21 Burst results for "Marie Curie"

"marie curie" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

11:30 min | 11 months ago

"marie curie" Discussed on Science Friday

"And for her work. She was the first woman to win a Nobel prize his and the only person to win two in different sciences. It's possible you knew that last part but did you know that she also invented a portable x ray way to help injured French soldiers during World War One or that. She drove the ambulance and administer the x Rays Yourself. Or how about this. She had a close friendship ship with another brilliant woman in science the English physicist and suffragette. Hertha Ayrton these are all just a few things that I learned from a new play the half life of Marie Curie which pulls back a curtain to reveal the human side of this scientists. And now the playwright with me Lauren. Gunderson is a playwright whose webpage Latte loudly proclaims. I Love Science Welcome to science Friday. I Iran such a fan of the show. Thanks for having me thank you. You know I you know. I'm going to quote from your from from your webpage again. I find deepen thrilling drama. In the course of scientific progress and put it on stage as much as possible and you have been doing that during your career I have indeed. It's almost two decades of diving into science because I think science is incredibly stage worthy. It's riveting it's emotional. It's intellectually thrilling. So I I always go back to. It was talk about this. This latest. Play the half-life of Marie Curie. It doesn't actually start with Madame Curie science but a personal scandal right indeed. Yeah we've what made me want to write. This story was taking something that we do know Marie Curie and something we don't know which one of those is. A person hurt the Airton her great friend and as you mentioned incredible engineer and physicist and suffrage Ist But it also this moment and Mercury's life where frankly she was closer to Monica Lewinsky then to Albert Einstein. She was brutalized in the press absolutely just diminished and the just radical cruelty That she survived Because of this Love love scandal that her secret letters between her and her colleague I'm Polish avant were released to the press and it was just a May Day against her. And here's this incredible woman. This also happened when she was in the process of winning her second Nobel Prize and I found those two things deeply interesting Partly because it it exposes that scientists are people they're not just brains their bodies and hearts and and It is not what we expect of the certain scientists of Marie Curie and I found that to be a really thrilling alchemy to put on stage rich emotion high stakes and and you know it becomes a story about this. Incredible unstoppable friendship that defines both of these women and frankly changes the world as well as save their own lives. Let's talk about that friendship. We meet Marie friend. Hurt the Airton and accomplished scientist in her own right. And I I I would wager that. Most people have never heard of her. Yes I hadn't told us about. Her relationship was yeah. She's an incredible woman in history. A person in history So she liked Marie Curie. Kind of came from not much Was Not expected to be much more than a wife and a daughter But they both found science and what Hertha became was this radical intellectual. She was a fan of literature and poetry. She actually chose her own name from a poem by alternates. Winberg called her which he wrote about the goddess of the Earth. So that's the kind of woman she is. She Says My name is Sarah Marks. But I'm going to choose the name of a goddess and she Finds Great Inspiration in the sciences particularly particularly in electro mechanics show she Invented a solution to the electric arc which was of course lamps at that time this is about turn of the century and she found a away to reengineer the lamp so that it doesn't make this terrible hissing and popping noise that used to these lamps were everywhere on streets and stages homes And so she really saved The world from this this this Reckitt But also took the time to investigate all sorts of large and small parts of the physical world. Ripples in the sand and wave dynamics So so it I found her incredibly interesting. Also a political activist during the suffrage Protests and movement at that time Pankhurst was a friend of hers. All of the suffragettes would come to her house. After they'd been starving themselves in prison they would go to hurt this house to be fed and welcomed back to society. So she's the most fascinating fascinating incredible person And I didn't know anything about her and there was one little footnote where she was a great and true friend of Mary. Kay reason they exchanged all these letters and and they visited each other. And then this one moment in time in which the play focuses true moments where Hertha basically saved Murray Corey's life she said you are in the middle of the scandal. Will you are physically ill you depressive to a concerning point and I am going to be your best friend. I'm going to save the day and I'm GONNA YOU'RE GONNA come to my Beach House on the the countryside of England the coast of England and stay as long as you want and she did and both these women and their daughters spent the time that summer and it it really did. Save Marie Curie and I think the play goes into why and how and how to friends save each other. How are we there for each other? How can this certain kind of of deep true brave courageous friendship Just really become the bastion and The support that that any of us would need so in many ways even about two scientists about history and it's about two women it's actually AB- all universal global themes of the human experience and in fact We we have a clip from one of the scenes in the play that I really I really really liked. And it's where her and Maria talking about what moves the most. We love our lovers. We do our children but our lives. Passion is proof proof yes knowing what's true and proving it peering for just a moment into the hearts of the universe and snatching some truth before the cartoon closes Mother Nature doesn't give you much. But when she does she gives you everything that is the greatest feeling in the were served. God Yes it is. Wow Lauren the these scientists are not at all dispassionate or emotionally removed from their work the do you think that what surprise people in I think it absolutely would think people might assume. Oh this is a history lesson. Oh this is something an impassioned and cold because it's scientists or scientists either science is boring or scientists are boring. None of those are true And I will say just an incredible shoutout to our actors came inaugur in Francesca Fair Donny. Who play their hearts out on the stage every night in this production? They were really great. I've made the mistake over the years. We sometimes when when we talk about scientists we say they're scientists and then there were people you know but but you're going I mean that seems to be a central core of your play is showing how these are have they have emotions. They're humans they think about themselves and their families and their love life just like real people indeed. Aren't they just like all the way. That's I think what makes what makes it so compelling as you get what is incredible about this the study and the rigor of science you get universal global themes you get massive ideas change making world shaking ideas but you also get people who make coffee and our mothers and fathers and get their hearts broken and you know all of these day to day human things And frankly things that that all of us will face mortality legacy meaning so in that way as part of why I keep going back to science you have this one level that is intellectually rigorous and another that is emotionally engaging and both of those matter and I'm married to a scientist just an incredible Virologist and I see in him as many of my friends who are physicists mathematicians this passion and it is a quest for knowing saying that isn't as detailed as solving an equation although of course that's part of it It is big and and philosophical and metaphysical and I am so drawn to that part. Well you're very famous writing other plays about women in science on just name one and particularly famous people like Adam lovelace and you also had emily additionally what what drew you to Marie Curie. Well it's funny. I have written a lot about scientists I am a very for science. Play was about it. kind of unknown cosmologists name Alpher. He did win the National Medal of science before he passed away but he was cosmologists About Newton and Darwin and kind of found I asked myself. Wow that's a lot of dudes I keep writing all the boys. There must be some other women here. and of course it actually occurred to me to write about mercury even back then. This was decade and a half ago but I didn't In some ways because I thought it was obvious so here I am now Finally at a place where I can. I think rightfully understand her more she as a mother. She was a mother of two as my Her female friendships Were so fundamental To her vulnerability to her resilience and that has been true for me She had incredible sister. I have an incredible sister. So there's something about a waiting for this moment in my life to reach across time to talk to Marie Curie about her life It felt like it could be a play again about all of these fabulously exciting ideas and radio-activity in that birth of that science science that she was critical and foundational to but but also about being alive being a person being a parent being a friend. being someone who's emotions get away from them who loses in love and gains and love and And Mrs People that you've lost your life and at this point in my life. I feel like I know her more than would've fired written at ten or twenty years ago it was a tough picking the actress. Oh God well there are incredible actors but I will say as soon as I heard Kate mulgrew who is known for Orange is the new black and of course star Trek. She is an absolute force of nature and hurt. The is the same and I felt in them. Kind of there was a twinning there. I felt very right and very real and and Francesca similarly. She has this Fire in her and what we really wanted was I. I think we look at pictures of Mary Carey and read her speeches. They're very stoic and conservative and she looks kind of conservative and we wanted to find the woman then who would roll her sleeves up and dig through uranium more for years with with no help. Who is that woman? That's the woman I wanNA GONNA do so well pregnant and do so you know what engaged in like. Oh my God so we had to find somebody with that fire and Frankie has that you know. It's great three back. The actors actors are terrific. As a terrific play we're talking with Lauren. Gunderson playwright the half life of Marie Curie. That's running in New York City until April until December twenty second December twenty second and then available on audio audible audible starting December six.

