35 Burst results for "Marianne Williamson"

"marianne williamson" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"marianne williamson" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Asking that question. I think that's the question of the conscious person right now. How can I best serve? And we're living the question, living the inquiry. Yeah. Me, no less than everybody else I know. But new connections are being made. You know? It's like an immune system, right? The body survives because there's an amazing amount of assault and injury and illness that the body can take as long as there's a healthy immune system. I believe the psyche has an immune system. It's amazing how much heartbreak and trauma we can take. There's a psychic immune system. And I believe there's an immune system in civilization. And the immune cells are awakening. And when the immune cell, I remember I once fell down. Cut my hands. I was running and I fell. This huge gas was on my hands. It was so fascinating to watch the wound because it was right here. And I remember a doctor friend of mine saying, you realize the red is good news. It means all the white blood cells are rushing to the wound. And that's what I feel is happening right now. Everybody's rushing to the wound. And cells in the body are assigned. You go to the lungs. You go to the heart. You go to the bones and right now we're all being assigned to the area of the wound where we can best make a difference. And I know for myself and for most people I know we're not quite sure where the assignment is right now, but we can wake up every day and do what we can to be the awakening. Yeah. Find the wound that works for that space to you. Right? I feel like so many forms of new media like podcasting, et cetera, play such a vital role in this. It's providing so many people with different avenues for learning and exploring media that just weren't available. Not that long ago. And I feel like that's a big piece in this in the construction of this. Absolutely strong immune system. Absolutely because traditional media is so corporatized and sold. It's that predetermined agenda. And this is independent media. People having a deeper conversation. You know, is Werner Earhart, who said, you can live your life from circumstances or you can live your life from a vision and things such as you're doing, allow us to have a vision of what's possible. Yeah. And from that, anything is possible. Beautiful. Well, you can learn more about Marianne and all of her wisdom by subscribing to her substack, which is pretty new, right? Transform. You just started getting into this and you also have a podcast that transform podcast. Well, is there anywhere else that you want to direct people towards that want to learn more about you aside from your over a dozen books that you've written? Yeah. Or people can go to Marianne dot com and sign up on my mailing list for the various things I do or substack, and the merriam Williamson podcast is on that subscribe. If you go to Marianne dot com, there's a lot you can go get to the substack.

"marianne williamson" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"marianne williamson" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"The other day, Massey that congressman guy from Kentucky, who posted the holiday photo. Yeah, Jesus. And I saw that and I was so appalled, you know, we're days away from school shooting. Normally I don't mix it up on social media and inject myself into that kind of discussion or acrimony. But I felt like I couldn't let it stand. And I tweeted it and said, you know, I just feel like these people are, you know, I can't, it's difficult to imagine how weak insecure and broken these people must be to think that this is a good idea to share this photo. It was met with a lot of different opinions, obviously. And then I thought, I probably shouldn't have tweeted that. Like, why am I doing this? Or is there a responsibility to say something when somebody does something that I feel is so deeply inappropriate? Well, I think on that one and where I land on that one is that it's not about math, it's about that school shooting in Michigan. Within two days, in Oakland county in Michigan. Due to credible threats of mass shootings, every single public school in the county was closed. Now, I raised my daughter in Michigan. I have a lot of friends there. There's an inflection point. It's really interesting what's happening there. A lot of people who would not necessarily have gone there since then have said this is going too far. Americans are afraid to send their kids to school. But this is also an issue where the consciousness of the American people is not the problem. Poll after poll shows the American people want to close those loopholes, poll after poll shows the American people want to outlaw bump stocks. Polls show the American people want to rid our streets of average citizens who are carrying assault weapons AR-15s, AK-47s, et cetera. This has to do with the chokehold that the NRA and gun manufacturers has on our Congress so it all goes back to money and politics. But the idea that right now, you know, a bogus interpretation of the Second Amendment. This is not about the Second Amendment. This is about the money of gun manufacturers and the hold that this holds in terms of congressmen and senators who are told. If you vote for the most common sense gun safety law, we're coming after you and you're going to lose your job. And we need more of them will say fine, I'll lose my job. And right now, you know, the first thing that Trump did, I don't think a lot of people realize. The first official act of Donald Trump when he became president was to repeal a law that kept violent criminals. From being able to buy a gun. These people, the NRA will not be happy until. I mean, they even have little gun holsters and pink for our little girls. I know. So how do you maintain hope amidst all of this? Because I believe that love prevails. You know, the crucifixion was followed by the resurrection. The slavery in Egypt was followed by deliverance to the promised land. The ark of the moral universe is long, but it bends towards justice. Even if God forbid, there is a nuclear Holocaust on this planet. And only 5 people are left. Those 5 will look at each other and go. Let's do it different this time. It's going to happen. You know it's that symbolic three days between the crucifixion and the resurrection, the symbolic 40 years between slavery and Egypt and deliverance of the promised land. That is a sign. There is a limited period of time. What is up to free will is will that be three years, three decades? 3000 years, 30,000 years. Lifetimes. That is in our hands. And I believe in people. It's economic systems and political systems that are holding all this back right now. But I believe that love will prevail because I believe that it always has. It always will, that's not only my religious and spiritual conviction to my experience. I think that's a beautiful place to end it. Thank you. You are a powerful and magnificent human being. I appreciate it. Thank you. The work that you do, the message and the vibration that you share with the world. It's really, it is very powerful. And I guess the only thing left to ask you is where are you taking this? What is next for you or where are you placing your focus? I think that there are these impulses that are collected in the zeitgeist. And I'm where everybody else I know is. Where I bet to some extent you are, everybody in this room is.

