinds of things will you are just making making me think of all kinds of questions <hes> but i'm certain that you have piqued the interest of our listeners and they wanna know even more about services <hes> can you. We're about to go to a break in about two minutes but before we go can you kind of give a broad overview of your services and then we can go into a deep dive after we come back from the break sure we have an array of services one of them as we've been speaking about is our co-parenting department as you might may call it and we have classes. It's a ten week program or the parents. Come together is more ideal than them coming separately <hes> to participate participate with other parents learning the skills and then us coaching them. We have <hes> we can also do a privately. We have therapy home. Can we also have free therapy which i'm really proud of that is because freeze so rare i know in these days for services but we have affiliations with the different universities -versities barry nova f. i. u. FAU and so there if they don't mind going to an intern we can provide that for free. <hes> we do supervise visits visits. Therapeutic supervised visits monitored exchanges reconciliation. Wow i'm so excited. We're gonna talk more about these services and how you can take advantage of them. After we come back from the break kimberly marie bonner helps millions make millions on business gail insights thursdays today's at twelve thirty pm on WSB our business scale insights helps your business moved from startup to scale up and sponsored by new day consulting systems new day consulting systems can help turn your business into a franchise and scaled globally interested go their website new day consulting systems dot com and don't forget to tune in thursdays at twelve thirty for business gail insights with kimberly marie bonner if you already have a proven business model aw but i have concerns about the best way to grow and scale then you should contact the experts at new day consulting systems new day uses innovative techniques speaks to ten times the impact of your business. Your local business can become a regional national or international enterprise new day. Consulting systems will show you how for more information and to get started with new day visit the website at new day consulting systems dot com one new day consulting assaulting systems dot com to get your business off the ground and into contact new day to day. We are back with business scale insights. I'm your host kimberly bonner and i'm here with dana khan who is the executive director director of faces family co-parenting enrichment services and broward county florida and dana was just talking about all the wonderful services that she it provides you want to recap and then we can go into a little bit more detail very quickly. Show are so i was saying we have a co parenting class. The pa- parents can come together to learn the skills we or you can do it. Privately we have supervised visits as which is when a parent needs to be supervised when they're with at their child for all kinds of reasons <hes> monitored exchanges when <hes> you need somebody there to do the exchange of your child for time sharing <hes> <hes> but don't need supervised while your time sharing reconciliation. If there's any kind of alienating going on or the child hasn't seen the parent and a while <hes> and therapy and then i was bragging about the three the free therapy yes plug that because somebody may have just tuned in a really great thing <hes> i'm thinking king <hes> maybe i'm wrong but based on my own personal experience things that i've observed. I'm thinking that the back to school season even though you would think it might be helpful because the child is going back to school it would cause many times even more <hes> pressure sure when it comes to communication because of that child is involved in extracurricular activities if they're older or there's something an issue with childcare right <hes> the child is younger. There might be even more stress on co-parenting <hes> during this time of year because it's just there's just new the new <hes> <hes> parts of the equation that the family has to adjust to and that might put strain on communication. Do you experience that at all. Okay smartening up my two for like. I said it's it's pretty amicable. Most part i mean we have our ups and downs but you know just making sure that the bills are paid on time question and he is is paying what portion absolute <hes> so we had to do that. We had to figure that out ourselves as a family this morning before we could even register because that part wasn't taking care of oh wow you know <hes> yeah like you said the extracurricular activities what they're going to be involved in. What days does it fall on <hes> uh-huh if both parents are in agreeance to that so if you have football practice on every day of the week but the other parents not on board that really causes a lot of complications for for the child because then how are they going to get to practice. We see that come up a lot with extracurricular. How do you how do you how do you advise parents on how to navigate <hes> so again. We really try to let them see it from the child's perspective. It's really damaging for children to see their parents in conflict have their homes in conflict act <hes> their year there as their guides. They're watching you their parenting. How you behave that's how they're learning how to behave and that's how they're learning how to navigate through life so it's really paramount for them to have no conflict in the home and <hes> you know the adverse childhood experiences. I don't know if the listeners are aware of aces but that's a big passion of mine and it's pretty much a global conversation perception or they did a big study about this conflict that these children are growing up with in their homes can relate to illnesses that they get later on in their adult dole life so you know <hes> mental health issues substance abuse issues domestic violence issues abuse neglect all these things come into play and actually change the trajectory of the children's brains parents. We really need to be educated on that because we're not what and adding to this if we're not really being cognizant of our children you know i'm a firm believer that nothing just happens and dan <hes> i am. I came back. One of the reasons why i came back to south florida. <hes> is because my father passed away suddenly only and then my mother got deathly ill and then almost all of her siblings got <hes> just ill at the same time and some of them a few of her actually the majority of her siblings. <hes> had children that were the product of divorce and i can say this without a shadow of doubt i can. I can say this to the people who are you're listening. If you think that time heals all wounds and if you think that this co-parenting issue you can just sleep sleep away and then when you get eighty or seventy five it's going to be it's going to be party central. I've got the wounds mice my my entire fit. We we have gone through a traumatic experience of just trying to deal with extended family members who failed to really co parent well <hes> and the collateral damage from the children right and then also from that parent who never learned to co parent. Now is an elderly kind of situation just the you. I think that the damage is just kind of cauterize to the you know five to eighteen round realm. No it's just just not true to your point about aces <hes> <hes> child i have a i have a a saying now because of what i've gone through in the past year either you you deal with childhood trauma or child trauma deals with you. Yes and that's proven now medically. That's one when you said the aces. That's why i said i i the you you do childhood trauma or challenge. It doesn't matter i've seen you can be seventy. Seventy five eighty eighty five eighty in your fifties heart attack stroke stroke pants. It's all related so truly you when you were growing up so true and <hes> i'm seeing i'm seeing all of that and the sad part about it is that to really drive the point home my mother's siblings they grew up in in a very traumatic like all of my mother's family. Her mother and father had a very traumatic kind of situation so you see it passed down well. That's what i'm yeah. We're watching our parents. We're learning these behavior and i'm just giving you taught us exactly and they they're going to repeat the pattern unless we break that pod like i didn't think we would have this conversation because my mom and dad are not divorced. Her parents were not divorced but i'm here to say as a as a niece right as a need not even somebody really in the throes of the co-parenting drama having to deal with smile the after effects is just very very profound <hes> <hes> okay so based upon this kind of conversation and also the rise of the millennials and all that good stuff you see co parenting skills being needed more more and more in the future right ideal <hes> and that's a good thing for you. I don't know if it's a is a good thing for his aside but what is a good thing that you are poised to meet that demand. <hes> are you getting. I guess people asking asking what is co-parenting a younger and younger age. Are you getting just kind of all types of people asking for hill we do we get all types of people the people that haven't spoken and they've been separated for eight years and they've been fighting in the courts spending thousands and hundreds of thousands of dollars we see people people that are going through the midst of it that just need help and guidance and people that were never married like i was saying that are <hes> that have children and <hes> yeah it's all over the place and there's no one really to go to you have the courts but what are you gonna have the judge make a decision on your whole life when he doesn't know you and gets to or here he or she gets to hear a few minutes here and there your attorneys you know they're not trained to <hes> help you with this. They're trained to help you with the off aw and you're gonna spend money with them so yeah. There's nobody guiding us through all this and then the children are the ones that suffer i definitely i you and i've talked about. This is being a blue ocean kind of space kind of like life. Coaching was twenty years ago. Tom <hes> because no one it's such no one recognizes that ah parenting skills can be learned and many of us learned our parenting skills from poor sources and whether it's parenting co-parenting and so i just see the future they go together. Yes that if you're going to be separated you have your parenting style. They have their parenting style so now. The children are dealing with both parents plus. Maybe the conflict of the payroll so it's a big mess it is it is yes and you just you're. You're providing such a needed resource because unfortunately to your point all these different institutions whether it's the legal as you know space and that's where i came out of or the educational space which is where most of my relatives came out of you know teachers. Don't oh can't handle this. I mean although there's that's hard for them but we don't want any busy we we act like teachers opposed to be he you know face it although they do they do children's grades suffer in. It's sad it's absolutely chips suffer as absolutely that so tell me what makes faces and again it stands for family and co-parenting enrichment services. Tell tell me how faces differs from other services that might be out there so one of the things i forgot to mention was that we also do testing cresting psychological and substance abuse testing so <hes> we just encompass it all under one umbrella so you don't have to go here and there and everywhere wonderful one stop shopping that makes it easy yeah and everybody can communicate with one another which makes it easier because sometimes the if you're seeing being a therapist. They're not communicating with the the lawyer he's not communicating what the courts he's not communicating with each other and so gets really long and dragged out and the pot just gets honored to be thicker okay so but but again how is faces different from just the whole one-stop shop is that i don't think that faces <hes> has much competition. There's not a lot of <hes> so you are one of a kind. I oh i think so well. That's good to know that's good to know so someone. I'm sure is compelled and they're like i need dana con in my life. So how can they reach out and get in contact with you and so i don't want them to think that i'm somebody special because i'm not going to be out there doing these services. This is my the company with the therapists and the teachers and all the supervisor specialists in all these. I would be very area to help yes so <hes> you can reach us on our website which is WWW dot faces dot family. <hes> feel free read the email me personally. Which is my name dana con at faces dot family <hes> wanna call me me. Give you my cell phone. I really i really love helping and helping connect to whatever services go to your website and connect with you there so so <hes> we're almost out of time. Thank you so much. I know i told you thank you so much dana for your time today and i hope everyone got the the kind of resources that they need to really be not just a success in business but a success in life. Take care of your body. You have been listening to business gail insights with kimberly marie bonner to get her personal attention to you and your empire goethe business scale insights network dot com aw that's business scale insights network dot com and tune in again next week for more from kimberly marie bond with business scale insights.

kimberly kimberly marie bonner dana kimberly marie bonner south florida dana khan Marie bonner Tom washington founder kimberly bonner dana con kimberly marie bond john limpets wounds WSB goodell FAU supervisor
Tony Hall: Teaching Kids Confidence & Self-Esteem Through Martial Arts

Business Scale Insights

28:09 min | 11 months ago

Tony Hall: Teaching Kids Confidence & Self-Esteem Through Martial Arts

"Hey empire-builders do you listen to business skill insights on spotify. If not you really should on spotify fi you can listen to your favorite musical artists and your favorite podcasters all in one place for free so download the the spotify app today search for business skill insights and follow the podcast so you never miss an episode of business scale insights incites welcome to business scale insights with Kimberly Marie Bonner listen for commentary interviews and information on how to grow your business business for all the details contact business scale insights network DOT COM empire-builders. Are you ready. Here's Kimberly Marie. Hello and welcome empire-builders to another episode of visits skill insights. I'm your host Kimberly Emberley Bonner and I can't believe in September and we are in the throes of everything back to school. Even though we kinda got a hiccup with Dorian we are back back in the saddle and talking about child related businesses and child related services and in that regard I invited Sinn say Tony Hall who is the owner of American Professional Mar Martial Arts. I WanNa make sure I got the got the name down in Boca Raton he owns a wonderful studio that really helps young kids and adults perfect their martial arts skills so say Hello Oh to the listening audience Tony. How's it going everybody now. I call Houston say Tony. All the time on in my emails because of a mutual friend and actually really one of your patrons introduced us. What is since I. I'm not a martial arts guru. So what does that all mean the whole title so the word sense a itself means teacher. Oh Okay and it was formerly given to me but honestly like coach. You know Mr Sense as long as I have. Somebody's attention on that. I got you will I was calling you since I might as well ask him. What does that mean because I have no clue You've got a really cool story. It's on your website. We've actually actually talked privately and you shared the story of how you got to be the owner of the gym share a little bit of that with the listening audience I it everyone gets to you know find out little gems about people when they hear their story also way back when long long time ago in south Florida is when I originally tailing nine thousand nine hundred ninety four I started now. I'd give eighty to ninety four is when I started ninety seven. I got my blackout that I went off and did you know kids stuff and adults off I wanted the military became a police officer and all that good stuff and then I changed happened. I decided to come back down to south Florida started working for other martial art schools while I was doing martial arts in the police force and military as well I decided to try how to make it may try to make a living by doing this. eventually in actually want to say late two thousand seventeen. I had a vision for what I wanted a school to be so I we were different name but rebranded and started a New Vision as American professional martial arts which is kind of where we're at today so pretty happy with the direction and the fee Utah going. We'll talk to me about that vision. What exactly was that vision. And how does the business you know embody it today. What are the biggest things that one is. I kinda jumped with the name. You know the name kind of says a lot. I wanted someplace. That was what kind of brings everybody together. In America you know so I grabbed the name American being a Patriot military police officer self-serving myself so I got that name American professional and I wanted to someplace that everybody kind of common kinda be part of something bigger bigger than cells be a part of a big family because that's really kind of what brings us all together being here and that and learning some realistic self defense you know a lot of other marshawn schools do uh-huh traditional martial arts coming originating from another country so when people ask me all the time you know what is the difference between Canto and taekwondo or what is the difference between judo and DJ J. will a lot of it's where it originates from punch is a punch and kick is a kick Mariah so America has a cool like thing about us is that we're just like a cultural l. Melting Pot from everywhere is here right. You know it was three different people in this room. Were well probably from three different nationality or you know backgrounds so that's what I like about. What we teach teaches we kind of take the best from all the systems that we know we call ourselves like an American style kick boxing or or like an ma or blended martial arts and we we kind of Nixon listen and make it real so people are using it for those of us who are completely like totally uninitiated uninformed? We have yeah I mean I. I used to watch Bruce Lee during Saturday morning. You know with my sister. This is aging me tremendously but literally break it down. Like what are the core components components that make up your your approach to martial arts. Jujitsu is a is it so for US specifically. I my coach is our mentor is got him. Duke Rufus who he kind of came up with a traditional background with his whole family came up traditional background he's based out of Wisconsin Milwaukee Wisconsin he runs rufus four martial arts which or roofs for kickboxing which is one of the big top teams in the NFC so for example couple of weekends ago we had Anthony Pettus one of his fighters versus Nate Diaz and Anthony lost but nonetheless he has a proven who've in martial arts system that he's kind of blended and you know they trial and testing the ring. You know work. We you know besides the street. Where are you going to test. What you're teaching kids. You know in competition is going to be kind of the the number one way to do it. You know besides you know obviously going out and picking fights in a bar or whatever you know and that's not where we want to kind of test is kind of so we don't WanNa do that. You know that's what I kind of like about our stall where it comes from it's coming from a proven system just you know coming from. Duke and do speak regularly and and you know get a lot of icy him once or twice a year because he's all the Wisconsin so we gotta go all the way up there but you know his tactics is formulas has strategies. You know they go right into our students. The same thing that people are seeing on the weekends and a fight. Are you know we're not we're not trying to make UFC fighters in our gym but the same tactics and proven strategies that are winning in the Octagon are translating the what our kids are doing and obviously you know. Do you see fighters are in great shape so the adult aspect they're getting you know. I call it like fight ready shape without actually having to get in a fight you know they want those ripped ads when they come out absolutely and I imagine that whole you have see brand helps you tremendously because so many kids and adults watch that stuff although I am I'm a lover not a fighter of course you know I've never had to really get into a fight actually more calm when when that situation kind of present itself but cool so you know I'm sure there's some adults definitely parents that are wanting to your more about the different types of classes says that you offer for kids and for adults share more about them soar program for kids all very progressive so I mean I. I tried to focus on our school. I don't focus other people are doing but I know for a fact that we're one of the few schools in south Florida that have dedicated three and four year old program so if we were start their youngest angus we have a three and four year old program dedicated just for three and four year olds and they're learning the basics fundamentals structure discipline how to follow directions in a class so they're. We're not going out there and learning how to do a bunch of crazy stuff right away. There are three and four years old people. Sometimes you get really hurt themselves. They come in and they're like my kids three. I want them to start sparring like you can also watch dino. Dan Doesn't want to start sparring just yet. Let's slow down. Listen for thirty minutes so but we do you have a specific three and four class and then we break our next age group down which is five and sixes and the five and six starts getting more fundamentals classes are really fast pace on that's one of my favorite classes that teach and then we go to our seven went through twelve year olds which is now in elementary school kids and they start to learn a lot of the basic fundamentals of you know self defense and building confidence so they can learn to defend themselves else if they have to then adults obviously go into a high intense kickboxing workout. You know we're in there not just punching kicking a bag. They're working with each other training partners learning learning control and discipline and that kind of thing that reminds me when you mentioned the three to four year olds you see all these viral videos where you have this little you know toddler. Adler trying to kick a piece of wood or break a piece of wood with their hand or their foot and it is so adorable and you know they've got their teammates cheering hearing them I mean do you see you get that kind of I when these little babies are trying to accomplish stuff like that when you're three and four and even five and six year olds the biggest thing is building confidence yes when we go into like bully defense and dealing with bullies bullies pick on victims yes on somebody. That's vulnerable or somebody. They feel like they can get one up. When you're that young age and you start building confident with little victories you know whether it's breaking a board or jumping over a patent class or high fiving your coach total victory start to compound on top of each other and that's how we kind of create a bully bully defense you know from the very beginning. It's not teaching kit how to defend a punch entre kick. That's not what creates bullies your or sorry. A you know creates defense against boys. It's you know starting from beginning if kids walking around with good posture happy feels like if they can do anything they put their mind to. That's what creates a person that is so funny that we're having this conversation and I want some members of my family to listen to this this because I was just happy to have read table talk with Jada Pinkett Smith and her mom and her daughter. We had a version of that red table. We'll talk in my family this past weekend and it was related to a fan younger family member and she does not we. Everyone loves her. I love her dearly early but she does not exude confidence and when she walks into a room her shoulders or down in different things like that and I keep telling her. I said you know your grandmother. Your aunt and your mother are talking to you about confidence because when when you walk into a room you have no idea of the energy and the attention that you are attracting by coming into a room without out that confidence absolutely because predators or attracted to that predators are attracted to that and that's another word. That's a fancy word for bullies. Yeah I mean it's twenty fancy words for everything but you know they're they're attracted to that and just standing up straight and walking into room confident that you have every right to be in that room and taking up your God given space. That's what you need to be able to do in order to succeed in the world so I I love. You're talking about that because you know when you're talking about anti bullying campaign it's not about the Karai job that has not about ticking somebody in in the groin. It's about owning your space looking at people in the eye and saying you know what not today exactly in mass and that's exactly what we try to reinforce and then when the fiscal part of it because it's an eighty percent mental game and twenty percents physical game when we get exactly mental game okay and and when we get down to the physicality of it is I always tell people like would you rather be trained or untrained you. You know because a lot of times if a bully is gonNA fight you know and not to get too you know Patriot patriotic but everything but if a terrorist is going to do something to the United States. Do we want to be prepared or unprepared prepared. You know so if if somebody's going to pick on your to fight you do you want to have the self defense knowledge or D- do you WanNa play the victim card. No matter how good your confidence is right you know. I got to be ready all right well. We're going to a break but when we get back I do want to go into a little bit more adept about the whole how you guys deal with low self esteem mm-hmm in kids and building that confidence when we come back from the break and then also sharing your success stories like you know what kids have gone through your program program and what they're doing now. We'll be right back after this break kimberly. Marie Bonner helps millions make millions on Business Gail Insights Thursdays at twelve thirty PM. AM on WSB our business scale insights helps your business moved from startup to scale up and is sponsored by new day consulting systems new day consulting systems can can help turn your business into a franchise and scaly globally interested go to their website new day consulting systems dot COM and don't forget to tune in Thursdays at twelve thirty for business gail insights with Kimberly Marie Bonner if you already have a proven business model but have concerns sermons about the best way to grow and scale then you should contact the experts at new day. Consulting systems new day uses innovative techniques to ten times the impact of Your Business. Your local business can become a regional national or international enterprise new day. Consulting systems will show you how for more information and to get started with new day visit the website at nude consulting systems dot COM one one new day consulting systems uh-huh dot com to get your business off the ground and into contact new day to day. Kimberly Marie Bonner helps millions make millions on business scale insights Thursdays at twelve thirty PM on WSBIU business scale insights helps your business moved from startup to scale up and is sponsored you buy new day consulting systems new day consulting systems can help turn your business into a franchise and scaled globally interested go to their website site new day consulting systems dot COM and don't forget to tune in Thursdays at twelve thirty for business gail insights with Kimberly Marie Bonner if you already have a proven business model but have concerns about the best way to grow and scale then you should contact the experts at new day. Consulting systems new day uses innovative techniques to ten times the impact of Your Business. Your local business can become a regional national or international enterprise new day. Consulting systems will show you how for more information and to get started with new day visit the website at new day consulting systems uh-huh. DOT COM NEW DAY CONSULTING SYSTEMS DOT COM to get your business off the ground and into orphaned contact new who day to day and we're back. This is business. He'll insights with your host. Kimberly Bonner and I am with Sensi teacher Tony Hall who is a martial arts expert. He owns a gym in the Boca Raton area and we were just talking about really really helping kids overcome you know bullying and increasing their self esteem and I know it's back to school season. A lot of kids are terrified whether they're going into elementary school middle school or high school a lot of kids struggle with self esteem loneliness. This is a big deal and so I I really want to plug this from not just a professional place from a personal place so talk to us a little bit more those parents that are listening that kid that might be in the car listening. You know what are some of the things that you guys do. Concretely you talked about being prepared on but what's what's what about the belief system. What what are you guys. Do at your gym. Is it's different so there was a couple little things and it all compounds onto each other so aside from just the daily positive reinforcement with kids you know sometimes we gotta at a push kids when they don't. WanNa be pushed. You know 'cause as adults. We kinda get. We kind of forget you know especially. When you're a parent that has a kid we like to give and really quickly so as adults such as you don't want to go to work but we go because we have to pay the bills because if not the bills are reminding us that we have to go to work so sometimes with kids they wanNA give up really quickly and sometimes parents are quick to say. Hey you know my kid doesn't want to do about it so we don't do it anymore. Because we try to find the easy way so with kids we try to re-instill that like let's get it done. Let's do this. Let's finish it because nine times out of ten. We always feel better after we're done doing something I mean. I never want to run when I'm putting all my shoes never i. I can't think of one time I've ever wanted to go run three miles as tying my shoelaces so when I'm done with my run I feel really good that I went for the run but as I put no shoes and socks no I wanNA call back into bed and go to sleep for another thirty minutes versus run. Only kids are in this weather and kids. Don't know any better you know. Kids know what we teach them. You know everything's trained by you know the influences around them so you know if they see Jimmy's say the kids kids don't grow up and become functioning adults by Osmosis like automatically. They were just waco he for some reason we think Youtube teaches them how to do. I put this whole series. Forget is just just don't wake up one day in our coal. You know what I'm saying. It doesn't happen that way as parents and coaches and leaders in the community. We have to influence them. The way we want to mold our future we can't just sit back and expect them to know you know just because they see it on Youtube and there's no no you tuber Gamer on there and his running three times a week. You know getting fitter faster stronger. That's thirteen years old or if they are. They don't have a dollar million billion likes you know or whatever subscribers whatever call them nowadays. You know they're sitting around. There's a guy on youtube just off topic. There's a guy and youtube video game with his kids and he makes like four million a year. Get on a plane and video games with his kids. My son watches them all the time his video games and my kids but I mean million dollars. That's like Agnete Revenue Stream ings and this that and the other and it's like you know kids are learning you know. I'm going to sit around all day so so in when it comes to us kind of influencing our kids in the DOJ oh going back to back to our topic. Is You know they don't know any better so we has coaches and have to push them. I'm so they get these little victories. That actually means something right. You know versus. Every kid gets a trophy. I'll tell you right now. I've one of the I'm not going to get a bell just because they show up to class you know except my three and four year olds they go up. They do get this laugh. That's different but you know if if a kid's not known known as moves and and he's not putting in the effort and I have no issues. I've had kids quit because they mix. We make our kids run. they have to run a mile in order to move onto the next boat. I've had kids quit because they failed the runtime by one second. A second is a second and also league totally quit. They told us again exactly because it was it would have been another three or four for months before they can qualify again and I was like you know that's that's on you and this was like they were like four four years into training they were close and they they they had one mile and under nine minutes they finish ninety one and I looked at him like sorry that would you probably walked for five seconds. You know that would have been it and so that's but that's the hard lesson you have to teach kids now or do you want to wait until you're spending forty thousand dollars a year in college what I tell people all the time but nobody listens to took awesome. You let me see so. Tell me about some success stories. Maybe a kid that you Kinda gave save some hard discipline to or maybe they didn't like the DOJ. Oh and you're you know the lessons and then they came back and they're like Oh my God. I'm a champ damn. There's love this. There's so many I mean the the school itself we should have this radius marquess in the show and the DOJ. Oh no they are so many kids and the the weird thing about what I do. Who is is sometimes you don't know about the success stories because they're not happening? The kids like I would not be very successful school if I tell you that every day kid comes in and gets bullied and they had to beat up the other guy right like that would not be successful more short school if you're Cobra Kai here. That's not you know. All my kids are winning fights with bullies in school. It's like well why are getting bullied at school. They shouldn't even be there so you hear about it every now and then and typically you know. I get a you know so and so was believed today because it's middle middle school. Everybody's going to believe what you were registered of a black shirt. You get bullied but you know I'll hear that so they'll be some success stories from that and then I've got other a cool stories like I had this kid he was with me for five six years and Super Small Skinny Shaikh hid in the beginning he gets his black belt and he becomes very fast because we require physical endurance from our kids and he ends up going off and he joins the the high school track team a lot of do that. Anna believing me is a martial arts school and going on and doing something else which is fine. It's like you know you're leaving the nest. You know go. You had one kid that used to be again. Another shy kind of quiet introvert ends up you know going to state drama. You know these kids that kind of come out of their shell and find their way and a lot of it just has to do with you know the confidence that they learned in the DOJ. Oh it's not all he has great parents and a great support system but for every little thing helps exactly you know so. I don't WanNa take too much credit but you know I'm sure it has an influence in there as well and then other kids that like you said I've had to push who hated running hated running this kid. I hated run. I still I ate it running for the record. I hate it but he was struggling with ah he's gotTA run two miles to get his black belt and he probably spent there's one belt right before black belt that you have to run two miles any probably spent a good year year and a half at installed. Kinda like Dorian over the stayed there and then finally you know parents started running with him. you know so they put some time in effort to running with their kid and he's now brought the family little bit closer together and you know he was able to pass his run time two or three weeks ago and he'll be getting his bipolar and a couple of days so you you know there's different ways that influences families and cultures and all that kind of stuff. I I I I. I really didn't think about this question but I do want asset do you do you see differences with genders. You see differences with the girls and boys or do they just all appreciate it the same. Do you have to have a different approach with them or as everybody just like yes. My approach with everybody is slightly different because everybody's events. Definitely you know I've got I've had some ladies that you know rocket and they're way more dedicated you know and then I get some boys that you know Kinda get flaky or some boys that get super dedicated and you know it's hard to 'cause we compete with everything else that goes on you know so sometimes you know we compete with other school activities and everything else and I try to remain a constant all the time but it's still tough so booy gender differences. It doesn't matter you know the requirements the same commander and ten percent. I love it. I love it. It's just you know sometimes. You're at it depending on your age. Sometimes you get female programming that you know yes. You're not supposed to hit and all that other good stuff yeah. Sometimes we gotta pull it out of him. Come on like all the time like you know. I talk his athletic. A lot of the lot of the youth nowadays is is very anti like what's what's A. PC. See there no to soft. I'm like it's so it's it's beyond soft dude. I try to kids. It's like it's it's like apathy and like inertia and it is the nails. I try to make the training in the dough. Joe Is is realistic as possible and that is this is like a I mean we have padded floors. Anders coaches everywhere and everybody's your friends. I'm like if you'RE GONNA fail Falen here because we're all gonna catch you and help build you back up. You don't WanNa fail out there. 'cause out there your friend. They're not going to help you so I try to get the kids his only when you grab somebody for a risk grad their wrist and pull like sit makes simulation simulation. Don't make it you know trying to like. I always try to relate to kids. Mike WHO and here's overplayed VR before they all raise your hand all I I wear the OCULUS headset them like make it like that like you're in the moment. Get in there like 'cause because they're they're all too busy here my phone in their head in this world of make believe mark we just kind of kind of wild but anyway tell me what the future future holds for you and your business and if some parent really wants to reach out and get their kid enrolled how the how can they do that so biggest this kind of like vision. If you want to influence as many people I can in positive way now. Let's hard because not everybody's different. Everybody has the same goals but we want to try to reach each and kind of let as many people know about what we offer as we can and hopefully they try because you don't know if you don't like it if you don't try and if it works out and fits your culture and what you want food good to go and if I can go into a larger scale one day that's great you know but right. Now I WANNA do is many people woke. Leigh's we can absolutely uh and if people like and they want to do it the easiest way to jump on his of super-rich won't like every form of social media whether it's Instagram facebook you know American professional martial arts. Yes you can literally Google it. We're top like three or four Google and then A. WW dot amp pro American professional martial arts dot com were right there and you know come and get a free week and and rocket out awesome. We'll thank you so much since they Tony Hall. You were wonderful and definitely reach out and enroll your kids. They will benefit if it from it. I know try it. I don't care if they enroll just try. I know I know thank you guys so much and here's to your success. Take Care you too you. I'm have been listened to business gail insights with Kimberly Marie Bonner to get her personal attention to you and your empire golden business the scale insights network DOT com. That's business scale insights network DOT COM and tune it again next week or more from Kimberly Marie deep bond with business scale insights.

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John Chapman: From Incarceration to Disrupting Vocational Trade Training in the U.S.

Business Scale Insights

25:31 min | 1 year ago

John Chapman: From Incarceration to Disrupting Vocational Trade Training in the U.S.