Marie Curie Hertha Ayrton Lauren Nobel prize Gunderson Mary Carey Iran National Medal of science Reckitt Latte New York City Francesca Francesca Fair Donny Sarah Marks Kate mulgrew Winberg
Nobel Prize For Economics Awarded To 3 For Work Fighting Global Poverty

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:03 min | 1 year ago

Nobel Prize For Economics Awarded To 3 For Work Fighting Global Poverty

"This message comes from NPR sponsor xfinity some things are slow like a snail races other things are fast like xfinity. X. By get fast speeds even when everyone is online working to make WIFI simple easy awesome more at xfinity dot com restrictions apply in wealthy countries have grown anxious about their position in an economy that is increasingly global and she suggested that you know the same approach that she and her colleagues opened and wife from Mit and a colleague from Harvard all of whom studied alleviating poverty NPR's Scott horsely joins us now hey Scott good around the world not necessarily exactly on topic of her research but she was asked for example about brexit and things like that she suggested that a lot of workers have used to explore the causes and solutions for extreme poverty around the world could also be used to address some of that insecurity that's affecting less Dan eared and experimental approach to the study of poverty really digging into the discreet causes of poverty extreme poverty around the world and some of the best ways to go about address deserving but this does come a time of a lot of soul searching in the economics profession there has been concern of late that profession itself is hostile to women spire more women to go into economics and she pointedly added inspire more men to give them a chance what else does she have to say when they woke up to give her the news she was woken up lows originally from France energies originally from India and Kramer is from the United States as you say the three are being recognized for their work on alleviating poverty in particular they thing it the Nobel Committee said this has been instrumental in helping policymakers and nonprofits figure out what works what doesn't and how to allocate aid money the most effective way this style of economics has been widely adopted now and do flow says the prize is really a recognition not just them but of the work that's being done by that larger community undo flow talked a little bit about that this morning she said economists are grappling with ways to make the profession more welcoming to women and she said she hopes that this this Nobel prize will in makes his rather unusual isn't it it is only the second woman to share in the Nobel Memorial Prize for Economics the committee stressed that she shared that prize not because she's a woman but because she's before five five o'clock this morning on the East Coast and she did get a chance to have a cup of coffee before she was trying to address the news media but she was asked about some of the political turmoil Senate people in wealthy countries she was also asked his as Nobel Prize winners usually are what she plans to do with the money she is she's a poverty researcher blue are these researchers esther do flow from Mit and her husband Ajit Banerjee They are sharing the prize with Michael Kramer who's from Harvard Liam that is she was going to plow it back into her research and flow said she and her fellow Laureus will have to get together and figure out what's our gramme of radium wow suddenly become a fairly wealthy woman yeah she pointed to the example of Marie Curie who when she won the Nobel Prize was asked what was going to do and said she was going to use it to buy a gram of rates nine hundred ten thousand dollars I assume can buy quite a lot of radium she in that way Scott thanks so much really appreciate it you're welcome Steve That's NPR's Scott horsely

NPR Nine Hundred Ten Thousand Doll
Happy left-handers day! What percentage of the world is left-handed?

