4 Burst results for "Marie Rothbart"

"marie rothbart" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

08:09 min | 3 months ago

"marie rothbart" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"Hey everybody, inflation is a thief. We dive into the new inflation numbers and also Darren Beatty. It's when pack his reaction to the January 6th committee prime time hearing. Email me your thoughts was always freedom at Charlie Kirk dot com. Get involved with turning point USA Today at TP USA dot com that is TP USA dot com sort of high school or college chapter today at TPUSA dot com. Support the Charlie Kirk show at Charlie Kirk dot com slash support that is Charlie Kirk dot com slash support and email us your thoughts as always freedom at Charlie Kirk dot com. Buckle up everybody here. We go. Charlie, what you've done is incredible here. Maybe Charlie Kirk is on the college campus. I want you to know we are lucky to have Charlie Kirk. Charlie Kirk's running The White House folks. I want to thank Charlie. He's an incredible guy, his spirit, his love of this country. He's done an amazing job building one of the most powerful youth organizations ever created, turning point USA. We will not embrace the ideas that have destroyed countries, destroyed lives, and we are going to fight for freedom on campuses across the country. That's why we are here. Brought to you by the loan experts I trust, Andrew and Todd at Sierra Pacific mortgage at Andrew and Todd dot com. We're not going to lead with what happened last night, front page of The New York Times panel says Trump led attempted coup. That is not going to be our lead today. We are going to have Darren Beatty to help unpack what we might not be talking about when it comes to this. I encourage you to listen to our sister episode that we posted. 6 questions, the panel or the January 6th committee will not talk about. But instead, I'm going to talk about something impacts all of you. We should have prime time hearings about this. We should have prime time hearings about the fact that Americans are getting poorer, despite making good financial decisions. So one of the moral reasons why inflation is so treacherous. One of the moral reasons why, inflation is so bad for a society, is that people's good economic decisions will still get punished. The moral argument for sound money is that you want people who save people who spend prudently, people who do not live above their lifestyle to be rewarded for doing that. You see, the west has been built on a principle of delayed gratification. Not every country believes in delayed gratification. Delayed gratification is what built the civilization that we are living through. Means that I am going to work hard today, understand the costs to me and to my time, but tomorrow my children or my grandchildren will be able to enjoy the input the labor the risk that I put into a marketplace, inflation, obliterates all of that. So let's just make sure we define our terms. And we've done many shows on inflation. This one will be similar in some sense, but totally different in other ways. So we're going to talk about where inflation is today, what we could do about it. Well, inflation put simply is the decline of purchasing power of any given currency over time. It happens when there is more dollar bills than there is value in the economy. Now, for those of us that are conservatives, we do not like centralized power. We do want a small yet strong government, but one thing where I think conservatives have gone wrong over the last 30 or 40 years and something that I would probably find common cause with libertarians on is monetary policy. Mine monetary beliefs have changed very little over the last ten years. There's other things I've changed beliefs on. Of course, everyone's constantly changing. Life is about adaptation. But in fact, I've become more of a monetary hawk over the last ten years. As I realize, that central banks are the ones that truly control. Human behaviors. Now, Austrian economics from the writings of Marie rothbart or Louvre von mises or FA Hayek, I got my start reading the literature from these authors and from these thinkers. Some of what they write about is profound and brilliant. Some of it is quite honestly silly and utopian and is never going to happen. But in particular, there is one belief that the Austrian economics economists and ash economics, I think, gets perfectly, something that I think deserves our appreciation and our study. Now, this comes to a belief or a school of thought called praxeology, which is essentially the study of human action, which actually was the title of one of Ludwig von mises's books. One of the arguments of Austrian economics is that interest rates actually determine human behavior. That is not just some sort of number on a balance sheet. It's not some sort of abstract thing that when you lower interest rates, you're going to get secondary tertiary and unlimited amount of other impacts or let's say other costs associated that you might not have expected. That interest rates must be taken very seriously. So what isn't it? What is interest rates? Well, interest rate is the price of money. It is the cost that is required to borrow money. So when interest rates go down, people borrow more money, but what also happens is that people are going to engage in reckless economic behavior. When interest rates go down, people are going to buy things they shouldn't. They're going to borrow more than they probably should. They are going to buy boats or second or third homes. When interest rates go down and money is cheap, let the good times flow. However, when interest rates go up, the opposite happens, all of a sudden, the economy starts to tighten. So as interest rates go down by definition, the money supply is usually typically going to increase. Inflation is the measurement is how we measure whether or not the amount of money in the economy is correlated with the goods and services that are already there and also going to be produced. Now, inflation is something that is such a silent killer because everyday Americans have very little they could do about it. Now, there's some things you could do to be defensive about it certain asset classes you can engage and we'll talk a little bit about that. But inflation is such an overwhelming villain for most people. That they feel as if they're disempowered. Now this is different than other things that are actually happening in America. For example, when violent crime goes up, there is something you could do about it. You can move to a better neighborhood, you could buy a firearm, you could not go out at night when crime goes up. You're not totally helpless. When inflation goes up, you are largely helpless. Yes, you could buy gold. You could buy silver, you could buy the vix. You could buy shorting the market and negative ETFs. You could buy asset classes such as land and real estate. You could buy apartment buildings, but let's be honest. Someone earning $55,000 a year right now in Phoenix, Arizona, or in Dallas, Texas, or in Atlanta, they're not going to be able to have the liquidity to be able to diversify in the asset classes that are necessary. They're getting poorer every single day. Inflation is a thief, inflation is a massive wealth transfer between the workers and the asset class owners. If you really want to stick it to the rich, if you really want to tax the rich, the worst thing you could possibly do is engage in an inflationary cycle. In fact, inflation is a gift to the rich inflation is a gift to the people at the top of the income ladder because they'll just move their assets quicker to places where they can adjust their rates, for example, apartment buildings. People that own apartment buildings do okay. In fact, some of them do very well in inflation. Why? Will the value of their asset will go up, and they're able to adjust the rates based on inflation. Oh, rent is now $1800 a month. Oh, rent is now $2100 a month. Oh, rent is now $2400 a month. Oh, rent is now $2700 a month. They're able to go up the ladder of what they charge based on what inflation is. So when you artificially intervene into the economy, you're going to get disruptions..