"Welcome to business scale insights with kimberly marie bonner listen for commentary interviews and information on how to grow for your business for all the details contact business gail insights network dot com so empire builders are you ready appears kimberly marie bader hello and welcome empire-builders to another episode of business skill insights insights. I'm your host kimberly. Marie bonner and i'm so honored to be continuing this branding series with me today. Hey is the c._e._o. Of jazz <hes> john chapman john say hello to the listening to a quick. Hello everybody nice to talk doc with you and build a few with you today. Absolutely i'm really excited to continue the series on branding because i really think it's so important as many of you know i am an franchise developed actually by trade and then before that i was in i._p. Licensing <hes> for lack of a better word guru for much of my career and branding <hes> is so important when it comes to the r._o._i. Of business <hes> licensing opportunities unease if you want to scale and i found that a lot of small businesses really don't understand what branding is all about fundamentally. It's about what you're known for what you personally as the c._e._o. Or or a business owner you are known for and also corporately. What is your business known for and it's beyond just a name it's beyond just a logo <hes> it's beyond just identity but it's really what are you fundamentally known for and i brought a john chapman on as a guest <hes> because he has such a powerful for full brand story and what a lot of people don't understand is your brand's story is really fundamentally. How people will find out what about you. How people will get an impression about you. <hes> how people will perceive you in the marketplace and many times the bran dan story is what the c._e._o.'s story is and sometimes. It's what really how the company was created you know in somebody's garage or in somebody's basement etc and so forth but nevertheless that's what gets people's attention in the marketplace and that's how you become known for x x y and z and so i have. I have john on john. You still there. You're getting some feedback <hes> <hes> i have john on because he has an incredible story and that story is really kind of bleeds into giles's stories so <hes> first off john. Can you tell <hes> you know the listening audience more about joshua. What exactly is it and what led you to create all right. Jazzar in trade. School is a fully accredited crate school that is located in the main offices offices in manassas virginia. We have several offices in the process of opening we train in electrical plumbing h hvac and also orthodontic assistant <hes> what led me to do this is to help the reentering citizen which are actually ex offenders getting out of prison and jail be be able to give full-time jobs and be successful in the community. <hes> another thing i went into the low income people that are on food stamps were able to get them fully funded into the program. Get them into the program. Get them out making full salaries of sustainable salaries awesome awesome. Now i know you've had an incredible amount of success and i know we were going to talk about this later on in the interview but she was the listening audience plants you know when was jazz created and how many schools <hes> do you have online to open now. <hes> jazz thank trade. School was founded in august of two thousand and fourteen by myself and i started it as one school in fairfax. Now we have a menagerie virginia main campus. We have been norfolk campus over there. Bev virginia beach. We are in the process of opening up one in roseville michigan in san diego california so i'm pretty excited about those that is amazing that is absolutely amazing now i we were introduced by kind of a mutual friend and then you shared with me your story put the before or that you shared your story with this mutual business friend and he's just been over the moon about about really what you've gone through and how oh you've come out on the other side and so i really want to spin the bulk of this interview since it's really about branding and getting that brand narrative down now i want you to spend the next five to ten minutes really talking about your story and it's so compelling you guys. You may even have to pull over the side of the road. Perhaps some popcorn at home or something like that. Because it's unbelievable so jon shere really the story of you and how you got to this point definitely i moved to virginia as a single data two daughters and <hes> basically move with bags on my just the luggage on my back and moved in started over <hes> met somebody we had a we have a child together three daughters now <hes> i'm in two thousand in nine. I got arrested for selling my own disneyworld tickets on craigslist <hes> it was it's kind of ridiculous. I thought it was a joke. Actually 'cause my family's all in the government and i thought it was actually a joke but it wasn't nonetheless i did. I got three and and a half years in prison as my sentence <hes> luckily i was able to go back to court and get it changed to nine months incarceration ars ration- i did ninety days in the whole 'cause i couldn't afford. My fine lost my kid. I'm kind of going through a pretty quickly because it's only five to ten. We'll take what it's so important. I my producer j. as you were talking. His eyes are lighting up and he's like whoa so you know take your time because it's a lot to digest. It's a lie. Just take your time so what happened. When we got it changed over to nine months the house arrest which in virginia is about eight hundred and fifty dollars a month just to build where the ankle bracelet so. I couldn't afford the ankle bracelet i fell fell behind three hundred and fifty dollars and they came to my door and brought me back to the jail and threw me in the hole for ninety days which is solitary confinement at the time you only eight on sundays and it was it was crazy because <hes> during that time in solitary confinement environment. I got a letter from my ex wife saying she took my kids from me. I had no you have no access to the outside. Dhaka receive letters but i can't send them out so imagine agenda feeling you get when you get that letter. I can't imagine i cannot imagine i then whenever you get put into the whole or solitary confinement you then get reclassified. The now i got put into the old part of the jail with the people who are real criminal. I mean the murderers. I actually might selmes gotta kidding me over disney tickets correct because you get re greeted reclassified. So what i did is at that point. I was re reclassified input input. The old part of the jail were my new cellmate had shot and killed three of his employer. I believe he was a barber. I have to keep from crying john. This is is this is crazy. This is easy. It was the same the leash not the best part of my life. I've gone through some stuff on. I then it was released on member tenth. Believe and i came out. I was able to get <hes> <hes> get a court date set up and drove <hes> got bus and all the way michigan to court for my take my ex-wife if the court pick my kids back <hes> who she had had them talk to to say that they were scared me mind you they were three and accepted time. I'm somewhere like that. They were younger younger <hes> so they listened to her but the judge notice in there is that something wasn't right so he took them back to their chamber where he came back out and said that none of that was true with the kids were saying they were just fearful of what you know whatever mom was telling him so oh he immediately reminded him back over to me and when i got to virginia we were basically we were homeless. I spent time. I'm at patrick henry shelter out in false. I know exactly that and it's so funny. I did work to support that shelter and so many other shelters when i lived in frederick that's amazing. I didn't know i didn't know that little factoid but keep going e. S. so i was in the patrick henry shelter and it was funny because my brother lives in a a <hes> a high rise with high security in my kids thought that we've got rich that we lived enough because you know when you come in you have to get buzzed in yes so they just assumed it was no different than my brothers and the feeling of i guess that you didn't make it that you you lost everything as a man to be able to provide for your family that hurts i can't imagine and so we literally well while i was incarcerated. I'd called my girlfriend and she was literally being kicked out of the house at the time and so. Could you imagine you can't do anything about that. 'cause you're locked up. I can't imagine so so. I'm in the shelter. They give me <hes> i go for an interview and this is when things start picking up go for an interview with my last twenty dollars and i'm meet this gentleman who's actually a really good friend of mine. Now not hires me as a pest control technician and as i'm talking to him i told my story and we couldn't believe it. Hires me and i said is there any way i could get best a extension to begin with because i don't have the gas kids work next week. He said he can't do that but what he can do is make me a manager and he took me up from bought me a ford f. one fifty and company trucks so things started picking up so this is what started me thinking about what i i wanted to do and i already building license. I was like you know what i'm having a hard time getting a job imagine somebody who's unskilled coming out of the penitentiary coming out at low income well. What were what were you. What was your job. What was your job before. The whole thing went down with the tickets. What were you doing before that. I had building license. I was a home remodeling. Okay okay amazing so you're absolutely right so you started thinking to yourself. Oh my goodness what what do people do when they're coming out of a similar situation correct and then i started doing my research and i started thinking. You know what i'm forty. I don't know how but somehow i'm forty now and i started thinking you know my age and younger. What were we push to do. We are pushed to go to college correct guess what by two thousand and twenty five. We're going to be at a deficit. I believe eighty five percents in the skilled trade absolutely all the baby boomers are retiring. It's it's so funny that you say that and we're going to have to go cut to a break but i want to leave this thought with the listeners i was just looking at an inc magazine article kohl about the most in demand jobs skills for the future and this is coming out of <hes> the association that handles kind of human resources. This is trade <hes> and it says that i i want to say among the top five is trade skills plumbing welding <hes> modeling modelling carpentry <hes> these are things that are up there with kind of more highly highly technical skills at all and and people don't realize this. This is a deficit to your point. We don't have enough of the folks trained to do this so when we come back. Let's let's kind of go from there. Talk about out the fact that there is that deficit and how you're helping to deal with that okay definitely thank you and we're back visit skill insights with your host kimberly. Marie bonner and i have the honor of interviewing john chapman ceo of jazz and we were just in the middle of him sharing his story which is an incredible story about how he was unfortunately incarcerated related to disneyworld tickets. Could you say that again. I'm probably i don't know if i'm framing it properly john yes unfortunately in the <hes> in two thousand eleven i two thousand eight nine. It was illegal to sell your own disneyworld ticket with the because because i was not a legal ticket or however in two thousand seventeen they made it legal. You are allowed to that. Even if it was illegal it would definitely pure that the punishment schmidt did not fit the crime so here you are after you served your time you're trying to provide for your family and you were talking about the fact that there is this deficit of trade skills out there and so. I just want you to pick up where you left off correct. A lot of people nowadays are pushing their kids to go to college which they they walk away oh and sixty to one hundred thousand dollars <hes> and as of as of two thousand twenty five we're looking at an eighty. The eighty five percent deficit because the baby boomers are retiring such as my dad who's in the trade. They all start to retire and nobody wanted. Everybody was pushing pushing their kids to go to college and you won't make good money. I'm using it. The math and electricity and after four years is making one hundred thousand dollars a year plus and over with nothing in school rice. I completely agree. The difference between a doctor and electricity is just based on you. Gotta do something you enjoy for a living because we we're. We're at work a lot more than we're at home and the truth so you have this idea. You know there's a deficit deficit. Then you have your experience of how it's been so difficult for you to really <hes> be gainfully employed after the whole episode with the incarceration and so is that where johnson was born understanding the need and your own experience correct jazz was born based on the experience of the fact that these guys is how could you how could you. They don't re-offend because they want to go back to back to prison. I know i would do whatever it takes to make sure my children children. Don't not miss them. Don't meal saying that again say that again. A person who has been incarcerated is not trying to re-offend offended go to jail to go to prison again. Go be parole. Get pulled back from parole violated. They're doing it like myself. You do what you gotta do to make for. Your children. Don't miss out on a meal so true so if these people are on i i couldn't even get a job at mcdonalds. They told me i was overqualified. Fidai said i don't care give me a chance and i'll say here wow somebody trying to raise their family. We can't even get a minimum wage job so so my goal with chazal was trained them in train the miniscule so that i can get them a job. Our program is not to three years long. Our program is five weeks or if you wanna double up and do a fact program or or ten leak that one day a week we we play with the union picking people up. I have one guy that graduated comes to every graduation and speak because not making over one hundred thousand dollars a year two years later when he thought he was going to be nothing. That's amazing. So how did you start jazz. I mean it's one thing to have the idea and god knows your story is incredible. What a testimony but how do you go from that your story to actually make an it happened happen right and starting the school so i- partnered with a company called away are out of fairfax they help ex offenders <hes> <hes> they took us as a sample program because before you can be accredited. You have to show that your class actually works before you feel your class action works. You have to run a class so it's kind of like a twenty two <hes> so i ran three classes for free and then show that we were able to put people people to work and then i sent it over ep dot fully accredited then i sent it over to the federal program called we owe work investment opportunities act nama fully only accredited training provider for them so i can get funding for these guys and just recently the news is is that we partnered with the school district and they're we're gonna start putting people bussing students highschool credit and credit draw that has worried or twenty twenty one year. Oh that is wonderful would school the district that would be prince william. Oh congratulations john this is you're doing some pioneering work and i'm so i am so i'm happy for you so you start out with those humble beginnings and you shared a few of that one success story. Do you have some other six success accessories other than that that you can share the <hes> the director of that shelter that help me. Please help me in a in my first home. <hes> i hired hired him. He works for gazza now. As director everyone around no he goes around talking and speaking and telling people that you never treat anybody different because they could end up being your boss one day. You know that's the truth and my grandmother. My grandmother used to always say but for the grace of god honey. Go you so you you need to always. Have you know deal with the whenever i dealt with exactly so whenever that person on the street you never know it's the truth bruce. It's the truth i and my business arden. I never tell them that. I'm the onus. I always tell him. I know somebody who can hit you funded and i will i personally hand out <hes> tailored ship's in my mom's name and pay for people who can't get into the program because the idea is not about the money to get people out and get them jobs. When i first i heard your story i said you have to be you have to be on this radio. Show and we have to get you on the podcast. Because what what you're doing. There's gonna be somebody that's listening either through the podcast or on the radio show there you know the world is small and this message needs to go out there because number one. You're going to encourage somebody that if you could give you go through hell and back right and have and really be where you are today than they can to and so that's one of those things. My pastor used to tell me that you're going through. Hell it. Just keep on going truth. We're encouraging somebody. It's it's true <hes> and number two. I think it's so important that you talked about young people in high school etc and so forth you are right <hes> attention xeres have so much pressure to go to college and college doesn't even have the r. y. Particularly if you're not going to one of these these top name schools with a top network it doesn't make sense to go to a unfortunately college has become the new high school diploma well. Everybody has one but it depends. I mean it's one thing if you come from top tier college. If you come from a bottom tier college is it really worth it. I mean seriously <hes> versus getting a trade and knowing our ally of getting that skill the marketplace is going to reward it with a the minimum salary of acts that you can like in virginia for electrical if they take our class within four to five years to make an upward to sixty five dollars an hour who wow so. Can you talk about the different classes that you offer so you talked about. Electrical is there are there other domains that you specialize in and people can get <hes> certifiable the correct electrical plumbing h. back. We're looking at getting into glacier. Which is <hes> glass on. We just i got certified as a orthodontic assistant program and this way we can offer to women as well. I have several women that actually go through the electrical program program and you'd be amazed they end up being providers amazing. It's so funny that you mentioned age fac. <hes> there is a business that is investigating gating franchising with me. The guy who's the founder started out as a nurse. I start he started out as a nurse and he you for whatever reason his he was waiting on his certification to come through. He couldn't get a real nursing job here and so he was just like we'll let me take like a handyman kind of a._c. See guy job and it was with an apartment building and he thought he was just going to kind of fluff his way through and the guy who hired him was like i. You don't know anything think about doing anything with age so i need you to go through this certification kind of like what you went through right or what you're offering it does really. It's changed his life. He's like he's. He's a dominant player in. I'm using this as kind of a a validation for you. He's dominant player and south florida. He made a career transition invested in you know a trade school like yours and the rest is they say is history and he's thinking about franchising. He's got multiple locations. That's that's the best part about a trade school. You learn hands on so you actually learn what you're going to be doing for a living you go to college. I have a sister went to college for electrical intrical engineering. She went and got her job in hated it after all your columbine thought it was and she's still working her degree but but she's not an electrical engineer. She's doing something different with it. I definitely consider you <hes> such a disruptor in education and it's a necessary disruptor <hes> the fact that you're focusing on the trades the fact that you are you know it's a short amount of time a low cost investment and i do believe that this spaces blue ocean because to your point the market needs it. <hes> the demand is there so we only have two minutes left left and i really want you to plug kind of your future vision for joschka you know where do you wanna take this and if somebody in florida loves loves what they're hearing and wants you to come to south florida and connect with high schools in this area. How can they get in touch with you so really i. They want to move forward with you in this area as well definitely if somebody wants to get in touch with me they can call our number's five several one realistic three zero six six the nice thing about our number if they wanna talk to me particularly ex message are made number and it hits the first cell phone terrific terrain and and then the other thing that they can do is email info at j. f. i._n._c. Dot org they could find us on facebook. Videos of of classes in previous students. Speaking is j. f. a. I n. c. like us on facebook. Follow us on instagram jazz the increased pool wonderful well. That's about it. I'm really excited. Thank you so much for sharing your story and the best is is yet ahead for you john and to those listening here's to your success take care you have been listened to business scale insights with kimberly marib honor to get her personal attention to you and your empire go to business scale insights network dot com. That's business the scale insights network dot com and tune in again next week for more from kimberly marie with business scale insights.

john chapman virginia Marie bonner kimberly marie bonner fairfax michigan kimberly marie bader business owner patrick henry shelter i._p facebook c._e._o. disney inc magazine south florida kimberly marie Bev virginia beach instagram
John Lipetz: Helping Children & Families Enjoy, Preserve and Understand Nature

Business Scale Insights

27:09 min | 1 year ago

John Lipetz: Helping Children & Families Enjoy, Preserve and Understand Nature

"Welcome to business snus scale insights with kimberly marie bonner listen for commentary interviews and information on how to grow your business for all the details tails contact business scale insights network dot com empire builders. Are you ready. Here's kimberly marie bonner bonner hello and welcome empire-builders to another episode of business scale insights. I am your host kimberly. Marie bonner and you can believe it. We are in august. I can't believe it. It's like you blink and the whole year is gone right. I feel as though you know it was just yesterday. I was celebrating the new year but anyway here. We are so <hes> more than half of the years past and that means. It's back to school time for so many people <hes>. I've got a ton of relatives who've been calling me <hes> talking about back to school. I've got a niece. He's that's been tugging on my pocketbook talking about back to school and because of all that back to school flurry <hes> i wanted to take take an opportunity to focus highlight on <hes> children's focused businesses and <hes> the way different types of child focused businesses scale since everyone's so focused on children this time of year and i brought onto the to the radio show and the podcast john lipids of the c._e._o. Of fish and explore john are you still there on the phone with me. I am kamp thank you and he is based in northern virginia and john has this incredible <hes> camp exploration adventure adventure <hes> kind of there's there's so much deficient explore even though the name is kind of self explanatory but i wanted him on <hes> the broadcast even though it's the end of the summer to kind of talk about <hes> this child focused <hes> business because everybody's he's kind of focused on kids and what they're doing and and the different things that they're going through so that's the number one reason why i brought jon on and also for the rest first of the month of august and into september. I'm going to have all types of different guests. I'm going to have america's supernanny a one of america's supernanny supernanny deborah tillman on the broadcast. I'm gonna have <hes> dana con on the broadcast who focuses on <hes> children going through. I'm divorce and services towards a focused on them. I'm also working on getting another guest who is based in texas who does a lot of kind of have fun stuff for kids in the texas region so stay tuned. If you've got a kid and or you're interested in child focused businesses. You definitely want to <hes> <hes> visit one zero three point nine f._m. Twelve thirty on thursdays every thursday and we're going to talk about all things related to children's is businesses so with that said <hes> i am. I wanted to start the whole series off with john because john and i've worked together together for a few years now. He's got this great business. It's based in virginia but i really want the whole world to to know about this business. Because <hes> it really is unique. He does an excellent job <hes> he's award running and now he's starting to franchisees. He's going to work with people all over america and probably definitely south florida to bring fishing explore two different parts of of the united states dates so that your kids and all kinds of kids can benefit from his services so john again. Thank you for being on the broadcast and i really really want people to know more about you. How fishing explore got started because i think it's a great story. Thanks kim and <hes> you know. I've just i'm flattered uttered to be <hes>. You know to be on your show. I think it's <hes> you know. I think it's a real privilege. <hes> you know our story that is you know it's something <hes> you know that i really actually enjoyed talking about <hes> just because you know it was not <hes> fishing explore was sort of a lifelong passion of mind but it was not something that i had intended <hes> you know to start as a business and what happened. <hes> you many years ago when my when you know when my children were both young <hes> my son i think was five and my daughter was about three and a half <hes> i found myself with some of their friends and <hes> the parents that were supposed to be joining us opted for an opportunity then to actually go on a you know to go on a play date and <hes> in them selves so the parents were out at at starbucks or wherever they may be i've found myself with five kids <hes> at a at a little <hes> little creek week on a on a rock outcrop that the children had dubbed toad island they named that because there were there were you you know just of animals and toads hopping around in the silent <hes> and really the so you know i found myself here and i'm like going okay. Wait a minute. I'm the only adult here. I've got five kids. They're they're running around and they're doing and they're doing <hes>. Also you know they're doing all sorts of really interesting things and hear all these you know here all these animals i looked down and and you know they're smiling. They're happy they're wet dirty and that that you know and i i got a picture of my daughter and in one hand she has two toads and the other hand she has has one and you know the the boys. These are sitting in the water laughing and you know the light bulb this kind of clicked on for me. <hes> these kids are happy and all kinds of stems around on what we built fishing spore which is animals watering dirt cool so from that excursion and i know you've you've loved fishing. Your entire is have you been competitive fishermen. I not okay. I've been a guide fishermen. Really you know what <hes> <hes> you know what i saw after spending time with the kids and and getting them outdoors and having you know having a great experience with them the <hes> i i basically i basically went into a scenario where <hes> i've started looking at what programs were available for kids. You know to get them outdoors especially ashley when one set involves fishing because fishing was something that was so you know that was so <hes> such a big part of my life growing up my fishing at three years old <music> and i had <hes> you know i in turn had my kids fishing at a very early age so that that's kind of where we where where the you know. The idea for fishing explore was like okay. Here's nature programs. How do we get kids involved in these things pool and so how. How long ago did you start fishing explore. We started fishing explore in two thousand ten <hes> prior to that. I you know it was do. I spent a good a good deal of time doing some doing some <hes> research and <hes> <hes> and and <hes> you know doing doing some research and working with some other camp programs just to kind of get a better understanding of how that world worked but i actually hung my shingle in april of twenty ten cool and you know as we've been working together <hes> over the years to scale and conventionally franchise your business one of the things that really inspired me to work with you. Is that just a recognition that a lot of children and they don't have the same experiences that we had as children like you talked about your mom really forcing you right to do fishing as a kid well my mom and my dad. They didn't force me fishing. They forces to get outside right and they forced us to get outside and play and in south florida orna. You know many years ago forty years ago. You know people think south. Laura was is beautiful. Now it was truly a paradise back then and you could find all kinds of ecosystems like just take ten steps in front of you right you can find all kinds of beautiful things in nature and they were far more fascinating to me my sister and all the kids on the block than anything on the radio anything on television anything that was a latronic and then you fast forward forty years and there is this there is this lack of an appreciation a a four th nature which i think is sad and so when you and i first started working i told you i thought the work that you were doing was far or more important that you than you even realize because there's a whole generation of children that does not appreciate the basic wonder under of nature that i think we took for granted and what you're trying to do is kind of bring that wonder back and and bring that enjoyment back and again to the to the parents that are listening. Don't take it for granted that your kids appreciate the same things you you appreciate it as a kid. 'cause what i've found is many times. They don't so can i mean they don't because they haven't been exposed. Would you agree to that. <hes> i agree a lot in part. <hes> you know <hes> i the first one he jumped back. My mom didn't have to force me to actually took me out and my first fishing experience with my mom was pretty neat story to is she actually <hes> we literally used a willow branch a piece of string and a safety pin that she taught me how to bend with a on a on a rock like ours as well in the neighborhood yeah and so i i i was an outdoor kid as much by choices. <hes> you know as as anything that <hes> you know anything. My mom was egging me on to do but the. I think what you're saying you know we're in a very different time and for for parents. There's so many things that <hes> you know especially like up here in northern virginia. There's so many things pulling kids in so many different directions and what's really nice is that when parents weren't about what we do and how we do <hes> you know our programs. They get excited to because a number of them remember being able to do this but they don't have a scenario where they're able to get out and do this with their children and then there's also that group of parents were they personally are no longer interested in doing these things and you know. It's nice frost because that's where we step in. This is our passion. This is what we do and we're in you know for us to go and to take kids outdoors and you know and have a safe fun play environment virement for them to learn how to fish and learn how to kayak and learn how to do nature photography and at the same time be safe yet be able to kind of stretch their limbs and really <hes> you know get in some experiential learning which you know fancy word for saying learn by doing so you know. We've really lucked out absolutely. Will i have to jump to a break real quick but i want you to unpack what you just mentioned the kayaking fishing all the wonderful services that you provide. I want you to share that with the listening audience. I'd also want you to share a little bit more about whether you offer services in florida so this is going to definitely air in florida <hes> and just more details about fishing explore when we come back from the break. Okay thank you kimberly. Marie wagner helps. It's millions make millions on business. Gail insights thursdays at twelve thirty pm on w._s._b. Our business scale insights helps your business moved from startup to scale and is sponsored by new day consulting systems new day consulting systems can help turn your business into a franchise and scaling globally interested go their website new day consulting systems dot com and don't forget to tune in thursday's twelve thirty for business gail insights with kimberly marie bonner if you already have a proven business model but have concerns about the best way to grow and scale then you should contact the experts at new day consulting. Nothing systems new day uses innovative techniques to ten times the impact of your business. Your local business can become a regional national or international snow enterprise new day consulting systems will show you how for more information and to get started with new day visit the website at new day consulting the systems dot com new day consulting systems dot com to get your business off the ground and into orphaned contact a new day to day and we are back. This is kim him bonner host of business scale insights and we're talking about all things related to children's focused businesses. This and i have with me on the show the c._e._o. Of fish and explore john limpets and we are talking about all the wonderful things that fishing explore does so johnny stiller. I am here. Talk to me what what would you. What would you like to talk about kim to me about all the wonderful services. Well you know our our our primary businesses. Is you know as you summer programs. <hes> you know so and this is. We're right in the thick of it right now. <hes> we offer you know different age groups of different age groups of fishing programs we offer fishing program starting for youth as young as seven and going all the way up to sixteen different. You know we have what we call a young anglers program which is for kids from seven to ten years of age. We have another program. We call big fish and that's it's for an basically that for the older group that's for kids that are you know eleven and up and you know so that's our those are two primary fishing fishing programs. We also offer a fly fishing program but that's that's typically by request and that's through our private programs that we offer <hes> in in addition to fishing we offer to age groups of kayaking we offer nature photography and then we offer native animal explorers which is <hes> which is a hiking and exploring camp. I've affectionately nicknamed that camp saturdays because when i was seven eight years old that's pretty much how he spent every saturday of my my life. It's <hes> you know we. You're basically hiking trails until you get to a body of water. Once you get the water you you know you're you're in. It's looking for everything from <hes> you know salamanders and frogs and crayfish to <hes> snakes and turtles. It's just <hes> you know. It's just a great way. Hey to get kids and you know involved with involve with awesome. Well you know there are a lot of folks who are going to be listening to this on their drive their commute in south florida and they're gonna that doesn't sound that different from a lot of the you know kids camps that are <hes> in south florida. So how how would you say your for. Your services are different from your competitors. Well you know that's that is a great question and you know <hes> in the answers actually simple but don't worry. I found a way to make it complex so really i <hes> fishing explore. Is you know as an artisan. It's an experiential learning company. That's built with an environmental and social conscience so really just a fancy way of saying that we teach individuals in small groups fun safe ways to play outdoors while learning to you know respect and care for our planet. <hes> you know in this is a this again. This is a worn by doing approach. It doesn't necessarily separate us from our competitors but it helps define what we do and the real you know the real answer the question is you know as people and and basically what that is is that anybody that works with fish and explore or works four fishing explore is first and foremost <hes> in educator and they're also outdoor enthusiasts so we're not you know we're not really a workplace workplace world lifestyle. When we go home at the end of the day you know we go home and we we fish and we hike or we paddle on you. You know to relax so what we're doing. During the day is to sharing those experiences. You know so i think you you know i think lifestyle versus work is really you know the the best answer. I mean how many people work and go home to play with spreadsheets yeah yeah so i mean that to me is what makes you know fishing explorer unique and you know as far as you know what kind of differentiates us there were some other countries <hes> countries. My goodness companies it. We we run. We run small programs at you know at a out of advance that basically basically this allows us to have smaller groups we have a you know and and when we go to different places we have a little lower impact on the environment and we're also able to focus more on you know the education side of the program and and allowing you know allowing <hes> people do to have fun yet feel comfortable and safe. You know what i love. Even though i've i've worked with you for so long now the word lifestyle. This is the first time i've ever heard you say that word which i think i if i were to give you a suggestion moving forward that you're deliberately talk about fishing export as a lifestyle brand because what you're trying to do with these kids is to your point. Yes you are exposing them to all these wonderful things outside that they can do enjoy themselves but you talked about an environmental and social conscience but you're also telling them. We want you to have fun. This should be part part of your everyday life almost like breathing being able to go outside and enjoy nature and it's kind of like that's how this whole conversation on the on the air started off with both of you both of us talking about how this was just part of our life style as children and how our children have veered away from that lifestyle and so i think you have you have stumbled upon a great branding <hes> <hes> identifier for you in a way a for you to draw attention to yourself in the marketplace and talk about this being a lifestyle and being able to translate that to kids so anyway the the cool thing about it is that you're not just working with children but you've also worked with adults and you have <hes> i know you work with lansdowne resort resort in virginia right now and i think that's really exciting that adults can now go outside and play and have as much much fun as their kids share more about that sure you know in this sort of circles back around to services in addition to summer camps we do guides guides and tours and included in that is <hes> you know his travel services which you know i'll i can launch into that later if you want but the are guides tourists are are <hes> you know we do <hes> single day events for <hes> for adults and those are you know like in northern virginia what's very popular is that we you can pick up a small group of about <hes> ten to fourteen and we take these groups out and and go kayaking or maybe you know a a half day and then we end the day at one of our local wineries breweries distilleries and then we bring people back to a central location so they can can have a little bit of an outdoor excursion and then you know tie it into something that is <hes> you know nice within the community. <hes> you know that <hes> that that is also you know entertaining relaxing. I mean you know who who you know who doesn't appreciate a you know a winery and you know in in getting getting an opportunity to do you know have a nature tour and then combine that with <hes> with little little sip of something pleasure absolutely absolutely i i imagine the people people that are listening to us right now are like when is he coming to florida. So do you do this kind of thing for adults in florida. Have you done in the past. <hes> you know our travel services. Does i mean this is actually what an ice question because i mean if i look at this and i yes we do this in florida through a travel services and a guide partners so the you know so what we do is we actually take people here from northern virginia and we have different spots will go down into you know down into florida everglades jumps trump to mind and i'll actually take a group down you know down we will actually spend a week in florida working fishing with different guides and targeting different species lisa fish so that's something for people that are you know a very passionate. They are passionate about fishing so you know so that that's that's a travel opportunity to go to florida to you know when and experience the everglades that being said four to such a great place for outdoor activities i i didn't i keep saying culture so much room for growth even within that so if there's anybody out there listening i would welcome talking to you know guides that share mission to teach <hes> you know appreciation for fishing or paddling or just just you know just exploring and getting outdoors wanted to reach out to you because i'm sure knowing south florida <hes> either either guys listening or somebody that knows a guy. That's listening so if they want to reach out to you. How could they do that. Oh that's well. That's that's pretty darn easy <hes> they can they can visit us at w._w._w. Dot fish and explore dot com or they can call seven three three two one five one zero six six and it's our office line and then they can ask for john awesome well. I wanted to kind of as we were talking. I was thinking janis to share some stories <hes> if you have them <hes> with like some of these kids that have been with you for years years and how may be fishing explore has changed their mind or their perspective or their attitude as it relates to <hes> <hes> going outside and playing in nature and all that good stuff. Do you have any any of those <hes> examples to share with the listening audience. I do as a matter of fact we <music> get. <hes> you know we get a lot of those kids. <hes> i mean one of my one of my favorite stories. <hes> was about a boy and he was <hes> he came to camp and my goodness. This was probably about <hes> gosh about twenty probably about two thousand twelve or two thousand thirteen so our second or third year in business. We were working in <hes>. You know we were working with a with a private school and this boy was was fifteen years old and <hes> he was <hes> having having a great time at this <hes> this <hes> program at this private school because <hes> there were there were lots of girls there and so that was a fifteen that was the higher priority him than than than than a fish <hes> his mom signed him up for you know for fishing camp <hes> was one of the older they're boys in the camp and i had i had four other kids that no matter no matter what you know this camper said they would repeat and they would follow him around so he was you know kind of you know halfway through his first day was a lot of this <hes> y. You know i don't want to be here. I'm only here because my mom said. I had to come here and one minute left okay so the the the short story is is that i told told him that i follow me for the day. If you're not having fun will you won't. You won't come back tomorrow by the end of the day. He said he'd like to come back by the end of the week. He thanked to me and told me it was his best experience ever. I told them to thank his mom. He lives. He's actually <hes> in his twenties now and he actually lives in florida and he fishes on a regular. It was a pretty neat success story that is that is well. I know that you are franchising and you're looking for franchisees. All over the united states. It's florida would be ideal <hes> and so if if you or someone who's listening to this and you're thinking i love kids. I love the outdoors. I <hes> this is part of my lifestyle and this guy. John sounds like he is the real deal. We'll let me tell you i've known him for close to three years now and he is the real deal and so i can't say enough or too many things that are wonderful about his company their mission and also the leadership so if you're interested in reaching out to john what's your number again <hes> my direct on my number seven zero three two one five one zero six six and then after john if our website is w._w._w. Dot fish a._m._d. And banned export dot com wonderful. Thank you so much john for coming by the broadcast today and sharing more information about your wonderful full company fishing explore and everybody listening. Here's here's success have a great week. You have been listened to business scale insights with kimberly marib marib honor to get her personal attention to you and your empire go to business scale incites network dot com. That's business cisco insights network dot com and tune in again next week for more from kimberly marie bonnard with business scale insights.

florida virginia john kimberly marie bonner united states Marie bonner kim america starbucks texas Marie wagner kimberly marie bonnard kimberly marib deborah tillman jon ashley john limpets Laura Gail toad island
Nick Nelson & Michelle Talbert: The critical role of branding for your career and business

Business Scale Insights

25:53 min | 1 year ago

Nick Nelson & Michelle Talbert: The critical role of branding for your career and business