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

Happy left-handers day! What percentage of the world is left-handed?

"It is international left handers day left handed people make up ten percent of the world's population there are some studies that have found evidence linking left hadn't handedness and intellectual creativity also some evidence that right handers tend to live longer than left handers a lot of famous people are left handed Barack Obama Oprah Winfrey Bill Gates Albert Einstein Marie Curie and Isaac Newton among

Isaac Newton Barack Obama Oprah Winfrey Bill Gates Albert Einstein Mar Ten Percent
Philly Pulse survivor on latest mass shootings: 'Tragedy changes you'

KYW 24 Hour News

01:14 min | 1 year ago

Philly Pulse survivor on latest mass shootings: 'Tragedy changes you'

"One of the Philadelphia victims of the pulse nightclub master that was the one in Orlando three years ago was reacting to the latest mass shootings is K. Y. W. community affairs reporter Cherri Gregg explains every headline can be a treat patients corner arrive home in Florida this weekend following a trip to Philadelphia and the first thing she saw as she exited the plane headlines about the second mass shooting in twenty four hours realization stopper in a track because you understand the pain that those people are going to do you understand the fear Carter was just twenty when she and friends here a park or a cura Marie went to post my club in Orlando where a gunman opened fire Carter was shot multiple times in the leg Murray who with eighteen with killed since that night there have been at least fourteen mass shooting them and how much yeah no matter how much I try to raise I think things like I think it's happening now twenty three corner has earned her trauma certification and authored a book titled survive been live the story of patients Carter in just a few weeks you were merry Alex Marie Curie Marie's older brother able to find love and hope and let us help those will come out of our debt the she prepares for her wedding Carter is still speaking out calling for universal background checks podcast is that cable W. news radio dot com Greg he reviews

Orlando Cherri Gregg Florida Philadelphia Carter Murray Alex Marie Curie Marie Greg Reporter Twenty Four Hours Three Years
"marie curie" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"marie curie" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"And free food and deals for Father's Day blubber rundown for you in about twenty minutes. Google's algorithm. Reps up people places, and things into boxes that the company calls knowledge, panels, the panels. Gather information from Wikipedia and many other sources on the internet, the panels once popped up for important historical figures other famous people. Now, they appear for all kinds of people, and when they contain significant mistakes that can be difficult to fix. It's a story by Shalini Ramachandran reporter at the Wall Street Journal Shalini. Explain what goes down over the last several years is it's try to make it. Search more easily digestible by creating these panels, which are algorithms, we've done that are about people, thanks, but when, when it was like Marie Curie George Washington, you're eating idiot of figure out, who they are, and what they're up to but over the, their knowledge panels have become have started incorporate kind of not very famous people because their understanding of how you're connected to those and dead and has has increased. And so a lot of not very famous people have people themselves to find a panel on the right side of their search landing pages. That's very wrong. And they've had real trouble trying to fix it and found that a lot of business opportunities that may have fallen through or have getting a lot of weird questions when opera singer was saying that he spent fourteen months trying to scrub her ex-husband off of her panel. So it can get personnel. How does it the panels get incorrect in the first place? Well, Google pulled in the information from various sources on the internet. So it's unclear it's don't algorithm. Mickley done. So it's not a human incubating. Nothing is vetted. For accuracy before it goes up on the landing page unless you're political candidates for a health disorder, but that's not even but every everything else is not vetted. And incorrect information can come from Wikipedia vandalism or if just I it's sometimes it's really baffling. Some people have wondered how, how the heck did Google find that or same name issues have often gotten confused panels like Benjamin research, an English professor at Emory University got confused with another another Benjamin race who was born in France? So there's a who the French cartoons. So there's all kinds of ways you can get, you know, get messed up based on your story. It seems like getting a Google to make corrections is difficult. Especially a couple of folks, you mentioned, who are listed as dead who are not dead. It can get really difficult on Google says that it committed to verifying things fast. But it deals with a lot of there's essentially a couple of tools that it offered people who have no panel to get them. Six one is this tiny almost on find a little button that says feedback if you click on it, he can try to start editing stuff. Unfortunately, many of the people, I talked to say they were sending feedback for months, sometimes years and not, not every getting a correction to Google wash this thing year ago, that's supposed to be so you can get verified by Google so that you prove that you are, who you are. And this panel is about you now that requires you sending a lot of personal stuff to Google, which includes your selfie with a passport or driver's license to Google. Or sometimes one the, the woman who is trying to get her ex husband scrubbed was told by Google employees you may have to send in her divorce papers. There's it can it can get really personal and private quickly. And but during that process, gogo, verifies, you and once you're verified beer, radically, day, elevate your feedback end in correcting faster. But some people, I've talked to have had a lot of problems even getting stuff fix after they got verified frustrating. Thanks, Shalini Shalini, Rama Chandran reporter at the Wall Street Journal twenty one minutes.

