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"marie tahiliani" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

13:10 min | 3 months ago

"marie tahiliani" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"With over seven billion people in the world. We all have one thing in common every day. We all get dressed. Welcome to dress the history of fashion. Podcast where we explore the WHO? What point of why we wear. We are fashion historians and your host Cassidy Zachary and Abra Kelly him. Well well well I mean. Where do we even start this week's episode cast? Since the last time we recorded the show things have changed just a bit in the world had perhaps gone from zero sixty and here. We all are stuck at home last week. We mentioned in passing that. Social distancing was an effect but now everything has closed and the course of this past week. Schools restaurants bars all non-essential businesses. Here in New York City have been closed including museums. Which is why one thing that I'm thankful for is at least the fact. I got to go see this exhibition which we're going to discuss. Today I saw in person more than once and I am supremely jealous of that mere fact and you know what to all of our listeners. We just want you to know that we recognize the exceptionally trying time that is unfolding on a global level. It's kind of changing on a daily basis and some of us are just now becoming accustomed to working from home. A lot of us also managing our kids who are at home and also many many others of us out there have lost their entire source of income. Yeah casts as you know a ton of my friends here in New York work in the hospitality industry in super cool restaurants and nightclubs venues. A lot of them are are performers as well so their very livelihood is banned at the moment they simply cannot work and there are so so many other industries that are deeply affected as all non essential workers have been ordered to stay at home depending where you live. Of course you know throughout the world right and I would just want to say that if you are in a position please consider donating to money to your favorite organization restaurant performer. Bartender Yogurt instructor. You know a lot of these. Small businesses are selling gift cards to try and get through this time. Restaurants are doing curbside pickup to go orders while others have set up go fund me pages to help support their staff and so you know. Consider that money that you might have spent on a beer or on a dinner during the week. Consider donating it to that place or person instead and you know. We are all adjusting but I truly believe that we are stronger together and when we support each other even if it's from afar and we feel it's necessary to acknowledge this of course but the same time April and I really feel a great responsibility to all of our listeners to not linger too much on the subject of Krona virus. You're certainly getting it from all angles. These days you know as the saying goes the podcast must go on so instead of focusing on the current social disruptions what we endeavour to do is to continue to remind everyone twice a week about the beauty of expression which clothing brings to our world and today's episode cast is chock full of a wealth of beauty beauty. Hard one to be certain but the transcendent kind that I think we could all use healthy. Dosa right now today. We are pleased to welcome one of our favorite Fashion History Scholars Patricia mirrors to the show to chat with us about her exhibition Ballerina. Fashion's favorite muse. Which opened at the museum at? Fit this past February and the museum might currently be close to visitors but cast. That doesn't mean that we have to stop learning from the experts. That's right Patricia. Is the deputy director of the museum? Fit and one of her special interest as fashion. Historian is the intersection of dance and fashion. She's also written in detail about modern fashions. Innovators in terms of construction techniques. And this includes work Madam Gray and the Great Isabel Toledo who passed. Oh too soon recently. We are thrilled to have Patricia with us today. Patricia welcomed addressed Tricia. Thank you so much for taking the time today to join us. Undressed welcome thank you. So Much Apron. Really excited to be with you today Congratulations on your new exhibition. It is truly magical. It's supremely beautiful. Have to say and I learned a ton from its accompanying catalogue which is called Ballerina. Fashions Modern Muse for any of our listeners. Who WanNa pop on over to Amazon and pick up a copy so for any of our listeners. Who like me may not be ballet aficionados? I'm hoping I we can do a little bit of Bali history just a little bit. When do I see the emergence of ballet? And what distinguished? It from other types of dance which preceded it bally's quite an old art form the genesis of what you see today. The basic steps in the positions were already in place as early as the sixteen sixties. The first formal school was started in sixteen sixty one under the auspices of Louis. The fourteenth who himself was a very accomplished valeted Ella. It was clearly an aristocratic endeavor. And you see that carried over today. This would erect posture. This sort of very formal movement of the body so in some ways it is part of that French also regime aspect and we still see it today but ballet's also a very athletic endeavor so it's marrying these two extremes if you will sort of restraint kind of technical Bravura and again. That's why I think they call ballet dancers artists athletes. Yeah because they merged the two and then fast forward. The ballet went from being aristocratic very classical in its themes and male dominated to about the eighteen. Twenty eighteen thirties when women take over ballet's international. It's much more standardized and very importantly the romantic style. The sort of supernatural narrative takes over and it seems that women artists were better suited to express this new ballet form. What can you tell us about the life of a professional ballerina in the early years of the art forum in the Nineteenth Century? What was her place in society very different from today. The Ballerina really sat at the bottom of the socio economic scale. If you will. There were a few exceptions in. Even though there was a flourishing in the eighteen thirties and