"Welcome to business scale insights with kimberly marie bonner listen for commentary interviews and information on how to grow oh your business for all the details contact business scale insights network dot com so empire-builders are you ready appears kimberly marie hello and welcome empire-builders to another episode of business scale insides. I am your host kimberly. Marie bonner and i am so excited to be closing out our series on branding with none other than michelle shell talbert <hes> and nick nelson who we're going to talk about either. Leave all things related to personal. Branding and development and michelle is going to have event <hes> later on in august and nick nelson is actually going to be there and i think it was so appropriate that that they be on the broadcast kind of in the series and just to let people know who have not been paying attention to the series <hes> branding for a small business quite frankly is your bread and butter as someone who specializes in scaling businesses is one of the number one ways to increase your r. y. I differentiate yourself in the marketplace when it comes to mergers and acquisitions. This is the number one thing one of the number one things that comes into play if even when you're going out of business we're talking about i._p. Brand trademark trade secrets all that good stuff so branding is a big deal if you want to scale and if you're a small business looking in that direction that's one of the number one reasons why i devoted this series to branding so for some of you who are listening. Michelle talbert is not unfamiliar. You've heard her name before because she's been on the program before so michelle tauber. Say hello to everybody. I know they're kind of familiar with you but say hello again. I can't really empire bill. I is wonderful to be back. Thank you but nick you or a new name and your new face as it were. You are the c._e._o. Of brand per noor thank you so much for coming on the show. Oh and not as many folks are familiar with you. So please share your story with the audience mic nelson see your one sound or brampton north <hes> grandpa noor we help people products and organizations known as <hes> complain about you know roughly almost two decades of experience within marketing and advertising owning a marketing and advertising firm for proximity that long the most so dealing with an entertainment the marketing space so during that time frame <hes> under my leadership are managed <hes> motion pictures and television shows <hes> or <hes> major brands and interesting. I had actually over twenty some odd. <hes> films reached number one box office status concerned with putting together marketing campaigns that is amazing. It's twenty seventeen. You now decided that i wanted to to make it because i wanted to just have impact you know <hes> terms of <hes> closer to audiences and consumption of entertainment et cetera. That's not really solving a problem we do that. We're going to do that because we over index and that's what i want to do to make myself available for actual people people because what i'm seeing is that you have a lot of people that are great at what they do but they are stuck at for whatever reason in terms of either on moving to a next level achievement specific goal <hes> and this also business wise nowadays we're taught that we need to have multiple streams of income at least three and even from a corporate all the way through to entrepreneurs <hes> the thing that i saw that people are wanting to do something <hes> more to do something think different and <hes> there really was nobody that was filling that void now also have a gift for photography videography and all things branding and so <hes> over the course of twelve to eighteen months begin to figure out what praying for noor was and <hes> it started office really just you know image development here yeah but over the course of that time frame of the end of what i call my cars in terms of just really <hes> helping people in areas one one is strategy. I am do market strategy for years but these people how to get noticed online strategically <hes> by kabila something that's personal and very much unique to them in terms of helping build their story inconvenient in such a way that makes a sensitive attracted to its targeted audience. The whole thing was basically marketing stuff whose audience what do they want to know. What are you provide. What's the return vestment that type of stuff excellent images inches on the thing that in some of the habits amongst people that are online you scroll you scroll and you stop when something catches your attention in what i do catch people's attention as i create what i call school stopping him just like this pop from screen eleven look amazing racing and you're not naked. You're not naked. You're making nobody claps for any of mine video nor any of my images so yes this is this is all professional people still pop in the spring. I also <hes> and so <hes> so creating those images people feel <hes> their very best and we look very best <hes> and then also through coaching coaching in terms of okay. I'll coaching and support long-term. Okay now i have. I'm dealing with a variety of people who are not very somebody was social or have the using in a way which is personal personal but not professional so we're going beyond the self easy on the showing your particular party <hes> or your or your family and kids. We're talking about leveraging social media in a method that allows you to be able to <hes> give people to know you for certain things and that's strange for folks a specially those in corporate and entrepreneurs just like okay. I don't know how to do that for granted. That's what it's all about because if you're not doing it what you will find yourself one days as waking up and realizing that your new your word of mouth clients on the number there <hes> but you are <hes> lagging thing and quite frankly retarded so dinosaur and so i have really helped remarkable people get beyond those issues and help them blue acclimated to this new environment which is social but then also didn't notice well. I am so excited that you shared more of your story your background in a marketing particular because i'm gonna kinda. Go off the range a little bit and and and share with you you something that i've talked with other business developers and business consultants about that we're seeing the marketing space <hes> and believe it or not particularly in the social media marketing space and it seems as though a lot of agencies and a lot of gurus out there they have no idea what brand strategy it is nick like they have no idea what brand messaging is and i'm a lawyer by training and so is michelle and <hes> i'm sure michelle's probably seen some of this too but it's it's amazing when you feel as though you get branding and you don't have the marketing and ad <hes> guru background but you understand the basics of a consistent message write a story that needs to be told but then yet you've got a lot of people out there air in the marketing space who they're just putting content out there but there's no there's no what are you going. What are you trying to get people known for <hes>. It's one thing to just get bodies in the building or seats in the restaurant. We understand that but couldn't goodness gracious. We got we we we have to do something thing related to the brand. Have you experienced that or is it just me and all of my friends know it because the thing that were taught as bad <hes> <hes> as a business owner is that you know somebody who's fresh to this. Is that your brand is your logo. Your branch of the france your website <hes> it's none of those things it really isn't <hes> it. It's doing and leveraging the same thing that tried and true for ration- that have have been around for years have learned <hes> one of the examples. I give this particular <hes> they're known for specific. I think they're known for chicken. Eat more chicken ranks right but they're also they also make their clients feel certainly outstanding customer service outstanding customer service and they make you feel good. I've asked that question for you know for young and old. It's always the same chick-fil-a makes me feel truly feel it because of the customer service you know because of the month leisure because of the cleaning because of the inclusion and diversity that they have that you're going to restaurants and you see somebody that might be you know differently able. They're they're working with you in there. You know assisting you and saying hey i mean it's just a value system that they have and for some. It's very controversial others. It's very welcoming but whatever ever good bad or indifferent how you feel about them. They still makes you feel something. What i far to find out with. Many people is that you're so busy trying to push your agenda agenda for sure whatever it is you're hawking or summit that you're not taking the time to be known for a single thing not multiple things but one thing make people feel a civil war and that and the key is connecting to and this is how we started the the series was suzanne term bill. She talked about how how your brand is really more so connected to what your customers how they perceive you and so <hes> getting clear on that that is really really really important to your point. The best brands have crystallized that right and they've got that down to a science and they know that one the thing that they do that they execute on that makes their customers feel fabulous so anyway i we only have a few minutes left and then we have to go so <hes> into the break michelle. Do you want to add anything to what we just spoke about. Yeah i think what i would ask for that. Is that in terms of branding branding just like you said and crystallizing your message. It's really plays into the marketing because you're not clear about how you want want people to feel when they interact with you or your brand you. You don't know the language to use. You don't know who you're speaking to is it permeates every area area but marketing not to have your ending and it's right and you're absolutely right michelle. You're absolutely right well. When we come back from the break doc <hes> we're gonna take more of a deep dive into the whole brand discussion its relationship with marketing and social media and the we're all talk about at this great event michelle that you are hosting this on networking event. That's coming up and broward. County in nick will be featured so <hes> stay stay tuned and we'll be right back. We are back the business skill insights. I'm your host kimberly. Marie bonner and i'm so honored to be closing out the branding series with michelle talbert and nick nelson and talking about particularly personal branding but also <hes> corporate branding with us today now. I know <hes> there are a lot of people that are listening to this who for small business owners and they're like well. You know i understand marketing. I understand advertising but the whole branding thing saying i did nick to your point. I did think it was a name or logo and <hes> i just want us to circle back because when you see things on the internet internet the definition of brand is all over the place. I'm a lawyer by training and so i'm all caught up in definition so i want you both to talk to the listening audience and give them some level of clarity about what you perceive. What exactly is a brand in your opinion well for me it. It really became what my clients what my customers with the women in our her power moved ecosystem. Costa told me they felt after we had then then meeting than online and what is that what what they said was that they felt like they weren't alone. They felt like they had partners. They felt like they had people other women who were solo preneurs and business owners and they didn't feel also silo anymore and so our brand her power moves brands sort of morphed into this really communal space of creating a safe kim bar for women and business to come together and get the resources and the connections that they need to elevate their businesses but i started off saying well. I'm going to provide resources. This is for women and women told me yeah we liked the resources but it's the community that keeps us coming back as well why well i can vouch vouch for that on. I brag on y'all your your events. Are you know i've i've been around. I'm not i'm not a new to this. I'm used to this so i've been around networking circles for a long long time. You're events are unprecedented in the connection. It's not simply transactional but it's transformational transformational and that is really what is different to me about her power moves and you're a networking events because to your point the community the connection and the transmission of not just information and knowledge but of sincere care. It's like a little sorority sisterhood. If as it were four but nick how would you i knew you talked about being known for something is that is that the essence of what a brand means to you <hes> it. It's the essence of what brown is period did goes beyond thing. Okay <hes> it's it's. It's if any any brand that you look out there and we'll use nyc as an example <hes> you know when i walk through the corporate office in the first thing that i see here is if the everbody athlete <hes> you know they it boils down to. What's your overall system. What are your beliefs. Those beliefs permeate through <hes> what you want to be known for knife wants to be known for associating itself with champion. That's right you have everybody from tiger woods venus williams that represent the brand in a variety of ways they want to the very best the lebron james anybody who was at the top of their game and and using their body right <hes> that's what makes sense for <hes> and they they wanna make people feel like champions when you when you put on that jersey although shoes shoes you feel like you can be just as great as those individuals so if it goes above and beyond just what i think but you know that's branding is branding bill only focus on telling me known for something over if there's there's somebody listening to this. They're entrepreneur their solo per noor. They're a small business owner and they're like you know what that's terrific for nike <hes> that's terrific terrific for chick-fil-a but i don't have time ain't nobody got time this truck to keep the doors open. Keep the lights on. I've got staff half. I've got payroll. Y'all don't understand the trouble i've seen and so you want me to be concerned about personal brand i i. I just need to get bodies in the door. What would you guys say to people like that because i deal with that all the time. Would you say to people who are focused we we today at the top of the year i sent out a survey so all of the women in our ecosystem we have about two thousand and one that nationwide and about four hundred here in south florida arta and the ninety percent of town lit fifty fifty you know forty five percent of forty five percent said that they needed it is more customers and they needed more connection and to me that means me ninety percent of the women in our ecosystem me branding and marketing. They need to get their message out there. They need to be known and that is exactly what small business owners say are some of their hurdle hurtled. How do i get more customers had generate more income and that comes from getting from the people like nick says get noticed. That's his hashtag and it's really all point. Wait because if you get your story straight and then really well <hes> caption and then get that story in front of them rights customers customers customers then it's done for you so ninety percent of the women in our community mead branding and marketing and relationships at that you know really the crux of what most small business owners i agree but i would say to you based upon my conversations with small business owners they would double down on advertising and marketing and there's just this kind of confusion as it relates to branding. That's just <hes> my own personal. You're absolutely right there there there. There isn't using let me help you understand so advertising marketing branding public relations. Let's just go one good old fashioned one. Oh one okay so advertising advertising spending money <hes> to reach a specific audience and leveraging specific vehicle to do that but that's built off of me or something that you've created right now the very essence of the media whether it'd be a commercial or radio spot internet advertising is based ace off of your brain all right if you are chick-fil-a and you're creating media. That's talking about <hes> burgers then. You're wasting money right. You have to understand foundationally who you are. It's the very essence of <hes> even any business plan that you put together because many people understand the very nature of business slander suit mission and vision you know that's what we're talking. You know in business school. What's your mission. Worship vision worship values better all of that ties into branding need to understand what she stands for who you're for and how you're targeting yourself because you can have all the advertising or paid you know media geared toward a specific audience. She wore but if it's to the wrong audience. You're wasting exiting 'binding. It was the wrong message. You're wasting by absolutely thank with publicity. Publicity is what we call earned media. That's something in which you're not necessarily surly paying for but you're hiring somebody to talk to reporters. John lewis when you have to incorporate you into stories across various media platforms arms if you are trying to reach the wrong audience and then jobless will they're just. They're not gonna pick you up right all of this off everything. You're doing this for not unless you have two things or really understand what you want to be known for how you wanna make people feel any strategy to get there. Everything is strategy and if you don't have foundational. I don't care what business you are. You're just gonna pound your head against the wall. <hes> and you're going to be upset because you're not seeing what you think should be the return on investment when you haven't made the true investment and that really is to find <hes> how you want people to experience you each and every last one of us experienced system. Somebody gets on your radio program. They are looking for an experienced that dictates how you speak that dictate tweeting having a program that dictates everything about the style of your program. That's an experience. No who wants to experience you the same thing with your brand. You have to understand what you want to be known for high. You wanna make people oakville so you understand how to draw people in from the experience. I love it. That's going to be a clip. You know that was terrific. We just got a lesson you guys. I hope you actually will you if you're listening to it on the on the drive that's wonderful but this is also going gonna be distributed via podcast and you really need to listen to it again because this is chock full of so much good stuff well. I yeah i know folks are listening with bated breath and they're like well. I i'm so excited. I've learned so much <hes> just on this program michelle. I know you have a major major event coming up in august so i want you to tell everybody about it. We are so excited. We are doing the her power moods brand pin your brand day. Nick does these incredible transformative brande's with his client and he's based in atlanta. We're here. We're an article was to be able to bring in nick south florida so far with the entrepreneurs the women entrepreneurs women in business here in south florida to help hope branding become more acceptable to get fresh headshots like he said he's gifted with the cameras video and of course to do our signature on networking in an incredible environment. We're going to be a nomi- bar and grill on august seventeenth. We have some incredible sponsors from traveling or moral spa. Ah cake is life catering <hes> her power lipstick and we have a special beer it's company duke and dame coming on board with their camel isky to give us some signature cocktails and most importantly to really we're looking to breakdown branding understand it to make it more accessible to get your story told told in a way that brings them. The clients that you want to work with and nick is doing a workshop to that event and so that affect as well so we super excited itself seventeenth at the saturday and you can get more information. Her power moved dot com slash brand day two zero one nine brand day twenty nineteen pounds dot com slash plant twenty-ninth will nick. We only have a few more minutes left. What can the folks who come to this brand day. Twenty nine thousand nine expect to experience with you. <hes> what they expect to experience really really is <hes> meet lending myself in terms of just taking <hes> you know two decades worth of knowledge really understanding of branding <hes> gifts for people at the end of the day i work with people that they represent and <hes> <hes> you know i then myself out there to to help individuals by answer any questions that they have but then also to provide them with an image that will last them a lifetime uh-huh and and really help them to at least begin to get themselves out there. That's my objective in mind my goal and mission to <hes> get people comfortable getting out of the shadows shuttle mistakes. You know under steady giving star show i love it. I love it. I love it and we're going to get you out there well. I'm i'm so excited. It's august seventeenth two thousand nineteen. Where is it located again in. How can they register michelle. It'll be yes in north miami. Thank you know me bar and grill. You can get more information at her. Power moves dot com black brand paid twenty nineteen and folks can always email me michelle with two hundred ninety at her power moves dot com will that's wonderful. Thank q. so much for being my guests and thank you all so much for listening and here's to your success. Take care you listen to business scale kale insights with kimberly marie bonner to get her personal attention to you and your empire coda business scale insights network it dot com business scale insights network dot com and tune in again next week for more from kimberly marie bonnard with business scale insights.

nick michelle business owner kimberly marie bonner nick nelson Michelle talbert Marie bonner michelle tauber kimberly marie michelle shell france noor miami nyc kabila florida kimberly marie bonnard nike
Suzzette Turnbull: Brand Building for Small Business Success

Business Scale Insights

25:13 min | 1 year ago

Suzzette Turnbull: Brand Building for Small Business Success

"Welcome to business scale insights with Kimberly Marie Bonner listen for commentary interviews and information on how to grow your business for all the details contact business scale insights network work DOT COM so empire builders. Are you ready Pierce Kimberly Marie Bonner hello and welcome empire-builders to another episode of business scale insights. I'm your host Kimberly Bonner and we are kicking out a brand new series or kicking off a brand new series on all things related to branding and brand strategy and with me. Today is the brilliant Suzanne to Turnbull. Who is the C._E._O.? Oh of uncommon marketing and she is very well known in the South Florida Area I've seen her face and and her seen her name in so many places she speaking constantly on media marketing social media <hes> social media branding influencers all kinds of good stuff so say hello to the audience real quickly. Is that first of all Kimberly. Thank you so much for having me. I'm so excited to be on your show then hello to everyone out there awesome well I just wanted to before I take a deep dive with Suzanne. I just wanted to tee up the whole topic of branding because you know there's a big debate out there in marketing land about the relevance of brands and if brands are going away and if branding is important anymore and as many of you know I am a franchise developer before that I was an intellectual property licensing Guru I mean that was my claim to fame for good chunk of my life and end so branding and trademarks and trade secrets and all that good stuff that goes into developing a brand you know I've spent a lot of time kind of in the weeds in that space but also looking at how you commercialize socialize a brandon how branding actually <hes> impacts the Aro I for a business particularly. If there's a merger or an acquisition or anything they want to expand they want to have an I._P._O.. ETC and so forth so my entire career kind of has been in this space and so <hes> when I pivoted to really focusing on franchising one of the things that I notice is when a small business came to me Suzette and they were like Oh oh both got I want to scale my business and I think I won't live range is the funniest thing would occur because I would ask them. What about your brand? You know what does it mean is it you know do people know you out in the street. <hes> is is is your name on the lips of people when they think of pie or cake or pet sitting or shoes and they really couldn't give me an answer and one of the things that shocked me was not only could they not give me an answer to that. Not many of them had didn't even know what trademark they hadn't even protected their name right so I was like every time I would encounter a very like strong small business. This would be a recurring theme so I thought well let me just pause you know and take time for kind of a public education effort in this series and I'm so honored that you are with me to kick this whole thing off one of the things I one of the reasons oh I think people are confused about brands is that when you just kind of Google branding you get just kind of people are all over the place like people just don't know how to define it and so a tried and true definition is kind of a name a term assign a symbol that identifies cell or the maker of a good but it's more than that but it's clear that when you have a brand you're able to distinguish that brand from generic X._Y._Z. right so you think of Nike. That's a great. Icon a brand that's kind of stands for kind of cutting edge rebellious athletic brands and when you think of apple you're thinking of a think differently a creative consumer electronics onyx and on and on when you think of Chick-fil-a you're thinking of high-quality customer service for a chicken based franchise right <hes> chicken based <hes> fast food franchise treat their customers well at treats Sir with excellence with his clothes on Sunday that is that is absolutely <hes> their brands so what I have tried to instill with some of my <hes> clients is my I call the five is of branding the I I is identity and maybe that's the reason why people are confused about what brands are because they think oh well. I have a brand because I have a name and I have a logo but when you even think about who it's about who you are right the essence of who you are so my identity is not just Kimberly Marie Bonner. That's my name right right but I'm so much more than that. I'm my value system. My beliefs my actions. Do I you know do is show up on time. Do I pay my but you know what I'm saying. You Know M.. I. extroverted at my introverted so when you think of a brand you know it's more than just think about it personally as more more than just how you look right is the essence of who you are and I think for a lot of companies. They haven't figured that out figure that out at all so identity influence. Are you influential in your industry. Are you a leader. Are you associated with other influencers. Here's the third eye innovation you gotTA. You gotta be innovative. You can't you have to adapt to changing circumstances right <hes> international <hes> this is not politically correct but I'll just say this. If you WANNA be an iconic brand and you have there's no way for you to go across geographical or cultural linguistic boundaries then you're probably not going to be one of an iconic brand. You're just going to be very very limited and lastly infinite. <hes> you know strong brands are timeless so you think of Disney you know. Roy Disney was around all well Disney was. I'm sorry around a long time ago and Mickey Mouse's still right and even more exactly far more profitable now than it was when he first started out so that those are some of my thoughts related to branding and I've got Suzette ah here because I want her to kind of pull out her ideas and thoughts because she's clearly an expert <hes> but before I do that I want the honest to learn more about you and what what is you do and how is it that you've become this social media powerhouse and every time I hear anybody talk about social media marketing. I see your face and I see your name which is powerful personal brandon yes so you have master Mr the art of personal branding yourself so share a little bit of that story with the audience so I'm the founder of on a common marketing and for the last ten years we have provided social media marketing management and training services to multi million dollar brands this mega ministries public figures awesome <hes> entrepreneur small businesses so we kind of run the gamut <hes> and the reason why we've been able to run the gamut of the sizes is because it all comes down to what is that company about them. What do they have to offer? What does that person have to offer to the world and that's that's exactly where we start <hes> but we've been doing this for ten years and we love it? We're passionate about it. <hes> which is another key to what we do in a part of our brand is being passionate about a and I think that's what has given me. The longevity that I have is that people see how connected I am passionate about the the subject matter one but also about my clients and their success awesome awesome you know <hes>. I know I shared a little bit of information about what I think. You know defines a brand but you're you're the expert here so share some of your thoughts about what makes a great brand well first of all. I agree with everything that you said but I'm just going to build on that <hes> to to just simplify right you walk into an electronic store and you're buying a big screen T._v.. And you have no idea where to start. You haven't done your research. All you know is you're leaving with a big screen T._v.. And then Dan you walk to the aisle with televisions and you're overwhelmed by all the choices absolutely that's how I feel when I buy Mascara. I'm overwhelmed by all the choices okay listing so then what Oh you do at that point you start to think okay. Which one of these names do I recognize name right so your brand is really an identifier so you think to yourself? Which one of these names do I recognize so you may recognize Sony Toshiba? <hes> you know some of the more obvious ones then now you narrow it down what you still have to choose you. Say what do I know about each of these brands reputation right now so your point. It's not just about how you look. What do people know about your brand? What is known known about your brand right so now you're thinking you know Sony's really reliable? You know they are long standing have been around forever. I'M GONNA buy a Sony. big-screen TV. Sony might not even be the best choice but with the information that you have about their brand and it is the best choice and that is why your brand is so critical especially in the online world people see you before they actually meet you or talk to you so now you're talking about the visual. What do your colors look like? What's your color Palate <hes>? What is your logo? Look like you know what's the name of your company. Will people remember it your social media handle. Is it easy to remember. Do you have underscores and all these different characters in there that make it hard to find you. All of these different parts is comes to one two three seven exactly zero underscore underscore Dan what Oh my word that is really really powerful <hes> and so in a crowded lead market market it becomes really really important for people to have a name to your point and a visual identity yes that they can recognize now now that we're coming into kind of this voice space we've got Google Assistant Alexa and all this other stuff. What's your view of the importance of branding in that space in the world well again? I think I think people are are using the same framework to make decisions. You know <hes> what they're also using is. What's the chatter online? No that's true so that feeds into the brand so are there more Alexis being sold Komo Google assistance. What do you hear people talking about Malacca exactly Alexa so if you're going to buy one of the two and you have not done your research what are you going to buy? You're gonNA buy absolutely <hes> Google is trying to get at that by undercutting them in price <hes> and so that's that's generally what people try to compete on if they don't have a brand name they try to go on price rise is right but that's that makes life very very difficult <hes> because you're going to have to constantly cut your costs cut your house at all time so that's that's not a winning strategy. <hes> when we get back from the break break I really WanNa talk about how brands in the social media era have been kind of built from the bottom up and I'm thinking of Fashion Nova and all these are makeup and beauty influencers on Youtube. Urban really they've just kind of flipped the script when it comes to branding and so can we talk about that. When we come back from absolutely I would love to terrific? Thank you ask your host of business advice and I'm so honored to be whistles at Turnbull and we're talking about all things brandy for you small business owners out there and so before we went to the break I want it says that to talk talk about really how social media has influenced the development of brands and it's more like a bottom up creation of brands now as opposed to a top down and I wanted her to unpack that so <hes> small business owners out there kind of appreciate really what a revolution is going on in branding right so one of the beautiful things about social media is that everyone now has a microphone <hes> it's also one one of the dangers but we're going to focus on the beautiful part of it <hes> and so you have to leverage that so you mentioned fashion over. Let's talk about fashionable before Second Bazhanova before they started working with the influencers the Kardashians and the other celebrities ladies they start they would give free apparel tomatoes in exchange for them taking pictures and posting them online so before they even really started the ecommerce part of the business they had brick and mortars l. before they started the ecommerce part they had about fifty to sixty thousand instagram followers already. Oh Wow this is just re- brick and in his because they were tapping into those people who had microphones on social media and they were using it so so a model who likes to wear their type of clothing <hes> you take a picture you posted guess. What is the same thing as a mannequin you see the picture? It looks fabulous on a mannequin. I want that outfit and now you're using your audience to spread the word for you to their audiences in so one of the statistics is that each per per each person on facebook has three hundred and thirty eight friends so you think about the exponential value of that and quite frankly I have a lot more show you have a lot more but each person is is posting and sharing this information and it's going out along the social media waves to so many more people than if the company just marketed the way that they market and so this is how things are starting from the bottom England in going up and the word is spreading spreading the amazing part about it is that they may have started out with just models but now it's like the average you know the average instagram because I'm I'm an I G Girl I love I G so I don't hang around facebook but in the instagram world you see all of these <hes> just kind of average ladies with you know nice followings but they have these fashion of outfits on and they are relatable exactly like you could say I can say oh my gosh. I don't have tyra banks is height right or per curves but there's this person on instagram who kind of looks like me so I have an idea of how this outfit egg back on me the and because of that relate ability people purchase andro absolutely and the thing is that the models they use a warrants Victoria secret models really because they're not gonNA model just for free clothes they don't close so they're using people the everyday person who's into Mali and you know and and loves tomato but they looked like the mall and they have the look and they can model the close well. Oh my one. That's how you begin with an influence or strategy you can use everyday people who you have the influence on the following their audiences listening to them and they are the ones that can help to spread the word and fashion over did that until they started then working with the influencers at the kardashian level and Cardi Cardi B. Lebanon Cardi B. was wearing fashionable before he was yeah when she was on was a love and hip hop right Yes yes. She loved the brand absolutely so but the thing is though okay so if I am <hes> A. More traditional died in the wool company and I see this going on and when you follow it on social it's almost as if the influencers kind of have far more say in the voice of your brand and and it's more than just the the traditional you know <hes> per athlete on the wheaties box right you know they are really amplifying into kind of really defining these brands on social media and I feel feel like it's the brands are it's like I said it's not this top down thing. It's more bottom up right and these influencers are kind of crafting the message and it's it's you know this is not some Madison Avenue stuff what's going on. It's Cardi B. going right on that person's unique in their twist to it right so they'll take they'll take the fashion of outfit but they flip it. Is that a danger for company Buzney who really pride themselves in being in control of their identity and their message and their voice well what you're speaking of authenticity and that's why the influenza strategy works when you get it right because the people who are posting it opposing it according to the way they talk to their audience so it doesn't sound like a commercial now because no one wants to be sold to know they don't well we want to see is how this product or this merchandise fits nicely into your life into your everyday life that we've come to love and we follow. That's why it it works but when you're choosing your influences and their influences in every category you're choosing the influencers that fit what your company is about <hes> so when you choose the influencers that fit what your company is about. You don't have to worry three about them doing something in a maverick fashion because you've already done the due diligence which is necessary. You've researched brand. You've gone through their posts. You've researched them on Google to see what are some of the media that has been featuring them so you have a full understanding branding of who that person is before you invite them now to be a part of your influence or strategy now. They're always wildcards things happen. In people's lives and you see different celebrities getting dropped from their endorsements. You know so so those are some situations but in general you do your due diligence in advance and you make sure you vet the people to make sure that they are consistent with your values and now they're consistent with your values then yes it absolutely works what you hear about. You know those weird situations. When there's an influence concern that has a gazillion followers and they can't sell like fifteen sneakers? What's up with that? Why why would that happen like well? The first question is who's following you okay so if you're selling sneakers are the people who follow you interested in sneakers. All were they following. You should make you did makeup tutorials exactly exactly so. Is there an alignment first of all good point another thing is. Did you buy your followers. Did you organically gain your followers followers. Are they real following so again. In every category you're looking for alignment is so funny because you would think that companies would understand that like they would no. Is this real or is this nuts a real so what are some a key brand strategies that you would give a small business. Let's say a small restaurant or a small. I don't know <hes> retail location if they wanted to really take their branding to the next level. What would you suggest they do? I think the first thing is to be very clear on who you are and what you're offering. You have to be absolutely clear on that because that directs everything else that you do. I grew the second thing. Is You have to be clear on your target market. Yeah who are you appealing to so those two things <unk> are critical and they happened before you start anything else so to the point that you know you and I were talking about. Sometimes there's some confusion and the work is not put in so really understand who you are. What is your secret sauce? What makes you different from the other person making pies? Or the other person you know doing social media. What is your secret sauce? Now you bring those things together and you figure out how to authentically tell my story now what you hear from a lot of people as my. I'm not that unique so you might have to deal with this. Sometimes when you're dealing with people who were started starting out <hes> you know I have I have a great pie recipe for my grandma. It's not that unique. I Make Great Apple Apple Pies. What how is that going to? How is that going to make me this stellar brand? What would you tell them? I would say reach out to do a study reach out to your customers the ones that love your pies and give them a questionnaire. Ask them to fill out a survey survey and have them tell you what they love not just about your pies but about doing business with you all of those things because I know for me. The reason why my brand is the way it is is because people know me to show up to be reliable deliver with excellence. That's my brand awesome. That is my brand so for them and it's hard when it's you you don't see what other people see right and so you have to ask other people ask the people who continue to come back. You're loyal customer base. What is it that you love about buying pies from what you love about the pies how my pies different than other pies that you've had in the past when you collect that data you begin to define your brand? I love that so I want everybody. WHO's listening? If you have a friend or relative who has a business if you're thinking about starting a business you've got a dial down in the clarity peace and get that feedback from your customers because your brand is really what your customers exactly how they perceive you in the marketplace and if your customers are giving you feedback like it's it's just you have kind of you have a branding problem then your genetic generic correct <hes> and you can be replaceable very very easily. I I love what you talked about when it comes to your personal brand and uncommon marketing because I want you to I want you to say those three pillars again because it's it's clear and then it also ties into the title Oh of Your Your Business names to say oh no it was it was brilliant and it fits perfectly they know meet to be reliable reliable they know me to deliver with excellence delivering with excellence and they know me to be committed committed and I can tell you right now in the marketing space and I've dealt with tons of marketing agencies big small and everything in between <hes> that is uncommon wow and I know I know you've heard that from other people. I know I'm not the first person to say that I do hear that here and I and I'm grateful. I'm grateful but I'm thankful for the work ethic that I've been raised with you know and I'm thankful for the passion that I have for seeing other people be successful successful absolutely well in light of that <hes> tremendous uniqueness about you and your company. I want you to plug your book. I know you have a book that I've seen and I've got a by. What's the title <hes> the ultimate guide I understanding and getting started with social media wonderful and if they want to buy that book how can they get that book Amazon Dot Com they can search by my full name Suzette with Tuesay's <hes> turnbull or they can search by the title the ultimate guide to understanding ending and getting started with social media and if I know you're very in demand but if some great company wanted to pay you gazillion dollars? How do they reach out to you through my website okay? I have a team the people that are ready to go. Oh Okay so say the website so my website is Suzy Talks S. U.. Z. Y.. T. A. L. K. S. dot com wonderful and so I'm I hope this was a wonderful introduction action to our listening audience about all things branding. Take this information listen to this radio broadcast. We're going to rebroadcast it on the podcast platforms and <hes> hopefully you will stay tuned for the rest of.

Google Kimberly Marie Bonner Suzette Turnbull Sony Dan Suzanne South Florida developer Disney Alexa Roy Disney apple Victoria Nike TA Chick-fil-a Cardi B. Kardashians
Josh Gerben: Building Your Brand By Protecting Your Trademark