Google Wall Street Journal reporter Shalini Ramachandran Marie Curie George Washington Wikipedia Shalini Shalini vandalism Emory University France Benjamin research Benjamin Rama Chandran professor twenty one minutes fourteen months twenty minutes
"marie curie" Discussed on Slate's Double X Gabfest

Slate's Double X Gabfest

03:10 min | 1 year ago

"marie curie" Discussed on Slate's Double X Gabfest

"She didn't even take credit. She immediately posts on Facebook that she hadn't, you know. She wasn't trying to take credit. She was proud of the work that she had done, which I believe was like do working on an algorithm that ultimately didn't end up being the one that was used but was important to the like creation. I also think adding a fourth thing to your litany there. Marcia is is the way that we are taught about women in stem like in school, and beyond is like you can be Marie Curie and not like you can be part of the team that you know, develops this thing. But it's like, you will be the great woman, and because you are fighting against the odds, you will triumph even more than anyone else. Like, I think that is sort of a problem. And so people are looking for that kind of thing they're looking for the Marie Curie of the black hole photograph rather than like, an understanding that it's super collaborative process and that like it might. Actually, be harder to integrate women to that process into that process than it is for women to be loan geniuses. Actually in a weird way. Yeah. It was very striking the language that she used in that Facebook post. She said, no one algorithmic person made this image at required. The amazing talent of a team of scientists from around the globe. And in a way that kind of take me off like, absolutely. It's a statement to the war two hundred people working on this. They were trying multiple approaches. Apparently, there was even kind of an effort to anonymous is kind of who's the ideas came from two to kind of avoid bias. It was a very clearly st-. Let's to stipulate it was a group project at the same time. I kind of felt even though I agree with everything you've both said that like can we not take credit like come? We just not say. Yeah. I did this and it was great. And I was one of two hundred but I really worked hard. I worked for years on this. And you know, I staked in in some par-. I state my future on this. And and just is it something about. Our socialization that just doesn't let women say I did this. And it was awesome. I think so I do and I think that because she is young and her career. I mean, there's so there's so many layers. Yes. And as someone who's also academia, not an algorithm stuff, but understanding the culture of an environment where it is very difficult. I think for women to. Claim that status because in doing so you have to an -ticipant what the applications will be for you down the line. It's one of the things that sometimes had talked about with my colleagues, you get letters or recommendations about like men being wonder kipnes and the future of the field, and this and that and everyone just chill out this person just finished grad school. They're freaking out and crying all the time. Like the rest of us. Everyone needs relax. And so when that when those layers are added onto your persona, I think, it's it's very I think it's very difficult to to claim in a healthy way ones accomplish on well. But this this was sort of a special circumstance like I think if she had not become the internet symbol of the black hole project. She could have posted like a joyous..

Marie Curie Facebook Marcia
"marie curie" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"marie curie" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

"Much long. We're covering women's history month when we all celebrate all of the great icons from Marie Curie to MS pacman. She is the perfect woman, strong sexy and eats ghosts everything I'm looking for for more on this. We're joined bow senior gender issues. Correspondent Desi like everybody. This month is so important to me because I get to celebrate some amazing women and the show buys me. A really nice watch. I didn't sign though from that. I said, no, that's why for your signature. I did it for women. Look, I know a lot of men might think women's history doesn't affect them. But it turns out women throughout history of invented of men's favorite things. For example. Trevor what's the number one thing that men can't live without I'll give you a hand. It starts with the b you whip him out during spring break beer. Yup. Yeah. You know, as brand of South African. Okay. Well, beer is a five hundred and thirty billion dollar industry. Mostly thanks to men and who can blame them for loving beer with all those macho ads full of sexy women, desperate to have sexy. Sex who grandpa your social security? Check is. So. Turns out message pertaining women were the ones who invented this, man. Juice. Wait sorry that doesn't sound right. This man fluid. Better. But it's true seven thousand years ago beer was considered a gift from goddess and only women were entrusted with making it, which is why I no longer pay for beer when I go out signing my bar tab. I just right. You're welcome. Actually, you're really cool thing you stealing drinks, but the invention of Bill. Yeah. And that's not all a woman helped create one of the things men think they can do when they're drunk kung FU society has always told us that that it's meant for men and pandas, but guess what Bruce Lee the most famous kung FU or of all time got his whole style of food from a woman in the seventeen hundreds and none by the name of ING Moi developed her methods after teaching female student how to fight off a creepy guy. These days, you can just swipe left the back then you had to literally white left. Yeah. That's so amazing. I didn't know all of these women's issue. Like, I didn't know that a nun helped invents kung FU any it's not that crazy nuns are bad ass. Remember that none in the nineties took down Reno's biggest mobsters, and she still had time to teach our choir. Some Motown classics. Isn't that sister act? Yes. My favorite documentary and speaking of fighting it was this woman these Meitner who discovered nuclear vision, I'm sorry did nuclear fission. What is that? God. Seriously. Trevor you don't know what nuclear fission is the everyone knows it's it's when you fish in the nuclear. Whatever the point is her discovery of nuclear fission became the basis for all nuclear weapons, so without her their nuclear bombs without nuclear bombs world leaders would have no way of proving how big dick saw. The next time you're chugging PBR or start a bar fight or drop a nuke. Remember, all of the women who made it possible and honor them by not doing any of that dumb shit in the first place. Want? My guess is a Republican lawmaker from Texas who represents Moore of the US Mexico border than any other member of congress. Please welcome congressman will heard. Welcome to the show. Thanks for having me on. Let me ask you a question that oftentimes the elephants in the room. Sure. Let's hear it as a black Republican. That's the question. There's not many of us, right? There's not think that is look I think that is because my dad always says that he was a Republican from the first time Lincoln freed us, and how old is your dead. Exactly..