forties where there were certainly respectable stars By and large these women were very marginalized. They were paid very little and as a result they were often exploited. Many of them had to turn to prostitution To survive and we see these beautiful pictures by got today showing what seems like an idealized environment but in fact often in the back. You'll see men lurking. They were known as the abomination repower men of the Jockey Club and they regularly exploited these young women so many of them had very sad stories even though they were quite accomplished artists and speaking of data. I think there's even a little back story to his very famous sculpture of the fourteen year. Old Dancer Right. That's right that famous. Bronze sculpture is of a young girl She was part of a family where I think her sister was. Also a dancer but sadly she was likely a victim of the circumstances at the time where she hardly made any money to survive. Many of the dancers were hungry. They were physically exerting themselves and this young lady did fall into prostitution as well and probably died a very sad life so yeah it's horrible to think of and so different from the way we view dancers today right and it really is a fact that the majority of ballerinas then and now will never make it to star status. That's right or or you know prima which was a term. That's kind of more favorite in the past right. Today's top dancers are really generally called principal dancers. If I'm correct right why this shift and terminology from Ballerina to Principal Dancer. I think it has a lot to do with the fact that ballet culture came up in Great Britain and especially the United States and we view ourselves as a bit more democratic so the idea of the Ballerina which was a term given to very very few female dancers. You really had to be at the apex at one point in the late nineteenth century in Russia and said there were only six ballerinas in all of Russia was extraordinary So you can see how limited the term was bandied about then but today we view of the hierarchy of the principal soloist in the quarter ballet member but I think it erases the difference between male versus female and one that really I think asserts a sense of achieving it not so much through social connections or through whims but really through technical as well as artistic merit so. This is one of the reasons we see that change in France. They still use the word. A twelve or star to designate the very top rank. Oh Nice Yeah. I'd like to turn our attention to one of the all time greats who we were just talking about Before we started recording Marie Tahiliani And she really rose to international claim in the early nineteenth century. I'm hoping you could tell us a little bit about her. And also her innovations which helped to shape the future trajectory of ballet as an art form. That's right I think Marie Tagliani was important to very significant ways. One was the art form itself. He was not considered a beautiful woman and had certain physical flaws. Someone told me that. She was slightly hunchback and her father who was a brilliant choreographer was able to create dance. Movements that did not distract from that in fact Really enhanced her physical illness She was very hard working and she was a pioneer of the idea of going up on point sort of Now we think of it is absolutely essential in classical ballet for a female dancer but it was very rare when she started and I think the other thing that she did was to raise the respectability of the Ballerina. She was very careful in the way she cost him herself. She was discreet. Show is where pearls she had. A Floral Diadem And the other thing is that she acted very lady like off stage and she made sure her physical depictions whether in costume more in high fashion. We're always done in a very respectable way so she was able to do something. Many other ballerinas could not do which was Garner female audience. Even the young Princess Victoria was a huge fan of hers and so if members of the royal family could embrace. It was considered acceptable. So she was a breakaway star but unusual in that way and and correct me. If I'm wrong queen perhaps named one of her horses Tahiliani. He did tell Yoni was one of her race horses and also there was a stagecoach that ran between cities that was called the Tagliani fabrics after her famous role muscle feed many different types. Candies were named after her and the Russians were especially enamored. There were some bellum who made a soup out of her shoes needed hotel. Yoni mania swept through Europe and the eighteen thirties forties talk about being a mythic. Yes exactly Speaking of iconic elements of ballet. I would be very very surprised if there's a single one of our listeners out there who is not familiar with the garment which is of course. Queen essentially synonymous with ballet and I am of course talking about the two one thing that I was taken a bit backed by. When I was reading the exhibition catalogue was the somewhat body origins of this term. So how did this term to come about an aunt at its most basic? What is a two two while the two two is just the Ballerina skirt? It's costume and when it was invented in the eighteen thirties It was a word that came from. Rather if you will of course background it's a slang or play on the word. Kuku which itself is slang for the petite call. Which is your behind. Basically ballet audiences were different in the way they were positioned back in those days. The people who were members of the aristocracy or had money were always in what they called the box seats or the rings that were on the upper tiers of the Opera House and it was down in the orchestra seats where the more working class people sat and they could sometimes get a glimpse of the Valarie Yes that they were diaphanous garments and so sometimes depending on how she twirled or whatnot it you could get a look up them and they were also bit dangerous they were often starched ahead sizing in them which made them flammable and with the open gas lights. Some of the Ballerina skirts caught on fire and sadly a number of stars did die that way. Yeah Yeah we talked about this We talked to Alison Matthews David about her book fashion victims and we kind of went into some of those stories. Just a little bit. It's very sad it's very sad. Marie Levy is an. Emily was one of them exactly..