Business Scale Insights

25:34 min | 1 year ago

Josh Gerben: Building Your Brand By Protecting Your Trademark

"Welcome to business scale insights with Kimberly Marie Bonner listen for commentary interviews and information on how to grow your business for all the details contact business gail insights network for DOT COM empire-builders. Are you ready. Here's Kimberly Marie Bonner hello and welcome empire builders to another episode of business scale insights this this is your host Kimberly Bonner and we are continuing on our series discussing all things branding and brand development and I have with me on this episode Josh Gurban of the Gerpen Law Firm. Thank you so much Josh for joining us today. Thank you kimberly privately absolutely now before we go into a deep dive Josh I just kind of want to remind our listeners <hes> and also kind of Ah get affiliated those who are just joining this entire series about why I wanted to focus on branding and brand development this month and the number one reason is when people talk to me about scaling a business one one of the things that goes probably not fought a very well and not really new ought not strategically thinking is the brand and <hes> that includes the trademark that includes the name <hes> branding is more than that but it certainly includes that and so to develop a great business that lasts you don't WanNa be generic. You've got to have some kind of unique distinguishing identifier fire in a very competitive marketplace because if you don't it's going to be really really hard for people to choose you and transact with you so branding you know generally is thought of as a name a term a sinus symbol that identifies a seller or maker of a product or service in the marketplace but it's more than than it's again definitely a differentiator <hes> it's also got <hes> issues related to kind of values and identity and in all kinds of emotional kind of triggers that are associated with branding but I wanted to focus in this series on brand because I see so many small businesses just forgetting how foundational this is so oh I've got josh of the Gerber Law Firm because he focuses on everything related to trademarks and trademarks are a critical piece to the whole brand development and enforcement in licensing opportunities so I want you josh to kind of share with the listening audience. I know you're based in The Washington D._C.. Area but we're in south Florida <hes> many of our listeners might not be affiliated with you <hes> in the work that you do at your law firm so can you just share more about you and your work with the listening audience absolutely and thank you for having me. I should mention I did my first year Law School Doubt University of Miami so very familiar with the Florida area and a lot of local businesses down there I started by law firm urban law firm in two thousand and eight with the idea that we're going to focus on on Trademark Law <hes> at the time you had sort of the self help online online services such as like legalzoom that we're out there and then you had the larger law firms that were pretty expensive and sort of out of the range of small to mid sized businesses to use for for branding and trademark related services so we kind of thought well if we could start a a firm that was <hes> more moderately priced but still providing you know high level expertise that would be a good sort of middle ground <hes> for seem to be a missing part of the legal market there and since then <hes> since two thousand. Thousand Eight <hes> we've worked predominantly with small and mid sized businesses and clearing and registering trademarks <hes> at this stage we've done <hes> we've obtained five more than five thousand trademarks for our clients over the last decade wonderful. Oh thank you yeah we're very proud of that would probably all the businesses that we've helped protecting them and have grown <hes> under our <hes> <hes> you know grown along with US essentially the last ten years and it's been a fun ride wonderful so you know I I could <music> asked this a lot and I want you as the expert <hes> to tell our listening audience what exactly is a trademark and why are trademarks important sure so trademark can be a number number of things <hes> typically. It's your name <hes>. It's a slogan. It's a logo <hes> but trae marks can also be things like product packaging which would be called trae dress in look and feel of your product packaging where the look and feel of a store that when you walk into into a you know oh I'm in this store because the look and feel in the store that could be registered at actual look and feel could be registered as a trademark <hes> but typically for most small business owners number one place to start is going to be the name of the company the product or the service <hes> because that's obviously precisely how you're going to market. That's how everybody's going to know you. That's how people are going to Google you. Look you up <hes> that typically is where we start with small businesses now again. Some people and we've talked about this off air. Some people are in business for years years. Josh and they don't think about <hes> registering their trademark. <hes> you know why why is registering our trademark very important. If you are a small business owner yeah absolutely so a couple of reasons <hes> especially if you're just starting out and you haven't get launched so if you haven't purchase signs for your location if you haven't ordered products and have products sitting on your shelf labelling is the first part of the trademark registration process is doing a proper trademark search to ensure that there's not a same or similar trademark already and you and especially you know in the age of Amazon and in the age of just the amount of small businesses that have started in the last ten or twenty years. It's a much more crowded marketplace and there could be names out there that are similar to yours. <HES> may not be exact but similar enough to cause a trademark pro- problem at some point in the future so if you just sort of go blindly into selecting a name and never looking and doing a clearance search for it you could wind up in a year or two in trademark infringement lawsuit in a worst case scenario which ends up with you having to change your name so by starting Your Business and conducting a clearance search around your name you help to ensure that you're not going to have those types of problems later on now once you know the name is clear and we can actually obtain registration from the federal government that registration can have a lot of value it. <hes> you know we've done due diligence diligence where clients are getting acquired and one of the first questions that comes up is do you own the trademark absolutely own the registration those have value. That's a lot of what's being bought <hes> in enact with absolutely and people don't know that and <hes> it amazes me. I'm I'm like we'll who were the attorneys advising people C._p._A.'s because this this intellectual property really has tremendous value to your point if there's going to be a merger merger and acquisition any kind of sale if you WANNA have kind of <hes> make derivative income from your company your brand I mean it's a big freaking deal apathy for small business centers as to why it doesn't happen though you know I grew up in a small business my dad owned and operated you know from starting at one to up to twelve automotive repair centers in the Philadelphia Area and never registered trademark <hes> and and you know a lot of small business owners I think worried that lawyers are going to charge tons and tons of money to do something and they don't actually know how to manage that or get involved with that and then there's sort of the unknown that you you don't even know that this is something that could be or should be done and there's not and because many. Small Business owners may not be starting with you affording or hiring even a business attorney to help them with certain things <hes> that this can be something that's missed and and what I always tell 'cause people like me. There's you know there's other people like me out there. That can do your trademark search and do the filing at what's going to be extremely affordable rate and do it well and and that's something that's available in today's marketplace because of the way that legal practices changed and and there's a lot more <hes> lawyers out there that are geared toward helping helping businesses of the absolutely and it's one of the reasons why I definitely wanted you on the air because I understand there there has been this chasm <hes> to your point <hes> related to intellectual property services. I worked at a big firm in Washington in D._C.. And for the longest time that's really the only that was kind of like the only game in town or a really high brow boutique firm that really wasn't accessible so <hes> your point is really well taken why some many small businesses have avoided needed this so I talked a little bit about branding a might seem obvious <hes> the relationship between the trademark and brand. How would you say what is the relationship between a trademark and brand really? They're one and the same typically you say okay you have Nike and that's a brand right and Nike owns the trademark registration on the word Nike throughout the world not only the United States but actually in variety different countries throughout the world so by owning a federally registered trademark on your name your logo or slogan that is owning your brand and if you do not own your brand from a registration perspective. It's going to be extraordinarily so we're talking about earlier. Which is that you're losing out a lot of potential value in your company but also should there be an infringement on your brand? It's going to be extremely difficult to deal with it without the registration rights that come with especially the United States Federal Trademark registration absolutely Lee spoken like a true lawyer if I if I asked an advertising marketing executive they would give completely different they would give a bit of a more kind of an emotional touchy feely kind of approach to brand development so <hes> but I kind of expected that <hes> trademark and brand are the same <hes> so how do I if I'm I'm listening to you. Josh and I'm totally convinced this is something that I need to do. How do I obtain that trademark? What I know you talked about the search <hes> process? That's it's the first part of that process. <hes> can you walk the listening audience through everything absolutely so <hes> the first step like we mentioned is making tree do a proper trademark search and I underline the word proper are there because in today's world you can go online and you can get on the United States Patent Trademark Office's website and do a search right there you can. There's even private websites that say oh you could do a trademark search for free here and those are very limited searches that that are looking for a typically looking for very exact matches cheer trademark and but that's not what typically trips people up. It's the same. It's a similar trademark yours. It could be a problem so phonetically similar mark something that's spelled a little differently so you don't have to a come hire me but I just strongly recommend that you look for professional advice around the trademark search because they're not all created England's pump the brakes there because you just went over a whole lot of people's heads <hes> phonetically similar so can you give some concrete examples so people I can appreciate the issue. Absolutely I'll go back. I'll use my dad as an example <hes> so he currently runs <hes> now he runs three automotive repair centers Philadelphia area and the name of the <hes> the the shop is tires excetera and etc A._T._C. period right and so if somebody were to go onto the U._S. P._T._O.. Website and that said they wanted to call their shop tires etc but spelling out the entire word etc and they did a search for that in all likelihood his registered trademark which we got for him which is tires. A._T._C. is not going to show up in that search because the software is not smart enough to find that right so you may go open your tires etc full name spelled. Spelled out and go on for your two and then come under my monitoring and I say hey they're operating you know with the trademark that's phonetically similar to ours and therefore they're in violation of my dad's trademark and and that would be pretty open and shut trademark case and that's where I think a lot of folks get confused because first off they think oh well nothing came up into search. Show must be okay or even if somebody finds the tires each you see mark. They think well if I spell it out then I'll be okay 'cause that's far enough away where sorry good okay. I'm going to have to jump in here because we have to take a break but I do want you to finish this whole discussion. After the break okay and we're back welcome back folks to visit scale insights this your host Kimberly Marie Bonner and I with Josh Qurban who is an attorney in the Washington D._C.. Area who specializes in trademarks and before before we went to the break Josh are you still there. I am <hes> you were talking about some kind of some tricky situations when it comes to trademarks and <hes> phonetically phonetic distinctions with trademarks when I wanted you to go back to that example kind of a concluded for the listening audience sure so essentially we're talking about is ensuring that you do it proper trademark search before you settle on a name and move into the process of applying for that Federal Trademark Registration and the point is is that if you had a tire shop right which is the example going with just spell tires etc A._T._c. for sure and that was the name of the Shop Tires A._T._C. if somebody came along and tried hard to file for or use the trademark tires etc fully spelled out that would be then infringing on the Tires A._T._C. Mark and that is something that in in that small example may seem relatively obvious but when you apply riot to individual situations ten get a little confusing as to whether or not something is too close to an existing trademark and that's that is a call that even attorneys will have differing opinions on right and that's and so becomes very something something that where it seems self-serving an attorney to come on here and say hey you should hire a law firm to conduct a trademark search for you. The point is simply that it's very challenging to sometimes determine whether or not the trademark you have selected selected is actually legally clear to us and register and getting a professional opinion on that can be very valuable absolutely okay so after we've got the search then what happens next after you've got the start studying feel pretty good about your trademark trademark that's when you would go to the United States Patent and Trademark Office and file federal trademark application and any application. You'll typically list the owner of the trademark with the trademark. Is You know what the trademark will be forced to whether it's going to be four Automotive Automotive Repair Center <hes> frozen yogurt shop. <hes> you know a clothing boutique you're GONNA YOU'RE GONNA explain to the government. What the what the trademark is four and you'll submit the application? It takes four months four months from the day you filed the day you even get a response back from the government as to whether or not there's any issues with the application so during that initial period it's just you have no idea what the government's going to say and you have to wait. There's not even an expedited fee. You can pay for <hes> once you would get that report back and four months if everything checks out and there's no issues the next stages at the trademark application goes for a win a thirty day window when any member of the public or another company could oppose the application so if someone thinks they're going to be harmed by the registration your trademark trademark for one reason or another they can file a formal opposition but the government at that point in time if you got no opposition which they are on the rare side. If you get no opposition then the mark would move to get registered as soon as you can prove that you were offering your goods or services services in the marketplace so actually proving that you're offering all the goods and services you've listened in a trademark application is a requirement before a trademark can be registered and as soon as you can do that at that stage in the process the governmental issue registration certificate. Bucket and you're all set at that point wonderful now. How long do these lasts lead these trademarks last short so the trademark theoretically can last indefinitely as long as you're using it so it is a use it or lose it type system <hes> in the sense that if you were to this shut the business down or stop you know offering a product or to that particular name you would lose the registration rights <hes> you do have to file a renewal to keep the registration active and that renewal the first one is typically do five years after the Marcus registered disturbed and then there's another one do five years later and then it goes on in every ten years schedule so they're very infrequent as far as renewals are concerned and it's an interesting point because a lot of people miss them because they're so frequent and it's something that you really have to make sure you're keeping on top in your organization if you do own registered trademarks because you WanNa make sure you keep up with those renewal <hes> some so it's true what people kinda say? The trademarks are forever if you're doing your renewals properly well. Let's talk about okay right now. We have this wonderful <hes> trademark. I've done everything that you've told me to do and I find out that someone in <hes> poughkeepsie is using a very similar name and they're making a lot of money online and I'm angry because when people are looking for for my I don't know the shoes that I sell they see this. This stored Poughkeepsie pisses me off and I call you up Josh. What are you GonNa do about my trademark? There's all this confusion Asian. They're giving out. It's an inferior product. What are we gonNA do Josh right yeah absolutely absolutely now before you even call me or call it? A lot of people will have the knee jerk reaction to reach out to the infringer themselves and because of that because it is it is a hot button issue. I understand that I understand that I believe it or not. As a even as an intellectual property counsel I've I've had other people copy things of mine and and it's made me upset but I take him under cool down. You're not call do not call the infringer or do not trump the email them you know which is worse because you're creating a written documents the second because it's it's it's certainly not a criminal case but anything that you do say or put in writing ten come up in any litigation. That goes goes forward so you want to be very careful about that. There's also the potential trap that if for some reason this person you think is infringing on your trademark happened to actually been using the trademark in the marketplace before you filed for your federal application and before you actually started using the trademark yourself they might have senior rights over you and can turn the tables around and try to cancel a federal trademark registration that you have so you WanNa be careful enforcement right context that you're not just shooting yourself in the foot and that's where you know taken us getting some legal counseling about okay is enforcement appropriate here and if so you typically the first thing your lawyer will recommend is sending a letter to notify the other party that there's a concern there there are certainly <hes> folks out there that when they get a demand letter like a cease and desist letter we'll be nervous about that themselves and we'll reach back out and try to work with you to resolve the issue and then there's people that will get letters like that and just ignore them and hope the problem goes away and <hes> you so at that point in today's world. One of the best tools that you'll have available is if that infringer is selling their product on a platform like Amazon facebook you know using your trademark on Google ads you can if you have the federal registration you can go to these platforms and asked that the infringing material be removed and a lot of times you will get the appropriate response and get the material taken down that only will happen though with the federal trademark registration which is another benefit it and value of actually owning the registration <hes> and having done it before there's a problem you know we get a lot of times. We'll get a call from someone who says oh I've had I've been using this for two years and now there's somebody else and it's GonNa take us eight months to get the mark registered so it kind what ties our hands legally from being able to take a lot of really effective action without actually already having that registration place absolutely I can't emphasize it enough <hes> again when people come to me and they want to scale their business particularly through franchising. Rising when you think of franchising it's all about the brand people are pertinent. One of the main reasons why people are investing in your franchise system is because there's a brand value <hes> that you have created in the marketplace and if there's no protection action of that name <hes> is can be very difficult to convince people to spend hundreds of thousands if not millions of dollars investing in your franchise system and the name hasn't been protected and to the point of Enforcement Josh as you know there you know five thousand other ice cream shops with with a similar name. You know what I mean. <hes> and I'm somewhat exaggerating but it happens. I mean it happens a lot and so it's one of the reasons why I'm excited. When I deal you're with a a company that has an unusual name like the Amazons of the world or the googles of the world or the bangs right Josh because the're unusual and unique for a reason right they are go ahead? Oh no absolutely flu and one of the things we see is that folks in a particular industry all tend to gravitate around the same type of word so it's a brand of dietary supplements. They're all around the you know the frozen yogurt shop so you see people in industries tend to gather around certain words so one of the pieces of advice I give the clients who come to me and you know sometimes one of the problems run because we run a search and we do find a problem and then and then the client can be exasperated saying well. You know I feel like there's no good names out there in today's everything must already be taken you know because there's more taken today than there was in the nineteen eighties. That's just a fact but they're still really good names available especially if you reach outside your industry for words that aren't commonly used in your industry because so many people to stick with the same words over and over again in names and and things like this that you find that you actually go outside that bubble that you're operating in the bubble that you're industry is <hes> in the language you typically see you can actually find a lot of really neat names. I I completely agree and I hope this is food for thought and it's gets people's alls creative juices flowing <hes> because wh- what is sad though is when you see a business that's been in business for a while and they've kind of stuck to kind of a tried and true very descriptive name Josh and then they WanNa do something in grand and then there's all this confusion out there in the marketplace or someone else has <hes> the trademark and then they have to literally rebrand and they've been in existence for a long time <hes> and it's sad it's heartbreaking heartbreaking because that's a really expensive endeavour. Don't you think I mean I. It's been my experience experience at rebranding is far more expensive than branding would you would you agree. Oh absolutely because not only are you having to change out signing image and marketing materials. You've lost all that brand equity. You've built for twenty years right all that reputation it's built into your name can just go out the window just like that if you have to complete rebrand and and especially like you just mentioned if people are trying to buy a new or franchiser buying into the brand and if you're just starting fresh with that the value of that Franchisee lesser we willing to pay exactly very low well. I'm running out of time Josh <hes> but I want people to if they've heard wonderful things about you and they're probably thinking how can I work with you. Don't live in The Washington D._C.. Area you work with clients all over the U._S.. Right matter of fact we've worked with clients in all fifty states and from about twenty five countries around the world so it's yeah that's a nice thing about our practices. Get a very diverse group of clients touch reach out in <hes>. Get in touch with you yeah absolutely so all you'd have to do is go to our website which is urban law dot com. It's G. E. R. B. E. N. L. A. W. Dot Com and if you submit a contact form on our contact page will <hes> comes right to me. I'd be happy to provide calls we do complimentary consultation and and see if we can help folks out wonderful well. Thank you so much Josh for all of this great information nation and I hope you guys reach out to him. He's a great attorney and that's it so here's to your success. Take Care Thank you you have been listening to business gail insights with Kimberly Marie Bonner to get her.

Josh United States Patent Trademark Kimberly Marie Bonner trademark infringement attorney Google US Josh Gurban Washington D._C Philadelphia Mark Amazon Washington gail insights Nike Florida federal government Law School Doubt University of
Dr. Deborah Tillman: America's Supernanny Gives Back to School Tips for Parents

Business Scale Insights

27:22 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Deborah Tillman: America's Supernanny Gives Back to School Tips for Parents

"Took welcome to business scale insights with kimberly marie bonner listen for commentary interviews and information on how to grow your business for all the details contact business scale insights network dot com so empire-builders choir builders. Are you ready pierce kimberly marie bonner hello and welcome everyone to the business a skill insights <hes> radio show and also podcast. I am the host kimberly marie bonner and i'm so excited to continue continue our series on parenting and child focused businesses and services as we get ready for the whole aw back to school season. I can't believe it that it's already august. It's like you know you blink and the half the more than half the the year is gone but anyway since this is that time of year i thought it would be appropriate to invite some friends and some colleagues <hes> onto the broadcast cast to help our parents out there because there's so many really talented people out there providing services providing businesses for parents and children unfortunately absolutely a lot of people don't know about those services so <hes> that's the main reason for me having this series in august and also into due to <hes> september one of my dear friends i have on the show today is dr deborah tillman. Dr deborah say hello to the listening audience real quick. I everybody excited to be here. Can i am so incredibly excited to have you because i think so many people <hes> will be introduced to you and some reintroduced to you because you are a powerhouse yourself. Some of you might be thinking in the back of your mind. Dr deborah tillman doctor how that name sounds familiar and you might have heard of her because is she was actually on lifetime television's america's supernanny for for a period of time but before i go into that i want to tell you a little bit more about her her resume as at work because it's very impressive <hes> deborah tillman is a consultant speaker author founder of happy home christian chen leadership academy for early learners and america's supernanny on lifetime television. She's been labeled a force for good by the washington post and she obviously based upon what she's been doing has a deep passion for kids her career <hes> in this area began over twenty five years ago. When she became became frustrated with the lack of quality childcare her son was receiving and as a result quit her lucrative job in accounting and started her own successful childcare center in nineteen ninety four dr deborah holds a master's degree in early childhood special education from george washington university diversity and a doctorate in education from the richmond virginia seminary. She also studied at oxford university. <hes> magdalen magdalen college in england and among her many accomplishments deborah has been a recurring parenting expert on the harry. Show the steve harvey daytime talk shows. She's also been on the view. The today show the katie show windy williams great day washington and c._n._n. Just to name a few in two thousand eighteen dr deborah was asked to join the faculty of the number one leadership expert john maxwell team aim to create parenting and family content all over the world that is such. I'm i'm just like exhausted. Just reading your resume sipa coffee after that lady you are making a powerful impact and i love i. I love love surrounding myself with people like you because you are an action oriented person and <hes> i love people who take take a problem right and they come up with a solution but they don't just come up with a solution for themselves right. They share it with the world so i i kind of scratched the surface on your obviously your professional background your personal background <hes> and a little bit of your story but yours. I've i've heard your story in person. I've heard your story about your son but you tell it better than any body so i wanna give you the floor or i want all these listeners to perk up. Turn the volume up in your car. You know when it's on the podcast term this up on whatever device you're listening to because this this is a wonderful story and i know it's going to connect with a lot of parents right now. Thank you so much kim. I totally appreciate <hes> really the the fact that did you even know reading the resume. I hate when people read the resume <hes> because it really does not tell you the story in terms of you know god <hes> 'cause it's a god story. It really is <hes> i years ago never wanted to be a teacher. I'm originally from east orange new jersey and so far the jersey people out there shout out to you <hes> son of them in south florida's ready i love and i <hes> grew up with two sisters so i was the middle child <hes> which was interesting. That's a whole nother story but anyway <hes> yeah so i <music>. I always babysat when i was young. You know from twelve years old. I was like the town crier like the babysitter for further down in the city. Everybody kinda liked me hanging out with their children and so i never really you know connected the dots until until i got married until i had the sun <hes> zeppelin and and <hes>. I never wanted to be a teacher. I'll tell you that that was the truth. That's the honest to god truth. My mother was a special education teacher for thirty years and i watched took him. I watched her toil over papers. I watched her. Have you know parent teacher conferences and she'd come home and say nobody showed up and i was like oh that is a dead end job. I never do the same thing. I saw the same exact thing growing up. I feel your pain so you say never say never right. We make plan dan but god has the purpose and so yeah twenty five years later i found myself <hes> looking for quality childcare and we thought we had interviewed a lot of people had to go back to work and like eight weeks so he was very young and <hes> was very happy in my accounting job i was the the staff account and the youngest one they had ever had an engineering company making six figures like i was living the life and still you know until we got to those <music> childcare centers so the first one and i won't bore you with all seven but the first one i dropped them off at like eight o'clock in the morning came back about four hours later kim on his coat and a car seat the same car seat. I dropped him off when sweating profusely and i could not believe it. I was like like okay so <hes> i'm taking you out so that's the thing about me soon. As i found out something i would take him out. That's why it was seven in three months so i went to the you know the next one we interviewed. You know it was a school that time that he was given the wrong breastmilk. They'll just all kinds of craziness happening to me. The next one was a provider. We are just three months old and they would give him cereal at three months old talking about you need cereal like what is happening and i kept saying to god why you know why me why. Why is this happening to me and i know most of your listeners out there like i hope you can resonate like why me <hes> and i would not here. Thank god would not talk back to me when i was saying and why me but the seven after mid seven number of i <hes> walk into a back acronym by this time <hes> i'm nervous. My heart is beating. I'm like oh my god. Where's my son with my son to ladies out in the hallway talking to somebody else and i'm like okay. She's not even watching watching my son so i'm going to all these dark room and he no. He's not in there. No he's not emma. I'm i'm telling you i'm hyperventilating. Okay get a one room rome. I opened the door cam and he's in a bassinet in the corner. He has a bottle in his mouth. The wall is holding up the bottle and he sucking air. Oh my gosh and i liked die like you. I cannot every time i tell the story. I'm like i feel feel it in my spirit and i took my baby and i left everything there because i really i tell people when i speak all over the world i tell them i even be in jail right now or talking to you. Thank god walkaway. John was seen red eye. It's going to take my baby. I go up to an apartment where we because we were still living in an apartment. I love to my apartment. I think i left everything there and i put him down and literally. I just fell to my knees. I fell to my unease and said okay. Get it now like i surrender. What is it you want me to do. I heard seven still small word. I want oh you to do it better and i quit my job the next day. Are you serious. I kid you not and must be. I heard it very clear. I tell everybody i i want you to do better. I literally heard that you give goosebumps deborah. Oh my god yeah it was i'll and so i quit my job on my husband's like <hes> you know we gotta pay my <hes> yeah but god's sake with my job so i mean i'm not telling all of you out there that could because i say hey here <hes> because he's got us. He's got us and so i quit my job and did not give them. That was the only job. I have never given too weak note. They were pretty pretty happy because they thought how unhappy i was so they were like okay. We get it you gotta go and <hes> i called in my mother-in-law from florida. We flew uh up from fort lauderdale florida my yeah my husband is and we flew her from fort lauderdale florida and she watched the plane. Why i took a half an hour it was crazy. It was literally a half an hour course for a week that wound up being a half an our the first day and then maybe two or three hours the next few days but it was a week course and becoming a family childcare provider and then i said well no wonder there's so many problems out here like the training is so short so i became a family childcare provider and started watching children in my apartment. Remind say that again. How long was the the trauma week literally a we know. Yes no unbelievable believable. It's simply a week. It's probably longer to train somebody to be public son. Thanks you think that <hes> over the years. It's been twenty five years. They've gotten better but that's what it was that within and so. I became a family childcare provider. My first child obviously was zeppelin and <hes> his best friend jordan chamberlain. Who's now a doctor so shout out to jordan out there <hes> but yeah i watch children but but because god gave me the vision cam i set up my apartment like it was a school so there was no t._v. On on like literally the head of schedule i was making lunch for them. I did my curriculum so in the downtime. When they were napping. I would create a parent handbook and i only have one parent but literally i created an employee handbook with no employees our school school. I had no idea how calm but i thought the school honestly. I wish every one of my clients was like that because you have to have that vision and you have to have that expectation tation. We're going to have to go to a break but when we come back from the break. I want you to continue to talk about really the genesis of the school and how it expanded over time okay all right kimberly. Marie wagner helps millions make millions on business scale insights thursdays at twelve thirty pm on w._s._b. Business gail insights helps your business moved from startup to scale up and is sponsored by new day consulting systems new consulting systems can help turn your business into a franchise and scaled globally interested go their website new day consulting systems dot com and don't forget to tune in thursdays at twelve thirty for for business gail insights with kimberly marie bonner if you already have a proven business model but have concerns about the best way to grow and scale then you should contact the experts at new day. Consulting systems new day uses innovative techniques to ten times the impact of your business. Your local business can become a regional national or international enterprise new day. Consulting systems will show you how for more information and to to get started with new day visit the website at new day consulting systems dot com one one new day consulting systems dot com to get in your business off the ground into contact new day to day and we are back empire-builders. This is kimberly bonner with business skill insights and i am so excited to have dr deborah tillman. She is the c._e._o. Of happy home christian leadership and also many of you might know her her as america's supernanny and she was just telling us really sharing the story of how she kinda got started in childcare space and how she started did her business adopted deborah. I know everybody's kind of waiting with baited breath for the rest of the story so continually there were so i'm in the home and i'm setting it up like what god told me the vision the school in this little apartment and ten months in i get a call from the general manager of the buildings things that were in and literally he says listen. You're deborah. I say yes you called me and you call me out you and he says i heard that you are running your <hes> at some as he's talking. I'm like okay. Did i do something wrong that i commit a violation violation is like i heard that you're running your daycare center <hes> in excellence and so i wanna tell you that we have a childcare child care center on property did just went out of business because they lost the child and had to bring in overhead helicopters and so the ladies wiped out but all of our equipment minutes still here. She can't take it with her. She's bankrupt and i want to know if you would like it. Wow yep confirmation the square feet yeah. I think if you were confused if they weren't sure four okay you're on the right track. Exactly that's amazing exactly so we moved in <hes> not not quite then that was october of like nineteen ninety three and then when i went to look at it oh my god my heart broke because i literally was in here and i pulled i like taking legos and pulling them apart with cook like just nastiness and so it literally means six months i like. I called them family from new jersey. Whereas the everybody i was like okay you know. God gave me the school but we're not moving and until i feel like i could sleep here so we did a cleaning. We did everything everything we did a whole renovation job and <hes> i opened in march of nineteen ninety four and now how many centers <hes> do you feel all though we had three at one point <hes> we got the second. We've got nationally accredited first of all by the n._a._s._d. Y c 'cause. I was really big on you know having that quality polity of excellence is not so much the number of centers but really the quality of the center and so i got the first one in nineteen ninety four the second one was in nineteen ninety eight and similar story where a lady heard that i had a weightless of a year and a half and she said her mom had cancer and she wanted to talk to the church because her center was in a church she she was gonna talk to the church. If i wanted it which was literally down the street from where i was to expand and so that's how i got the second center and the the third center happens kinda kinda kinda the same way and so then i had three centers but unbeknownst to me i i get a call from well actually an email in two thousand eleven from lifetime t._v. and <hes> yeah to to say you know joe. Uh-huh frost has retired and we're looking for news america's supernanny and basically what we want is a home grown supernanny she she was from london but we want somebody from america. Four hundred people have tried out. We yes and we'd like to know. Would you like to try out now. This was an email and we had just gotten home from vacation and my son was like mighty sent you an email and i was like they probably send it to. Everybody just deleted. He's like no. I don't think so because it says here. Your dad riled up my hundred folks aurora. You talk about more confirmation for me when cal to this. Oh my god i got a call. I've got so many goosebumps right now. I mean need. I need serious jackets. That's this is amazing so okay so two thousand eleven america's supernanny the nighttime calls your <music>. You try out you literally. They do a skype thing and at the time. I don't even know what skype was skyping like. Oh my god so they put let me on skype interview. I can't see them. They apparently can see me doing all these questions and they're asking me about okay. So what would you do in this scenario. What would you do that and got. I tell you when opportunity when preparation meets opportunity shows up and so you know i always tell people i said you know i was prepared for that because i had been doing get from my parents for like you know how many years and so yeah they did a skype interview on a wednesday. They flew me out to california over. The weekend. Threw me in the house with a woman that had a plethora of issues and said okay. Here's the cameraman deborah he's going in with. You and i need you to fix problems and you only have an hour and a half to do it. Wow that was that was the interview and how did it and how it must've gone very well in our area well it went very well because why because i was used used to seeing things like that i mean you know i think a lot of times when you go in parents can't see the forest for the trees because we're so close to the situation but when you have fresh eyes is coming in it's easier for me to detect okay yep. They're not sharing but this is. Why okay this one's not potty trained because the mom has an accident has already been an hour and and a half you know what i mean and so it's easier for me to see things you know so it's not so much that i call in blaming a parent or going and being judgmental more like okay. We're on the same team. Let me just figure out what's going on the dynamics of observing first and then it's easy for me to figure it out because why because i was running the school for whistle long tech thing will you have all of this experience with the school and also with america's supernanny and i'm i know there are a ton of people in listening audience thinking to themselves the same question. Are there some recurring themes that you've been seeing with parents in the united states over all all these years like some kind of general issues that you can share with the listening audience of things that they need to be aware of shore. I think one of the big takeaways away from me especially when i was doing show was the parents kept saying you know thinking. I'm mary poppins. Come in and fix my kids. My kids are all right. Okay six kids so i went in and he was winning and winning and i was like okay yeah. That's really isn't then how your children really us. You know i this one doesn't respect me. They don't respect you or your husband because they just just watched you. Emasculate your husband in two seconds. You know what i mean and so i always feel parents okay first of all we got a model the behavior that we want to in our children and the modeling thing is real. Children are watching every single thing from the time that two years old all the way up there watching how you interact back there watching u <hes> whether or not your identity is the same in front of them. Is you know as it is with your friends. So so so voiding examples say for example. I saw one parent and they would be like the best friend would be like mary. Mary's the best friend but mary would go outside the door and then mom would start talking talking about mary. I don't know why he comes over all the time. He won't be like wait a minute. Mary let me tell you something. Let me tell you i wanna stop. I wanna uh stop right here because we have a crisis in america and this is this is this is a big deal and i want to really kind of impact this because what you are talking about out you know i had another guest and we were recorded on a similar parenting topic and you were you raised by teachers. I was raised by teachers. There's an for so long we've put so much emphasis on children and their issues and correcting them but this is what i want the parents i don't want you to feel condemned and but i do want parents to take some responsibility because i'm so tired of everybody blaming the millennials and everybody blaming the kids and it's always this generation ruined x. in this generation will raise them. Thank you raise to them. Were they raised in a vacuum. No so i say this like a loving sister on the air stop it look in the mirror. Maybe maybe it's you and maybe you can get help from dr deborah or some of these or or dana con who's going to be on the program program but we have to stop the madness dr deborah of blaming these children for behaving the way we raised them. I agree. It's all about owning your part and that's what i've seen. It's like we have to own a like. You said be accountable on your part. Who are you in front of your children. That's your identity. Who are you when you're not in front of them. That's your inner character your integrity and then what kind of influence are you. You know that you have over your entire family and friends and co workers. Who are you once. We figure that out and we are real with ourselves. Then our children can actually see the real us not these mask back when my word oh my word and this fake image of perfection which is nuts but i we're unfortunately i only have two minutes left and i hate it because the show is so short <hes> what does the future hold for dr deborah tillman. What are you what are your plans for the future. What's in the works. Yes oh <hes> i obviously you know i love working with children and families please and parents and really just making sure that i teach really teach children but then on the other flip side of that teacher parents that it really is about respecting thing our children responding to our children not reacting to them connecting with them before we correct them you know and then loving them and listening to them. Unconditionally was what what's what's in store for me. Only god knows right is have not seen not heard right but i do <hes> i'm very grateful for the blessings that have been bestowed upon me so i'm on you know the video now facebook all that kind of stuff with tuesdays with tillman so for those parents that are out there share tuesdays with filming because i just give you free advice to add value so that we can become the best and highest version of ourselves and then i am working with john maxwell team. I'm so excited about that that i created parents and family engagement certification for parents on yeah to go out and really be the hands and legs and really each one teach one. That's how we get better so if someone wanted to contact you get in touch with you because they they need help or they want to take your courses. How can they do that. I would just go to my website w._w._w. Died debra l l for louise but debra l. kelman dot com wonderful well. I'm incredibly excited and i know it's back to school season and people who are under a lot of pressure and i really encouraged everybody who's listening go to the website. <hes> check her resources out on social media. If you feel like you're weak in this area of parenting. There are far more resources out there now for you than they ever were. Don't wouldn't you agree dr deborah. Hey like dr my angeles's right. When we we know better. We do that exactly exactly so. I am so excited. Although this isn't technically a real hardcore business episode it really is about your success says as a person because if you're not successful as a person as a parent as a mom as a dad as a human being everything else is just is not not even worth it so anyway. Thank you so much dr deborah so much for having me and here's to your success. Everybody take care bye bye. You have been listening to business business scale insights with kimberly marie bonner to get her personal attention to you and your empire coda business scale insights network network dot com. That's business scale insights network dot com and tune in again next week for more from kimberly marie bonner with business scale insights.