Trevor Marie Curie Reno Bruce Lee ING Moi Meitner congressman Lincoln Texas congress US dick Moore Mexico thirty billion dollar seven thousand years
"marie curie" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"marie curie" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"In just a few minutes. I'm Cody Goth, and I'm actually Hamer today. You'll learn about the towards and Leonids meteor showers happening later this month, how working out could boost your willpower and the secret university where the trailblazing scientists Marie Curie got her education of satisfy some curiosity November twenty eighteen is an extra special month for meteor showers. Keep your eyes on the sky because the towards and the Leonids are here for a meteor shower double feature, I've never seen a meteor shower. I have they're pretty great. They're hard to see here in Chicago when there's a ton of light pollution. But yeah, if you just drive out into the country where the sky gets a little darker. You just see little streaks of light everywhere. It's beautiful. All right. Well, I would be jealous. But next month, I'm going to be in Alaska. Oh, man. So I might see the Northern Lights. Heck, yeah. We lock just need a clear day anyway for the rest of us who are not going to Alaska in December. Let's talk about what's happening this month November twentieth. Meteor shower month. It's great we'll start with the tourists for this meteor shower. You can thank a giant ball of ice called Enki. That's a comment that loops around the sun every three point three years, which is pretty often for a comet hence why he is one of the comments. We know the most about inky isn't visiting this year, but tiny chunks of it from previous years probably will. And that's what you can thank for the towards meteor shower. Most annual meteor showers, come from the debris left in the wake of a comet it's traveling around the sun, and the Torrens are no exception. Most of the meteors we see sparking across the sky will burn up by the time. They hit our surface. But we think the ones left behind by Anke are big enough survive. They won't be car. Crushingly huge. They'll be more like a couple of onces instill. It'll be worth it to keep your eyes peeled. None of these fragments have been discovered yet. But NASA meteor expert.

Leonids meteor Alaska Marie Curie Cody Goth Torrens Hamer Chicago NASA Anke three years
"marie curie" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

07:46 min | 2 years ago

"marie curie" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"Marie Curie Fasching between midnight. They called max Monday. Now five thirty nine. Well, you know. I'm not sure what that does ratings. They won't be on the sellers is one big block. Well, you know, there's another big game. I should say a game bird hunting season coming up Saturday. Another game bur that you've never gotten there was during neck. Yeah. Let's see. I got the numbers here. Hundred and ninety six thousand one hundred and forty-one pheasants were taken in two thousand sixteen and sixteen or seventeen sixteen seventeen figures and that's down from two hundred and forty three in two thousand fifteen hundred ninety six thousand pheasants and it says in here. In radio magnet. Max didn't get one of them. That's what that's where the big drop. Unless you're cutting hunting preserve that may be right. Well, listen, we're going to talk later about the big president opener. I I tell you. It's gonna be it's gonna be a tough tough tough one rain keeps coming. I know not only the rain, but the rain stopped the harvest of crops. Corners everywhere. And those pens are going to want wanna be standing corn because that's the driest place to walk. And so it'll be games whereas mud boots. Well, he he I don't think he worries about getting a bird or not. But you've hunter with him are part of the governor's opener before though, I have and MMC the evening banquet. But then then governor plenty to and governor Dayton, et cetera know good sports, then if they're smart, which they are they know that occasionally they have to cater to something that a heck of a lot of Minnesotans makers part of their life. And so yeah, the peasant openers brings attention to it you did you ever live in Minnesota as the glory days. A fascinating had already gone by came. You got your it was already gone time. I got here. I got here in sixty seven nine. I mean, there were the fifties and forties. You hear about the legend? Right. But let me tell you of say, I don't know that. Dates but back in back in one thousand nine hundred ninety s I think it was when Minnesota really got a lot of European leaders. I remember standing down there. In southwest Minnesota and seen birds get up in the air. And I'm thinking to myself. You know what I never thought? I'd see this Minnesota and two I could be in South Dakota right now. That's how great it looked Schiffer for a few years, and you know, the governor government give within the government take away and went out our friends went down. And that's nothing news about that. It's. Way back in nineteen sixty seven sixty eight when I first went to work for South Dakota game and fish department. I edited a booklet about the peasant decline in South Dakota. Now, they're what they thought was the decline the sixties. Yes, what they thought was a declined was nothing compared to Minnesota's decline was. But Maxine the same thing happened in the fifties in one thousand nine sixties, they called us soil Bank back then a lot of older hunters will remember the soil Bank day. So Bank was the same thing as Sierra, and even but it was even greater because. Crops prices were low and farmers were anxious. Get into the government is trying to stabilize farm, incomes et cetera. So soil Bank days, but then things changed the markets changed and suddenly show Bank days delivery farm. Right. Right. And as a so Bank acreage went out the peasant population went down. Well, that's back in the fifties. Well, the same thing. Same thing happens every time you put grass on the ground. And then later, you take it away. Yeah. Not that difficult figures. No, no. But we sit there and wonder and wring our hands, and we do in this state. We wring our hands over the peasant population all the time when it seems like it's a pretty simple answer. Now, the uncontrollables the winter, of course in the spring. Yeah. But they can recover from that. You know, they can always recover from that pheasants are very prolific. If you give them a chance, but it's our federal farm programs are my way stupid because they use my tax money to retire land for so-called conservation purposes, Rozhin purposes, blah, blah, blah, blah, and it's temporary. I don't know that conservation ever should be a temporary fix conservation. Should be something that we do because it's the right thing to do. And we keep it there. And you know, I'm not a farmer's easy for me to say, but they're gonna do. Okay. Anyway with that. So I'm on my soapbox here. You got me on my soapbox. But you reflective of what a lot of outdoorsman and conservationist think. Yeah. Yeah. Especially with debit legislating in programs, and helping and all that stuff. Well, no, we. But you to talk about the Sierra et cetera. But it takes a lot of federal dollars to pretend in effect so land you really need, right. Right. And minnesota. I mean, we've got the great legacy amendment that helps savage from grassland, but we're without that right now to really make the needle move a lot you need just a tremendous number of dollars and only the federal government has that kind of money. They really don't, but they spend it like they do. And so it's hard to get to move that needle. So to speak. Man, something really have. They can't even agree on a farm program, so far no, no at the federal level. Now, if you if you let see you farmed. I dunno thousand acres doesn't matter the number. Let's see you're interested in hunting. Do you think? What would it take to fortify that land? If you raise pheasants in at what time do you need to release a pheasant to give it his best opportunity to live a longer life. Well, it all starts with the the habitat. If you don't have winter habitat nesting habitat, assume you okay? Well, theoretically, you shouldn't have to release any because they'll be there naturally, you'll find it. Yeah. But you know, if you want to let them go probably is no big deal. I would just let some hands go, for example, in the springtime view of them survive. And and NASA and bring off a brood. So what you were going to effective way to do that to release x amount of birds raider it's used like they've tried that kind of thing before it hasn't. Well, it it's a waste of money. Because as I said before if you have good habitat and ascend pheasant range, you'll have the birds will be there. And if you don't have enough of it, they won't be there. And I don't care many. You put will release out there. If you don't have enough about they're gonna fly around, and I get nabbed and shot and run over, and they'll be gone. So they're just not the same as wild birds. We'll talk duck hunting when we come back Steve courts. He's the man that runs it for the DNR live outdoors and C C L, Minnesota, we'll have a new governor for the first time in eight years in two thousand nine hundred and this election season is dedicated to bringing you the voters the candidates in their own words..