Patricia principal prostitution New York City Russia Cassidy Zachary Jockey Club Marie Tagliani New York Europe Marie Levy instructor deputy director Opera House France Abra Kelly Marie Tahiliani Bravura bally
Ballerina: Fashion's Modern Muse, an interview with Patricia Mears

Dressed: The History of Fashion

08:30 min | 3 months ago

Ballerina: Fashion's Modern Muse, an interview with Patricia Mears

"On your new exhibition. It is truly magical. It's supremely beautiful. Have to say and I learned a ton from its accompanying catalogue which is called Ballerina. Fashions Modern Muse for any of our listeners. Who WanNa pop on over to Amazon and pick up a copy so for any of our listeners. Who like me may not be ballet aficionados? I'm hoping I we can do a little bit of Bali history just a little bit. When do I see the emergence of ballet? And what distinguished? It from other types of dance which preceded it bally's quite an old art form the genesis of what you see today. The basic steps in the positions were already in place as early as the sixteen sixties. The first formal school was started in sixteen sixty one under the auspices of Louis. The fourteenth who himself was a very accomplished valeted Ella. It was clearly an aristocratic endeavor. And you see that carried over today. This would erect posture. This sort of very formal movement of the body so in some ways it is part of that French also regime aspect and we still see it today but ballet's also a very athletic endeavor so it's marrying these two extremes if you will sort of restraint kind of technical Bravura and again. That's why I think they call ballet dancers artists athletes. Yeah because they merged the two and then fast forward. The ballet went from being aristocratic very classical in its themes and male dominated to about the eighteen. Twenty eighteen thirties when women take over ballet's international. It's much more standardized and very importantly the romantic style. The sort of supernatural narrative takes over and it seems that women artists were better suited to express this new ballet form. What can you tell us about the life of a professional ballerina in the early years of the art forum in the Nineteenth Century? What was her place in society very different from today. The Ballerina really sat at the bottom of the socio economic scale. If you will. There were a few exceptions in. Even though there was a flourishing in the eighteen thirties and forties where there were certainly respectable stars By and large these women were very marginalized. They were paid very little and as a result they were often exploited. Many of them had to turn to prostitution To survive and we see these beautiful pictures by got today showing what seems like an idealized environment but in fact often in the back. You'll see men lurking. They were known as the abomination repower men of the Jockey Club and they regularly exploited these young women so many of them had very sad stories even though they were quite accomplished artists and speaking of data. I think there's even a little back story to his very famous sculpture of the fourteen year. Old Dancer Right. That's right that famous. Bronze sculpture is of a young girl She was part of a family where I think her sister was. Also a dancer but sadly she was likely a victim of the circumstances at the time where she hardly made any money to survive. Many of the dancers were hungry. They were physically exerting themselves and this young lady did fall into prostitution as well and probably died a very sad life so yeah it's horrible to think of and so different from the way we view dancers today right and it really is a fact that the majority of ballerinas then and now will never make it to star status. That's right or or you know prima which was a term. That's kind of more favorite in the past right. Today's top dancers are really generally called principal dancers. If I'm correct right why this shift and terminology from Ballerina to Principal Dancer. I think it has a lot to do with the fact that ballet culture came up in Great Britain and especially the United States and we view ourselves as a bit more democratic so the idea of the Ballerina which was a term given to very very few female dancers. You really had to be at the apex at one