Dr deborah america dr deborah tillman kimberly marie bonner john maxwell mary poppins Dr deborah tillman washington post united states steve harvey oxford university deborah he washington george washington university magdalen magdalen college florida kimberly bonner Marie wagner rome jordan chamberlain
Julia Aquino Pt. 2: Know Your Numbers to Grow Your Numbers

Business Scale Insights

25:54 min | 1 year ago

Julia Aquino Pt. 2: Know Your Numbers to Grow Your Numbers

"Welcome to business scale. Insights with Kimberly. Marie bonner. Listen for commentary interviews and information on how to grow your business for all the details. Contact business scale insights network dot com. So empire builders are you ready? Here's Kimberly Marie Bonner. Hello, empire builders and welcome back to another episode of business scale insights, and I have the honor of interviewing Julia Aquino Serano, who has spent twenty years in finance strategy and operations. You don't look at day over eighteen girlfriend. She has her bachelor's degree in finance and an MBA with a specialization in accounting. She also understands how to simplify the complexity of finance so we can utilize the power of our financial information and reports to both manage and build our businesses. I've brought Julia onto the show. I consider her a friend, but I also wanted her to share her expertise with the listening audience because I think financial industry is just a big area for business owners. That's just missing. I, I see it over and over again. It's gonna like groundhog day when I deal with the new client lake their basic pieces of their financial life of their businesses. Financial life that they don't understand. And I don't have an accounting background like you. And so I many times point them to their CPA, but unfortunately, there CPA's not like Julie. I wish I could clone you. So I'm trying to do that through this show. Many CPA's do not know how to teach these concepts or they don't care to teach these concepts. And hopefully you know this show for those who are listening, listen to part one because Julia goes over so many wonderful concepts financial concepts. And then also you can visit our website business Gill insights network dot com for a replay of the show. But before I go any further if people want to take a course from you, if they want to learn from you, they wanna follow you and be just become like, you know, just a follower devoted of Julia. How can they contact you? So I have a few Email addresses. Start with the main, too. So my consulting company all systems grow dot CO gives you formation about the consulting side. And then she defined dot com is my work workshops, retreats and coaching for women in on she defined calm. We actually have a really cool workshop going on right now called the zen of finance in. So if you go to she defined com type in zen, the workshop will come up, and you can take a look and see if it's something that you would enjoy. I highly highly highly encourage anyone who's listening to this broadcast to sign up for that. Although if you're a guy can you sign up for the him? Absolutely. Same everybody same concepts. I have to ask, because I know some guy was a kid, I'd do it to of course. But really I again I love my CPA's out there. But unfortunately, I have. I've not come across that many CPA's that teach their clients. So you're giving an invaluable service to everyone out there. And so, before we started recording, we were talking about this concept and you've talked about it with me. Many times of paying yourself. I if you're an entrepreneur of you're starting your own business paying yourself first. What's that? What's that all about? And why do you believe that so so passionately that that's very important? Sure. So I'm sure many listeners have or may have heard of the lean startup all kinds of books about bootstrapping, and, and we all start, you know, I have three companies we all start with really tight budgets and making sure that we can get the company off the ground. And I totally respect that in bleed that's necessary in an entrepreneurial environment. However, what happens with many entrepreneurs is if they have any money in the. Bank or any ability in the Bank to pay themselves to keep their their life running at some level, they won't pay themselves at all. And so what happens is everyone around them gets a paycheck, and they don't until such time as they quote can. But what happens is they keep hiring and keeping others. Never pay themselves to three years in their burnt out, and they're resentful in their done, or worse. They don't have any money in the Bank, but they can't pay themselves, and they're just so busy, keeping their head above water that they're throwing money out there to do everything that everyone's telling them to do instead of really looking at what paying themselves something even if it's small to begin with, and then utilizing the money that's coming in to obviously move the company forward. But if you don't pay yourself, something at some level, first of all, there's IRS implications. At some point. And you know, but really getting to the point that you value, what you're doing. You're working sixty. Seventy eighty hours a week. It's, it's very, very difficult. If you not get your company to a point that you can pay yourself something. Now, you can grow that something to the point that it makes sense. You don't have to take every penny out of the company, you need to reinvest, but really getting clear on not only what you wanna pay yourself. But then creating your sales plan to make sure that you can pay those around you and yourself create the sales goal from that place. It's so funny because in my experience, I've seen two types of business owners kind of like bipolar business owners on the one hand. They're the people who don't want to touch anything. They don't wanna give Alary. They're just petrified of that for whatever reason, and then the other people who are, greedy, is out. They don't care about really reinvesting in other than themselves and a car, and, you know, have you seen that kind I see it all the time on. Fortunately, and so, you know, you've talked to the, the business owner who doesn't want to take salary. One out of the people who are just like me me me. Me me. Offering. They're pilfering your own company. So neither business owner is going to be probably, I agree. And so you need to sort of meet in the middle. And I think in, in the first show we did talk about people that take everything to all the profit out, right? And that's dangerous. You have to reinvest in the company, so really it's understanding what you wanna get paid within reason what others around you need to get paid to do their jobs. Right. We need to operate the business and scale it. And then really start to decide what that looks like from a budget perspective and build your company that way. Absolutely absolutely. Well, and these issues also go to two concepts that you talk about in your courses being bankable, or is it lendable Lennon's, I'm sorry, Linda ble, and my Mansell. What are those concepts all about? Well, this is this is actually. A great conversation to be. And I'm sure you've run across this where entrepreneurs start making money and they start didn't have a positive bottom line, and then they're like, what I gotta pay taxes. So, so then they're like, well, I don't wanna be types. And so I'm gonna run some more stuff through here. So I don't show a profit. No, no. I I made a profit night. I made some money over here. But I'm gonna show that I didn't make a profit and so I didn't have to pay taxes. Well, guess what? They start growing two three years down the line. They go to a Bank to get financing in the banks. Like, will you never made any money then? No, I did. I did I made money. But I took it all. Now that doesn't work. It doesn't work. So you, you have to really your bottom line, your net income is so important to being lendable or financial and also cash flow. So again, remember, we talked about that net income of one hundred thousand dollars on your profit and loss from on the first show. But yet, you don't have any money in the Bank rate, your cash flows negative, because you're spending it on the balance sheet side, you have to pay attention to that as well, because the Bank doesn't just look at whether or not you have a positive net income rate, I made money, they also want to know that you have cash flow to cover the debt payments, and so you have to pay attention to how, and where you're spending your money and you have to strive to pay taxes. You have to strive to be profitable. So true. So true. Well, people think that they're getting away with it, and I can understand particularly in the early early early stages of a company, you don't want to people want avoid writing big checks. However, you know I've dealt with companies at been have been in existence for ten fifteen years. And, you know, I asked immediately to see I always no, it's not gonna go. Well, when I asked to see the PNL and the if if the business has been in existence for over ten years, and it takes it. I get well. Let me talk to this EPA, and I'm like, oh, it's just so funny, because they come to me, and they wanna they wanna let say franchise, their business. And all I see is. For lack of a better word, you know, accounting jujitsu. That makes them look legacy. Are not profitable, but it's clear that they are profitable. Right. But it's just all over the place. And it just looks like they're not profitable, and I say to them, honestly, you're not going to get any one who's really saying investing in this business because at some point someone is going to ask about profit. Yep. And the financials. Yeah. Some- somebody somebody and I, if and if you're not prepared to I like to use the word open the KOMO, no. And get some somewhat naked with people, then there is you might get your cousin, get you might get, you know, member, the, and it's not a bad thing. You know, they're BFF from college or whatever like that. That, that might be your first few franchisees. But beyond that, you're not gonna get a really talented savvy. Franchise invest. Or because they're just not. It just doesn't add up not saying that they're gonna use the same calculus as a Bank. But the there are the are going to be looking at the kind of the basics, the financial basics of your enterprise, and they're going to ask you questions. They're going to ask you pointed questions and any franchise developer that tells you. Oh, well, you know, you should hide that none of the in my opinion. That's very short sighted. I try to disclose kind of financial information in the financial of the, the, the franchise disclosure document. And I just basically say, let's, let's put as much information out there in that item, nineteen as possible, if it's good, right? Yeah. If it's not good. Maybe you shouldn't be right now. And, you know, a sitting it out a few years until that gets kind of cleaned up. Not everybody believes, like I do, but to me, one of the greatest ways to get buy in from any. Anybody not just a Bank. But however you wanna angels these sees franchisees is to really not to have to have to have a financial kind of. Statements that are readable and past the past the I'm not be Essen test. And then people are like, okay, this is this is a sound business because how else can anyone really tell if it's a sound business, right? Why think too, that it's really comes down to whether or not you wanna lifestyle business or a scalable biz agree. I agree. And people say they want scalable. Big not behave they're like a lifestyle business. You know, if you want a scalable business, you have to treat it with care and do the right thing, no matter what. And that includes pay taxes. It is so absolutely absolutely important. But I don't know you know, but this EPA's go kind of go along for the ride with that. What's up with that? So I think a lot of times, and I can't speak for other. I know. But I do think that a lot of times, they will follow the lead of their client. They won't do anything illegal, but they will help them to maybe manage their taxes. Right. But to your point, and this is again, why I have you on the program. CPA's and I love all you CPA is out there. I'm not beating you up. I'm just telling you sharing my own personal story. You gotta do more than just what the client is saying, when, you know, long-term, if they share with you, I have a vision or scaling the business, you gotta sit there and say, you know, if this is what you wanna do on term, and it's not a lifestyle to your point business. You know, we gotta pay some taxes at some point, but you also know that CPA's face the same stuff you and I face, which is the give him the opinion. And then then by the person goes they want to do. So that's the other side of this. I know. All right. Well, we will be right back after this break. If you already have a proven business model, but have concerns about the best way to grow and scale, then you should contact the experts at new day consulting systems. New day uses innovative techniques to ten times the impact of your business. Your local business can become a regional national or international enterprise. New day consulting systems will show you how for more information and to get started with new day. Visit the website at new day consulting systems dot com. One one new day consulting systems dot com to get your business off the ground and into orphaned, contact new day to day Kimberly Marie Bonner helps millions make millions. I'm business scale insights, Thursdays, at twelve thirty pm on WSB business scale insights, helps your business move from startup to scale and his sponsor by new day consulting systems. New day consulting systems can help turn your business. Into a franchise and scale globally interested don't their website, new day consulting systems got calm and don't forget, the tune in Thursdays at twelve thirty for business Gail insights with Kimberly. Marie bonner. And we're back. Thank you guys for coming back. I am interviewing Julia Aquino Serano, and we're talking about financial literacy for business owners. And so hopefully, you have been you've stayed tuned. We're in the final stretches at this episode. And I wanted to talk to Julia about issues related to women business owners because she's done a lot of work in that space, and we kind of scratched the surface, a little bit when you talked about women in numbers and kind of being a little paranoid about it. And so share with the listening audience your work experience. I know your past presidents of Nabo, and you'll explain that acronym, and just is there a difference between the genders when it comes to business owners and how they approach finances. Thank you. Sure is so I am past president of novel Broward, Palm Beach, which is the national association of women business owners. It's. Forty five year old organization based in Advocacy's for women business owners, so work. They've done is amazing. And I've been in on multiple stages. Speaking about women in business, and fear, and all those things that makes us unique, and I'm really really knowledgeable because I happen to be a woman. And so as much as I may seem like I got it all together. I haven't plenty of moments. I get it. And so what I find really working with, and why I really have moved into a niche of working with women. Business owners is we do things differently. We sell differently think differently. We allow things to stop us, that may be your male. Counterpart may not and we have different fears and a lotta times we allow them to hold us back. We're all sit in front of a room of two hundred women and say, how many of you have a big vision or a dream in less than half? The hands will go up, well less than half. You gotta be kidding. No. And I literally stand on the stage, heartbroken in the moment. And then, but my job on that stage is really to get them to embrace the fact that they get to have a vision. They get to have a dream. And so in the business world, what I see is women. A lot of times, you know, valid or not will. Will start their business so that they can have a lifestyle business. So they cancel or pick up the kids from school, but they still want to do something really amazing in the world. So kudos to them in you build your business based on that knowledge. And then I have women who have their feet in two different boats. They're building lifestyle business, but they talk about scaling, and so really helping them to move into the scaling side, actually requires them to walk through some fear stuff because in the lifestyle business, they're able to their thriving their surviving. They're making enough in their having time with their family, but now they're like, oh, I might actually wanna build and scale this, but you have to move that other foot that steady foot into the rocky boat of scaling and growth in that is very scary. So really working with women to get through to that big dream. Why is it so scary for women in particular? I think the failure. Actor, you know, when, when we're building a quote lifestyle business, we don't have to prove anything, anyone only, we know for making money or not only, we know if, if this is successful or not when we actually get to the point that we wanna grow in scale you've really stepping into a big big big role, many times, you're really taking a leap and responsibility and responsibility. And then when you start hiring now you're responsible for other people's salary, and you're responsible for making sure they have the work and women, and I include myself and almost every woman, I know there's a perfectionism and you can't be a functioning entrepreneur business. You, you will die. Missile die. You'll die you'll ever nervous breakdown talk about that, because that's, that's massive it. I. I'm going to use. I was dealing with a. A person. And she had this issue related to possibly taking a leap of faith, and scaling that, and it was related to not having all the is dotted and the. And I was I and I tried I tried very hard to explain to her, that this is normal in the business world as long as the people that you were doing the scaling with appreciate everyone is disclosed. These are the risks involved, and we do this, and there is obviously Orissa this is gonna take. Right. We've done all part both parties of dumb their due-diligence. But if we shirk back. There is there's, there's possibly a greater risk that you're going to be left behind in the market. So can you talk about that whole perfectionism thing when it comes to scaling because to scale you just you're gonna break a lot of stuff you're gonna make a ton of mistakes? You're gonna miss fire, you're gonna miss higher. You're gonna it's gonna be. It's like, oh my God. It's not it's not pretty when you're growing. Well, so Kim really think about what perfectionism really is. Okay. Fear of making a mistake. Yeah apps. Here of people seeing you as less than perfect fear of, you know, messing something up fear of the world not being successful. And I was one of those I was one of those chicks, I really was, we all were we all were because in perfectionism we get to stay stock. You have to step out of perfectionism and be willing to fail to succeed, and that's here. And that's why we get stuck in. Oh, when I have a hundred thousand dollars when this happens when that happens now I can tell you from living life for all these years, the win is never gonna come in exactly the package. We think it should. So we will never have that perfect moment to do the thing, we say, we need to do, so you need to let go of it. You need to literally let go and be okay with failure with falling with making mistakes within not turning out, exactly as you envisioned because what how it does show up in the lessons. We learn along the way in our ability to grow in scale comes from learning to fall. How do you learn to fall by falling? All right. Philosopher. Financial philosophy by. Well, I mean but falling is just not cute. It's not pretty. I know as girls were taught to be sugary might hand. And we did it cat us. We know. Oh, my word tot serves us at some level until it doesn't. Yes. And if you're gonna sit in your little box in your little perfect life in your little perfect house in risk. Nothing it will serve you. But if you want something greater, and bigger, you have to risk you have to fall, you have to fail. You have to be okay with getting back up and trying again. Wow. Did you guys hear that? Did you ladies here? That, that's a lot that's a lot. So if, if people wanna hear more of the philosophies. Again where can they see you? I know you're doing so many different things you're active in Nabo. You've got all of your workshops, you've got your clients, you're also doing a lot of philanthropic work so pick one and plug it hard to the audience. Okay. So, well, I'm gonna go philanthropic. Okay. So I was just named event chair for American Cancer society's making strides against breast cancer for southern Palm Beach county and I am a breast cancer survivor. I am six years cancer free. And so the walk is going to be an October. And I would love to see everyone there. But if they want to learn more about me, she defined dot com, also grow dot co. Follow me on Instagram Facebook Twitter. Look, up my name, I'm there and love to talk to anyone that has questions. Definitely reach out to Julia. It'll be more than worth. It will change your life. Not only your business life, but your life trust me. She's done that for me. Read the book she strategy. She strategy book. Yes. Thank you. All right. Will that is up. Our time is, is over and come back next week on business skill insights, thank you Bye-bye. You have been listened to business scale insights with Kimberly Marie Bonner to get her personal attention to use in your go-to business scale insights, network dot com. That's business scale insights network dot com and tune in again next week or more from Kimberley Reid bond with business scale insights.

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Julia Aquino Pt 1.: Know Your Numbers to Grow Your Numbers

Business Scale Insights

27:04 min | 1 year ago

Julia Aquino Pt 1.: Know Your Numbers to Grow Your Numbers

"Welcome to business scale insights with Kimberly. Marie bonner. Listen for commentary, interviews and information on how to grow your business for all the details. Contact business Gail insights network dot com. So empire builders, are you ready? Here's Kimberly Marie Bonner. Empire-builders? Welcome back to another episode of business skill insights with your host, Kim Bonner. I'm so happy to be back in the saddle on WSB. Our new day new time Thursdays at twelve thirty with my dear friend, the wonderful. Julia Quino Serano. She is very well known all over south, Florida. I think every time I meet someone. Julia. And I say your name, they're like. So she's just so incredibly well-connected, and she's you know, kind of born and reared here in the south Lord area. And I am true is true. South Florida native Hialeah in the house. Absolutely. So love her lover's spirit. She's also a bit of I would say a finance accounting grew. And I hate to say this. I don't wanna be Syra typical about the accounting types that I've met and the finance types that I've met, but you are very unusual to have that level of expertise in that space and also be as what's the word. You also have a deep understanding of emotional connection and how to connect with people on a human level, not just the numbers. And so did I say that a nice and of gentle way, you didn't? And I I think that that actually has come from doing a lot of personal work. Okay. And the way the reason I am the numbers person. And the reason I love it so much is literally I was that girl back in the day. When girls didn't do. Mad? I was the girl who excelled in math. Okay. And I love math. And so a counting really came naturally for me. You know, my undergrads and finance, and then my MBA with a specialization and accounting because I never wanted to be a CPA per se. But I wanted the accounting knowledge to do the work that I do. Oh, that's awesome. Well, you I I'm not a numbers person. But I was raised by a lot of numbers people. My grandmother was a numbers gal, she was in mathematical mind. My aunt wrote calculus textbooks today. So they're really know. It was like I would sit at the dinner table like am I really related to these? 'cause I am. So not that. But tell us a little bit more. You gave us a little bit of a background about yourself. The whole finance accounting piece. You love numbers then kinda tells a little bit more about your career trajectory and what you're doing now. Sure. So when I first got out of college when I was doing was I was working as a financial analyst many, many moons ago. And the reason I think I was so successful in that role is because I didn't just analyze the numbers and give someone and report to me. I actually need to understand the why why do the numbers look the way. They did what did the analysis actually tell what was the story. Oh in so being able to report on that really literally out of school because that's the way my mind works made me very valuable. But what happened was as I went along the path is I started recognize that the numbers told the story of the operations and the operations. In how the operations were run reflected in the numbers. And so taking those two pieces and utilizing them together to make managerial decisions became very important on my path. And so that actually is what brought me into all systems grow, which is my consulting company. And really looking at not not just the numbers because people will call me and say, my sales are stuck I can't improve my sales, and it's always so much more than the numbers. And it's generally always about the people in the operations. So I combine the two, and I look at both, and I can actually logically look at a process in see if it makes sense in a line that process to understand how it actually directly affects the numbers and work to improve both that is beautiful. So I would imagine a lot of people come to you. Because you have that kind of focus you come have that kind of specialty and not a lot of. I guess maybe there are a lot of other people out there that do what you do. But. But it sounds like you have a level of expertise that may be others. Don't I think that it's really the way I use the expertise. There's probably people that are smarter than me. And that may be CPA's and maybe better than me. And in how a transaction is booked all the way down the line. But what I think I do that unique because I actually combine the strategy the operational processes, the financials and the people so I actually helped to look at having the right people in the right roles and ensuring that if we have the right people in the right roles that they're they are working infective -ly, so really kind of throwing in some coaching. So I think it's the combination of all of them. And like, you said sort of that emotional human connection side that I use because it's so near and dear to my heart and making sure that that we're dealing with people not numbers. Absolutely. Well, that's the one of the reasons, and you're kind of the listening audience can can glean why? I invited you on the show is because you have a way of being able to explain numbers and finances in very human way in a storied way. And that's an tremendous gift. Not a lot of people have that ability, and that's coming from a, you know, four lawyer whose award person. So I really do appreciate it. And I think I listening audience will be able to take a lot from this. These two shows I'm gonna have you for not just one, but two one of the things one of the reasons why brought you on the show is financial literacy for business owners, and I deal with people all the time who want to do big things with their businesses. The come to me because I'm known as biz skill pro or they wanna franchise they're business and one of the first conversations I have with every business owner. So please don't call me. Don't send me an Email. Like, you know, Kim, wh why are you? You talking about business, you know, or profit margin of after having a two minute conversation with me. Well, it's because it's just it's critical. Like, I I as much as I might love you or like you or think you're terrific person. If you don't know your numbers, if you haven't wrapped your head around your numbers. What is there for me to scale? It's kind of like trying to cook a meal, and I don't I don't even know what I have to work with to make this wonderful wonderful wonderful meal. So I brought you on because I think is just a missing component for a lot of business owners. I understand business owners. If you're listening to me right now, it's not a judgment against you. It's just I think because of our schooling K through twelve and college, and many people just aren't raised around business is or business owners that number scare people, and they just feel afraid of number. Hours or they just don't appreciate how important some of these concepts are so for the next two shows. We're just going to try to break things down for people to get them to a higher level of financial literacy, particularly if they are indeed business owners now, you've told me a few times, you have to know your numbers to grow your numbers. I love that statement. So what exactly do you mean by that? That is just my number win statement. And the reason why is because our numbers like you said tell the story. And so what happens is if we don't actually understand our numbers, and we're making really management or entrepreneurs decisions on growing our business without understanding. How those actions of the numbers we are gonna screw something up. One of the biggest things we mess up is pricing. Oh my goodness. Can I tell you already had this conversation before tell my one minute pricing stories. So I go into a gentleman who has this amazing business mazing business concept. He's telling me as high profit margins and very unique business, and he's really one of the few in the game big clients, the whole thing. So I said, okay. So if you're making all this money your profit, so high where are your expenses so is expensive weren't that? Huge. So I said something's gotta be wrong. So your profit margins? Give me wrong. I said show me where your your costs. I I wanna see the breakdown of your cost to understand how you decided your pricing. So he took out a yellow notebook that had handwritten notes on his costs. And I said, wait a minute. This isn't in QuickBooks showing where he just done. Oh, no. This is all in my head. And I said, and he was like three million dollar business at this point in. But all in is it not making any money. And so he was actually bringing a loss. And so when I actually look started to look at his costs, and what he did took labor. I said, where's the labor costs? And he goes, well, I pay them off the books, and I said, all right. That's the legal. But. Vardon regardless. I said, where's that cost on your yellow tracking? Well, it's not there. I said that's a major part of your production would be my guess. And when we added it in he was making the product for free. Wow. Because he didn't understand. He was so worried about keeping it off the books. It didn't even occur to him. That was important in the pricing. He was only looking at the pieces that went into making it a not labor. So the labor was nowhere to be found. And so his pricing was completely wrong completely wrong for three years amazing. So was he just basing his pricing off of what he perceived in the market. He will. So again, he was one of three he had the quote lowest price. There was a reason he had the lowest price absolately because his costs were incorrect. And so he priced it without a major component of its cost. But again, this is someone who had never been in business before. Right. And so in his mind, how you made a product had to do only with the actual physical. Tangible pieces that went into building that product in. So the labor was never considered. So the pricing was completely off in labor was about fifty four percent of the cost. And Labor's always such a high component developing any business business model. You're absolutely right. So is that is is the cost issue or and or the pricing issue a consistent error that you see in almost every business that you work with like there's a flaw that people have just have not thought about what it takes to what what is the cost to manufacture XYZ while not not all the time. But yes, quite often their pricing is off based on what they believe their costs are. But what they're actually not looking at either is how their expenses lineup against their sales. So a lotta times your sales will be. Increasing in your expenses or increasing a higher rate than. So they think, but my sales are increasing. So I should be making more money, and that may be the case, but you're traveling more or you're spending more money on people you've hired at a quicker rate than your sales grown. You're investing many other reasons, but if you don't understand the that relationship, you just think your sales are growing. So you're not looking at really the relationship of all these line items to the sales awesome. Well, we'll continue this when we come back from the break keep if you already have a proven business model but have concerns about the best way to grow and scale, then you should contact the experts at new day consulting systems new day uses innovative techniques to ten times the impact of your business. Your local business can become a regional, national, or international enterprise. New day consulting systems will show you how for more information and to get started with new day. Visit the website at new day. Insulting systems dot com. New day consulting systems dot com to get your business off the ground and into orphan contact new day to day. Kimberly Marie Bonner helps millions make millions. I'm business scale insights, Thursdays at twelve thirty pm on WSB business scale insights helps your business moved from startup to scale and is sponsored by new day consulting systems new day consulting systems can help turn your business into a franchise and scale it globally interested. Don't their website new day consulting systems dot com. And don't forget the tune in Thursdays at twelve thirty for business Gail insights with Kimberly Marie Bonner. And we are back with Julia Quino Serano, and we're talking about financial literacy for business owners, and we were talking about concepts like price and cost and I just want. Julia to kind of give us an overview of some of the key concepts that you think every business owner should really grasp in order to either be financially literate for their business or to increase their financial literacy for their business. Okay. Sure. I think the first one is actually profit margin. And that is understanding you or difference between costs and sales as a percentage of sales in that profit margin is very important to understanding what you have left to spend on operating your business. So on an income statement, or what we call a profit and loss, you're gonna have your sales your costs. Of good sold. And then you're you're gross profit, and then you have operating expenses. So those operating expenses are things like advertising or rent or payroll or anything that is actually an extra expense to upping the business that has nothing to do with building or selling the product. Okay. And then once you subtract those operating expenses from your prophet, your gross profit, you end up with your net operating income, and those just that alone just understanding that those concepts on your income statement is very important to understanding how much money the businesses making absolutely now, the greatest confusion for people is, but I have profit. Where's my money? Yes. Right. So my cashflow is negative, but I made one hundred thousand dollars this year. How is that possible? Why don't I have one hundred thousand dollars in my Bank? And so the difference between your net operating income in cash flow is the you're actually spending money in other places like debt. Or investing on the balance sheet side. So we have those two major financial statements income statement and the balance sheet, the balance sheet is where we keep things like assets liabilities and equity and the assets are the fun stuff like cash in the Bank inventory, right? And then liabilities and equity is actually the money you as an owner put into the business or liabilities like debt such as credit card in that. So if I made a hundred thousand dollars on the income statement side, but I don't have any money. It's probably because I invested money or spend money on something on the balance sheet side. That's good waves. Yes, does that make sense Kerr? And so on the balance sheet side where that hundred thousand dollars may be sitting in inventory inventory that hasn't yet sold so five inventories sitting on the. Floor of let's say three hundred thousand dollars that other hundred thousand is price sitting in that inventory, or if I have been putting things on credit cards, and I have acquired debt as a startup. Let's say, and I pay thirty thousand a month to credit cards or line of credits. That's coming out of my cash flow. It's it doesn't mean I didn't make that hundred thousand I made that hundred thousand I was profitable a hundred thousand dollars, but I may have used that hundred thousand dollars somewhere on the balance sheet side does that make sense to us? Absolutely. So when when you're dealing with a client, and they're having cash flow issues is it often because they have made a miscalculation as far as their debt-service or inventory is at just it every single time. I think that there's multiple reasons. Okay. But a lotta times. Because they don't understand this other side where the money is residing in a lot of times what happens is especially start-ups in in smaller entre preneurs, and I'm gonna say smaller, I've I've dealt with this. It's you know, ten million dollar companies. But the the company becomes their personal piggy Bank. And so they will just write themselves to check in put it under owners draw or they'll take it out of equity or they'll pay their own personal credit card with it or they'll pay for their card. There's there's other money coming out that actually does not serve the business, but as is taking money from the cash flow, and that's a big one in the startup phases in up to about ten million dollars. They don't realize how much they've spent because it's not showing up on there. Income statements coming out of the balance sheet equity was absolutely are there any other concepts that you think biz entre Noor's business owners need to know really short their financial literacy sure, I think that really looking at your expenses in relation to sales. So for instance, payroll to sales as a percentage of sales. So if your sales are one hundred thousand in. Month. In your payroll is fifty thousand a month. Then your payroll to sales ratio is fifty percent. And here's why that's important because if your sales increased to one hundred twenty thousand but your payroll stays at fifty thousand right because your capacity may be much larger on the payroll side than then your sales are at this moment, Raksha growing. Now, your percentage to sales has gone from fifty percent to about forty two percent. So you're actually becoming more efficient lotta times it happens in the opposite way where your sales will increase, but your payroll increases at a higher rate than your sales are increasing. So your sales go to one hundred twenty thousand in the month in your payroll goes to seventy thousand so now you're no longer at fifty percent. And you certainly didn't go down to forty two percent. But now you're at almost went set sixty percent, you know, fifty eight percent. So. You're becoming less efficient. And so for some business owner whose becoming less efficient. How would you advise them ado just increase sales? What would you? What would you do? We'd have to look at what's actually going strategically in the company because a lot of times me from the outside looking in says, oh, you're becoming less efficient. And then I'll ask them what's actually going on. And they may say, oh, no, no, no. We're investing in people because we actually expect sales in the next three months to be at one hundred eighty thousand and we need to do the the training. So we'll be more efficient in five months or they'll say, oh, I didn't realize we, you know, they told me we need more people and I hired and so if you're actually looking at your ratios, and you're looking at them in respect to sales you can actually start to make decisions based on information and say, hey, we got to a hundred thousand dollars with fifty thousand in payroll. What is the capacity of those of those employees at fifty thousand. And where can they get me to in sales? Oh, that level grouping of people can bring you to one hundred seventy thousand awesome. When I start getting to one hundred sixty thousand then I know I'm going to have to hire. Right. But we actually until we look at those relationships to sales. We're just gonna be looking at whether or not sales are increasing whether or not expenses are increasing we have to look at them in relationship to each other solid. Well, you know, one thing that I I also encounter over and over again with business owners is not just a fear of numbers of. I'm sure you have to do with that. But this idea that okay? Well, since I'm not a numbers person. I'm going to defer all of the responsibility for understanding my my numbers to someone who's much smarter than me like Julia Quino Serano, and she's going to be my CFO, and I'm just going to give that to her. And I'm gonna pay her a boatload of money for her to figure that out, and I'm gonna be on the beach. Thank thinking big big thoughts for the next kind of tesla like idea that's out there 'cause I'm a visionary. And I can't be bothered with these numbers like that. And that's why pay brilliant people like Julia. So what's what could possibly be wrong? What? Showgirl? Possibly. I mean, I don't want to really be the most financially literate person the were. That's why pay people like Julia. And this is an I know people who are listening, many of whom are business owners are thinking that I don't need to really know this. I don't need to because that's why pay you because you're genius. And you do that for me. That's right. And I am. Protect you. There you go. And so what I tell all anyone that I work with I teach them what they don't know. And I urge them that if it is not me that they're dealing with that they know and understand and get reports and know what's happening because when you don't know someone can walk away with the whole kitty, and that's the truth and the other half is all the time. All the time. No, one is loyal to you in your brand as you are you have to know what's going on. I don't care if you're sitting on the beach looking at the spreadsheet, I send you you need to be looking at it. And you also need to know if something doesn't look, right. And the only way you can do that is by understanding what's being presented now when it comes to the belief system that I'm not good at numbers, I want to shake them. And generally that is women absolute tell me that in. I I know I know that it came from childhood, I know that it came from the school system because they used to they used to talk to me like I was this. Oh my gosh. She knows numbers. I'm not special. I just like numbers and I study so we I want people to realize that they are capable of being a numbers person. They are capable of understanding and learning will trade have to be willing to step outside that little comfort box, right and understand. How important those numbers are in. When knowledge is power in that power is where we get to make change build our business, grow our business without it. We cannot I completely agree with you. I think the key is making making numbers understandable for you. Like everybody learns differently, and I had to get past my numbers issue by turning as to your point numbers into a story. And so when I was managing department many, many moons ago I had. Had to get into the groove of creating a story behind every line item and the store fixation of my numbers helped me love looking at the those statements every single, you know, month, it wasn't a chore. It was like, oh, wow. You know, I get to figure this kind of storyline out. I get to figure out which are the missing pieces to this plot, etc. And so forth at definitely worked for me. But we're coming to the end of our our little session. Here, thankfully, there's a part two to this. But I hope everyone who's listening. You got a lot out of this first session because it's chock full of great stuff. And if you if you wanna hear more comeback part to next week. Thanks so much have been listened to business insights with Kimberly Marie bonnet to get her personal attention to us in. Your empire. Golden business scale insights network dot com. That's business scale insights network dot com and tune into next week or more from Kimberly Marie Bonnard with business scale insights.