Minnesota South Dakota Max Sierra Marie Curie Fasching governor Dayton federal government president NASA Schiffer Maxine DNR Steve fish department thousand acres eight years
"marie curie" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"marie curie" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"We turn our attention now to another key election in turkey which heads to the polls on june the twenty fourth in presidential and parliamentary elections for a closer look at what's stay on the final week in this election joined by dr lati toz assistant professor marie curie global fellow at syrups thanks so much for coming in i think it's worth rolling back slightly and looking at the overall picture in turkey as was president from two thousand three he was prime minister since two thousand fourteen his stunts became increasingly authoritarian particularly since the failed coup in two thousand sixteen and the country's been under a state of emergency since then i think the problem in turkey just to start recently from two dozen fourteen doesn't turn was a crucial time when the the referendum was passed giving additional power to our on and sell it during that time liberal of turkey also failed on their stand the aim of our dawn i think too since it doesn't turn them crecy was totally destroyed in turkey there was a little bit before but since two thousand ten we cannot talk about democracy anymore in two thousand seventeen he narrowly won a referendum changing the country from parliamentary to a presidential republic if he wins this time he'll want to enact constitutional reforms which had given extraordinary powers as an executive president he's ordered using executive power since doesn't fourteen and to rule of law mateya or parliament doesn't have any power or any push it even the police and armed for snow on his control as well i of course i think the darkness hasn't arrive yet in.

president prime minister turkey executive president dr lati toz assistant professor marie curie executive
"marie curie" Discussed on Alice @97.3

Alice @97.3

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"marie curie" Discussed on Alice @97.3

"Benny so good come on stuck in traffic in it's terrible mood until i heard sarah's thinking rock out in the car now looking like a crazy person love you guys hopefully everyone was singing along to it always sounds better when you're singing along one hundred sixty five years ago to today is four twenty so i looked at like what happened today there's all kinds of crazy things one hundred sixty five years ago today in eighteen fifty three harriet tubman started the underground railroad like epic day hundred sixteen years ago was the first boring company the first boring company hundred sixteen years ago today in one thousand nine hundred to pierre and marie curie isolated radium they like discovered radium with they didn't know was that it was radioactive in super dangerous and then their daughter died of leukemia and i want to say both of them died of cancer oh the first commercial commercial use of radium was to paint it on wristwatches to make them glow in the dark so people were walking around with this crap man a lot of people who painted that who were handling the radioman painting it or not so much the people who had it on their arrest i guess maybe it was just too small amount of the people who were handling it a bunch of them died two i'm sure of course one hundred sixteen years ago so most people alive than dead now hundred six years ago today nineteen twelve the green monster opened in boston fenway park wrigley field opened on this date in nineteen sixteen in chicago you've been to fenway right you like it i do and if you've ever been to boston or to fenway it is like it's a ballpark that is i mean it's it's the most citified i mean i don't know i haven't been to that many of them but there's no parking lots there's no it's just right like there are buildings backed up against it like it's just so in the city right there in the in the middle and so you know parking lots are a luxury take the t fifty seven years ago today in nineteen sixty one f m broadcasting i know there were all these like kinda neat things before twenty twenty six years ago.

sarah harriet tubman leukemia cancer boston fenway park wrigley fie chicago Benny pierre marie curie fenway boston one hundred sixty five years hundred sixteen years one hundred sixteen years twenty twenty six years fifty seven years hundred six years
Earth's Changing Temperature

Wow In the World

01:39 min | 2 years ago

Earth's Changing Temperature

"About eighty six degrees fahrenheit on average on average so meaning that it was hotter on sundays and colder on others that's right and for comparison in july of two thousand seventeen the earth average temperature was sixty two degrees fahrenheit oh in july is one of the hottest month of the year in some places that's right and while eighty six degrees fahrenheit might not sound to scorching hot well fifty million years ago it was hot enough that crocodiles were swimming in the arctic and there were palm trees in alaska hotter than a carolina reaper mixed with a ghost pepper mixed with pepper x mixed with peppermint yeah yeah yeah i get it i get it but you said that the year twenty one

Ross Marie Curie Nobel Prize Mindy
"marie curie" Discussed on The IVY Podcast

The IVY Podcast

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"marie curie" Discussed on The IVY Podcast