Charlie Kirk Darren Beatty Sierra Pacific mortgage Charlie Todd Andrew Marie rothbart Louvre von mises FA Hayek USA Today Trump White House The New York Times USA Ludwig von mises Phoenix Dallas Arizona Atlanta
"marie rothbart" Discussed on Part of the Problem

Part of the Problem

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"marie rothbart" Discussed on Part of the Problem

"O. t. p. all right let's get back into the show anyway. What i'd advocate is more or less people gotta take matters into their own hands like if you hit the streets. Yes we need batman. Well no listen if you see. I've seen these videos. It makes me disgusted about like the society we live in today. They see these videos. Where like you know. Some some guy will attack a woman. And i see like there's men around who get on their phones and start calling the cops that's like what they need. Help doing. have guns and laws that they can shoot that guy. That's what you're saying. I did not say that. No saying that you'd be legal that it should be laws that if violent attack has taken place and you're not a man of physical strength. You feel comfortable interrupting that fight. Perhaps you should be able to your gun and resolve the situation. I'll i'll just say i'd like legal. Protections i would like to see a different reaction than Jumping on your phone from men who see a woman being attacked by another man you know. That's all say that But yeah it's it's It's this is a problem. And who knows i perhaps this will you know Kind of level off and crime. We'll start going back down but if this rise in crime continues That's going to be something that libertarians have to deal with. Because it's going to be this big opening for law and order right wingers to come in and say well. We know what the solution to this problem is. And it's cops cops cops and as we've seen there really actually if you understand what the problem is they're not so good addressing it the other thing i will say And i know that this ruffles feathers of a lot of left libertarians. But i really don't care. But i i gotta say that i think murray rothbart was right that when he said that thing about how Cops should Be in the business of protecting people and property at people freaked out when marie rothbart said that the unleashed the cops line even though he said subject to liability if there if they you know beat up the wrong person or whatever you know like that's that's more or less the closest within the status model to a private security force And i also think that like something has to be done about the homeless problem and i. I'm not going to pretend that. I have the exact answers to it but i i. I am very sympathetic. To the rothbart argument of clearing out the streets now. I do not think that homeless people should be like beaten up and assaulted or anything like that. But i do think that it is just. It is outrageously unacceptable and just There's nothing libertarian. About it either that we should just accept that me and you are robbed to pay for these public sidewalks and then other people just get to claim them as their home. And you're literally talking about like pissed covered mentally ill drug addicts but just like living in on the streets and then like what. The families with children who whose parents work hard and pay the tax dollars for these roads have to just deal with their kids walking through that shit. I mean i like. I just don't think that's acceptable. I don't think that's the right thing to do. So i think should be unafraid to like support. Whatever solutions are available to that problem just expand off of that. If you're a business owner and you start running from the mall rights here in a partnership with the mall where ben your rent To be a part of the mall and you wouldn't tolerate it if the mall was just letting homeless people live inside of it because that's going to ruin your investment of paying the rent same as your rent from a building. The building doesn't just let homeless people live within the building. Because that's where you live your city streets me no different if you're a business owner and you spend a chateau ren to be in the downtown area because you think there's going to be traffic and people come into the downtown area. You're in a partnership with the government that they're supposed to be maintaining that street so that you can operate your business there and they get their tax dollars and you know your landlords gonna make money. Everyone like it's a partnership there and the government's just not kind of taking care of their end of the bargain will. Yeah and so. I think even what you're demonstrating by By by saying it that way is that the problem is really solved when it's all private. Yeah private agreements. It's just nobody even say like nobody. If like in your example of living in an apartment building if homeless people just come in and move into the vestibule and then the the owner of the building hires a few people to physically remove them from the building. No one is sitting there going like. Oh my god. You can't just clear out. The hallway of these people took well. Of course i can. This is my building and people here. You can't homeless people can't just move in the people who live here paid live here like no you know. No one really can have a moral objection to that. No serious person can at least And same in the mall and all these other places like people getting kicked out of a mall. That's known as a problem with that. It's only when you get the government involved that then all the sudden. There's like this weird. Like well i don't know. Can we just kick them out of the streets. I mean the streets belong to everyone type thing. But that's not the libertarian possess or you can be there but with some level of decorum like anywhere else in the world lion..

murray rothbart marie rothbart government
"marie rothbart" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