point in the late nineteenth century in Russia and said there were only six ballerinas in all of Russia was extraordinary So you can see how limited the term was bandied about then but today we view of the hierarchy of the principal soloist in the quarter ballet member but I think it erases the difference between male versus female and one that really I think asserts a sense of achieving it not so much through social connections or through whims but really through technical as well as artistic merit so. This is one of the reasons we see that change in France. They still use the word. A twelve or star to designate the very top rank. Oh Nice Yeah. I'd like to turn our attention to one of the all time greats who we were just talking about Before we started recording Marie Tahiliani And she really rose to international claim in the early nineteenth century. I'm hoping you could tell us a little bit about her. And also her innovations which helped to shape the future trajectory of ballet as an art form. That's right I think Marie Tagliani was important to very significant ways. One was the art form itself. He was not considered a beautiful woman and had certain physical flaws. Someone told me that. She was slightly hunchback and her father who was a brilliant choreographer was able to create dance. Movements that did not distract from that in fact Really enhanced her physical illness She was very hard working and she was a pioneer of the idea of going up on point sort of Now we think of it is absolutely essential in classical ballet for a female dancer but it was very rare when she started and I think the other thing that she did was to raise the respectability of the Ballerina. She was very careful in the way she cost him herself. She was discreet. Show is where pearls she had. A Floral Diadem And the other thing is that she acted very lady like off stage and she made sure her physical depictions whether in costume more in high fashion. We're always done in a very respectable way so she was able to do something. Many other ballerinas could not do which was Garner female audience. Even the young Princess Victoria was a huge fan of hers and so if members of the royal family could embrace. It was considered acceptable. So she was a breakaway star but unusual in that way and and correct me. If I'm wrong queen perhaps named one of her horses Tahiliani. He did tell Yoni was one of her race horses and also there was a stagecoach that ran between cities that was called the Tagliani fabrics after her famous role muscle feed many different types. Candies were named after her and the Russians were especially enamored. There were some bellum who made a soup out of her shoes needed hotel. Yoni mania swept through Europe and the eighteen thirties forties talk about being a mythic. Yes exactly Speaking of iconic elements of ballet. I would be very very surprised if there's a single one of our listeners out there who is not familiar with the garment which is of course. Queen essentially synonymous with ballet and I am of course talking about the two one thing that I was taken a bit backed by. When I was reading the exhibition catalogue was the somewhat body origins of this term. So how did this term to come about an aunt at its most basic? What is a two two while the two two is just the Ballerina skirt? It's costume and when it was invented in the eighteen thirties It was a word that came from. Rather if you will of course background it's a slang or play on the word. Kuku which itself is slang for the petite call. Which is your behind. Basically ballet audiences were different in the way they were positioned back in those days. The people who were members of the aristocracy or had money were always in what they called the box seats or the rings that were on the upper tiers of the Opera House and it was down in the orchestra seats where the more working class people sat and they could sometimes get a glimpse of the Valarie Yes that they were diaphanous garments and so sometimes depending on how she twirled or whatnot it you could get a look up them and they were also bit dangerous they were often starched ahead sizing in them which made them flammable and with the open gas lights. Some of the Ballerina skirts caught on fire and sadly a number of stars did die that