Michigan NRA Massey Oakland county Kentucky Jesus Donald Trump Egypt Trump Congress
"marianne williamson" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

06:29 min | 1 year ago

"marianne williamson" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"In holding what was by then Chevron accountable because Chevron had tax code. Chevron doesn't even deny that it happened. So Chevron said, we don't want the case tried in the United States. We want the case tried in Ecuador. And if it is tried in Ecuador, if we are held accountable, liable, we will pay whatever the judgment is. The judgment that came down ended up at somewhere 8 $9 billion. That was like 9 and a half billion. That's a while ago. Oh yeah. That's right. This has been going on for years. Chevron said hell no. And ended up coming at Steven donziger. And I have sought to destroy his life. And they had him on this misdemeanor where they claimed that he had there was some money that they said he owed them. They wanted access to his computer. Now, we all know how sac was saying the relationship attorney privilege. The last thing he wanted to do was to give over his computer in which there was all this contact information about Ecuadorian environmental activists. He wouldn't do it. He was filing an appeal, and what happened there was this was just a misdemeanor. New York State said, we're not even going to deal with this. A judge Lewis Kaplan found a loophole and basically gave over the prosecution of Stephen donziger to Chevron. This is very important that we see this for what it is. This is Chevron, and I think in many ways on behalf of the entire fossil fuel industry. Putting its line in the sand, trying to freeze human rights and environmental activism, saying, you go this far, we will destroy you. Stephen donziger was held in home detention for over two years with an ankle bracelet. He was denied a jury trial. And judge preska, these people are all related to the federalist society, et cetera, on behalf of Chevron basically, using a law firm which is Chevron related has now thrown the book at him and he is now in Danbury prison in Connecticut, serving a 6 month prison sentence. And what we want is for Merrick Garland to take this case and several Congress people have written a letter. The UN high commissioner on human rights has called us political prisoner, has said that it is a human rights abuse, has said that he should be released and he should be paid money in recompense, Greenpeace, there is more and more of a building energy of the outrageousness of this. He's basically a political prisoner. And at this point, it's not just that Merrick Garland needs to step up. Merrick Garland needed to step up a while ago. Joe Biden should step up. Joe Biden should step up and commute the sentence now. Yeah, this is such a crazy situation. I mean, first of all, Chevron still hasn't paid the 9.9 billion. But they will pay any amount of money they've said in order to prosecute. Because they realize that if you let this go through, that's the way the fossil fuel companies are looking at this. It's all about freezing environmental and human rights activism. Yeah, it's so crazy that they've been able to amplify what is essentially a misdemeanor charge on a trumped up, I think, fraud claim. Where he's just like, look, I'm not turning over my phone on my laptop. Ordinarily, that would be so there's a contempt charge, right? But that would be a fine or a slap on the wrist or something like that. Two years methan ankle price slip. And the 6 months now. 6 months. It's unbelievable. It is. And it's clearly sending this chilling effect message on anybody to say not so fast, not so far. Yeah, you can't go. It's not so far. But there is so much energy in this case. People are talking about it. And he's been very forthright. He's been doing videos and stuff like that from his home before he went to Danbury and you've been doing Instagram lives with him and stuff like that. And it's a fascinating test case and an example of just how far a company like Chevron will go to make sure that anybody who challenges them in a meaningful way will get put in the grave. Also, I don't think the average American knows I certainly was shocked. Everybody, I know a shock, who knew that there was a loophole. Yeah, I still don't understand how this happened. I mean, I was at the trial. The first part of it, the first day, a Chevron sponsored lawyer. Comes in and uses a U.S. courtroom. This is a show trial. This is the corporate prosecution of a U.S. citizen. This is a corporate prosecution of a U.S. citizen. Right, in the context of a civil trial. Yeah. It's not even criminal court. It's wild. Yeah, it's just one of many things that's quote unquote not supposed to happen in America. But it is happening. And that goes back to what you and I were saying earlier, we can't just influence the conversation. We need to stop this. I can't end this without talking to you a little bit about the idea of forgiveness because that's so central to your core philosophy and perspective on everything. Like, how do we develop the facility to forgive and why is that so important in terms of living our lives in a manner in which to be most whole and complete? Well, I'm a student of a course in miracles and the concept of forgiveness, which is central to a course in miracles. Presents the word in a very different way than it is presented within traditional Christian terminology or any religious terminology. Usually when we think of forgiveness, it's you're a jerk, but I'm so spiritual that I danger forgive you. The condescending. My favorite kind of forgiveness. Judgment to destroy the North America says. But forgiveness within a deeply spiritual metaphysical concept means knowing that we are all created by God as innocent and good, and we make mistakes. And that God does not punish us for our sins, send us an art term, means you miss the mark. He seeks to correct us for our mistakes. And when you are in that place, you realize that the love that is who you are and who I am is real. The rest is this mortal hallucination that.

Chevron Merrick Garland Stephen donziger Steven donziger Ecuador Lewis Kaplan judge preska Chevron basically Danbury prison America Joe Biden federalist society et cetera Greenpeace Connecticut UN New York Congress Danbury
"marianne williamson" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