"Interesting moment of timing and access to resources marie curie it when she she's brilliant ride she decides to put herself through school uh she pursues education really intensely because it was the only way to preserve poland at that time and i'm not going to go into that whole story right now but it's a great story about height why she is upsetting to pursue an education in a time when women didn't really women didn't uh so she pursues education but right at the time she's about to get her phd is right when rontgen discovers these mysterious raise and becker arale discovers mysterious raised trish she decides to study the mysterious raise let's figure out what's causing race and ends up meeting a man named pierre curie who is uh also brilliance also very a socially disconnected but falls madly in love with marie and he hasn't dented a state of the art electronic her but it's hard to use its very finicky to use the beca ralph couldn't figure out how to use it so oh he trains marie very carefully hours and hours of work to use this electron better and it is that electronic are that enabled her to measure the tiny currents that led to her discovery of radium and polonium so that's a pretty unique confluence of timing and resources steve jobs recognized how much this had influenced his career trajectory he said i feel incredibly lucky to be at exactly the right place in silicon valley at exactly the right time historically where this invention has taken form.

poland rontgen pierre curie ralph marie curie becker arale trish steve jobs
"marie curie" Discussed on The IVY Podcast

The IVY Podcast

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"marie curie" Discussed on The IVY Podcast

"Women in at the time that marie curie was growing up so the fact that she was able to do a she did is staggering to read her story is both inspiring and painful up the she discovered polonium she discovered radium she discovered radioactivity as an atomic property she invented a bunch of the methods for isolating radioactive isotopes that we use in medicine she also invented a portable ray unit that she personally tomo made a bunch of i'm cheian bent and the idea of a portable your unit and then created a bunch of them taught them out into the field in warwick wold war one and has personally attributed with saving over a million soldiers lives so truly a staggering person this is nikola tesla he's the person after whom the car company tesla is named in honour of him he was the weirdest innovator i studied probably the most brilliant innovator i studied if you had to pick one person my book is like eight biographies but if you had to pick one person that you just got to learn about it's nikola tesla this guy was he he was amazing ads first official at a photographic memory and his photographic memory headed it memories of child which is of this intense visual memory it was so strong that he would see things right in front of them as if he were there and he couldn't tell the difference between them and real life so for a big chunk of his childhood everybody thought he had hallucinations they thought he was crazy he thought he was crazy but he learned to harness that visual memory to turn himself into a computeraided design machine right he could do what computeraided design systems do today he can design a system tested turn it around adjusted refine it run it see something wrong fixit tested adjust it and when he was convinced the whole thing was perfect then they would put it in a physical form and it would be perfect which is an astonishing thing right that's pretty astonishing.

marie curie nikola tesla tesla warwick wold official
"marie curie" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"marie curie" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"Trees most influential historical figures uncover little known facts about their lives and accomplishments we dig up what you don't know about the icons you do know from the many trials the right brothers underwent to successfully craft the airplane to the unrelenting research by marie curie to discover radioactivity i learned something new with each episode of historical figures so if you love to learn this podcast is perfect for you and historical figures is also a par cast podcast you can expect the same intrigue indepth research and highquality sound that you hear on conspiracy theories you can listen to episodes on the right brothers sigmund freud and more now visit apple podcasts tune in spotify google play or wherever you listen to podcasts and search for historical figures or visit par cast dot com slash history to start listening now that's par cast p a r c a s d dot com slash history to listen now to say area fifty one is a secure military base is an understatement in fact even today it is arguably the most highly classified military facility in the united states the physical lay out of area fifty one is changed little since nineteen 55 with only several additions of various hangars and runways over the years however while the base itself is small above it are millions of acres of restricted airspace since 1954 i've the government has tried and succeeded to by as much property around the base as possible the road leading up to it is desolate and by the time he reached the front gate there are most likely many cameras and eyes watching you well not fenced the restricted area is surrounded by signs warning any that dare to trespass that security is authorized to use deadly force on any who insist on crossing the border.

marie curie united states sigmund freud apple spotify
"marie curie" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"marie curie" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"It's not marie curie such an for lopez a can't be like mcdonald's is known for the bill for there oh it's the booty that's kind of what i was guessing the assets might be realign this aila singer are we talking banzer boobs we're talking everything oh okay little now hearing tucked their new jackson there go who demi lovato uh how old 30s lady gaga uh alist singer with does this aila singer boast about her real assets she has yes okay i e um since hunters another hint our eyes spears no you're listening an obvious a list singer visit it is it a man or a woman woman of katy perry oh let's filling the blinker who lay down again this is not confirmed however this is only speculation the assets might be real on katy perry but they've lift been lifted and moved and injected multiple times so is that really real now the word assets comes into mind because on january seventeen th that would have been yesterday here's the headline who from capitol fm it big pop station in london england quote all my assets are real katy perry eyes surgery but admits having fillers okay i have a question you yeah we read the description again about the serves the assets might be real on katy perry but they have been lifted and moved and injected times what is moved well okay so my of the way i took that immediately was.

marie curie lopez mcdonald katy perry england demi lovato london
"marie curie" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"marie curie" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And please remind us what happened to larry walters after he drifted into space well larry brought a bb gun along with them on on the flights for a good reason and that was to shoot the balloon so that he could eventually dissent uh and he he did land safely at one of my favorite things so i learned though wait landed safely got tied up in electric cables i should say he survived maybe lennick safely is an overstatement uh but the they were following him in saw where he was going to get tied up in electric cables and cut off the power thankfully but one of my favorite things i learned about larry walters was apparently a united airline pilot radioed to the tower to say he had just passed a man in a lawn chair with a bb gun at sixteen thousand feet and so yes the gun was used to shoot the balloon so that he could eventually descent look in again the cast of characters that you you've written songs were drain godal harry houdini billie jean king marie curie and evil can naval you don't often have them referred to in the same brand and the five this the.