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Sammy Aldeeb & Jaime Torres: Bringing Urban Bricks Restaurants to the Masses

Business Scale Insights

26:27 min | 1 year ago

Sammy Aldeeb & Jaime Torres: Bringing Urban Bricks Restaurants to the Masses

"Welcome to business scale. Insights with Kimberly. Marie bonner. Listen for commentary interviews and information on how to grow your business for all the details, contact business Gail insights network dot com. So empire builders. Are you ready? Here's Kimberly Marie Bonner. Hello. And welcome impair builders to another episode of business skill insights on your host Kimberly Bonner. And I'm so excited to continue our series focused on restaurant business, the restaurant, business, and really keys that you need to know to affectively scale restaurant business, and today, I am so honored to have a wonderful up and coming, or they might say, we're not becoming, we're, we're we're established Kim, but a great upcoming franchise called urban bricks pizza franchise system. I have this EEO with me Sammy, I'll Deeb and the area director high may Torres and I would just like them to just say Hello to the listening audience, real quick. Jim how the going fails here, thank you for having us on the radio channel wonderful. Greater living with technology. We that was a little bit of a hiccup. But Sammy could you could you share with our listening audience more about your background because you this isn't your first rodeo as it were in franchising, you have been in the franchise game for a long time. And you've been you're double down in the food space in the restaurant space. So could you share with the listening audience, your background and really, you know what brought you to found urban bricks? Kim up an increase on the point years. Young bought my first franchise when I was twenty it was ice cream parlor called slab normally after a year. I telling the subway family opened up my first subway and my first ice cream parlor. Right. So I would I would bake bread that the morning and coop ice cream at night. Two locations down the street from one another and all I did was was based bread and, and coupons cream for for several years. I loved I loved Crenshaw's in the franchise just food fed me, all sorts of information, all sort of experience, that they've gathered with them. Two years as you imagine a twin you're young could use all the help I can get. And insurance. As a franchise. Always say subway bomb, slab. Of Crenshaw systems developed. My, my spirit soar that today by business. My business sets to work for got today. If it wasn't for them, obviously wouldn't say a successful as a business owner at age twenty by my two locations, down the street from one another quickly took over city, San Antonio, started popping up location, left, and right. Both subway mom slapped concept, my love, I love one thing. Let's let's hit the other five twelve or thirteen years later, I decided to go ahead and open up our first urban brick location near the city. Wow. What made you wouldn't spire you to open up at your own urban bricks went made? You take that leap. Look at other franchises than this category. I you know, we've you'd never really a love for say with any any of the competitive concepts out there. We got real close and we're really at first I just wanted to get into a franchise. I wanted to buy franchise, like, yeah, I want by time, and they say with the right concept and the right. Looked at a couple, but really done of none of them were were as attractive to me is the marble slab or the subway that up over the past, so we find the of our own an open own location at first, we didn't really open up a first of bricks afraid shine. It was it was more of a restaurant that we wanted to do, we wanted to bring the, the, the concept of San Antonio. So, so we did just that and six months later from the turning away. So many potential investors. We to say you know what maybe time for us to really a framed Shaq was coming up. And we we did that. When he'll very rapidly took over and stayed until the start opening up locations with Antonio metro and one thing, let's four years later now where we're in Panama country where all over the world over from Montana. That's amazing. Now, we are based in south Florida, this radio show and airs on Thursdays at twelve thirty. And so not everybody, even though hiring is going to change that quickly, but not everybody in south Florida knows about the urban bricks brand your restaurants. But a lot of people, you know, we see fast casual pizza restaurants popping up everywhere. So I'm sure that listening on answers like well what's so what's the difference was the urban bricks difference? Great question. We did not one of the focusing on pizza. Only you're right. There's there is plenty of fast casual pizzerias. I'm surprised. But none of our competition have done this, this to all. I think everybody needs to not be very narrow in their menu offering for, for I'm talking about those that are in the fast, casual pizza segments. Everything that goes on the pizza, whether it's green peppers, olives mushrooms, and made of onion can easily be put in a bowl for pasta for Terrell possible, or for both for salad to make your own south bowl or even an opinion. So why do we wanna focus on peaks, only when we can go ahead and? Getting to the pizza, pasta, Panini and salad business. And we did just that, right. So you walk into our restaurant, and it's more of a open kitchen field airy very, very, very fast, very fresh, you get to go in there and you get to go ahead and pick your pushing reading off the line. And whether you wanna put it on a pizza crust. You wanna put it a possible, or you wanna put it on a salad bowl or even Panini club. We're going to go ahead and get it to, you can fresh RIC fast should be on your table within two to three minutes that enough father to fast, Florida. Right. And we just that though. That's the big. That's the big difference that you'll find that herbal bricks versus gotta competition. Is that you can go ahead have pizza one day and you wanna go there on. You can have can have a possible absolutely to win. You can have a salad bowl Thursday. You'll have. You'll have a Panini you wanna go to Friday and sheet. We can go ahead. We've got up we've got, you know, cowgill auto in our store, so we get a little bit more. And just your fast casual typical in, you do a great job of an I visited the new store, the new restaurant in south Miami. And that's exactly what it felt like you were you were catering to, you know, whatever tastes that your consumer hat had when they walked into the store, and I didn't feel like I was limited. I had a numerous choices, which is wonderful, but that kind of leads to my next question I was reading an article about how you built urban bricks by catering to millennials that whole issue of variety and choice. Is that a millennial driver or is that just you what did you mean? When you said that you built your restaurant concept by catering to millennials. Well, Tim millennials account for little over thirty percents of, of purchasing power this today, that's obviously going to go had grow more and grow more and more than a few years. Millennial left to spend money and they say they don't like to eat at home perfect perfect target. So any restaurants, right? And they, they love. They love the, the idea of freshness. They love the idea of having an open kitchen. Nobody wants to wait for their pizza or for the possibility more, nobody wants their super supreme or you know, your typical chicken publish on pasta. Every millennial would like to go ahead and get his own twist their own taste of the electric, custom make all their other food. And we offer just that being an open kitchen and having all fresh ingredients, right there in the open for for our consumers to, to point out to is, is a is a huge era right now in the in the restaurant world. And if you notice, most of these customers are going out and eating outside on the money. So, so we did just that we said, okay, what mailing a lot who's who's spending money out there and we cater to them. Why wouldn't we right day? We're business people. And we wanna make sure that we're successful. And we went to we went to grow. We want to grow the brand. So we, we, we picked out who our target audiences which in this case, the millennials and we, we've catered the tour designs, the menu for locations to just that and help us grow and be successful. I just had a guest on talking about how important it is to. Make sure that your food is accessible via delivery offsite. So do you all have, you know, I'm sure you do, but I wanna give you the opportunity to talk about delivery options, and, and excessive -bility for particularly that millennial target audience. So whether it's a trend or not delivery is is a huge part of. In. US toront-. You're selling food or someone pizza or. He's, you know, several years ago you thought about delivery. You basically have to option. You're either in in Chinese delivered here or or just plastic pizza, right? With with third party delivery, guys out there. They certainly have changed it. They have the naval to go ahead and. Allow for more competition to Chinese restaurants, and the people he is. Right. Right. So now consumers can go ahead receive anything from McDonald to BJ right to their help. So if you are not remote, as a restaurant tour or if you are looking at a plane size, but does not often delivering then you are not gearing up for success. Absolute. Hold that thought we have to take a short break, and we'll be right back Kimberly. Marie Wagner helps millions make millions on business. Gail insights, Thursdays at twelve thirty pm on WSB our business scale insights, helps your business move from startup to scale and his sponsored by new day consulting systems. New day consulting systems can help turn your business into a franchise and scale globally interested though, their website, new day consulting systems dot com and don't forget to tune in Thursdays at twelve thirty for business Gail insights with Kimberly Marie Bonner. If you already have a proven business model, but have concerns about the best way to grow and scale, then you should contact the experts at new day consulting systems. New day uses innovative techniques to ten times the impact of your business. Your local business can become a regional national or international enterprise. New day consulting systems will show you how for more information and to get started with new day visit the website at new day consulting systems dot com. One one new day consulting systems dot com to get your business off the ground and into orphaned, contact new day to day. Back to visit scale insights on your host Kimberly Bonner, and I have the honor of interviewing the CEO of the urban bricks pizza franchise system, Sammy Deeb and his area director for the state of Florida. Hi, may Torres. And we actually don't have that much time left. So I really want to pivot and talk about Florida and maybe I may can come in and talk about your development plans, your grand vision for the franchise system in the state of Florida. What, what you want to accomplish in the next three to five years. And, and do you think that urban bricks pizza? Franchise brand is a really wonderful fit in the Florida market. And the south Florida market in particular. Making for how again. Yes. Well, I just moved almost two years ago to forty two the bell bricks market, I'm willing sold more than twelve franchises, which is great. You mention about our goals. For the thirty market. We're opening the stickland story Miami in a month month and a half and quality Gables where we opening Miami in Saudi he wrote one four four hundred sixty wrote in south Florida, actually one, one other franchisees who owns that story in Dixie. He's sick, which is where the opening bell beach where opening Orlando by the end of the year we're looking at Tampa Jacksonville. So I think briefs concept. It's going to do extremely well into thirty market other markets. Well we're looking at tonight's. Yes, well, and that's it. I mean any thoughts. Yeah. Up florida. To, to Puerto Rico, think I Puerto Rican location is gonna be opening up by the end of this year as well, then was definitely, quote, we're definitely growing in that region. Our goal is to have twenty five open locations within the next five years. Obviously, you've got to open this year, two thousand eighteen already opened up. See location, and we have the third one that's under construction fourth one on the way our land. So we should close up the year with the with four urban bricks of Drake's points out, great state of Florida. I know so I'm in Boca Raton, right now. So what's the closest urban bricks to Boca Raton, Florida? That will be probably know Coral Gables location. We'll be the closest one on the wanting big wrote and south Florida. However, where actually opening another storing depletion area in the new development lengthy walk. Development. So we signed up these almost two years and a half ago. So we should be opening twenty twenty that will be gross wants to book wonderful. And I know you had a grand opening for your south Miami location that happen this past weekend. No. That was Vero beach could grow going to be coming up in the next two weeks. We'll definitely have you wonder how about free pizza from twelve to two. Everybody's on the line, so that will be great. We'll give let's let's do that. Shoutout. Again because when this air is going to be right around your grand opening for that location. So can you give that date and time again? That day. Sure. So we will have the we should have our grand opening on June. The twenty second, we will be giving away a free pizza between twelve and to come over and see that urban bricks on busy wrote. I have the address. Absolutely six one four four big seas. Highway forty three one four three wonderful, wonderful. Okay. So you probably wet the appetite of some of our listeners and some might be shopping around for franchises. And you might might have wept. The appetites literally of some of our listeners. What kind of franchises franchisees, are you interested in working with? Right. What kind of backgrounds do they need to have? We're looking for business oriented franchise as you don't really have to be restaurants were actually worse than the restaurant business. If you have managed a few employees in the past. If you have had led the war, the role of leader in a company with fifteen or so employees ease, then you would actually qualify for her brick. We're looking for owner operators in the further between the hour between month one and months, six, we feel about very important to actually have somebody that's gonna be hands on somebody that's gonna go ahead and recapping community be able to go ahead and give the best service and experienced possible to each and every one of the customers, walking in, and then hopefully within six months. They'll be sitting up there restaurants on cruise control where they can be semis, absentee older, and basically looking for a key to redo the experience in an area next to the smoke patient. But yeah, we're definitely looking for franchisee partners being a smaller up and coming franchise as you mentioned Earlier Kim. We have a lot more time to be very has on each and everyone about partners. We wanna be in, in, in constituting occasion with them to make sure that they're they're to, to succeed. We, you know, we are our stage. We can't afford for failures. So we'll give in a hundred ten percent from our side, wonderful talk tuck, little bit more about the franchise support that they're going to get because. You know, the franchise restaurant market is so competitive, and it's a crowded market, and particularly your space. And I know you've differentiated your brand as far as you're offering as far as far as your food offering. But as a franchise system is are there, other differentiator is that you wanna share with the listening audience? I support I agree. The restaurant market is, is the always have the last hundred years up in the been a little saturated. Right. But once you go and be able to not only build your own pizza, Joel possible till build your own, Panini and salads in and out within two three minutes. There's, there's not one of their nation was offering. Right, when it's rain where can you go ahead and just a pizza or possible delivered to us through life? I pick up system we offer that, right? Who's got who's got an in house delivery system, put in place with all the right six dollars and all the right marketing, we do. That's, that's the that's what we offer versus versus others. The other big thing that we offer is each and every one of our executive team has gotten some sorts of restaurant experience, whether it's been a real estate confi construction team are, are obviously, developers have our marketers are marketing directors. Everybody's starting from the CEO has made scoop. Ice cream or made sandwiches in the past and have actually worked with an eight hundred behind the counter. So we understand what, what are French, I've you going, right? We do we understand, we're not sitting behind a desk and try to come up with. Got a. But. I think that's very important. I agree. I think that's, that's something huge. We are young. I'm sorry, I've got to interrupt. I told the time goes quickly, we only have about a little bit more than two minutes left in the show. So if someone in south Florida or around the world wanted to reach out an invest in an urban bricks franchise. How can they get in touch with you? Who do they need to talk to you? Can we show our website, WWW dot fervent, brick dot com? And out the film franchise, including so we'll be in touch with them very soon. Usually we're, we're, we're in touch with within twenty four hours, they or we talked to them and see what we can do to welcome to our family. Some I am so excited. Thank you so much, Sammy, and high may for actually spending time with me today and going into more detail about the urban bricks franchise system. This archive of this show is going to be on the business skill insights network dot com. Online community, actually all of the archives of the show are going to be there, and we really encourage you, if you wanna listen to this, this conversation more in detail. And if you have a question right, that you wanna pose to the community about what we've just gone over. I encourage you to hit that location up business skill insights network dot com. Thank you guys so much for your time. Don't forget to tune in every Thursday on WSB are at twelve thirty four the show. And if you wanna connect with me, personally, I can definitely be reached. At eight five five eight six three three three two seven Kimberly. Marie von are helps millions make millions on business. Gail insights, Thursdays at twelve thirty pm on WSB. Our business scale insights, helps your business move from startup to scale and his sponsor by new day consulting systems. New day consulting systems can help turn your business into a franchise and scale it globally interested, go to their website. New day consulting systems got calm and don't forget, the tune in Thursdays at twelve thirty for business Gail insights with Kimberly Marie Bonner. You have been listened to business Gail insights with Kimberly Marie Bonner to get her personal attention to us in your empire Goethe business scale insights, network dot com. That's business scale insights network dot com and tune in next week for more from Kimberly. Marie? With business scale insights.

Kimberly Marie Bonner south Florida Florida Kimberly Sammy Deeb Kimberly Bonner Gail WSB Kim Gail Marie bonner Miami Torres affectively scale area director business owner CEO Crenshaw Marie Wagner Boca Raton
Jarael Holston: Sharing His Recipe for Business Success As A South Florida Restauranteur

Business Scale Insights

27:11 min | 1 year ago

Jarael Holston: Sharing His Recipe for Business Success As A South Florida Restauranteur

"Welcome to business scale. Insights with Kimberly. Marie bonner. Listen for commentary interviews and information on how to grow your business for all the details. Contact business Gail insights network dot com. So empire builders are you ready? Here's Kimberly Marie Bonner. Hello. And welcome empire-builders to another episode of business scale insights, I'm your host Kimberly, Marie Bonner. And I'm so excited to continue our series on the restaurant business. We are really focused on these next few episodes. We're focused on how to take your restaurant business from startup to scale up. And so in that regard, I've brought some of variety of restaurant tours onto interview last week. We had the CEO of urban bricks franchise system who actually owns and operates a global franchise system with over a hundred units and today, I'm actually bringing it closer to home. And I'm interviewing this EEO of fat boys barbecue in Broward County. Joyal halston, and I am so honored to have him on the program today. So. So mister halston. Thank you so much for coming onto the program. Thank you for having me Kim. I'm so honored, well, you and your family have an incredible story, and I have to say have to preface all of this, that I heard about shore your barbecue restaurant from friends and family. So that's wonderful. That means you have a buzz on the street. That means people know about you, and they know about your brand, and then when I did a little bit of research about you. I saw an article that you are so so well known in the area that you have people fly in from the Bahamas to come to your restaurant, which is pretty impressive. I might say, so as really really congratulations for having that kind of following. So you are locally owned your family owned. You are a veteran you have an increase. Your also a pastor, you and your wife own the business. It's just a great inspirational story. And I want you to share that story with the audience today a little bit. Well, thank you for having me Kim, I wont all and just appreciate everything that you do for the business community thing, and helping entrepreneurs with inside resources and it's people like you that really help people like me along the way to really start, you know, in one place, and then, you know, escalate to where you desire to be I just wanna appreciate you on all that you do in sewing, back into budding entrepreneurs and restaurants here. So I appreciate this thing. Yes, ma'am. So we what was the long story, but just to give you a snapshot at what how we've gotten to this point, I am a military veteran, and I worked in aviation, once I got out of the military and my wife started, we got married, baggage thousand and nine my wife started wasn't for the post office, and she had been with the post office about nine years or so. And maybe eight nine years and she had grown weary with the post office wanted to, you know, venture out his mother things. And one day she was attacked by dog. And it was her. Yeah. Hurt pretty bad. And at that time, I was not financially able to do anything at that time. So I really start to, you know, look at what business ideas I have that could, you know, supplement my wife's income because she couldn't leave right away and I love to barbecue and I came to be just start barbecue. When you know and I love to barbecue so out of my that yard, I still have the same smoker that I started this business in my backyard, I look at it every day. What me and I started barbecue on that little smokeout, my backyard and letting friends and family, taste it and everybody loved it. And, you know, from there we did a church function and fat, boy, started right out of that. Search function. Everybody said we gotta have this barbecue. So my plan was just make enough money that I could, you know, make in two weeks with my, you know, why would you know make in the month that was my plan and here we all day. We started off in front of church, and we eventually got a little low small food truck, and we graduated to a big food truck, and starting all the food circuits, and we have lines of fifty to seventy five people waiting at a time, and we were served for five, six hundred people at food truck events. Some of the other. Trucks, when have many people, we have a line of fifty sixty five people, so we traveled the food truck circuit truck was parked down at the courthouse and one day, I drove by restaurant I was not interested in opening a restaurant I hadn't experienced and passed the restaurant and something said, you know, go forward and we gave it a shot in Deerfield and from day one the line was out the door, and it has been that way every since our children helped us out. It was think thirteen fourteen at the time, and they have been in the business, helping us out running locations running out of when they were teenagers when my, my wife and I could make any way hoping my mother-in-law she is just, you know, been there since day one. So it's a family of fan, my sister, my brother. You know, step, dad. I mean it is just been. A family of fair. Everybody digging in, in helping us spiel this business. I'm might be the face of it, but I am not the whole business in and of this by myself rather because it's a family of fair and my wife and my children have really been the bedrock of our business and keeping grow going and growing, you know, it's it's truly labor of love, you can tell that in your voice, and your story. And it's I hope I hope the people that are listening to us today, and even when it's rebroadcast on the podcast, what you're sharing with them, as very common, meaning you and your wife, experienced a pain point. Right. It was something that was jarring, and it got you out of both of your comfort zones, particularly you and it or not, that's a very common theme and entrepreneurship. And so whoever's listening to my voice in listening to you to your voice. If they're going through a similar pain point don't waste your pain. I've had the similar experience. I had a near death experience that literally birthed my company and it's taken me all over the nation's nation, this nation two different countries. So don't waste your pain. You may be going through a very kind of dark night of this whole of valley experience. But you're if you mind your pain, very well. Something can come out on the other end that will just transform not only your life, but it can transform your family's life, it can transform your communities live. I don't know why I'm going in this direction, but I'm gonna flow with okay because because I, I, I mean, I was flat on my back in ICU, and people were looking at me, and my, my father and tears rolling down his eyes and he thought he was going to lose his daughter at thirty nine and then I'm, I'm back. So so don't waste your pain saying your way. So anyway, if you haven't gone to fat boys barbecue there is one that is in Coral Springs in its very visited. It's a wonderful establishment. The food is even better. I bought a bunch of food over the Memorial Day holiday in my, yes. And my will I when we first met when we first met, I said, you know, my standard for barbecues very high because my daddy's from North Carolina and anybody. Style or North Carolina is just a big deal. I was like I it's. Yes, it is. It is like you worship at the altar the barbecue. So I bought the barbecue, and I brought home to my mom and my mom was, like, whoa. What is this? I said, if I tell you where it is going to be parked up in there. You go every day. Absolutely. Right. So it's hard for me to articulate the difference between your barbecue and everybody else's barbecue. And you know how people are barbecue fanatics but share with audience? What makes you a restaurant different? What makes you a recipe different? What makes your food the whole experience? What, what makes fat boys barbecue unique? Are well I one one of the things about barbecue is barbecue is regional guy. Carolina barbecue. Texas barbecue. You've got, you know, a sore Kansas City style barbecue. You've got a missing out. Barbecue you've got to Kentucky style barbecue, so barbecue is regional somebody in Memphis might not like the Carolina style. You know, so it's, it's open. Into interpretation. You know, based on a person's upbringing and their region and what they're accustomed to for us. We apply to marry all of these different regions in some form on other in what we do whether or not I port is more Carolina with brisket is more is Texas out brisket, you know, our baby bags some more of a Memphis, south baby bags. I think Lewis ribs or more of a Kansas City style. So we like marry all of these take all of these, you know, myriad of regions of barbecue, and we bring them together. Then we give southern sides with it, you know, and excuse me, he it breathes for great experience because it's like different things coming together from like different flavors. It's all good. But it's like, you know, everything is you meet. And we also. So came out of the food truck world. So we have awesome barbecue food truck menu. We've got sandwiches like the big daddy whereas, you know, Carolina port Texas brisket and smoke. Mac and cheese on top all one big huge sandwich. So that's you know our food menu. Definitely sets us apart, and we do seven five nine and we talk about collard greens. Cut and clean grease word word you have my mom was crying with those Colleen. Right. Right. So, so that's, that's what makes us unique and it's all homemade and it's made with love barbecues labor of his, and we put love into what we do in love into our customer service experience. And so we believe that that's what sets us apart. Okay. Well, I'm going to have to jump in here real quick. Because we have to go to a break. And we'll be right back. And let's talk about kind of two or three pieces of advice that you would be able to pass onto budding restaurant tours that you wish you had, when you start it. Okay. Okay. All right. If you already have a proven business model, but have concerns about the best way to grow and scale, then you should contact the experts at new day consulting systems. New day uses innovative techniques to ten times the impact of your business. Your local business can become a regional national or international enterprise. New day consulting systems will show you how for more information and to get started with new day. Visit the website at new day consulting systems dot com. One new day consulting systems dot com to get your business off the ground and into orphaned, contact new day to day Kimberly. Marie von helps millions make millions on business. Gail insights, Thursdays at twelve thirty pm on WSB business scale insights, helps your business moved from startup to scale and his sponsor by new day consulting systems. New day consulting systems can help turn. Your business into a franchise and scale it globally interested, go to their website, new day consulting systems dot com and don't forget, the tune in Thursdays at twelve thirty for business Gail insights with Kimberly Marie Bonner. We are bag. This is Kimberly Bonner, your host for business. Get insights, and I am interviewing Joyal Holsten the CEO of fat boys barbecue when in Broward County, Florida, and Mr. Wilson are you still there, some you're wonderful and before the break, I just teased up the fact that I really wanted you to share really your wisdom, right? There are a lot of people who are listening out there. They have hopes and dreams of becoming a successful restaurant tour and doing something similar to what you and your family have done. And I'm just wondering if you could share maybe two or three pieces of advice that you wish someone had given to you. When you first started. And there, there, there are so, so many that I I've so many lessons and experiences that I've had I've taught me so much, but I can say show, you guys, some of the, the key ones that I've come to realize, and comes really allowed to form. My journey is the first one is that they all is, is a necessity for success. And I'll say it again. Failure is in the sesame or success. I used to think that being successful and what I was doing was all about things excess ful but it really let me open myself up to knowing that they all is really what teaches me how to have success and a half the things excess, because when I failed, it wasn't about me learning, what to do that made me successful a lot of times, it was learning in that failure whatnot to do. So I use my failures as the key ingredient to sustain my success and I was always afraid of, of ill your as on, once once I got out, and I got him business, but it was my many failures that have gotten into a level of sustained success. So we need you need. Healthy dose of failure, and you need a healthy dose of adversity might not always be in the form of failure. But adversity, you need, you know, challenges that really produced a fabric of you as entrepreneur, a lot of times, we run from those things are necessary in order to produce a good, wholeness entrepreneur, and one of the other things that I have learned that I wish someone had told me is that being successful, especially in the restaurant industry is not always about your passion, passion. You know you can have a great passion. But you never subsitute your passion for proper infrastructure because you're, you're passionate about something doesn't mean that you might just open up a restaurant I love Jamaican for I'm passionate about. And I turn that into my business model. You know, you have to really, you know, measure. Is your your passion which business plan? And sometimes you can't, you know, move in as much of your passion as you have to do with the market is dictating some people will go to their passion, and just stay there. I'm not moving 'cause that's that's, that's what I do. And, you know, and you you drown out there, because sometimes we have to deviate from your passion to maintain perspective in the market. So I was someone had told me that. You know what helped me out? And, you know, the other thing is, is the last thing that I was share is it doesn't matter how great your business plan is it doesn't matter how great your recipe is doesn't matter. How great your, your marketing skills are it doesn't matter the great package that it culminates in comes together for you. And, you know, the great one that you are, you're great business plan, or whatever it is at the end of the day, one of the most challenging things for successful entrepreneur is staffing, and it is delegating. People, you know, to carry out your vision, and your brand, and your DNA and a lot of times, you know, you'll find that not everybody is, as excellent about, you know, sharing your brand. The same passion and insane level of excellence that you would. And so it becomes challenging staffing becomes a challenge. So. So that's something that you gotta prepare yourself for as you begin to grow as entrepreneur, hiring, the right people, motivating those that you do higher, and being able to not keep that people too long, that'll be seeing choice vision. I love this. So I'm gonna park here for a minute, because you could literally write a book based upon those three gyms. So I want our listening audience to get a piece of paper write this down. I'm going to reiterate what he just said, and then I'm going to add some of my two cents because I've been in the franchising space for a decade. And what he's saying is pretty much gospel. Failures needed for success. This is the complete opposite of everything that you've been taught K K through twelve this is the exact opposite of everything. You've been taught in college. It's the exact opposite of everything you've been taught as a graduate student. And if you've got a PHD, everyone is going to tell you, you, she you cannot fail you cannot fail. You should be afraid of failure because you're going to be penalized with failure as an entrepreneur, if you're going where no one is bully gone before, right? You don't have a real blueprint. So you're going to. And so the key is when you do fail that you make the course correction very quickly and you don't make the same steak again. So that's, that's that's key. So really I want to really go there because I get people who talked me all the time, and they want to be great entrepreneurs, but there's so much fear of failure, and we've all been there because we've been pro rammed completely feel fear fear failure. The second one is about the market. And you talked about being successful is not really about pursuing your passion per se. And I love that because a lot of people think that they can be a successful entrepreneur restaurant tour, because they make great been yet is or they make great shrimp and grits, or they make great sweet potato pile. What you feel into playing a, you know. You know, whatever meatballs whatever it is. But the problem is if you live in a place that no one even knows what been yeas are an as if rebel from Louisiana. They're like, what people do. And I'm like, believe it or not a ton of people don't know what have been yea. So if you open, you know, twenty four seven hot and Milton your mouth been yays. No. Nobody y'all looking at me, my, my crew in front of me people know what you're stating what they will know what you're talking about in south Lord. They'll try they'll be like what don't it is. But what world is this? So your passion might be been used. But if you're market, they don't no one knows what have been your years, you won't have a problem. So you're gonna have to adjust your passion for what the Mark there you what the market can support. And then lastly, you know, staffing is really, really everything. And, and, and, and I'm going to I'm going to ask you to really impact that because right now there's somebody that wants to pull over to the side of the road, or somebody listening to this podcast, and they're like, okay, he said staff. That's my pain. N- point I have a revolving door. I can't keep qualified staff people get what's going on. What's going on? So I know staffing, everyone knows staffing is a key. But can you pull that out a little bit more? Can you tease it out a little bit more? How can we retain your staff? How do you do job of recruiting staff, that whole issue of firing? What are some of the gyms that you've learned over time while I will be transparent, and I will be honest. Which is me, you know, I am ill figuring this thing out. I I'm still I'm still figuring it out. But I can say one of the things that I have come to realize is that the most detrimental thing for me. In my time is entrepreneur as released the building my plan and making sure I have sustained growth and development has not been about always hiring the right person in hiring the wrong person. The problem for me in the most detrimental thing for me when I know I have the wrong person but I keep them too long. And it's it's so detrimental. It's so cold, that's for mental, you know, so I think that it is important that when you recognize certain traits and certain characteristics that don't look like your DNA when you start seeing everybody comes in the door with a great resume. And everybody comes in the door that, you know, they're, they're ready for the position that gun whole first couple of weeks of first month. Whatever after that, do they still have the you'll to really be molded with the DNA of the brand. And I stopped hiring people that don't have our DNA. You know, I actually certain questions I see other compatible with the DNA in the fabric of our organization. They can be intellectual. They're gonna be bright now, the cognitive energy, and intellectual, ingenuity. But do they have certain traits and certain characteristics, that say that they're they have to pinch? You'll to possess the DNA about working. Innovation and whatever you're, you're in a first of all in order for you to hire the right people. You have to have a good mission statement, when live by it, you gotta have a vision statement, you gotta know who you are as an organization because you're just bringing people in just for the sake of filling positions and Neil, you're needing bodies, you're not gonna hire with the intentions of bringing somebody that's compatible with the vision of the organization. No, I love everything that you just sit there. And I wanna almost kind of land the plane here because this is probably the most important thing that you've shared culture over everything that's over everything culture over everything. So if you are hoping to build a great business that stands the test of time. Everything is centered on your identity. He said it DNA and closure. So unfortunately, it happens every time you know the. Thirty minutes goes like that. And art. Unfortunately, the time is up, but I want you to plug your locations in your most recently opened location. Well, our barbecue -cations are in. We have one in Deerfield tool for sow powerline road in Deerfield beach. We have one in call springs, sixty one ninety two westbound paroled. We also have a barbecue. Location, just recently opened in Lauderdale that ones to five north federal highway. Right. At sunrise boulevard, and federal hiring. We also have a Cajun crab and location in pumping. Oh, that's at twenty seventeen with Atlantic boulevard is called crazy. As in crafts, and also the reach of the web, fat boys with the barbecue dot com. Wonderful you guys definitely, you definitely want to check these restaurants out. Okay. And thank you, so much, Mr. halston for your time, and attention and pleasure album, everyone. I hope you really take off with your restaurant businesses. And here's to your success. You have been listened to business Gail in. Sites with Kimberly Marie Bonner to get her personal attention to you in your empire Goede business scale insights, network dot com. That's business scale insights, network dot com and tune into get next week or more from Kimberly Marie Bonner with business scale insights.

Kimberly Marie Bonner North Carolina Marie bonner mister halston Kim Broward County Gail Kansas City CEO Memphis Bahamas Joyal halston Texas Gail Deerfield beach Deerfield Carolina port Texas Coral Springs WSB
Marco Scanu: Restaurant Business Financials- What You Need to Know