07:25 min | 1 year ago

"marianne williamson" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Raytheon 8 having it though. Oh, the Brazilian is not happy. But we have to have it. We've got to say it. We've got to stand on it. We've got to run on it. I love the idea, but ultimately do we not have to disentangle campaign finance laws and find a way to prevent this insane undue influence that these industries have on legislatures, like it's anti democratic and it's like, can't we all find some way to fundamentally agree on that? Well, I think the American people do agree. Sure. I think they do too. The undue influence of money on our politics, particularly corporate money, is the cancer underlying all the other cancers, particularly dark money, particularly that which is exploded since citizens united. Ultimately, we're going to need we certainly need to repeal that. But that's not going to happen anytime soon. Ultimately, we will need a constitutional amendment that establishes public funding for federal campaigns. I don't think most people realize that your average congressman spends half their time on the phone trying to raise money. I'll probably more than half their time. It starts on day one. And yet these people were supposed to look at them and go, oh, they're so qualified for leading us forward. It's the Ken and the Barbie doll. Yeah. You were talking about the manner in which money goes into the medicalization of the sickness care system rather than the yeah, exactly. Yeah, we don't care. We have a sickness here. But that also it's metastasized into much more than that, right? We've medicalized sadness and grief, like we're overmedicating everybody. And that also speaks to kind of the undue influence of these huge pharmaceutical companies and their financial interests in making sure that everybody is adequately medicated at all. Absolutely. And that's another reason they came after me actually on the campaign. And that's not to say that medication certainly does has its place in mental health inappropriate situations. But as somebody who understands very well, the difference between what one might consider clinical depression versus grief or having a hard time. And the fact that we're now sort of giving people pills that just are going through something that they kind of need to go through because we're human beings. And life is hard. I look at antidepressants away I look at painkillers. I have a place, but we now know the sacral family Purdue pharmacy et cetera. We know about predatory behavior on the part of pharmaceutical executives, creating profit centers, dangerous, immoral, profit centers, where they did not belong. And I think it is absolutely naive of us to think that that's not happening in relation to antidepressants as well. And the fact that if you even suggest that you are considered naive or irresponsible about mental health is absurd, you're what's happening is how naive and irresponsible people are too so blindly trust. Big pharmaceutical companies. And like you said, they do wonderful things. I mean, my God, I mean, you know, I had surgery not long ago and believe me, I was grateful for those painkillers. Of course they have a place as to I'm sure many people's lives antidepressants. But the fact that you can't even suggest that the over prescription of medication in America is a real issue and we should be able to talk about it. That has to do with the chokehold of big pharma. And the fact that the political system and the media, you know, like when Anderson Cooper came after me, I pointed out how many were talking about that issue. And I said, well, that's interesting because look how many pharmaceutical companies advertise on your television show. And he said, I don't know who advertises. And I wish I said to him. It's constant. Yeah, of course. And by the way, before Ronald Reagan, this was not legal. Pharmaceutical companies could not advertise on television before Ronald Reagan and the orgy of deregulation that his administration brought forth. Yeah. I mean, it's a sticky wicket. It's all one and the same though. All of these issues go back to this inextricable connectivity between government and giant conglomerates. Well, and also you bring in on the sickness issue and one of the things I brought up in a debate was that we have to ask ourselves, why is there so much more chronic illness than the United States? Then among citizens of other equally advanced European democratic societies, for instance, this goes back as you well know, you talk about this. This goes back to our chemical policies, our agricultural policies, animal factory farming. Subsidies. Yeah, it's a whole corporate matrix. We have this corporate aristocracy. We have reverted to an aristocratic condition. And we have to understand what that archetype means. An aristocracy means that a few people are considered entitled to the major resources of the country. We repudiated that in 1776 and we need to repudiate it again. I mean, it's outrageous. The idea that profit making for companies whose practice of capitalism is so predatory. That it is constantly at the expense or at the very least too often at the expense of the health and well-being of people and planet. The American people have every right in the world to push back against this. It is the most traditionally American thing in the world to push back against this. We've never been a perfect union. I mean, obviously, we're not slavery from our inception. We've always been a dichotomy. You know, you had out of the 51 signers of the Declaration of Independence, establishing these enlightened principles. More enlightened that had ever been encoded in the founding documents of a country. 46 of the 51, or is it 41 of the 56. I think it's 41 of the 57. Were themselves slave owners. So we've always been this dichotomy between people who held in our hearts. This flaming love for what was possible versus people willing to transgress in the most violent ways against the execution of those principles. Our generation in that sense is no different than any other. And other generations have pushed back. And I just pray in my heart that we will not be the first generation of Americans who wimp out on doing what it takes to say hell no to that kind of nonsense. All of these ideas and themes are almost perfectly crystallized in this Stephen Don's situation. Speaking about. So explain a little bit for people who don't know this situation because it's unbelievable. In the 1960s, then oil giant, texaco. Went down to the Ecuadorian Amazon swath of the Amazon River. In order now, already, Ecuadorian environmental regulations were less than ours and ours were never so wonderful. So they were even less than ours. Even in violation of those, texaco, in order to save $3 a pit, left their pits online. And they admit that they did this. Thus poisoning that era of the Amazon, the food, the water, even the air. They would actually say to the indigenous farmers down there, oh, it's good for you. This oil has vitamins in it. Its mother's milk. Now, Steven Dons a girl, I know..

cancers Raytheon Ronald Reagan Purdue Anderson Cooper United States depression united Stephen Don texaco Amazon River Amazon Steven Dons
"marianne williamson" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

08:36 min | 1 year ago

"marianne williamson" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"I'm somebody who's been sober for a long time. I got sober and stay sober and the construct of 12 step. And I always tend to kind of evaluate problems and problem solving through the efficacy of 12 step, which I know has kind of overlap in the Venn diagram with the course of miracles and your perspective. The 11th century. This idea of like you have strong feelings about reparations and the immense process is fundamental to recovery as is a spiritual connection, right? In a non dogmatic way. So when you look at kind of rectifying where we've gone off the rails, socially politically culturally, there does seem to be a necessity of inventorying those missteps and actually implementing amends, like not just incremental policy change, but how can we how can we not only acknowledge the ills of our past, but also make them right so that we can be whole as we move forward? Well, the United States does need 12 stepping. It needs to get out of its denial. I can handle this. You know, we've been going to the Republican town to the Democrat. It's handle it. Which can manage this, the situation has become unmanageable. My life has become a manageable. It's so true, right? Absolutely. Yeah, it's amazing. And once again, like, but I got it. Yeah, I got it. You don't got this. Your best thinking got you here. And we're relying on the people that created the problem to solve it, telling us, go home, it'll be fine. Oh, and that's so much a part of the way the political media industrial complex operates. We're still supposed to think that the only people qualified to lead us out of this ditch are people who have had careers ensconced in the car driving the car that let us into the stitch. They act like the car. We need better political car mechanics. No, the problem is one on the wrong road. But that's a separate issue. Let's go back to the 12 steps. So the 12 steps is a program of a man so obviously. You have to admit your character defects. You have to admit them to another person. And you have to seek were possible to make amends. In the Catholic religion, this is what confession is. You have to atone and the Jewish religion. It's what yom kip is. The holiest day of the year, the day of atonement. You have to admit the exact nature of your wrongs and seek to make amends. Now, when it comes to reparations for me, I have for years been at my lectures doing these ritualized apologies in my book illuminata, I have the ritualized apologies to Native Americans, blocks in America, et cetera. But I came to realize that if you took a $1000 from me, I would really appreciate the apology, but I also want my money back. And so it got to the point where we can talk about white privilege. We can talk about deconstructing our own racism. But at this point, I feel it's time to do more than a tone. For slavery it's time to do more than atone for the hundred years of institutionalized oppression of blacks that occurred after the 250 years of slavery. It's time to make amends now. And like you were saying, the same psychological and spiritual principles that prevail within the life of an individual prevail within the life of a nation because that's all a nation is as a group of people. Germany has paid $89 billion in reparations to Jewish organizations since World War II. And this has gone far to create a kind of emotional reconciliation between Germany and the Jews of Europe. Not only the former culpa, which they certainly did. But also two things reparations and the guarantee that in perpetuity. School children in Germany would run the history of the Holocaust. They would understand how these things start. And that's where the United States is. We have not evolved on the level of consciousness to realize we will not be moving forward the way we want. Until we do make this change, look at the history here. World War II is over in 1945 and look how much Germany has cleaned up. I mean, global anti semitism is an issue again, but not based on that. They cleaned it up. We, my gosh, the Civil War was over in the 1860s. We are still passing this toxic baton of systemic racism and the reactions and the horrors of this evil and how it is infused too much of our economic functioning, et cetera, generation to generation to generation. We could be the generation to clean it up. I mean, the Germany can't make the Holocaust not have occurred. But with reparations and the level of mayor culpa, they've gone far towards beginning again. And the United States could do the same. I feel like we're very far from that, though. Not that we're in denial of that reality, but it's sort of dismissed as politically suicidal and economically unfeasible. Okay, if I may. This is because we have such a corrupt political establishment. That follows rather than leagues. That should be the point of leadership within any system, but particularly with the political leadership that you build consensus. My experience as a candidate, I would go into audiences all white audiences. In states that hardly had such a small block population that most of the people in the room hadn't even had a lot of relationships with black people. Let's say it was in New Hampshire. Let's say it was an eye or someplace like that. I walk into the room. This was my experience over and over and over again, including among white people in states like South Carolina, okay? I go into the room and the subject of reparations comes up. The body language I'm getting from people is like this. And then I give a little ten minute maximum thumbnail sketch of the history of race in America. The first slave ships came here in 1619. There was almost 200 years. Of slavery in this country. At the end of the Civil War, historians believe there was anywhere between four to 5 million people who were formerly enslaved. Those people were promised 40 acres and a mule for every former slave family of four. Most of the time it was not given, even when it was given, it was then repatriated. What were people to do? You tell somebody, you're not a slave any longer, but how are you supposed to make a living? If you had that 40 acres and a mule, you could. The north sense during the years of reconstruction, federal troops to the south to guarantee that slavery would not be re instituted once they left this in the south had just held their breath until the soldiers from the north were gone, and then they passed the black code laws, which would ensure subpar economic political and social opportunity for black people. That lasted almost a hundred years. Until Martin Luther King, we passed the Voting Rights Act, 1964, 1965, the Voting Rights Act to give black people to ensure their voting rights, which now the John Roberts court has gutted, which is why we have all these voting suppression efforts, pass the Civil Rights Act to dismantle a segregation. So you've got 300 years of institutionalized violence against black people. Now, anybody would I'm sure agree that if you've been kicking someone to the ground and certainly kicking someone to the ground for 350 years is quite a bit of kicking. You morally and ethically over to them, not just to stop kicking, but to help them get back up. And if Martin Luther King had lived, they had dealt with voting lines, they had dealt with civil rights and they would have gotten to the issue of closing that economic gap that was understandable between whites and blacks at the end of the civil rights movement. And we've never closed it and it's simply time. I would go through this. I would talk about the history and many of the things that I just said to you. I'm sure I just said to rich was news or surprise to you, but you'd be surprised how many Americans I don't believe are racist in their heart, but are just under informed and undereducated. The point of my story is that I would go through that what I just told you. And people whose body language had been like this..