08:33 min | 2 years ago

"marie rothbart" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Gotten a huge advance for this. There was big demand for it and he just US couldn't believe that anybody gave a damn about any of the details of his life. He just could not believe that and his heart wasn't in it so he decided no no. Thanks so the money didn't matter it was. He just couldn't bring himself to people cared. And I know you're kind of the same way but Dogana Jeff diced there are some details that I want to wring out here people do care about. GimMe Your if you don't want to give me too long of a story. I WanNa know how somebody did. You grow up in California. Mostly yes okay. You start off in California. And somehow you have a successful career in things having to do with the financial world. And then somehow your Ron Paul Chief of staff and somewhere along the line you become an Ostra Libertarian. Teheran this is not the normal career path for most people so we are curious about. What were you reading? who were your influences? How did you because I didn't? I mean I I knew you existed. But we didn't have any mutual friends all of a sudden you just came out of nowhere. Who the heck were you? Yeah that's interesting. You know. I come from mostly mostly a background of libertarianism. I never went through a phase otherwise and that's mostly attributable to my father and to my older brother so when I was a kid in high school junior high. My Dad had some copies of books. Like the road to serfdom laying around My older brother Steve was getting a nineteen eighties. Eighties version of reason magazine in the mail. So I had some influences like that and of course I had some Ayn rand books that came into my possession which are very dog-eared which I still have today and my mom was probably not as thrilled about the randy and stuff because she thought it would make me an atheist or at least inclined me that way and I probably did go through a little bit of an obnoxious objective EST atheist phase to be frank in my late. Let's say late teens early twenties but for me you know. My Love was always literature. I thought I was going to be an English professor. Oh my God thank God we saved you from the. Yeah that's really what motivated me and I particularly liked Twentieth Century British Satire Evil in Wa. Graham Greene stuff like that. So my plan was hey. I'M GONNA go become a university professor and teach literature and and that sort of thing and at this point you know we start to get into the early nineteen nineties and I started to become aware that there was a PhD glut especially in California. And so I was going to school school in San Diego at the time and I started to rethink path and I said you know. It's the idea. Being a refresher appeals to me but I have to be realistic. And I don't WanNa be poor and and and Yada Yada Yada so at that point I thought about going to law school and ultimately did and from my perspective it sort of dovetailed with my personal interest because I was already a budding being libertarian. And felt that you know as a lawyer I might be able to help defend people against the state whether that would be criminal where I think you know rather regardless of whether the purses versus factually guilty of the acts the alleged to have committed. That doesn't mean the state has any moral ethical legal right to prosecute them and you know I ultimately went into tax simply because I felt like the tax payer was always in the right. There is no such thing as a just tax. There's no such thing as lying on your taxes or cheating cheating on your taxes that sort of thing and so in the early nineteen nineties I had a good friend Joe Becker who was a graduate who at student at UNLV because Murray Rothbart and Hans Hopper were teaching there at the time that was the reason he was there. So I was living in San Diego and he would occasionally say. Hey come on up to Las Vegas you gotTa see this guy. Marie Rothbart this professor so I said okay. I'll come up and drove up a few different times and Rothbart courses were always at night. He was very much a night owl so he taught his graduate sessions at night and afterwards they would all go to a little place not on the Strip by any stretch. This is way off strip. I think it was on Sahara Avenue. A little place called the stakeout which is a little sort of Gripe Video Poker Burger joint and I think it's still there actually and Murray would