Prostitution Principal Russia Jockey Club Amazon Marie Tagliani Bally Bravura Ella Marie Tahiliani France Europe Louis Opera House United States Tahiliani Great Britain Yoni Princess Victoria Garner
"marie tahiliani" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"marie tahiliani" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Romanticism in eighteen thirty two previous podcasts. Subject Marie each charmed audiences in her starring role in Las he'll feed which was choreographed by her father Filippo tag Leoni Marie? Is often credited with ushering in and shaping the romantic era in dance, which was due in large part to how natural airy and spirit lake her technique appeared on stage. This is a little bit ironic since she had as you may recall, if you listen to that episode, not take into dance naturally, she had had to train rigorously with her father to achieve physical skills that appeared effortless to observers at the ballet Murray's poured abroa- or the manner that her arms were carried was considered especially beautiful because they framed the head and face an oval when her arms were raised overhead, and this is rumored to have been a style. Her father develops to hide a less than graceful back. Marie also appeared in this ballet on point. Although it's probably not the first time. She dance that way. It was definitely different from the way that a ballet dancers Toshi us work today. Yeah. Tahiliani was not the first answer to useful point as part of a performance that is normal. Credited to ammonia glue newly eighteen Twenty-three. Tag Leoni saw Bruyneel lease work and thought it had potential, but she also thought it looked really laborious that you know, you could see her kind of using momentum of her arms to swing up into that position. And she thought it robbed the movement of it's gray. So for Tagliavini point work was sort of a Pepperdine as a transitional technique. It was used to create the illusion of gliding as she subtly changed her the level that she was at onstage in the shoes used to achieve full point at that point. We're not the residence stiff point shoes of today, they were soft satin with a leather sole in a toe with darning stitches right there at the tip and the tow- like full point really was a very tiny tiny almost pinpoint compared to like the the more squared off Tova shoot a day. Tag Leoni is said to have burned through two to three pairs of shoes in any given performance. Marie tahiliani. Also created something entirely new aside from. Technique or skill. And that was the celebrity ballerina women of the day saw her and her relatively simple loss of feed costume, and they saw her as an aspirational figure. They were really captivated by this dancer with whom they all identified, and they also envied her very expressive life Tagliavini inspired fashions of the day because women emulated the theory all style that she became known for on stage. There was even very briefly a fashion magazine called Lhasa feed that Tagliavini consulted on it was printed on scented paper. I find that so delightful to think about I would hate it because some fragrances give me a headache. I would love it. Marie Tagliavini success and celebrity stature paved the way for other women to achieve similar levels, one of her contemporaries, the Austrian dancer fanny ELS ler was able to carve out her own celebrity as a sort of counter detangle Oni style. Where Marie was the theory of SIL fanny was very much of the earth, and she was much more sensual dancer when the ballets Zell debuted in eighteen forty one. It's star car Lada. Greasy achieved her own fame as the lovelorn woman brought back from the dead to dance the man who had wronged her to death lawsuit. Feed engines Zell game their own levels of fame as ballets as they continue to be staged in the modern era, and they are sometimes recognized as two of the first, quote modern ballets the romantic era, also establish things like romantic to twos that continued to be used today. But but in last forever and coming up, we'll get into the culture and politics that led to its decline along with what followed burst though, we will take a look. Will sponsor break. The brink is a new podcast from how stuff works hosted by Ariel Castanon Jonathan Strickland. It's.

Marie Tagliavini Leoni Marie Marie tahiliani Tag Leoni Murray fanny ELS ler Filippo Ariel Castanon Tova Bruyneel Zell Greasy Jonathan Strickland