Germany United States kip Europe John Roberts court New Hampshire South Carolina Martin Luther King
"marianne williamson" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"marianne williamson" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

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"marianne williamson" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

06:02 min | 1 year ago

"marianne williamson" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Be able to change it. I am responsible for my experience. I was not a victim. I ran for president. As someone said to me, after I was just ambushed in the most unfair way by Anderson Cooper, someone said to me, and they were right. If you couldn't take on Anderson Cooper, what would make us think you could take on Vladimir Putin? Don't run for president if you're not ready to take on what it was. And there were too many ways in which I was unprepared. I naively thought I was going to be judged on the issues. People know I didn't even have any. You know? Or at the very least judged on my actual weaknesses and, you know, the things that are true about me that are not perfect and character defects, whatever. I thought those would come up, but this mischaracterization of wacky girl who doesn't go to the doctor and doesn't believe disease is real. So I take responsibility that's number one. And number two, what I knew I had to do was clear all that. And that's what that year was about for me. You know, it's true. It's a cliche, but it's true. You get better or you get better. I have to forgive myself. Have to forgive others? I didn't want to go forward with a chip on my shoulder. We all fall down in life. But I think the issue is who gets back up and how? Hemingway said everybody, what do you say? Everybody's broken, but some grow stronger at the broken places. So the issue for me is can I be a truth teller and point out what I think needs to be pointed out without playing violins like poor me, what they did to me. Because what they did to me is small compared to the larger issue of what's being done to the planet and to people all over the world. Yeah. I just remember you being on the stage and just kind of very bluntly speaking truth to power in a manner that was very bold and extremely unusual, like perhaps unprecedented for that type of dias, right? To just say, look, we got to confront the dark with the light and in a very matter of fact and convicted way. And I think that's why you ended up getting Googled so much like holy shit. I've never seen anything like this before. What are we going to do with this? Well, the DNC had ideas around that. Of course. But I look at it as almost as if, listen, you knew you weren't going to win the presidency, right? It's almost as if you were this Trojan horse. I'm going to insert myself into this equation. And I'm going to cede the national dialog with certain ideas that I think are hyper relevant and I know that I'm going to be perhaps mocked for them. But I am opening the door, but I'm opening the door for the next person, right? I'm creating permission. So that this can actually occur in the future. It's sort of like you're just you were the courageous adventurer or the first person to kind of say, let's talk about this more broadly. Let's talk about this from a broader spiritual perspective in a situation in which we have the Democratic Party that is kind of abdicated. Any relationship with anything spiritual or religious in any regard, that's kind of been monopolized by the right in a certain way. And has left the Democratic Party like fearful of even talking about these things in a meaningful way. I don't know about fearful. I think that by surrendering, it's as if we just abdicated the moral conversation. Traditionally, on the political right, they talked about issues of private morality and on the political left. There were issues of public morality war and peace is it should be seen as a moral issue, whether to invade a country that didn't do anything to you, is a moral issue. Economic justice should be seen as a moral issue. But over the last few decades, and I don't even know how it happened. I mean, Bobby Kennedy said that the contest was for the soul of America. JFK said we can't afford to be materially rich and spiritually poor. When I was growing up during the anti war movements of the 1960s and 70s, reverend wim Sloan coffin, the barrack and brothers that was definitely a religious left. So this is an aberration that the left in America has become so overly secularized. But I'd like to go back for a moment to something you just said about, you open the conversation. Oh, you brought up the conversation. You know what? Let me tell you something. We don't have time left to just influence the conversation. So yes, in my campaign, hopefully I did what you said, open the door, next person, et cetera. But this idea, you know, sometimes people say, oh, Mary, and you really influence the consciousness of people. The conscious of people is not the problem. You know, that's not where the problem was. The problem was, is in those who are holding the lovers of political and economic power. I have had the experience of quote unquote advising the most powerful people in the country. It's too late to just advise them. We need to replace them. So that goes back to this whole issue of incrementalism. And you don't go through a situation as brutal as running for president, only wanting to influence the conversation, not that I thought that I would become president in that election. But you know if somebody is sending you money to support your campaign. Even if it's $10, you have a moral I think an ethical responsibility to play at a seriously as you can. And I tried. And the fact that I in moments of nervousness sounded silly, clearly was used by those who sought to mock me, but once again, that's my responsibility. I own it. You've spoken many times about the legacy and the impact of Bobby Kennedy and MLK and what their assassinations kind of meant in terms of the chilling effect on activism. This sense that.