come and talk to his students and hop I think would sometimes come so I didn't really realize in those one or two times that I might have met rock that I did meet Rothbart. I didn't really realize what he was. I knew he was a libertarian. Professor and I had heard the term Austrian economics but I was still at that point very much in that sort of you know generic libertarian camp. I thought things like legalizing pot. That was still A. That was still edgy. Back then at taxpayer-funded stadiums are bullshit. You know that was. That was the sort of level. I love my libertarianism. And if you know we still find this today in other words. Libertarians who aren't rooted in economics generally bad libertarians and so thankfully thankfully. I found out through my friend Joe about the Austrian school inserted reading that heavier denser stuff which I'm now in retrospect glad to have have read but As far as Ron Goes Dr Paul just a few years earlier when he ran for president in one thousand nine eight I was just getting into undergraduate. I guess second you're an undergraduate. Maybe and so I went and saw him and back then of course you had to know that he was coming. He came to a little Ramada. OUGHTA in in Santa Ana California. Believe it's no longer Ramada in the building still there and so I think through my local Libertarian Group headed newsletter or something and I mean physical newsletter newsletter and I found out about him coming in I went and saw him. And that's where I met a couple people with whom I would stay in touch over the years. And so I have in a sense sense known ron for that long and then stayed in touch with him but My intention was was very much just to be a lawyer and I never imagined edge and I would be doing anything else with my life. I I got into mergers and acquisitions which is a very particular area of tax law. All the stuff dealing with buying and and selling companies which as you can imagine. There's a lot of complex tax structuring and a lot of cross-border international elements to this stuff. And so it gets very complex and as a result all especially from well a little bit in the nineties with Alan Greenspan and the early two thousands and then especially with Bernardi up until the crash really of two thousand seven The manet market really really went crazy in the United States will actually worldwide but especially in the United States and so oh it was a it was Lucrative at the time it was very easy to have a job you got a lot of calls from recruiters so it was good ee. No strictly from that perspective effective is a good place to be and So it was really just a call from a friend of mine who worked for Iran later on that sort of convinced me to end up working for him in his congressional office. And then through Ron Meeting Lou Rockwell not only coming to the institute so all of that is kind of a I guess a quick quick and dirty version of how I came to be sitting here where I am today in this room and Musa's institute. She's there's a lot of stuff that I could riff on but I WANNA on a pick out one in particular. You're kind of offhand remark. That people who are not rooted in economics tend to be bad libertarians. And here that I think some people in the audience here and that can't be right. You know economic system for everybody but there are very few exceptions to this rule. It turns out it's very strange range. I mean it and I think I have a theory as to why it is but when I think of people who are kind of squishy in their libertarianism. Or they're more interested in appearing appearing chic than they are and being really principled. Almost none of them are rooted in economics because economics. We were looking at private property and the Division of Labor and all these clear cut things that were if there's nothing mushy about it. There's nothing flighty about it. And it routes you in something. It's not that libertarianism is about alternative lifestyles I mean. Obviously Libertarianism says. You can't use violence against people because you disagree with their lifestyle. But that's not what fundamentally it is. It's fundamentally non-aggression peace and all these other things that I think flow naturally from economics but also I think about some of the people I have to deal with who are sniping keeping at me from the sidelines and almost none of them are in the Fed people. Almost none ever talk about the Fed. It's always the same three or four issues.