Business Scale Insights

26:26 min | 1 year ago

Marco Scanu: Restaurant Business Financials- What You Need to Know

"Welcome to business scale. Insights with Kimberly. Marie bonner. Listen for commentary interviews and information on how to grow your business for all the details, contact business Gail insights network dot com. So empire builders. Are you ready? Here's Kimberly Marie Bonner. Oh, empire-builders. Welcome to business. Skill insights with Kim Bonner. I'm your host. And I'm so excited to really kick off a new series focused on the restaurant business. As many of, you know, I am a franchise developer by trait and many of the individuals that come to talk to me on a regular basis, our restaurant business owners, and they are bright eyed, and bushy tailed, but many times, their pieces to their restaurant business that are missing. So I have with me today, a gentleman named Marco scanner who is a brilliant consultant, and businessman, he has been working with international entrepreneurial, ventures across Asia Europe. Africa, Latin America, and the United States. He currently serves as a venture coach at the university of Miami's launch pad program. He. Has been a invited. Professor in the areas of franchise growth, entrepreneurship and management of entrepreneurial ventures, he serves on several boards of directors, including the board of directors for the international coach federation. And he is a member of entrepeneurship advisory board of the school of hospitality business at Michigan State University, and he serves on the board of advisors for the Pino global entrepreneurship center at F, u he's gonna share more about his background today, but I just wanted to welcome him on the show. Thank you so much. Marco for being on the show with us today. Well, thank you for having me on the program today. And you know what I like to do? So my story I come from Samuel entrepreneurs, I was born and raised in the world of hospitality. My dad founded a travel agency back in nine hundred. Fifty six which he later used at a platform to expand into other related businesses, including a one hundred twenty seven room hotel and tour operator. My mother on the on the other hand, he's had retired medical doctor, but she's very enterpreneurial. My mother was also a very active woman. She was in the coffee business. So she, she's selected on exported premium coffee beans from Minnesota to the United States in the nineteen thirties. That's you know, I was born and raised in, you know, around businesses and bound in around the challenges when entrepreneurs and business owners want to scale their operation. Absolutely started work. So sort of working on my dad's business when I was eight and, you know, I for a few years, you know, I got my bachelor's degree and my MBA, and I launched my first company it was a ladder store. What a swith business and I was I was determined to scale my company, and that grits route to Sarah locations. However, I initially failed so I grow it six locations in a had to scale back down to one location, and that problem really was for me, particularly to learn about a key concept. I apply nowadays, which is importance of developing systems processes and metrics. So I became obsessed with NT fine and you seeing key performance indicators that. Each single department. Everything is done within the company. Back in two thousand four I went back to school again stayed. And what I was there. My friends approach me in some Luke, can you help as scholar company? I see that you were able to not only scale your business bad, while you're going to school. You're not two hands on on the company and the can feel operate without your presence. So I began coaching and consulting my friends on how to lament systems processes and again, metrics and without knowing its or even looking for the valid at business helping friends, and then their friends, and then other clients on how again to use metrics and statistics to grow business. So today, fast forward, I work with a team of about fifteen people to provide business consulting business coaching and business blind clients around the world. With again, the focus on the house, Taliban, distri restaurant business, which, by the way is one of my passions wonderful. So you're the perfect one when we initially had our conversation in Miami. And I thought to myself. Wow, I've gotta get this guy on my show, because of the just incredible variety of your experience and the depth and the breadth of your experience. So when, when we were in Miami, we had this great meeting, and you talk to me about a restaurant assessment that you do with a lot of your clients. And I thought this is something, the whole concept is something that I think are listening audience would really, really, really learn a lot from. And so, in case you guys didn't connect with the coal theme. Again, this is really focused on restaurant businesses and helping restaurant. Businesses develop and scale and grow effectively Margo is really kicking off this entire series about, really the foundations that you need in order to scale. Well, and so, even if you're not a restaurant owner, if you know, someone in your family, who dreams of becoming a restaurant owner, or you have someone in your family, or friends, or colleague, or in your network, that is looking to do this is an owner of a restaurant. I really encourage you to text them. Don't don't do it while you're driving. But text them or send this podcast that we're going to put out later into the podcast sphere, a sin this recording to them because it's so important that they get this information. Okay. So back to you Marco talk to the listening audience about this restaurant assessment. Why did you create it? And what did you find? You know that, you know, precipitated this assessment that. A lot of restaurant owners needed in order to effectively scale their businesses. Perfect. So. Back to when I was scaling, my delauro concept. And you know, I thought I was a keen of the world. Life was grade. I mean I there there was no way I could fail. But I almost failed though, that's where I would say that restaurant, I meant was board. Here's the thing, I tell my friends and my clients. The following if you cannot explain your business in numbers, you don't understand what's going on in your. I love that again, say that again, say that again, say that if you cannot if you cannot explain your, your operation in numbers, you have no clue what's going on in your business. That's a bottom line, which means that, you are mandates secrets, your driving this car blindfolded. That's what's happening. So as I said before a huge area of our business consulting for. Focuses on the foot service sector, and we have basically developed a dashboard, just like the one that, you know, came have when you drove this morning to the station, you have your that's your car that shows the speed that paternal so on way have developed dashboard, that provides data driven foundation for making informed business decisions. So here's here's the problem. Many restaurant owners are BC managers staff ordering supplies. Keeping customers happy keeping track with thousands of other tiny details to run success, a restaurant, they're walking around wondering how much money am I making as menu items profitable are my facials worth, so whereas assessment or audit, they holistic are? View or approach, so analyze the key drivers of revenue profit and customer base. For example, if they look at a breakdown of revenues, the food cost and labor cough. How do you manage orders? How do you manage him Vittori? How do you control consistency and waste? How about your marketing? So we come out with with their score and basically snap shop or, you know, an MRI or X Ray when you go to the doctor to same thing shows. Exactly what's working was working. And again is a data based type of report that allows for informed decision making instead of second guessing, what's going on with the restaurant that is beautiful. I wish I had met you a long time. Because I work with a lot of restaurants, and many people start a restaurant, as you will know, Marco, because you did it yourself with your July toe a store. They start the restaurant because they have a passion. They have a talent right? They're gifted at something, but they don't necessarily understand the business behind it. They don't have necessarily a business, and these certainly don't understand the financials and the numbers behind it. And so, again, one of the key reasons why wanted you on the show as we kick off this kind of restaurant business owner just series is that I want my listening audience, particularly those who either know restaurant owners or in love with a restaurant owner or is just connected and network with one to really help them get there. Hit around some important numbers that they need to know like they need to internalize in order to have a really, really strong restaurant business. So can you just kick off really quickly? We have about two minutes before the break. So can you kick off about three or four key concepts? Key numbers that you think business owners need to know. And then we can talk about it more during the after the break. Absolutely. I think it's important to even go beyond the financials and look at the industry. Benchmarks and I like to break down the four key metrics of restaurant into two categories number one, but online at restaurants, make profits when they can see as many people if they can through the day, and when the patrons ordered high priced items or basically more food, so we have to metrics and this category, and then we like to look at the force the foot cost and labor cost going back to the first two metrics. See down restaurant, sit turns is a key metric, given example, the national average is one which means that if you have for example, thirty restaurants, use should see thirty customers for lunch and thirty customer for dinner just to be on par with. The national average then the next question is how about your average tickets. Then go to the cost of food cost, which is our two sub metrics, such as do you have a send a recipe. What is it waste, as a percentage of purchasing then labor cost, what is your hourly rates? What is your employee, turn over that I do have an idea the typical food service restaurant is supposed to run at about sixty five percent prime cost? But his prime cost when we come bind put cost and labor cost that adds apt to prime cost. So if you think about it, sixty five percent, Maine, sixty five cents out of every dollar that you bring in revenue restaurant owner. So these are the four key metrics, that Winnie Shelly take a look at, there's at least twenty more. But these are the key metrics that we initially analyse. Is Iran awesome. We will take a deep dive into those metrics when we came bright back from this break. Thank you. Generally ref- honor helps millions make millions on business. Gail insights, Thursdays at twelve thirty pm on WSB. Our business gal insights, helps your business moved from startup to scale and is sponsored by new day consulting systems, new day consulting systems can help turn your business into a franchise and scale it globally interested Dona, their website, new day consulting systems dot com and don't forget, the tune in Thursdays at twelve thirty for business Gail insights with Kimberly Marie Bonner. If you already have a proven business model, but have concerns about the best way to grow and scale, then you should contact the experts at new day consulting systems. New day uses innovative techniques to ten times the impact of your business. Your local business can become a regional national or international enterprise. New day consulting systems will show you how for more information and to get started with new day. Visit the website at new day consulting systems dot com. One month, new day consulting systems dot com to get your business off the ground and into orphan, contact new day to day. And we're back with business. Get insights. I'm your host Kimberly Bonner, and I am interviewing Marco scanner who is a brilliant, business consultant, and he was telling us about key find key metrics for successful restaurant. So Marco continue what you sharing with the audience, we're Bank, you. And by the way, she had, you're calling me, a brilliant. I think that. It's more about, you know, looking at the numbers and looking at the basics of, of this, look, success in business on a specially in the restaurant industries, always go back to basics so to continue. So before I talk in detail about the four metrics. I think it important that the audience knows that in addition to the Alaska store, and change that I talked about, before I have experienced rating restaurants and nowadays, investing freshman. So somebody, I operated, they allowed to store and grew it. And then all of a sudden, I'm consulting for restaurants now. I been in the trenches in the restaurant industry. Eight years ago. The same mistakes of many restaurant owners are you know making today. So going back to the four metrics in seat down. Restaurant turns is, is a key key metric, so as I was saying before, if you have for example, thirty restaurant on average, you should be able to see thirty customers for lunch and thirty customers for dinner, if you want to be within the national average Ord into the national restaurant association that's one key mentoring that, that will look at when allies, the restaurant, second, one is the average tickets, which is basically, what patrons spend, you know, your restaurant, so we're looking at higher priced items or having patriots. Order more items. Or a combination of these two. So that's the second metric now I like to talk about the cost because that's where my experience many restaurant concepts fail or succeed against sixty five percent. And this is an average sixty five percent of every dollar goes to food cost and labor cost. So when we look at the food costs, you know, we analyze the whole process how, how do you order? How do you keep inventory, how many days of sales have an inventory, how are you changing your menu and even pricing based on the cost, especially when it comes to protein. What is your percentage of waste as tunnel purchases? So we look at the whole process from the beginning to the end to Termine the food cost under drivers of food car. Then labor cost. Labor cost is also a key key element to keep an eye on, of course. And we go beyond the hourly rate for the number of hours for staff, member, the employee turnover also is import the metric that we look at so combined these for metrics are he minds to mations keep it off of an initial analysis. But I would like to fifth one with a brief reference that I will go into a few minutes. The fact that nowadays. The lever delivering has become a key driver restroom from revenues. And I'm so that's, that's a new metric to keep an eye on. Yes. Absolutely. Because the fewer and fewer people want to go and sit down in a restaurant. And so you have to you have to factor in the cost to deliver. Whether it's something that you built into your restaurant, and you have your internal staff or whether you're outsourcing, so that's really key. And I'm glad you, you raise them, you know, not all restaurants want to scale and so many, many restaurants are happy, just having maybe one two or three locations. Family owned and operated, and they're happy and walking off into the sunset, but then their other restaurants, Margot who they wanna have global domination. Right. They want they want to be the next McDonald's, and they wanna be the. Next, chick fillet. And sometimes they come to me, and they probably come to you, Brad item bushy tailed, and they have the, the just total global domination, right in their heart and their mind. And while they may have some of these metrics mastered, you know, at the local level, when they're two three locations. Are there other metrics that they really these restaurant owners really need to have mastered, if they really want to just go worldwide? And and if so, what are those? Absolutely. And I'm glad you're asking this question. Because one we get into the whole conversation scaling then talking about about different set of issues, and challenges would say, the first one is when you scale. It's all about consistency. Meaning your customer goes to one location or different locations. You want those costs from our suspensions to always expect and get the same experience service wise quality, while wise, fortunate wise, and so on. So ensuring consistency is key. Because at the end of the day, it's, it's all about the brand. When ailing grow, it's all about keeping that brand consistency. And for me Brandon, it's about the living on a promise. Especially today with social media. You want to make sure that that experience is consistent. Otherwise, your costumers a little walkway and spending dollars somewhere else. So going back to having systems processes metrics. This is where they become really, really important in scaling in a for Asian. And I'm only talking about the metrics that I made reference to before the food costs and the table turns, I'm talking about when you kale those systems, I'm processes some metrics shoe, should help restaurant owners hold their team members accountable. So I'm a big believer in heavy metrics to measure and reward results. So, when, when it's skin in the business, the human factor, because they've been more important meaning attracting hiring and retaining the key people through the use of metrics, you wanna make sure that you're keeping the eight performers and force coaching them and helping them to become even. Same with those that are not performing us. Well, that's where the metrics, coming to hold that they members uncountable to make sure that they live experience that patrons expect them to the metric again remains that I mentioned before. I want to vibe restaurant owners to think about how the restaurant industry is rapidly changing own back then year, then you about ten years ago, the retailing distri phase. Challenges with digital commerce. I, I see that the next few years and it's already happening spin next few years will bring a huge formation in the restaurant industry used to name a few examples. How do you get back of changes in consumer eating habits? Yes. How do you incorporate new front and back of the house technologies into your appreciation? I mean rent to scale restaurant concept technology is key absolute word and third. What a set before the she's from premises to off premises sales. This is a huge shift star restaurant owners should always keep an eye on new technologies nutrients and have have a way to adapt to specially consumer habits. That is awesome, addition items that is wonderful thing. That is absolutely terrific information. Marco, thank you so much for sharing it we only literally have one minute left. So how can our listeners reach you? Perfect. Thank you for is skiing. We have to visiting Miami, or website is visa business plans come again, that's visa business plan stuff. Calm and our Email info at visa business plans dot com wonderful and if people want to connect with these episodes, check us out on business scale insights, network dot com. That's business scale insights, network dot com joined the online community. And here's to your success. You have been listened to business Gail insights with Kimberly. Marie Bonner to get her personal attention to you and your advisory Goede business scale insights network dot com. That's business gal insights network dot com and tune in again next week or more from Kimberly. Marie bonnet with business scale and sites.

Marco Kimberly Marie Bonner business owner Marie bonner Miami Gail United States university of Miami Kim Bonner consultant Michigan State University Africa Professor developer advisory board Minnesota Pino Asia Europe
Starr Dawkins: From Social Media Influencer to Trailblazing CEO

Business Scale Insights

26:40 min | 1 year ago

Starr Dawkins: From Social Media Influencer to Trailblazing CEO

"Welcome to business scale insights with Kimberly Marie Bonner listen for commentary interviews and information on how to grow your business for all the details contact business GAIL INSIGHTS NETWORK DOT COM empire-builders. Are you ready Pierce Kimberly Marie Bonner hello and welcome empire-builders to another episode of business scale insights nights. I'm your host Kimberly Bonner and we are continuing our series on branding and I'm so excited to have with me as a special guest star Dawkins who is an incredible social media influence her. She's come up with her own brand. She's got a store in sunrise and I just wanted you to say hello to the audience real quickly. Hello people many believe it or not star many many many many people in South Florida no you. I'm going to tell a story after I kind of tea up the whole branding series but <hes> she's much more popular than I think. She realizes anyway to just kinda recap what this branding series is all about. Oh one of the reasons why I'm doing it because ideal with a lot of small business owners and small business WANNA be owners. One as one is scale <hes> you know they want to scale and they know that I'm a franchise developer. They know I have have a background and intellectual property licensing. They're like Oh Kim. What do I need to do and one of the things that I find that they haven't done is develop a strong brand and so consider this brand series that you listening to lock it in W._S._b.? S. biard Thursdays Twelve thirty one zero three point nine F._M.. <hes> in Broward County really lock this in because if you don't have a brand folks you really won't be able to scale well and particularly if you WANNA franchise particularly want to license off and do a deal with another company. You've got to build your brand and one of the things that's changed. In the twenty first century. The digital age is influencers. The rise of influencers and people just us like a star Dawkins brought her on because I feel like there are a lot of traditional businesses that number one don't even know what influence our is don't have instagram they don't they're like snappy. chaps was snapchat <hes> youtube they might know about but they they're really really clueless about really wet being a social media influence or really social media's about so for the listening listening audience star. Can you explain to them really what is a social media influence. A social media influence. There is a person who has influence over their audience so it's like people think so deep into it. Do you behalf followers. Do Your followers listen to you simple as that so that's why brands like maybe Ford or even crayon companies because kids are on social media's in so if this kid is using this new cray Crayola Crayon on color and a bunch of kids listen to that kid what happens sales go up so big brands work with influencers like me but for me I decided to instead of being the influencers for brands. I became an the influence from my own business and that's why I love star people because I was one of the things that really made me excited about the work she's doing. She's not just an influence alike. She said for other brands. She's built her own brand. She's taking it from an online presence to an offline presence and we'll talk. You know more about that but let's let's Kinda real it back for those people who don't know star dockings. Don't know your brand. Can you share your story story with them. How did all this get started? How did you get into the social media influencers space? How did you start the cookie jar the cookie wash? How did it all be okay well? I graduated College College. <hes> Go Knowles F._S._U.. But I think that I knew I didn't WanNa work for anyone in not because I felt like I was above it but it just wasn't me I was a super creative person. I loved acting <hes> so I just decided I was going to focus on acting I got with a big youtube star a Jamaican Youtube Star Name Travis. We started doing a lot of videos together on YouTube. I was heating up the Jamaican scene because I was different friend. You know the taboos the everything weren't allowed to say getting care and then I started getting the followers. The followers were coming in they were watching me and I started documenting. How broke I was because I <music> those series because I used to them? You guys you know. The reason I'm document is on Youtube and snapchat is because I know I'm GonNa be rich and I want to see firsthand sauce. I swear I didn't know what I was going to be rich doing yet. I thought it was it's GonNa be acting but I just wanted to document everything so people started following this girl the only personnel social media that saying she's broke saying she don't you know because everyone social media lies. I know they get in Arbor Guineas. I'm then I got on instagram. I had sex Dr Star at the time Oh sex doctors of course I guess a lot of attention right. So of course I'm because I have a lot of sexual energy and I was intrigued by the topic of sex in how you know our community doesn't know that much you just know sexy didn't know you didn't have any health information just our community. Let's talk about the United States of America. We will just don't know those don't know so. I decided I'm educate more on sex as I educated educated more on sex I felt like women didn't know a lot about Josh at all so I was like okay well first things first lady's. What are you used to wash there because you shouldn't use chemical soap like your dove is for your skin? Your bathroom bodyworks works for your skin not for your cookie so people can't say like well. What are you used as you know everything so I started telling them will make some stuff and I and I literally? I took a picture of the aloe. Oh Veira the Shaybah I took a picture of everything my grandma's counter and I was like this what I use you mix it. Everybody was like no. I think you should sell it. You broke anyways where everybody was just like a girl into that. I'm I'm over thinkers. I WANNA do it Yeah Paul it so I knew another late that sold natural washes reached out to her like hey can. I wholesale your stuff. She never answered me then. I was like okay okay well. Another sex item is key Google's it tightens intones you know the pelvic great for people that just had babies or whatever so I started selling Kiko balls the Kiko balls I was doing it like on a preorder system because I didn't have no money so if you ordered would actually go buy uh-huh whatever works everywhere ever worked at the time I was walk into the post office so it was it was a mess but then one day I just kinda got fed up. I was acting. I was doing what I loved <hes> <hes> but I wasn't where I wanted to be and it really resonated with me like you have all these followers and you don't have like really nothing like you know to make you feel good so I was just praying and I was just like God. Please help me. I don't know what to do. I'm broke. I need my a and I don. I don't want me having premarital. You know affairs but we know his child gets a little frisky ski. So everybody gets everybody. Everybody gets so listen. Just make that correction there. Okay Kim going so I think that moment ice I stopped mid prayer and said my cookies eight cookie. You were thinking of the wash but you didn't have a name so I was like cookie. I literally stopped and started writing down a long list of cookie names candies and I sent it to my best friend because she's like business coach so I concern I'm like what do you think it is. What if I do all natural women's Feminine Wash Line and call it cookie whatever and then I started remembering fifty cents Song? I'll take into the candy shop. I'm like people already referred to their body. Parts is something sweet then Sierra. My goodies goodies my daddy's I listened to Sierra Song and I remember the guy saying something about like you can't get your hand in the cookie jar or something. I'm like I'm on the right track. This is I'm GonNa do it again. Either have money so so I started. I started promoting awash. I didn't even have I just the the one I made myself. I mean you just doing what Elam must those every single day. Keep it going and I started getting pre orders. When I A lot about ten pre orders? It was enough money. I didn't know where to get bottles. I didn't know anything I was buying bottles from like Amazon but then you realize you're wasting your money because these people are getting bottles for like ten cents right and you're paying for them for a dollar each anything this is this great deal and your. I don't actually make money right so that's kind of like really how a started I just used the the acting influence in the sex Dr Star Influence to convert them into the world of saving vaginas well. This is the funny part because you think that what you're what you've done is really unorthodox right but it's not in the sense of you had a market a market of your followers followers and this is for all the people out there in in listening land and they're like start my business and scale it and get traction you have like a wonderful market group attest group of your followers and they had had immed- they had a pain point they had a problem and you came up with the salute. She wanted to know this. The tricky part about that is why I always like is unorthodox is because I started doing his home where everybody's selling hair makeup I know oh and when I started people were buying because they felt sorry for me not not anymore yeah not because they have not because they actually wanted the product so what happens is people are scared they don't. They don't think they have the problem so it's like even when like you said when you have a market you have to show them the problem. Sometimes you go but but the fact that you were talking about these natural products and all we've been exposed to quite frankly frankly are the harsh chemical products right right and that's a big. That's a that's kind of a mind opening yeah proposition but sometimes we're still confused or what society teaches you yes. Everybody's like Oh is F._D._A.. Approved and you know what I always used to say in the beginning. It's so funny somebody that you walk in Walmart pickup anything. You don't know the owner. You don't know anything about you. Idea no idea and you put it on you and now me. I showed you what I use. I'm so trying you're giving music funny. It's so funny but I mean nevertheless you exactly put pass on persist but <HES> I I'm so excited about going into more the details about the whole feminine in an hygiene space because people at first blush might think Oh i. I don't understand why you picked this space but it's crazy. It may have picked you it. Would it's crazy like a Fox like like lucrative when you look at the data so when we come back we're going to go into a little bit more of a deep dive of that whole market and how in my opinion is blue ocean so we'll be right back. After this message welcome back to business skill insights. I'm your host Kimberly Bonner with star Dawkins. She is a social media influence her and the owner of the Cookie Jar in Sunrise Florida and we were just talking about how she's been able to build a brand in a niche market basically the feminine hygiene market and at first blush people might be like well. You know that's a weird market Kipa. Let me give you some some some data because when you look at the numbers it's it's beyond profitable. Okay <hes> allied market research forecasts that the global market for Feminine Hygiene Products. is expected to be forty two point seven billion but thank you Jesus. That's billion billion with a B. billion. Thanks God by twenty twenty two okay that is massive and more specifically to deal with what star is doing North America that would include the United States folks has observed observed a higher penetration of things like internal cleansers and sprays so the market for what you are providing specifically tell them about the Mark uh-huh Forty two point seven billion globally and the North American market is kind of getting bigger and bigger and bigger for internal cleansers and sprays the kinds of things that you are are providing so that's just amazing did you just you know when you kinda stumbled into this space. Did you say Oh my God. I've stumbled into like a gold mine. No I had no idea I'm so serious I remember I wanted. It's an act now and it's a beautiful thing because if I didn't have the acting background I wouldn't be able to sell actors are sellers. I agree so I'm blessed those numbers she just gave me you guys. There's something that Kim doesn't know that you guys know. I'm going to knock her socks off so she could find me more numbers on this later. I'm adding pads and Tampons. Oh so if however many women are on this earth of will before menopause. I'm targeting all of you because what I realized is sometimes people could kind of you as taboo like you said but feminine hygiene overall. We're not in a good place. tampons impacts impacts their their dipped in chemicals like all around it so I sourced all natural pads all natural tampons and we're going to get that booming because outside of the money I just think about as a woman how much women when young girls don't know when I started my period. I didn't know that pads were bleached. I know no one does the window and talks about it is the most taboo topic and we don't need it to be taboo very sad about that so well you you have tapped into this market but you also have this racy sexy brand on instagram on you to on Snapchat APPS <hes> I would call you. I would call call your at least the store is more like yes. It's focused on feminine hygiene but it's almost kind of like a Victoria secret for the twenty first century woman very very you know racy sexy cool who right yeah how would you describe your stores brand and your personal brand and remember there are children listening some sometimes occasionally so it is being okay in describing the brand I think again the sexiness was given to us because when I started to wash it was just an all national feminine Cleanser Women started saying it's making me what I just got pregnant Da da so it became the sex brand and I at the time sex Dr Star already have a certain level of sexual energy and putting it mildly yes. y'All can't see me yours out the producers McConnell blushing. He's like no. I'm not say anything okay. No seriously definitely say the brand is sexy. It is for but here's why it's for women. I want women to understand that hygiene vaginas are sexy. You should be confident you sexy so dirty massive of China's not sexy. That's what I'm saying is basically saying amen to that in the corner Amen yes yeah so I feel like I feel like I <hes> women gravitate to other sexy women in reality through. That's if I'm walking around sexy all the time. Women are constantly looking at me when you look at me. I'm hi how are you. I'm star. Can Can I give you one of my cards. You have to look clean. You have to look the part of what you're selling. I'm talking about Vaginas soon as you save vagina. People don't even think hell they think sex. That's very true. So what do I have to do. I have to keep up the sexy image my body auto my God I i. It's so important to me. It has to be it has to so I think that in for all of you listeners out there when you're going with the brand make sure if the face on it people see they're not like. I don't know if I WANNA know cookies cookies from her. I don't even want to have a conversation her because she looks gross. Not only known the other thing about your brand and your personality is at your so much fun right. Thank you so you're you're so much fun and you're like go walking party and that's the other reason why people are grab. They gravitate toward you. What share sheer more about the things the services that you provide in the cookie jar and then I'm going to talk more about your brand? Okay so the services we provide we are VAGINA SPA South Florida's number one vagina spa at that we have vaginal steams we do visuals and rational waxing of Ajay Chal is a facial for your vagina so after you get a wack. Sometimes you get ingrown hairs. We need to plug. Maybe there's some black heads. We handle all of that for you. The V. Steam is basically a old herbal remedy. My grandma used to do it in Jamaica. I just put a modern day twist on it. where it's basically a kind of like a cleanse you would say without actually penetrating the vagina it just gets into the pores in the skin and you know travels to your uterus and cleanses out anything from maybe you haven't a period or a baby or anything like that so so a lot of people who are listening men and women? They're like Whoa I wanNA. I want to get to the cookie. I want to get to the cookie jar because this sounds like incredible and the funny part about it is there are other. Spas out there. There are believe it or not visuals are like a thing a a real thing my producers like what are you talking about. It really is they are thing all over the United States. The problem is these visuals are happening in more traditional kind of clinical spas and it's not in the same environment when you walk into the cookie jar. It's like a party. Did you tell them about your cookie name. You better not say one okay fine but if you're in interview GONNA wrap it up say okay. If you're in town cookie name you can share the with them your cooking name <hes>. What is my cooking? Did you will first of all. How do you determine someone's could give them that? So you're cooking name is determined based on two things. It's the month of your birthday and the months of your last partners birthday so we're not saying you have to be currently but whoever you last slept with we need to know the month of their birthday I think mines is like squirting cream pie or something they agree with the door with that kind of craziness. It just makes you crack. Oh yeah and my poor producer A._J.. God what is happening. Girls aren't there to get away from the mackinaw so much fun you you just laugh. There's also do you still have a little kind of appetizers and different things or Noel so we do appetizer. Sometimes she'll get into the <hes> the real party that we're going to have soon but there's always always wine. We are wine heads wine and Sangria so if give give the location of the store so I know there I know peaked everybody's interested in south Florida Za whereas it locally so we are located at seventy eight thirty North West Forty Four Street <hes> sunrise Florida. This is right by university in forty fourth where the new Y Y is. I think that's the only yeah and it's it's pink. Thank your color. Scheme is like pink and black. The Plaza is ugly but I'm not the owner so don't be accountable for the plaza when I only al sticks it up however it's called Lincoln Plaza again right on the corner of university <hes>. I'm an inside the store. I want you to come in and experience it me telling you the colors US explaining what it really doesn't is. It really is well. Let's let's come back a little bit. You started this whole thing off with selling these feminine Hygiene Products Online right so was it primarily through instagram that you were doing it through you how you shop a five store share a little bit more about that. Okay so I'll give you guys a little Jim. <hes> I started off selling just promoting on instagram and snapchat snapchat mostly <hes> but I did a online store and the name of the host is big cartel. I would suggest big cartel to anyone just starting up. Maybe you don't have the money. You don't have the direction you don't you can't afford someone to build you a site big cartel is where I started. They have a free plan and they have a ten dollar plan ten dollars a month plan <hes> they're not paying me for this. <hes> <hes> unfortunately that is just my gift to you and use instagram to promote any social media platform to promote. Wouldn't you say instagram's where really kind of took off or or is it snapped up and <hes> <hes> I'm keeps calling snapchat match so you know what I would say this. I was made that snapchat is what got me started but you're absolutely right instagram's where it took off because as we know you can pay influencers to talk about you on Instagram <hes> <hes> then instagram came out with the one minute video so I could do a video. I think when things really went kind of more crazy for me when I did a video in public's talking about you know the products on the shelf versus mind but I didn't say it was my product right a and <hes> I use that same video for other people with more followers to posts and people are like oh my gosh she's not lying again educating them while bringing them back to me absolutely and then was that the video that Nikki Massage Josh got hold a no Nikki. Everything is strategy people so I know that I am able to sound like you know is Nikki Moniz Brooklyn what up like I know all I could do that. I am really good at voices. Acting of course she had like a her song Charnley. She had a challenge. I can't wrap like her but I could talk like her so I did the challenge talking like her in a time where everyone everyone is a kind of had this against Nikki 'cause they're starting to like Cardi so when she sees people boosting her up what is she gonNa WanNa do re post them and it's spooky that this girl can talk like me so I did the video <hes> and I said because her her line is like you know. Step your cookies up so I sat in the video yet you better get your cookie washes. Step your cookies up so in that moment she probably it went over her head. She probably even know what Cook you are but you're posting hosting direct marketing and when she reposted it she reposted it with my name on radio so when they came to my page the only thing that's all my page is a bunch of videos and content of meat talking about this cookie products and they know Nikki is always saying step your cookies up so it looks like we might be correlated. My sales went bunion. I know it did I know it. Did let's talk about we only have a few minutes or minute left literally. Let's talk about your one year anniversary. Let's talk about the event plug it people you need had to be there and you need to meet stockins listen. The one year anniversary we have a lot in store is going to be games. It's going to be vaginas got crazy and I am franchising so if you are even interested in anything I'm that I'm talking about and you feel like I wanna own one of the <hes>. You definitely need to come in on the one year. Anniversary is GonNa be a great time. I can promise you that so if you're a woman or a man that likes women come in all right. Why do we have date for that? <hes> not set day. I don't WanNa say something and then you guys are like no so but stop by the store again seventy eight thirty North West Forty Fourth Street Sunrise Florida wonderful. Thank you so much star and here's to your success. Everybody take care.

instagram United States Kimberly Marie Bonner Kim YouTube Dawkins Dr Star Broward County Josh Nikki Moniz Sunrise Florida South Florida W._S._b developer Ford Google GAIL bunion Lincoln Plaza
Dr. Khia Thomas: Helping young people and parents successfully apply to college and beyond

Business Scale Insights

28:43 min | 11 months ago

Dr. Khia Thomas: Helping young people and parents successfully apply to college and beyond

"Hey empire-builders do you listen to business skill insights on spotify if not you really should on spotty fi you can listen to your favorite musical artists and your favorite podcasters all in one place for free so download insights insights network dot com so empire builders are you ready peers Kimberly Marie Bonner the junior moving into that senior year and that very stressful time of preparing for call the college admissions Welcome to business scale insights with we know we know each other on the on the broadcast is because she really focuses on the older student and process and so I know many of you if you're paying attention to the news we had felicity Huffman that recently got transition to adulthood and that kind of really piqued my interest I want to know everything there is to know about your background hello and welcome everyone to another episode of business scale insights I'm your host Kimberly Marie Bonner and we are closing out if you can quite frankly the older the the parent of that older student in high school at that very very stressful time particularly let's say if you're earliest so stressful that it's causing us to do some wild and crazy things so just to give you a little bit of background about Dr Kia she's a are you presently do so thank you doctor for being on the broadcast thank you so much I'm so excited to be here today awesome so we were talking a little bit before Dole and I just wanted to have Dr Kia on here to help us up because clearly this is a very stressful time for kids and adults and clear proud graduate of Florida Agricultural Mechanical University Florida Alma go rattlers and the University of Michigan where she earned a phd a sentenced to fourteen days in jail for what she did involving her her child and then we have Lori Loughlin and we have this whole college emissions cheating scandal E. E. O. and founder of admission `ISMs and the reason why I wanted to invite Dr Thomas or Dr Kia I'll call her dr key 'cause I Kimberly Marie Bonner listen for commentary interviews and information on how to grow your business for all the details contact business scam today's so share more about your personal and professional background sure and I'm GonNa take you through a a bit of a walk through my life so I am Jackson so I have always been huge on education my parents would wouldn't had any other way you know always being on believe it our back to school series and I'm so honored to have in the hot seat Dr Kia Thomas who is the sea diffic- interest your research expertise which I think is very interesting and very needed right now In the state of the in in the state of the world in developmental psychology as a psychologist Dr Kia Fortune area of research expertise in adolescent development and wars broadcast but I really want this to get recorded and everybody to kind of know more about you and what brought you to this kind of place and your spouse learning the type of kid and my head was stuck in a book you know something I would say life changing happen on the and because my parents were always so focused on education and academic achievement my grades and my standardized tests special program this program is called the International Baccalaureate Program it has one of the most rigorous college preparatory programs that you can find any ores bought me a ticket to go to the one college prep magnet school that we have in the Jacksonville Metro Areas Cost Stanton College preparatory school so and not only was I invited to attend of Stan College prep but I was invited to attend as part of a oh Florida native entire families from grandfather was from Jackson really did not know that Robert Allen Okay okay way to me go into high school so I'm a public school girl I went to my neighborhood school which wasn't the best school in Jacksonville they should so not only did I get into this excellent you know internationally renown program but you know let's make fun of the nerds the nerds the ones writing checks so that's GonNa say that public school across the nation and so it was funny because in high school here all the time Oh you went to the nerd school and actually I did but I was like one of the nerd of nerds yes it's a great school what's interesting too is that like being born raised in Florida I mean I'll probably the lingo so to speak because of all of the hard work that I did and the the preparation in this awesome curriculum by the time I went word I mean so virtually phenomenon all the cost pertaining to getting my phd were taken care of that's really smart heard about Michigan and passing but I wasn't a hundred percent like up to speed with how big a deal it was until after I got in which is I'm GonNa tell you of psychologists who are scientists who researchers and developmental psychology is all about the different changes that unfold in specific stages of life eight on up our vocabulary words that we are learning in class where sat words so by the time it was time to take the sat like I was well familiar with the the deviation because I would say like most high school students that are interested in psych you're probably thinking about I want to be a therapist I WANNA have my own private practice. Another one of the perks of attending Michigan is that all their PhD students also get financial support to be there that's terrific so believe in after college I had my choice of multiple full ride academic scholarships and as you read my bio chose the go-to Fam- you and and I had an experience with internship later this sort of change my mind and put me on a different path right so after graduating ends out there but as a professional today I work at Broward College in Fort Lauderdale Florida I have been a fulltime Oh man it was such an amazing experience I'm so glad that I didn't know didn't get intimidated out of applying you know had known what a big deal it was I probably would have been too intimidated to even put in my application and you know so it's funny how things work out the way yeah I knew I wanted to go on to graduate school and also as you read in my bio life took me all the way across the country to the University of Michigan Ask for college credits to the quote unquote nontraditional student who maybe returning back for career change or maybe they've rate A psychology major like psychology I took a class in high school in the bug bit me and I've been passionate about psychology he's a whole slew kids and then they're coming back together college degree Love My students my classroom and the difference that a little bit of guidance and mentor ship can make for those students there's a lot of mid or not like this is like the offer that could not turn down all five years of my PhD program the tuition was paid for before it took a single this misconceptions people don't know what they WANNA do right and they're paying for college tuition to not know what they WANNA do alleged get to see such a wide array of different types of students like everything from students who are still in high school who are taking dual enrollment Sarcoma PG and developmental psychology. A lot of people don't know what that is again when I think about psychologists they think of therapists I'm but there's a whole nother world sir I got a monthly stipend living expenses to do they even included health insurance Oh my word at an one of the reasons why I started emission `ISMs was seeing the success that students experience beyond I'm working on writing some checks but one of the things I'm really thankful for it was a true college prep experience that transition so young adulthood which call emerging adulthood And Yeah if you look me up I have a couple of publication Sir I know that a lot of students don't necessarily get through their high school and it was looking back on like little things that were embedded in the curriculum like from ninth grade and I focused heavily took a lot of courses was able to do some research and collaborations in the area of adolescent development and and what are their core weaknesses because those core strengths and those core weaknesses are probably not going to change mine have really changed that much I've tried to mitigate long arduous assessment process and there were several but then it kind of boiled it down to the essence and time professor working there for the past eight years what is amazing is working at Broward College in as a community college and in a career counselor well after you know law school will after I'd done all of this work did anyone really do a very go to a break but when we come back let's talk about you know how you help your students both in the class and also it helped make decisions and guide me as I was kind of making my career path so I know we'd have to kind of I think that is pro if I was just kind of focus on that piece a little bit I think it's really really critical eight my weaknesses but my strength I've gone all in on unfortunately seriously at no time until I like invested all for both parents and for the student for the child to really figure out and double down on what are they what are their core strengths innovative techniques to ten times the impact of your business your local business can become a regional national or international enterprise new day a proven business model but I have concerns about the best way to grow and scale then you should contact the experts at new day consulting systems new day uses provide with emissions after the break we'll be right back Kimberly Marie Bonner helps millions make millions on business gale nothing systems will show you how for more information and to get started with new day visit the website at new day consulting systems dot COM one new day consulting systems dot com to get your business off the ground into contact new day to day gene may rarely well yeah something in high school and they continue with yes that's rare I mean there was a little bit it's new day consulting systems can help turn your business into a franchise and scale globally interested don't their website new day consulting system areas career counselor at George Washington University shout out to GW in Washington DC. That did a I mean it was it was a very your company admission `Isms you know are these kinds of assessments. Is that part of the consulting that you do so kind of unpack the services that you insights Thursdays at twelve thirty pm WSB our business scale insights helps your business moved from startup to scale and is sponsored by new day consulting system powerful assessment beyond just shallow kind of well she likes to talk likes to let you know what I'm saying yes eight took a regional national or international enterprise new day consulting systems will show you how for more information and to get started with new day visit the services of admission `ISMs and really you know how you can help both parents and students get clear on what there's Kimberly Marie Wagner helps millions make millions on Business Gail Insights Thursdays at twelve thirty PM on WSB business scale insights helps your business move the experts at new day consulting systems new day uses innovative techniques to ten times the impact of your business your local business can become to school issues related both parents and children and I have Dr Kia on board for her to talk about more of the Sir into contact new day to day business vacating through higher education and through mechanisms we provide one on one consultation services for students to help with the process of college dot Com and don't forget to tune in Thursday's at twelve thirty for business gail insights with Kimberly Marie Bonner if you already have ration- the emissions and application process this is the kind of in depth resort a research the guided exploration drinks are yes and I think that's so important so what I do and emission `ISMs is a little bit of extension of like what I do body I'll although we encourage people to go to college everybody may not benefit the hands on assistance that you typically do not get through your school's so my goals killing sites on your host Kimberly Bonner and I'm with Dr Kia Thomas Sheet is the founder of admission `ISMs and this is our concluding episode on refiner if you already have a proven business model but I have concerns about the best way to grow and scale then you should contact from startup to scale up and sponsored by new day consulting systems new day consulting systems can help turn your business into a franchise and scale it global they're growing and self awareness so a lot of times there's not an awareness of what their strengths from going to college there are people that can go and different trajectories technical schools vocational schools and make more money than a lot of college graduates quite frankly and finally an professionally and informally like through my experience in working with students I know a lot about the INS and outs of like what the next steps are less start with doing it a career assessment and it looks at the students just like through their school it means helping students explore their best fit college and career options a lot of students are very fuzzy about that like as you dealing with with a child who's feeling all this pressure from mom and dad and they're lying oh you know I could go to college but I also there's been work with students is to one make sure that they're all college ready that means working them through my college planning curriculum which may or may not exist and as well as scholarship dollars those are some of my main aims through emission `ISMs Let let's talk about that because they're everywhere gives them like hundreds of different career options and was cool for teenagers that some of them are legitimate career pass with interested go to their website new day consulting systems dot COM and don't forget to tune in Thursdays at twelve thirty for business gale and science with Kimberly Aptitudes it looks at their personality looks at their interest in kind of combines them altogether and what I love about one of the assessments that I use is that it to before the break and I have activities tools assessments that I use with students and to craft applications to earn acceptance letters suck at new day consulting systems dot com one new day consulting systems dot COM to get your business off the ground and eight to say that but I've got remains truth out there so with that said when you when you're and you think about it and like oh my gosh that makes so much sense right and sometimes it's a it's a learning one moment for the parents as well because Dr export their weaknesses are they can tell you I hate history but is it because you know like the subject matter you don't like your exam you know what I mean so digging beyond what it tells the students these are areas of strength and a lot of times that's a revelation to the students themselves you know true so what happened to me sometimes you know appearance want our kids we want the best for our kids so this means that needs to be a doctor a lawyer and like what about all of the other the surface and one of the things that I I like to do especially when I talk with parents and with students that are kind of I'm sitting on the fence as far as the other thing that I like doing how do you deal with that that's interesting in that kind of fits into like understanding where teenagers are writing the student has never even heard of you know so maybe the parent is not familiar listen and I'm not a person who pushes college where everybody he he always loved cooking right getting back to the assessment even though he's bit of a nerd Obrenovac he always loved cooking always love baking agree these are ones that may require two year degree a four year degree graduate school because that's important as well you know it is I think a lot about like me and my okay but he used to host on one of these food network's sugar rush and he opened a bunch of restaurants call K. Glove wouldn't have been interesting if someone earlier in his life said you know what not only are you brainiac and you could be a lawyer but you can a best friend and we met when we were in college and we're both psychology majors right and so I was the one who stuck with it because I was willing to make the The guys that I used to you know we used to hang around the same kind of networking circles we used to do pitch events his name has worn brown he was a lawyer by wrong with that at all but she was lost as to okay what do I do next because she didn't have an idea of what else does she could do that she could I think the students need to find the right path and another thing that I really love is that like it breaks it down as far as these are the paths that may not require a college town and it was I wanna say maybe ten years ago he was he had dreads and he also this show and the funny thing about it is that you know fulfilled by and make some good money at and a lot of young people have this experience is so funny one of even if you do lean into the law lane don't ever forget that you're there's an