Anderson Cooper Vladimir Putin Democratic Party Hemingway dias DNC reverend wim Sloan coffin Bobby Kennedy America JFK Mary
"marianne williamson" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

04:46 min | 1 year ago

"marianne williamson" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"When you're kind of debate performance is created so much conversation and a lot of interest. And yet you would read the pieces about those performances and they were written with such a tone of mockery and dismissal. There's a causal relationship there after the second debate. I was the most Google person in 49 states. And clearly, somebody, we know his name, Tom Perez, and that whole gang, a get her off the stage. They knew that if I was getting my sea legs on that second debate, you're right. I was talking about environmental justice had not been discussed. As I did reparations, a sickness care system, all of those things. And by that third debate, I would have been an inconvenience. And it was get her off the stage and within three days the talking points were so obvious. She's dangerous. She's crazy. I love that one. I mean, we're going back to ancient times, right? Just dangerous. She's crazy. She's kooky. She's a crystal lady. She's anti vax. She's anti science. She anti gay. I mean, things that were like, man it was the talking points. And you couldn't open a, you couldn't open your computer. You couldn't turn on television, but someone wasn't saying it. And for exactly, when you just said, these people who did that, they didn't do it because they thought I was silly. They did it because they knew that I was serious. That's why they created the mischaracterizations and the silly girl. Because they knew that was very very serious. Right, because if you were truly silly, it's easy to be dismissive, but if you're actually saying things that are connecting with voters and people are reacting and responding to that favorably, then you become a threat to the hegemony of the DNC and their greater agenda. But so all we know as citizens is we watch the debates. We read the newspaper. We scroll on Twitter. We see the hot takes. But what does it really like, what do we not understand? You had this incredible firsthand experience of running for president, going behind the curtain and really seeing how the sausage is made. And the relationship between the media and the kind of campaign industrial complex. The mechanics of social complex. Right. Intertwined. Yeah, they chop their wood and carry the water. Yeah, so share a little bit about what the average person doesn't understand or might not get about how that machinery actually functions. Well, I felt in my case when all those things were said there were two issues. One was the smear. And the other was how easily people were duped. I mean, would you really think everything you read on the Internet is true? Grow up. I mean, you know, no, and people post an article. You know, I mean, it's ridiculous. And I know in my case, when certain things would be said, I was, I believe ill advised. Don't respond to it because it will pull attention to it. But that's a ridiculous because when you're running for president, the attention is there. If I were to do that again, I would have gotten on Facebook Live or whatever would have been equivalent. And just spoke to it. No, the quackery here is not my views. The quackery here is the journalism that is saying these things. Let me tell you where the quackery is and talked about the points. But it became such a, it's such an assault. It's such an ubiquitous assault. So when you say, what is the average person not understand? I don't see the average person so much as a victim here. I think the average person as citizens we become lazy. We become complacent. And we need to wake up and realize that misinformation is a much bigger, much bigger field than we even think it is that the whole thing has become a corporate matrix and its minions who have these predetermined agendas, predetermined sets of people who it feels that it will allow into the into the conversation. And the viciousness with which they will make sure that anyone who they do not approve. Will not be on the conversation. And I think when you were talking about Andrew Andrew did not get it nearly as bad, because when I think a large part of it is because he's a man. The layer of misogyny that the craziness and the wacky. What makes them more of a businessman than I mean, come on. Coming back for more, but.

Tom Perez DNC Google Twitter Facebook Andrew Andrew
"marianne williamson" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

06:06 min | 1 year ago

"marianne williamson" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Yeah, we can place all our focus on Donald Trump and label him as a malignant narcissist and the like. He's a symbol. He's a reflection of decades of tectonic economic shifts that have led to a situation where people who have been so deprived and unheard for so long. And have to work three jobs as opposed to the one job that provides the car and the picket fence and all of that. Of course, you're going to have anger and resentment and all of the kind of emotions that we're seeing flaring up. It's reflective of that. And it's either going to lead towards some kind of revolutionary act and the dissolution of the union, ultimately, there has to be a reckoning, right? The most healthy way to address it is to have some form of intervention where we can course correct. What has gone wrong and find a way to provide for those people in a meaningful way who have been so deprived for too long? If you look at history, it's very interesting to see not only what conditions provided. The opportunity for it to gain power. But also how the United States and the other allies responded to that problem at the end of the war. At the end of World War I, the attitude towards Germany on the part of the allies was basically reparations in the form of Deutsche Mark till we tell you to stop. Interestingly enough, it was the American president of the time Woodrow Wilson, who tried to warn them that this was a bad idea. He was not listened to and the desperation of the German people at that time became a Petri dish when you have large groups of desperate people. It becomes a national security risk. It is whether it's in a corner of the U.S. city or a corner of the world, because large groups of desperate people become a Petri dish out of which a certain level of societal dysfunction is almost inevitable. Ideological capture by genuinely psychotic forces becomes pretty easy. That's why the Marshall plan. That's why we treated Germany so well after World War II. That's why we treated the Japanese, so well, after World War II, we knew that when people have been defeated, don't keep kicking them, something terrible is going to happen. Even if you don't see it from a moral perspective, just see it from a political perspective. So you're absolutely right for 40 years. People have been kicked down. Vote for us and it'll be better. Vote for us and it'll be better. And at a certain point, one man who I don't think any of us thought could have done that much damage so quickly, who was willing to take advantage of all the anger, all the anger to harness that for his own political purposes, then that coupled with what you've mentioned, the power of social media, and we've gotten not only the problem we have on our hands of a genuinely neo fascist force field, but what should have been seen as a predictable one. And I believe if the Democratic Party had been truly holding to its principles over the last 40 years. Well, listen, if either political party had held to their principles over the last 40 years, it wouldn't be. We wouldn't be where we are today. Yeah, and it feels like the Democratic Party can't get out of its own way. It's very feckless in terms of how it's dealing with this with bullet points and policy initiatives that fail to kind of penetrate the emotional force field of the people who could benefit from those policy shifts the most, right? Like there needs to be a broader conversation where these people are actually feeling heard. Well, these people were told, vote for us, stand in line for 7 or 8 hours, give us The White House, give us the Senate, give us the house, and we're going to make your life better. What happened to the conversation of raising the minimum wage to $15 an hour? What happened to the conversation about canceling the college loan debt? What happened to the conversation about Medicare for All? They are peripherals like it's a bunch of errant children who don't know what they're talking about. Too far left, even though the issues that are considered such as I just mentioned that are considered so far left in America today are considered like moderate centrist views in every advanced democracy except for ours. Certainly in Europe. And so to say to people, it's not just that I don't even think it's just the emotional force field. It is their pocketbook. And now the Democrats ringing their hands, how are we going to win in 2022? I'll tell you what you do. You raise the minimum wage, then people will vote for you. You cancel those college loan debts. People will vote for you. You pass Medicare for All people will vote for you. It's really not rocket science. And it's not just messaging. It's not just messaging. It's who they are willing to serve at the end of the day. And why can't they just get that done? Because they, at the end of the day, are under the thrall of the same corporate donors, whether it has to do with the military industrial complex, whether it has to do with big pharmaceutical companies, fossil fuel companies, big agricultural companies, big chemical companies, not the NRA, but on that one, they are better, but they're still not getting it done. So we all need to awaken, you know, it's like a woman who her friends is to have to say honey is a bad guy. He's not who you think he is. At this point, these people are not doing it because they do not choose to. Yeah. It was fascinating to kind of observe during your presidential bid, like how the media treated you so unfairly the manner in which you were marginalized and I mentioned earlier, I had Andrew Yang in here and he shared a little bit about his personal experience with that, which was kind of a lesser version of what you experienced and he wrote quite extensively about it in his book. But it was quite disheartening to see the manner in which you were kind of maligned and made fun of and marginalized.