Ron Paul California professor Murray Rothbart San Diego Joe Becker Fed Marie Rothbart Dogana Teheran Ayn rand Rothbart United States Las Vegas Jeff Libertarian Group Graham Greene Steve
"marie rothbart" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

03:32 min | 3 years ago

"marie rothbart" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"The he actually work right next to him so how much did dave really take your sort of libertarian leanings then i guess push them you know maybe leaning a little more and more and more into the libertarian ideas as they've got long hair over the years. Are there any positions specifically that you maybe you held previously and maybe either his insight or maybe other other. The inside of others have really challenged you want that. You've really they said okay on these issues. I've really gone full libertarian here. Yeah one of the big light years ago <hes> dave recommended to me <hes> you know murray rothbart rothbart writings and the first book you recommended to me was <hes>. What's the really small on the <hes> men at what what what what what's like the small one that people loved the one guy it's almost like a pamphlet you can read it to episodes of diarrhea. You can get through that one <laughter> man. I the way i remember information. It's the one with like <hes> <hes> like the it on the face with all like the <hes> the news and that should in it yeah. I'm the same way i remember. I remember enough vague information that only recall it fully want to end the conversation around the phone call. That's so maybe a bad combination. What's his main book that you know if you're recommending marie rothbart book what's the first one you're recommending well. A lot of people say for new liberty. That's not really a pamphlet one. Oh i think i know what you're talking about an enemy of the state of the state here. We go see we got there. I was so i dave dave loves anatomy state. That book didn't quite do it for me. I loved for new liberty on the reason i love for new liberty is he gives such a great breakdown of like in practical terms. Here's how we can do things better without the state and <hes>. I found those arguments to be like some of the things i wouldn't like. I wouldn't have conceived. Hey we don't eat schools <hes> or that's absurd to say we don't need schools but then in his breakdown like oh yeah that that's a better way of going about this <hes> so four new liberty definitely it really changed my mind. About how much government do we really need and then being around dave. I mean i've been exposed to so much. I i mean so many big ideas that i you know i still haven't sat down to read on and <hes> one of the biggest ones i would say. He really changed my mind on as i said before being on his show when it came to foreign policy i would have just said this is beyond me. I don't really quite understand the dynamics between countries and maybe it is kind of like a doggy dog world where if we don't have a massive military. We're not kinda out there and kicking people around realist the quote unquote realistic perspective yeah but i wouldn't i wasn't committed to adam is standoff would just be like listen. I'm not gonna comment on foreign policy because i don't quite understand the dynamics of it and maybe there's a possibility that <hes> in in a vacuum if we didn't have a massive military china would be over guy. I don't really understand it. <hes> you know and spending more time on the show and airy scott orden and then also on a sales sales book that i read really chipped in my view on that <hes> the sales book i can't even remember the name of the book by the part of what they were saying in the book was basically if you view the world is a doggy dog world old <hes> you kinda manifested and so like the joke i've said in terms in regards to foreign policy is imagine like i'm trying to get some chick to marry me and i go on a first date and like the like i really know like this is the one we're going to get married and i show on the first day and i bring my divorce lawyer like back in a winner over so the idea of hey we're trying to be cooperative and we're trying to trade with other countries and that's why we're building the largest military in the world. We're kicking them around and we're in their countries and that's how we're creating in a framework for being cooperative is just bullshit..

dave marie rothbart diarrhea scott orden adam murray