Broward College spotify Michigan University of Michigan Fort Lauderdale Florida Sarcoma PG hundred percent fourteen days eight years five years four year ten years two year
LJ Wilson: Crisis Communications for Small Businesses During COVID-19

Business Scale Insights

23:25 min | 3 months ago

LJ Wilson: Crisis Communications for Small Businesses During COVID-19

"Welcome to business scale insights with Kimberley Brewery Bonner. Listen for commentary interviews a formation on how to grow your business for all the details contact business scale insights network DOT COM so empire builders. Are you ready? Here's thank you so much for being on a big scale insight. So podcast today. I'm so excited. Because you have this wonderful expertise and crisis communications. I think it is so very very very important for us to kind of cover. This as many of you who have been listening to the business scale insights show. No we really focus on helping small businesses move from startup to scale up We've focused on really giving you the tools and equipping you to not only survive but thrive and scale and I wanted L. J. Wilson on the program today because we're recording this in April of twenty twenty the end of April And the world has been hit by a crisis that we never many of us could have never even dreamed about right This covert nineteen pandemic. And what I see are a lot of businesses struggling around the world. Not just in our our our our own country the United States but around the world and then I also see a lot of businesses not hitting the mark when it comes to their communications whether it's email whether it's the stories they're telling in their marketing I remember getting these barrages of emails. right Apple Pan to make hit and I was very. I've got to be kidding. Me Either your toned up or you read the email so after that I realized why. Oh we have. We have a crisis in communicating. Well here and we need expert and Elgin. Wilson is that person so eljay. Why don't you first of all? Thank you for coming on the show. Thank you for taking out and and and sharing your expertise with all of us appreciate it. Now thank you. It is my pleasure to be here today. Thank awesome and tell people more about your background. I know it but the world doesn't so please take your liberty and share your expertise with everyone. Hello everyone. My name is L. J. Wilson as Kim told you and I'm the principal and founder of L. J. W. Social Media NPR strategies For over fifteen years at worked in the Communications Industry from broadcast nonprofit communications. I've worked as a communications director for the Slice Lose Association of North America a Communications Manager for arrests in Chamber of Commerce. Where I met Kim and a communications director for the Institute for Educational Leadership Initiative of the Coalition for community schools I started out today. W Social Media. Npr Strategies in twenty twelve and created social media strategies strategic communication plans in crisis communication strategies for small and mid size nonprofits in the DC Maryland. Virginia area and I left the business for several years. Focus on education communications. Which is where. I was working at the Institute for Educational Leadership and after having my son which was fairly recently. I decided it was time to revamp the business in places strong. Focus on crisis communications. And then this happened. You know exactly. Like the stars were aligned. It was perfect timing so tell I mean I think that clearly everyone does not have the same definition of what crisis communications entails. So can you educate us for a few minutes yet? So when I think about the definition of crisis communications I would define it as building a strategy. The covers all avenues of your business or organization. Meaning you have done the research. Look at the holes in your business and possible crisis via social media and within in developed a plan that insure wars your business maintains its integrity to your clients and employees. You've done the worker ensure that your communication strategy stay strong despite a crisis so prior to creating your crisis communication strategy you should have had a strategic communications plan and that can be you know your objectives your goals and you WanNa make sure that you maintain that by having your crisis communication strategy and the whole point of having a crisis. Communication strategy is to make sure that you're ready for a natural disaster. Which is what we're going through right now. Which is a pandemic a financial issue. A personnel problem organizational or even technological system breakdown. So you just WanNa make sure you cover everything in the only way to do that is make sure that you built a crisis. Communication strategy that covers all those avenues. Well I know you have received these crazy emails from me. Small businesses and large businesses over the past several weeks and it is clear to me that they are not listening to you. L. J. or no idea what's crisis. Communications are so what is happening. What are your observations? Because clearly. There's depth miss? You know I don't tell you one so I was like to give two examples. One was actually the slim class for my for my son We received an email from his swim class. Saying that It it clearly. As if they were upset that they had to close in that they were. GonNa be losing money by doing it and what it did not sound like there was any kind of empathy or any kind of it just sounded like we're going to be back up when it when this is all over and trust me. I believe that they probably will. But I don't know if people will be there Dhakal and that's one example where I just felt like wow I would not send my son back there again because all they care about is the money the second one is another small business which was actually the person who comes to our landscaper's they sent an email saying okay. We're GONNA come in and we're going to you know you know me lawn do your thing and then my husband said something back telling them. Hey a tree valuable in our yard. We're going to have to cancel it. And they came back. It's okay we'll be back next week. Did my husband say that you could come back next week? It clearly sounded like they. Are you know struggling? And they're gonNA make their own decision to come back into the do the yard so that they can go and pick up their money wile E. exactly so there's a lot going on where it just seems. As if there's a lack of empathy there was a lack of planning it also shows that You know I don't know if you really care about your employees There's so many things that come with that when you send things like that because right now if people don't get it together interns of these leaders of these small businesses. They'RE GONNA lose their employees because employees are listening thinking to themselves have. Has this person treated me over this? You know there hasn't been any kind of connection. You're not trying to connect with me during this time so I I don't let me let me stop you there. I don't think it's just employees. We've had this conversation off line. I think there's a lot of brand damage and reputation damage. That is a long term. That is going on and and folks. I really want you to listen. I really listen. If there's a wheelhouse that I have it's brand development. I have a background in on a local property. Licensing this is. I develop franchises for a living. Okay hello people from my wheelhouse bigger so I'm trying to tell you what the the the words that you're sending out whatever the medium whether it's an email whether it's in video whether it's in phone calls whether it's a newsletters whether it's commercials you have no idea the long term impact that you are making on the people on the receiving end. There are businesses that I will never ever do business with a getting because of the way they communicated with me during this crisis one of those businesses and it's not a small business ironically eljay. It's a big. It's my bank. I'll Mike. Oh and don't get me started with that Just the way the tone deftness with which they are communicating. And I'm not alone. The which with which we are communicating with people is really highly transactional and not relational it is highly. I could care less if you lived or died You know it is what it is and so will you have a long term relationship with people and you're trying to build that relationship and keep that relationship over time because at the bottom at at its base. That's what this is all about. Lbj is about you know relationships between people who they know like and trust even if it's an institution you have to be really careful how you handle people during this crisis because you will damage your brand long-term that is so important. Amin scattered actions without direction. Come from not doing the planning to ensure Your Business Day strong most importantly during these times have integrity when you do not have a crisis communication strategy you end up not having the right messaging to ensure your business clients have eighteen your services. Your employees feel confused shirt. What actions to take in they. Just begin to distrust you and your and your clients and then loyalty. Wang's because there was not loyalty to ensure that there was a plan in place that you know you've showed that you don't know how to handle the situation that means you don't know how to handle in your case you might have felt like they didn't know how to handle your money exactly exactly and as a business owner if you don't have confidence right in the ability and the capability of the people handing your money handling your money. You have a problem. Yes a big problem though so we have underscore why this is so critically important. There are a ton of small businesses. That haven't gotten it right and they need to do a reset. What would be some of your suggestions for them right now I would say. They need to outline a commuter crisis. Communication Plan that outlines their goals number one number two they need to put together a Crisis Management Team. That specifically focused on that number three they need to know their key audiences and number four the need to have steps to take when this crisis emerges so right now if they do not have a crisis management plan for right. Now get the goals together. Make sure you have that crisis management team. I help you with those goals and start to work on that I would even suggest. Have a employee townhall virtually To talk with your employees to see what all of their issues are because some people like you said could be tone death and even if there are outlying with their goals are they need to know what's going on with their employees as well I would also say and it's kind of too late for this if we're talking about something right now. They will need to do those steps but if they have the time they need to do their research review their organization or Business Communications and list the possible threats to their organization in business identified. The possible causes our threads in detail and then list your crisis communication of objectives right as it relates to your research impossible threats in create tactics to go with those objectives. And then you have your crisis communications plan. But it's right now. Get those goals have your crisis. Communication Management Team or crisis management team together. Have those key audiences that you need to talk to and make sure that you have all the steps. You know that you need to take so that you're communicating with the public in a way that makes sense okay. L. J. will I can. I can hear some of my audience members. Some of them own a restaurant. Some of them might own a barber shop a hair salon. A Nail Salon. These are small businesses. They have under ten employees their own. They're like this lady eljay. That's all fine and Dandy for her. Okay Yeah I'm not you know. Wells Fargo. I'm not chase when she talked about. So for the small business under ten or twenty employees Let's get half. Can we get real practical? What does this this plan of action that outlines their goals? What does that look like? They don't have a crisis management team unless they outsourced to you yet while I'm saying no let let's walk through with them so if they are just a very small business mom and pop shop and they don't have like that can't get a crisis management team together. The one thing that they definitely can do is make sure that they can start creating like a crisis management templates for example like a press release. These are things that are easy for small businesses to do if they have someone who can help them. If it's me of course I would create like some templates for press releases in social media responses I look at their social media and see what are some of the issues that can happen during this crisis. I would also ask them to start working with her if they have financial planner to make sure would money. Are you saving? 'cause you know. Can you talked about that before about making sure that some of the businesses are saving some money? Something for a Rainy Day Right. So that's really important If I was working with them I'm trying to find out what other goals say. Something happens in your. You have to close down for the amount of time right now. Right Right are your goal. What do you want to achieve during that time? And how are you going to withstand? Keep Your Business going and I will create a plan that addresses those social media possible issues that you may have. I'll make sure that you have a press release. That's ready to go to your clients and then I'll also be telling them like what is going to be the strategy after we come out of this cloud will okay. So let's stop right there. There are I just got off another phone call with a group of entrepreneurs and you know. Many of them are nonessential businesses. So if you're unless you're in Georgia you know your hair styles. You are not considered an essential business. So they are in a very very difficult spot. A very very difficult spot. They want to care for their clients. They want to care for their employees. There might be another. You know another four to six weeks to eight weeks that they have to sweat this out until they can somewhat open up so for that kind of business. What would you suggest if they have to do that? My suggestion to them with the number one. How much you have like. How much money do you have in savings to be able to sweat this out if that makes any sense and then from there? Abbott work with them to just make sure that. Say for example now. This is what I would be doing if I were them. And let's just talk about. If this is a salon or a barbershop. I would be saying okay. They're saying that everything is going to go back to work soon. Right everybody going back. So let's just say September right number. I knowing your case where you stay in Florida. There's light we're going back right now. So let's say for example it's September so I'm saying to them okay. What you need to start doing is do you have your client log. Start making an appointment with points with them right now. Oh that's good for September. Start calling them say. Hey we're going to be back up in business I understand how important social distances let them know that? You're not tone death that you understand that and so I wanNA start doing some private You know sessions with all of my clients. I love the and so could you let me know what month and of course right now you can be booking hundreds of people besides just your clients. You could say if you have a friend who needs some help to to get their her dinner. Whatever I'm here. I'm going to be obeying the social distancing. You're going to have your private session with Me Right. If you do stuff like this you can maintain your business and your prophet and your money byles or you have a plan like this. The businesses have to get out of the shock and awe of everything. That's happening and start getting to. Hey what is my plan b? Get Out of the old. This is happened. How can I make people you know minds? Hairdresser is going to be doing social distancing even after when we come back I know right her private sessions with everybody. It's going to be so many people are going to be coming in you. You start creating a plan that shows that because this particular crisis is on the spot crisis management now we we have to do things on spot because we weren't prepared for this long you know so is the strategy that you have in place in in you. Start getting your social media together creating Social distancing We'RE GONNA be back up and business we're going to be. Oh band that social distancing. This is how we're setting up appointments. You need to get your hair done that now. That's social media strategy love. So that's how you're working it and you're going to get so many clients more than you can handle. I know well you know what we are almost at the end of our time and I want so many small businesses need your expertise badly so I really I really. I feel like this is more of a public service announcement than anything I've ever done and I'm serious. I'm very serious by now. You are Kim So how can people get in contact with you? Immediately people can reach me by visiting my site. L. J. W. Social Media PR DOT COM. Or you can email me at elgin w social media and PR at gmail.com and either one of those places of trying to reach me. I will get back with you as soon as possible. Wonderful we have come to the end of our broadcast part. One Heart One But eljay is coming back for a second show and we're going to pivot from talking about just crisis communications. We're going to start talking about crisis leadership and you definitely don't want to miss it. Thank you so much L. J. Thank you bye-bye if you already have a proven business model but have concerns about the best way to grow and scale then you should contact the experts at new day. Consulting SYSTEMS NEW USES INNOVATIVE TECHNIQUES. To Ten Times. The impact of Your Business. Your local business can become a regional national or international enterprise. Due date consorting systems will show you how for more information and to get started with new day. Visit the website at new consulting systems dot com one new day consulting systems dot COM to get your business off the and into orphan contract new day. Today the business scale insights with Kimberly Bonner to get her personal attention to you and your empire goto business scale insights network DOT com. That's business scale insights network DOT COM and tune in again next week or more from Kimberly Marie. Bonner with business scale insights.

Crisis Management Team L. J. L. J. Wilson Business Communications Kim Kimberley Brewery Bonner United States Elgin L. J. W. Virginia Kimberly Bonner business owner Apple twenty twenty Institute for Educational Lead Maryland Communications Manager
Danielle St. Luce: What Small Business Owners Need to Know about Lenders During COVID-19

Business Scale Insights

32:03 min | 2 months ago

Danielle St. Luce: What Small Business Owners Need to Know about Lenders During COVID-19

"Welcome to business scale insights with Kimberly Burri Bonner. Listen for commentary interviews a formation on how to grow your business for all the details contact business scale insights network DOT COM so empire builders. Are you ready? Here's low? Danielle Saint Louis. Thank you so much for joining the Business Gillon Insights podcast today. Thank you so much for having me glad to be here. Oh my word. We have talked offline and for a minute about all things related to lenders and banks and covert nineteen so. I'm so excited that you are going to be sharing with our listeners. Today what small business owners need to know about lenders during Kovic Nineteen I I'm just excited. That you bring your expertise and I hope that everyone listening particularly small business. Owners has a pad and pin out because Danielle is a fountain of Knowledge and Legal Share. All of her wisdom with everyone listening today. So Danielle. I know you very well. I know your background but many of our listeners do not know you so please introduce yourself and let us know more about your background in your current work Joan my name is Daniel loose on actually a native Meridian born and raised in Miami now on my family on the Caribbean more people in the South Florida. They'll be able to really to Very briefly before even working I was golden the. Us went to school. Finished the info go in West Africa. I did Cornell School of Industrial Labor Relations up there and I knew back from New York to Florida we to my family and you know as millennial smart at home and minimize my expensive rather than live in New York and started in nonprofit and after about three years of being here. I'm moved to work in our Iowa from art education into the field. I am now eds. Florida and I'm sure most people don't know about you either so I can explain that as well. Yes absolutely perfect so bbn Dan for block this vessel fund floral. It's a Florida based Community Development Financial Institution and rues definitely GonNa get into that later in the house so be horrible varying stories. It was founded by the State of Florida in the nineteen eighty as a response to the racial rights topping Miami at the time and the state of Florida undestood. That boxes were not being served at all. When it came to traditionall- national dateline thing so they created black as this investment corporation in the major metropolitan areas of Aura and be by is one of those so we grew from being fall. Orlando base. Fbi into a statewide bfi. And I'm now the seasonal director for the software market which includes Palm Beach Broward. Only wow that's that's a great story and it's a it's a great segue into our story together in the sense of why. I reached out each EERO. Odd in the midst of this paycheck protection plan. rollout with banks and lending institutions One of the reasons why Danielle and I really have started getting to know one. Another and work together is because what I was seeing at the beginning of the roll out of the paycheck protection plan particularly the first ways of the Nape paycheck protection program was that really minority and women owned businesses. Were being iced out and I include myself in that but it wasn't just me. It was everywhere I was looking. It was a similar Narrative and it was all over the news. It was all over social media. It was all over twitter and so I knew Danielle and I reached out to her via email. And then we jumped on a call and then she started. Educating me started really educating me. Abou- really really what's going on and the difference between banks and different types of lending institutions and a banking relationship and from that conversation Actually spawned the idea for us to reach out to more Small businesses with this information. And so I'm going to do. A shame was plugged of the no small business left behind virtual summit. That's going to happen. on May Twelfth Many of you some of you will be able to check that out. Others of you might be able to check out the rebroadcast but be that as it may All of that really. If we're honest Danielle was birthed out of our conversation. It really was our conversation so fully agree. I really wanted you to take time during my up. Podcast to share with the listening audience. Particularly those who are minority and female owned small businesses breaking down as far as you know okay. What are the different types of lending institutions? That are out there. And why is it that big banks don't necessarily attend to the needs of smaller micro owned mom and pop businesses and black owned businesses? Latino owned businesses Asian owned businesses. Women owned this. Could you see the data from the Tech Protection plan is it is pretty horrible and actually I read an article? There might be a third trunks a field on loan coming through most likely. It's going to happen. And lobbyists are lobbying for their firm. We get access to those while. Yeah Oh well breakdown. What what do we need? I think this is a learning moment. And who how small business owners particularly minority? I'm talking to minority small business owners right now. How do we need to pivot? Would it comes to our our relationships with these different types of lenders. What are the different types of lenders? That are out there and again. Why are there so what? Why is it important for our audience to understand the differences between these lending institutions and their focus over that? There's a lot in that question. I know I know though I will star. I think the first thing we need to agree on is what is a small business though. I think people who beam America is about ninety percent small business outside of Walmer Apple Google Microsoft and making and everything under those few are all these small business. And I've seen some people who have depends on your industry but what I like to go with under million dollars a year. I think that's really the standard for a small business. When I when I sleep the Outer Banks and I think for most minority we fall even lower so less than fifty thousand dollars in revenue on businesses depending on who or what so any. Well I with Big Bang. Every big thing is going to prioritize of big because the interest rates on those that want to two percent difference is going to raise them in a lot of money that Mahler minority businesses. Just don't bring in because of I five. And as a historically on this thing underserved community and by under banked on me we couldn't even get into something until recently. Yes we we. Dr Way. Way Behind there is a start line. And we're about fifty yards. You know so. It's very difficult for us to get into those institutions and even get them thinking about because of the limitation now. The government understood this and may relieve regulation the Ra regulations community reinvestment. Act and. Thank you need to lend in our community and they do need minorities and is unique to our people of a certain income and they usually work that way And do that. Work through companies like mine community on that financial institutions so banks do lend into communities and they do hope committed. But it's very rare that you're going to go directly to a big thing door and get that money from them. You have to go through a smaller community lender who probably partners with them and depending on the size of the bank an area they prioritize even though that thank may exist in your area a local city of finding not partner with them because to that think that area is not imported but yes let me get into the different types of financing option for a small business owners and the birth one with I think is like the most overlooked is the Bob Owners local city or county office but small business or economic development Not Everywhere has offices but they're the best start as they have relationships with meaning focus and mission driven lenders so it really does depend on where businesses located in the city or county How you run your business as it storefronts or out of home. You might be eligible for grants from your city or county Those the their CRA dollars which our community element act dollars and it gets very confusing. The are is that Eight counties and cities they get access to these dollars to revitalize and redevelop their cities or Tom Though that he do that with big development project when he partnered with big developers though. Cra dollars and some give up mom-and-pop grant or grants to help you fix your storefronts so you should definitely look to offices because they're not lender but you can get a grant and get some money. Now let's let's pause because in Broward County. We have you know our office. A small business and economic development. Which really does a great job? Sandy MacDonald does a great job in getting the word out about You know government contracting opportunities how however Comma. I really have not seen really publicity. Were regarding an enormous amount of grants out there. So you're saying I could just call this office and they're probably going to Direct me to their website. And they're just going to be like a gallery of grant possibilities. That could possibly apply for though every country is different with Broward. I know that the best way to get a grant is not through that office directly through the Fort Lauderdale the IRA so community redevelopment and Oh lord of different from states and other states though officers are tend to be one in the same ovoid only state that I know of that has developed as quasi governmental body to disburse. The are they trying to work together? Yeah the every is different. I know The city of North Miami. There your right is very busy with greg vocal Even the city council's this. Greg Focus. They give business owners grant or even No INTEREST DIFFERENT. Harpo like a very untraditional alone but this only eighteen and they give him a grant to fix this store fund Though with Broward I know that they have a startup competition. Though thank you Kaufman fast. Track with his Cochran has developed the program for people who want to be in this picture through as cages from idea. Yes very familiar with that. It's a great program it is and I know brow. County has done it in the past and when they manage their business owners talk three who gets the best this plan they get do of this pitch competition and they give them a certain amount of money? That is technically alone. But they don't really you know because fall business because they're new they don't even expect those funds necessarily come back technically alone. But it's a forgivable and it does impact your credit score. Okay so that's clear. Thank you keep going and talk to me. More about the C. D. F. is and how that's my point yes yes so a theory by the Communities Community Development Financial Institution and. This is a lender that is actually approved by the US Department of the Treasury and we're actually regulated by them. Wow so you have to apply and they approve and to have financial certain will essentially the same way and look. The government needs to Where a lot smaller than your average things but we lead in a much more strategic functions. So we're not as concerned about your revenue. Your Prophet Actors. Hack where concern about. How can you grow this business? And how giving money for and we're also concerned about as your business grows. How will you positively impacted? Though this means that we tend to lend to communities that rbis ear loaded middle gloves moderate income community who might not get thank all in terms of loans and we are mission folk go black up mission into ren lengthy black businesses Now video buys will have certain minorities whether they're email their ethnic minorities or rape minority that they learn to but we do lend to everyone and he don't give a cracker and safe unrest race at the week gender or location over another. But you need to know that. We view like focus on people who restorick under served under bank. I mean we length white men all the time but the people that know really need our help. We really really really want to let the black and minority business owners so I think it's a very powerful thing to say that in this country that will lend us the people of a certain race because we know they've been under served under thanks And most people will not say. Cfi's are kind of the unsung heroes who deal. And I think what's really important? Part of the city by world is that we offer technical which is essentially business consulting to our offices as well so that business consulting is will have someone. Who's marketing expert? Come in and speak to you about marketing. We have accountants I got yet. We have consultant that repay to it with business owners and I mostly roundtables to discuss. What their food. So every month our business owners get the chance to speak the expert about the business and that are we see our company grow overpop- Wonderful Okay. Yeah though You know it because they're smaller the if I lied answer A little bit was draining resources but especially now they're open. Nineteen people are realizing when needed. So please you. Local five helping grow essentially. Stop the best. That's the best way to stop because they with us. We deal with the riskier on. Thanks will never touch your business if you lend with us. But by the time he doesn't stuff finish where are usually a broken hand them off to bigger bank or a community bent to continue a lender really jeff and so from that point? The banks are really the next stage of this. You have both national things and local and regional communities and can you and I have discussed about the differences between the field and I will always recommend a local regional bank over a big national. Been the because our see that natural banks have been becoming more efficient with means left bodies in your local branch whereas regional community banks. I really really prioritize. Live relationship with the you know unless. Just stop there. It's interesting because We had an article highlighting a South Florida. It management firm In Miami Gardens that was owned Minority owned and they hit Omar time getting the their paycheck protection program. approved through. Bank of America. And I connected them with Danielle. But it's funny after they got this negative press Surprise surprise after five weeks. They were approved. I doubt and I've heard this Danielle so many times on social after people complained they which the media and that negative pr Got Up the chain of command. People got him route. And I've even had one gentleman on my linked instead you know if it hadn't been for the people that he knew that were high up in the chain of command at one of particular bank. He probably wouldn't have gotten approved. I think that highlights what you're talking about in the difference between a national bank and a local or regional bank because they there's a distance between these smaller businesses. There's a disconnect there's a distance and at the very least you won't necessarily have to go on. Cbs NBC CNN News. Right in order to get a local or regional banks tension including you know running unions. I'm seeing them people. Yeah I've heard that so many times. They apply through their local credit union. And they got approved in like a week. No I coming out of this. Hopefully particularly for micro-businesses Minority owned small businesses mom and pop businesses. I really think people need to adjust. I really do think you adjust. I knew I agree. I think so I will be very very partners with big national banks all go. I'm sure as we are kind of when these big banks pinpoint on it really up to be very and what we do. We can't stand in that gap created and I I feel for both the officers out of the banks because they're big bank priority is the bigger the one the bigger deals that are going to net them more money so that they can provide services to the communities. Aidan Sir but with the protection program. Everyone's help absolute though there. There's a model of prioritize the bigger he'll and small businesses. I left behind and it's funny because I get that they are incentivized New What's in their best interest to make more money but this is not this. We're talking about the survival of Bank of I'm sorry of merchandise and businesses analysts also be clear communities. I agree I agree and I think what's very interesting about. Covert nineteen are is The way businesses hostile to not that the business that need help with their businesses but the big businesses like banks who are providing a service that people so desperate me and I think what we're seeing is the big thing are realizing that the way they've been structuring themselves really ever. Who's the two thousand eight crisis? The impact of technology and everything. They are finding that that gap thing hog between themselves in the small customers on widened to a place. They may not be able to actually help her them? As well as a and I think that's where alternative lending institutions are going to fill the gap Now just CD. It is in the ones that we've talked today. But I see you know in high credit unions but I also see you know the financial the fintech folks. I think they're coming in and they're gonNA fill this void in an amazing way because they already recognize Jack Dorsey and other others recognized that. There's a whole unnamed population right Barry Hall and they recognize it and they understand that dad is kind of a sweet spot so in the future. I think we're going to see him. Even more of a disruption like Kovalyov. It has accelerated a lot of disruption. Obviously but I didn't banking I'm just going to be the d the futurist here. It's going to accelerate it's going to accelerate on a whole `nother level kind of small business banking as we it. That's just my two cents. I agree and I actually want to touch on Jack Dorsey. And the like and these then fact businesses though I think where the great example Business owners who used swear to accept we were able to do low yes were even before coke yes and where hopped onto the whole Tiki Mathis and did a really great job of navigating an n The form of financing that they use is actually revenue final on. This is new not lot of traditional lenders. I don't think I know of any use dumb. So essentially I'm late. They will give you alone the company where the perfect example. They'll give you alone based on your future earth though very different from set. Acquiesce there in insurer. But your payments were based at least require you accept payment. They take a percentage. Are you received from customers to pay down? Your one of my own of my clients is actually doing that. And jeeze incredibly happy with yet that PRODUCT ECSTATIC. I'm I am ecstatic because what are mediated. No revenue base financing as before with payday loan. I know though it. I love the fact that people are coming in and say what should be an equitable model. That hoping you throw negatively and turning it on and using it in a way that really our mothers and that and that the the the swears marked squares model particularly four commerce based businesses. Like I said she's static. I mean the enemy of your customers are happy that I don't mean so I I think the beauty the beautiful thing is that four have capital the front these lowe's and I really hope to being more armchair strike at into it if they're not already into it. They tape Powell well. I really hope to see more lenders or not even lenders but the technology that we use to affect me. I hope that more will be in on this because I think it's a great way for them to grow and Rick Fox ability if they don't have it also I can't believe it but we're we're truly running out of time but I knew you had to cover a lot and I know that of what you those gyms of wisdom that you dropped in this episode are going to help so many people so many people so I can't thank you whole I would like you to share your contact. Information Danielle I know you are active in the South Florida community Sure you know. I know it's a busy time with tech program and all that stuff but please share your details because I know so many people would love to reach out to you were so my email is the T. l. u. b. e. at BB DOT COM and. That's the best. Waiters swing ours bonds usually within a bit of And I will say. Please follow all the best email practices when emailing received a few that have made me. Greens and as twenty five year old interacting with adults that are hand plus years. My senior definitely can be jarring when some emails are I. Yeah I get into it. Let's try to adult year when you're when you know what? I just think that people are so we are living in just a bizarro time just unprecedented and people quite frankly sadly dam Danielle. And I'm seeing this up close and personal on a lot of different people are just not lose it. I know I know I know. I know I only say that because when I when I interact with someone how they behave Derek crisis it can always it can impact. How much in the early absolute import? We could talk money import with other people. Just don't understand that so That's good to know that's good to know and particularly if you're reaching out to people Linders you really want to be cognizant that your first impression is really really important so when you when you reaching out to Danielle or any other lending institution you really WanNa remember that your first impression makes a it makes a big difference so anyway do you have any parting words of wisdom for the audience minimize minimize your expense absolute that yes absolute one hundred absolutely all right well. I'm so happy that you came on the show. People are GonNA learn so much and I really hope that people listen to this episode repeatedly that it inspires people to really dig into like articles on. Line. Get you know. Really get their financial literacy game up their banking Literacy game up because it really Daniel. You have inspired me to do that. Because quite frankly I thought I understood banks and then I was like Whoa. I'm serious you have inspired me to go into the volt as they say and really to here early do my research and it has been an eye opener so I do thank you not just professionally but personally because you know what you can't navigate that what you don't really comprehend and understand you know in order to play a game you have to understand the rules of the game and a lot of people. Don't understand the rules of the banking game. And so I thank you so much for sharing some of the knowledge of the rules of the game with us today. Okay or you're most welcome you much right. Here's years accessory body a great day. Bye Bye if you already have a proven business model but have concerns about the best way to grow and scale then you should contact the experts at new day. Consulting SYSTEMS NEW DAY USES INNOVATIVE TECHNIQUES. To ten times the impact of your business your local business can become a regional national or international enterprise. New Date consorting systems will show you how for more information etiquette started with new day. Visit the website at New Day consulting systems DOT COM one one new day consulting systems dot COM to get your business and into orphan. Contact new day to day. The scale insights with Kimberly honor to get her personal attention to you and your empire code of business scale INSIGHTS NETWORK DOT com. That's business scale insights network DOT COM and tune in again next week or more from Kimberly Marie. Bonner with business scale insights.

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