Donald Trump U.S. Germany Democratic Party Woodrow Wilson Deutsche White House Senate Medicare Europe NRA Andrew Yang
"marianne williamson" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

08:02 min | 1 year ago

"marianne williamson" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Or wisdom, her courage. And so with that, here we go. This is me and Marianne Williamson. Marianne I'm so happy to have you here today. Welcome. Thank you. Thank you. I'm happy to be here. Yeah, I've been looking forward to this for a long time. Thank you. So many threads that we can pull on. But I think a good place to start is just talking about where we find ourselves right now, obviously we live in very interesting times. It's a very unique period that I haven't experienced in my lifetime in terms of the division and the divisiveness and the acrimony and this era of social media. So, you know, I suppose like I'm just curious like, how are you feeling about this current moment that we find ourselves in? I think all of us are feeling rather discombobulated by the whole thing. But what we're thinking about, I think, is very important. I think we're living in two simultaneous realities. I think on one hand, it is the fall of Rome, on one hand, it is the dissembling of a civilization, a kind of cratering of American civilization in many ways. And on the other hand, it is the dawning and the struggling to be born of a new world, a new renaissance. I think they're both true. And I think that we are called upon to be both death doulas and birth to us. It's our job to help that which in many ways has to die. To die tenderly and with us little harm as possible and with us just a transition as possible. And to passionately and vigorously give birth to a world that works. And it's just like when we were children and we were taught about evolution. If a species moves in a direction, where it's collective behavior is increasingly maladaptive for its survival. One of two things will happen, either that species will go extinct or a mutation will occur. It will involve in a different direction. And I think that that's what's happened in many ways to our democracy and certainly it's happened to the entirety of the human race. We're moving in directions that are increasingly maladaptive for the survival of the species. We will now turn. We will now move in a different direction. We will now mutate and evolve or global cataclysm, catastrophe on a level that most of us can't even imagine is a very real possibility. Yeah, it does feel like this epic arms race of light versus dark, which is obviously like a touchstone theme in your teachings and what you talk about. And I think the difference if we kind of root this in the political landscape, the difference in tenor of our moment is this ticking clock in the background, right? We could quibble about policy changes and the direction of the country and where we're at as a collective consciousness. And address those items in a kind of incremental way. But now we have this looming existential threat that elevates the urgency of all of this. And I think also exacerbates the antipathy and everything else that's going on right now that makes it like this crucible where it's very difficult to figure out the best way forward. And I'd like that idea that you mentioned around kind of evolution of the individual and how that is reflected in society at large. It's this idea of ontogeny, recapitulates phylogeny. Like you can't evolve the whole without the evolution of the individual. I think the issue of incrementalism that you mentioned is very relevant. I think it was in the letter from the Birmingham jail that Martin Luther King talked about incrementalism and he said, if you take an incremental approach to change, then the status quo, which will never seek to disrupt itself. We'll simply co opt the ideas. So what's happening right now is that even those who were standing for workable solutions and a more sustainable future. There's a tendency of the economic and the political system to provide too little too slow too late. We have taken it to a point now. So many of the solutions of being offered for instance even right now by the Biden presidency, et cetera. They should have been offered in 1995. We are now at a point where it's not just that we must move in another direction, but we must move quickly. Because as you said, the risk is so great. You know, even like when I think of things like protests against the Vietnam War. Passionate, important, huge, but when we thought about the worst that could happen, global cataclysm was not the worst that could happen. We're now living at a time where the worst that could happen global catastrophe on a level like I said, we can't even imagine. It's a complete shift psychologically. I think that we have to move into. And if you make that move without any consideration of larger more expanded sense of possibility, almost from a metaphysical perspective, then you are left with understandable nihilism cynicism, anger and fear. Because if you only look at this moment from a rational perspective, it could be argued, it's over. It could be argued that the gig is up. I think about much like when the Israelites were standing at the Red Sea. If they go forward, they'll drown if they go back, pharaoh decided he wanted his slaves back. It's an assaulter to go get them or to kill them if they refuse to come. That story like all stories of miraculous transformation. Indicate that there was a level of consciousness at which the laws of time and space as we know them are transcended. You know, if you think of the abolitionist movement, there was no reason from a rational perspective to think that slavery could be abolished given how ensconced it was within the economy of the south. If you look at the women's suffragette movement, there was no reason to think that women could gain suffrage given how infused the system was with the institutionalized oppression and suppression of women's rights. Even if you look at the civil rights movement, there was no reason from a rational perspective to think that it could succeed given how embedded the systemic racism and institutionalized oppression of the rights of black people were within the systems of segregation in the American south. And yet these changes occur, they have occurred in American history and they've occurred throughout the world, and I think we need to keep our eyes on those moments where very quickly, in a way that no one might have predicted the right prevailed. Love prevailed. Justice prevailed. Mercy prevailed that there was such a burst of yearning and passion for those things within enough human hearts that you managed, it moved in that direction. Yeah, I suppose there is a seed of hopefulness that can be mined in thinking about those instances, but I can't help, but reflect upon the inadequacies of a democratic system that is that is sort of systemically ensconced in an incremental way of progressing change with this ticking clock and this existential. Like, do we have enough time? Is there adequate political will? Is there too much denial is the kind of corporate stranglehold on that political will to powerful to really create the change that we're going to need in order to survive as a species and as a thriving planet? Well, let's deconstruct that. The problem is not democracy. The problem is the anti democratic force field represented by the corporatized political duopoly, that now is keeping the will of the people from being expressed in political terms. If you look at issue after issue, the problem is not the American people..