larry walters airline pilot marie curie sixteen thousand feet
"marie curie" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"marie curie" Discussed on KGO 810

"Most of alive now that we don't get any hormonal just not the right i mean you know it's it is is just it's fundamentally different biologically different so i'm marie curie is to get get your insight into this because everybody is browse on the internet for a minute and look at migraine shearer's and that guy there are a million suggestions some people are trying to sell you saying that you know what do you know about what we eat though in how that can contribute to um migraines yes so there's there's what you hear very often it that there's certain migraine triggers sample and j or red wine or artificial sweeteners aspartame alcohol on access those are things that actually can serve as migraine caters and you don't really know why you are triggers migraine suffer you may have absolutely no fact with wind air very susceptible to the other so alcohol some ten fits people off um whereas other people can house alcohol that they can't at energy or chocolate today the short list of foods that are pretty potent triggers and um interesting thing in the more important thing though is getting on the baseline state of your diet um you be either more or less susceptible to those triggers and all triggered including the emotional wine is like stratus and also including even the hormonal lunch.

marie curie shearer stratus migraine
"marie curie" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"marie curie" Discussed on WSB-AM

"He glory after the hour i'm marie curie said this is atlanta's news on wsb quick chicken the radar we've got more storms starting to fire up north of the city if you're up 75 from the perimeter you're gonna start getting rain act were very heavy stuff in canton right now very heavy strong storm just to the east the east of ball ground there is he'll uh slightly north coming as well gonna keep an eye out here it looks like the storms and the digital become severe thunderstorms momentarily i'll keep an eye out for the national weather service blooded slogan of these storms are intensifying in the evening now we gotta get into this donald trump jr stuff because this is getting bizarre you know iif said the entire week and i really have meant it this sounds like a set up may be now the democrats maybe it's the russians but it sounds like a set up its healthier the russians were playing both sides and now we know that two of the three parties that we're helping preval's on the russian group met with donald trump jr fusion gps was preparing the dossier against donald trump uh but it was remit act metson anatalya this on its guy who met with donald trump jr the other two she was the lawyer for preval's audie it just sales mighty coincidental to me but there is a problem here on the trump side i they said the meeting didn't happen then they said the meeting happen but there was no referenced that this woman will work for the russian government then dover really is the males at adjourns out she did do they did say she worked for the government then they said it was him it was kushner it was manafort any was her will now we know a russian a former soviet spy met with them that's number.

marie curie canton preval russian government kushner atlanta donald trump dover
"marie curie" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

02:45 min | 3 years ago

"marie curie" Discussed on WRVA

"Welcome back to costa costa got more clips for you with david ginola's we talk about reverse speech and your phone calls and let's go to the calls but before i do a quick little statement here why have gotten more emails about one of our callers because people are worried because we haven't heard ferment almost two weeks he's on the ally thomas from lahore your california are you alive and well of hi george thank you for taking my call and got no i've been what's coming to an ira unit wait a little break rip people didn't hear you and they thought something happened to you all i just dr yeah i thought i would go you know i really were spec pt but costarred em seven i thought i would take a break out oh am and i just want to dwell jacqet appreciate every man every woman who also took tom i really respect the audio while they're they're really got concerned about your time and that the is the type of person the the audiences they they care about the other caller sean pledge zero k and you're on with david ginola go ahead gebert my question for you many psychologists to over the last century theorized that everybody lawyers and yang ana sorry deeper honored shows you are telling the truth so i'm marie curie of i would be interested in what you call those still small boy of our content and can we use reverse page two oil down so to speak and to our psychology to begin to up to be supplied speech we are congruent with her own conscious we are telling the truth bite our society punishing us for telling the truth and if you speak about that i would appreciate it oh well at the april level of river get down at the very deep level very yet it is it is a real real phil speaking and that it is still small voice the voice of spirit that whether it was boardman auditing bodies he's ready for that yet we ah iq cya we punish lie we panni people who tell the truth and i am a who we have you know that we've got all kinds of apps now david i don't know maybe they have them now where people could simply speak into a recorded app in the app.

costa costa david ginola lahore california marie curie thomas ira tom i sean phil two weeks zero k
"marie curie" Discussed on This Won't Hurt A Bit

This Won't Hurt A Bit

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"marie curie" Discussed on This Won't Hurt A Bit

"It's kind of a paradox that on the one hand british close cancer on the other hand with go ways of using radiation to treat cancer and its changing all the time the ultimate goal here is to be able to give radiation just to the single cells that you want to get it to just to the cancer cells maybe one nanotechnology will let us do the marie curie was a brilliant scientist buds like most people who are passionate about something she suffered for her work her journals are still so radioactive today that they're kept any led storage cabinet and they can only be handled with protective equipment ultimately she died of leukemia from old this radiation exposure marie curie was also a woman in a time when sexism and prejudice were so pervasive but she overcame this through her scientific achievements because they were just too great to ignore simply because she was a woman she initially was not even name to receive the nineteen o3 nobel prize but pierre advocated that she should be included she also became the first female professor to hold chair in the department of physics at the university of paris radiation is everywhere it's part of being alive british in comelec sugar it's almost in everything you a a little bit here and there is no big deal but eating a ton of sugar really high doses of a long time will that can make you sick coz lots of health problems and just like radiation sugars also used in medicine but that's for another show to are.

cancer marie curie leukemia nobel prize pierre professor scientist university of paris comelec one hand