Marianne Williamson Marianne Rome Martin Luther King Biden Birmingham Vietnam Red Sea pharaoh American south
"marianne williamson" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"marianne williamson" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"The problem is not democracy, our system is so corrupt. It's become a system of legalized bribery. People know it. It's not like people are not aware, and it's not like people are not upset. But we're all living with this conundrum. What do we do? We are now at a point where it's not just that we must move in another direction, but we must move quickly. We must open our hearts and still passionately disagree, form boundaries just like you have boundaries and personal relationships are boundaries and political relationships, but you can do all of that with love. You can do all of that with respect and humility. To me, that's the portal. Through which we can walk to a more sustainable world. The rich role podcast. Greetings Internet, it is I rich role, your host, welcome to the podcast. My guest today is Marianne Williamson. Marianne is a teacher. She's an activist, a thought leader. A badass and absolute legend in spiritual circles. And the author of 14 books, four of which have been number one New York Times bestsellers. You may know Marianne because she quite famously ran for president in 2020, but if that's the sum total of your relationship with this human, I think you're in for a ride today because she is a force of nature that extends well beyond that singular life chapter. This one is both fascinating. It's fun and it's coming right up, but first. Real quick, a word from the awesome sponsors that make this show possible, like athletic greens, AG one, because let's face it, you guys, life is complicated. We're all crazy busy..

Marianne Marianne Williamson New York Times
Carlson, Maher Discuss the Current State of Affairs in Canada

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:27 min | 1 year ago

Carlson, Maher Discuss the Current State of Affairs in Canada

"Just some sound here. We're going to play a bunch of sound just about what's happening in Canada. And kind of some of the public opinion around this. So let's go to cut 54. A trucker says, look, this is a defining moment in Canada. You have declared martial law, which is totally true. Trudeau has declared martial law on the people of Canada play cut 54. So let's be clear. This is a defining moment in the history of Canada in the history of the English speaking west. The emergency act is martial law. It has never been invoked in the history of that country. Now, by law, the emergency's act has allowed only in emergencies. Urgent and critical situations that seriously endanger the lives, health or safety of Canadians. What's happening now does not qualify what's happening in Canada now is not an emergency. So it's Tucker, not a trucker. Sorry. He's misreading my sheet. Let's go to cut 43. Bill Maher blast Trudeau for his comments on the protesters, play cut 43. Or maybe this is September, but he was talking about people who are not vaccinated? He said, they don't believe in science. They're often misogynistic, often racist. No, they're not. That was not part of him at all. Right. He said, but they take up space. And with that, we have to make a choice in terms of the leader as a country. Do we tolerate these people? It's like tolerant. Now you do sound like him. And recently he talked about holding holding unacceptable views. I'm surprised to hear that Trudeau said those things. You didn't see the black face? Is that that crystal woman? What's her name again Mary Ann something? She's the, she's the person. Marianne Williamson, the crystal woman. That's right. So Trudeau was very, let's say adamant and supportive behind Indian protests when the protesters in India, the farmers were protesting. Even though it deteriorated India, Canadian relations. But when it came to actually supporting the people of his own country, that actually might have some concern, he's very much involved in the dehumanization of the people of Canada.

Canada Trudeau Bill Maher Tucker Marianne Williamson Mary Ann India
Bill Maher Hosts Panel Over Canadian Truckers

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:59 min | 1 year ago

Bill Maher Hosts Panel Over Canadian Truckers

"We scoop Bill Maher. The vac Rama Swami is on this panel. And former Democrat presidential candidate Marianne Williamson. So that's the panel. You got Bill Maher, the entrepreneur that ramaswami, who we interviewed last week and the former Democrat candidate Marianne Williamson, I want you to hear this segment from HBO's real time with Bill Maher. The beautiful thing about a democracy is that so far, thank God this has been a peaceful set of protests. I hope it stays that way. That's part of the messiness of democracy. It's part of what makes it beautiful. You're all ready for that one. I've been watching. I agree that democracy is messy. And that's the price you pay in a way for free society. As long as we're going to honor free expression, protest is important, but also protest is inherently disruptive. So the line we have to find for ourselves is where does disruption become harm? These people have spoken, they have expressed themselves. They have a lot of passion behind their message, obviously. And what the Canadian government and any government has to then balance is at what point does this now move over into more than your grievances, but the grievances of people such as workers in Detroit and elsewhere who are finding economic harm because of these protests. I think it's interesting. And why truckers? And I thought, you know, like during the pandemic, you know, I talked about this many times. You know, we would see these Ed rolling it together and I think, no, we're not. No we're not. Some people who stay home and some people who bring them the food. You know, if you're just ordering Amazon and you don't ever have to go out and your job, you can do remotely. But who's bringing the Amazon things? The trucker,

Bill Maher Marianne Williamson Rama Swami Ramaswami Canadian Government HBO Detroit ED Amazon
Bill Maher Hosts Panel Over Canadian Truckers

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:59 min | 1 year ago

Bill Maher Hosts Panel Over Canadian Truckers

"We scoop Bill Maher. The vac Rama Swami is on this panel. And former Democrat presidential candidate Marianne Williamson. So that's the panel. You got Bill Maher, the entrepreneur that ramaswami, who we interviewed last week and the former Democrat candidate Marianne Williamson, I want you to hear this segment from HBO's real time with Bill Maher. The beautiful thing about a democracy is that so far, thank God this has been a peaceful set of protests. I hope it stays that way. That's part of the messiness of democracy. It's part of what makes it beautiful. You're all ready for that one. I've been watching. I agree that democracy is messy. And that's the price you pay in a way for free society. As long as we're going to honor free expression, protest is important, but also protest is inherently disruptive. So the line we have to find for ourselves is where does disruption become harm? These people have spoken, they have expressed themselves. They have a lot of passion behind their message, obviously. And what the Canadian government and any government has to then balance is at what point does this now move over into more than your grievances, but the grievances of people such as workers in Detroit and elsewhere who are finding economic harm because of these protests. I think it's interesting. And why truckers? And I thought, you know, like during the pandemic, you know, I talked about this many times. You know, we would see these Ed rolling it together and I think, no, we're not. No we're not. Some people who stay home and some people who bring them the food. You know, if you're just ordering Amazon and you don't ever have to go out and your job, you can do remotely. But who's bringing the Amazon things? The trucker,

Bill Maher Marianne Williamson Rama Swami Ramaswami Canadian Government HBO Detroit ED Amazon
"marianne williamson" Discussed on Hay House Meditations

Hay House Meditations

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"marianne williamson" Discussed on Hay House Meditations

"marianne williamson" Discussed on Hay House Meditations

Hay House Meditations

02:45 min | 1 year ago

"marianne williamson" Discussed on Hay House Meditations

"Others as well. And thus may my day be blessed, may I be blessed that I might be a blessing? Every situation shall be a lesson for me. And for those with whom I am in contact, may I be my more loving self, teach me God, how to bless and no longer blame. To forgive and no longer judge. To receive. To be at peace. To be a channel for your love. May myself may this world may all living things be blessed, this precious day. I send the love and the blessing and the healing of God. To all war torn regions of this world. For those who are hungry, May they be fed. For those who are sick, May they be healed? For those who suffer. Dear God. Please comfort them. To those who are unjustly treated. Hope dear God. And use me as your vessel. That I might help you. Help them. Give meaning to my life. Health to my body. And graciousness to my heart. On this day and every day may your will. Be done. On earth, as it is in heaven. For me and for all human God. Amen..

"marianne williamson" Discussed on Hay House Meditations

Hay House Meditations

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"marianne williamson" Discussed on Hay House Meditations

"And ego and pain. Released now to the possibility of unlimited grace and radiance through the power and the presence of God. This is the day that the lord hath made. The power of God's light now poorest into you through the top of your head. This divine alchemical elixir. This golden light now pours down through the top of your head. Through your brain, down through your neck, relaxing the muscles of your face, filling your blood, your bones, your organs, your eyes, your nose, your mouth. The light travels down now. Into your torso, filling your heart, your lungs, your abdomen, your liver, your spleens, down your spine. Down your arms through your lower body. Into your legs. Every place in your body, every cell, receiving the slight receiving this healing. This light replacing all darkness of body of mind of spirit of feeling. All falsehood now melting away. All this ease. Now melts away. All cellular functioning,.

"marianne williamson" Discussed on Hay House Meditations

Hay House Meditations

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"marianne williamson" Discussed on Hay House Meditations

"All living things, thank you God for this day. Thank you for this new chance. This new opportunity at life. We call to mind now. Everything that will happen on this day. Call to mind all of the people in your life. For the relationships that are good and peaceful and abundant. Give thanks in your heart. And commit within to participate.

"marianne williamson" Discussed on Hay House Meditations

Hay House Meditations

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"marianne williamson" Discussed on Hay House Meditations

"We hope you enjoy today's inspiring episode. If you like listening to free audio content, you're gonna love the hay house unlimited audio mobile app. The app gives you unlimited access to thousands of audiobooks, guided meditations, and lectures to help you reach your goals, improve your sleep, expand your mind, connect with your spirit guides, heal your body and so much more. And right now, you can get a free 14 day trial. That's right. You can listen to everything in the app totally free for two weeks. You can even listen to this podcast and more from this author. To start listening free now, Apple users go to hayha's dot com slash Apple and Android users go to hay house dot com slash Google. That's hay house dot com slash apple for apple devices and hay house dot com slash Google for Android..

"marianne williamson" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

07:11 min | 1 year ago

"marianne williamson" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Mat matter and your host, and I guess again, Marianne Williamson, and we're talking about Mary Ann's work with Project Angel Food and If you could just jump back into where you were, and telling that story about how that evolved. I was just saying that I was giving lectures on a course in miracles, and there was a lot of desperation in the air. And a lot of gay men started coming to my lectures in LA at that time. Because I was talking about a God who loves you, no matter what, and miracles that can happen. And so gay men and really gave me my career. And I was lecturing several times a week. And there was great suffering what was occurring, So I began doing these support groups and then we thought, you know, this week we're at Johns and on Thursday where Aiden's and Monday we're going to be at David's and Then we thought, well, let's rent a house. That could be a place where people could come. You know, they can't work any longer. Um, we would rent a house and they could We would make food there and they could have Support groups and they can watch movies and they could have therapist comment. Massage all kinds of non medical support services free support services to people who are dealing not only with AIDS, but other life challenging illnesses. And then one day I walked in to the house and I said, Where's dawn things? Well, John didn't come in today. So why didn't it come in? I said well used to seek it can't get couldn't get I said, Well, how How's it going to eat lunch? Because John would be here for lunch? And I said, Well, oh, no, I'm sorry. We have to drive and somebody needs to taking lunch, taking lunch, and this just started happening more and more, and I realized how many more people would be at home, and they could not come to the center anymore for those services. So we started doing fundraisers and we start apart to change of food, which was a A a project of the center for living. Um, where the idea was that homebound people with AIDS would still feel I love that would receive our food. But that would also receive our love and people were So many people at the lectures would say I'm getting as this is as much as service to me. You know, people felt as as people do now with Covid, although the differences are interesting as well as the similarities People were like, what can we do to be of help? And so I think people who are volunteering in the kitchen and people who are volunteering his driver's felt like this was a way that they could in the midst of this. Horrifying situation of service to others, which made all the difference. It was born of a very beautiful spirit. And I'm so admiring and impressed and happy and satisfied and all those good things to see how Generation one generation on board membership executive leadership has carried on the best of traditions of project and all food served over 13 million meals. Now I feel like the grandmother has brought down from the attic every once in a while, you know, to talk about the beginnings of it to talk to the board members. I'm very honored that they Seem to have carved battle space that you know the found. I want here from the founder, and they want to hear about that that spirit out of which it was born and which they have so beautifully year after year, kept moving forward. It's a beautiful organization, and I hope that it's something almost Angeles control very proud of. Well, absolutely, and I think it's just such a great story of starting at such a small and modest beginning. And then building out from business player Never know. Like I said, I said to David Kessler, I said we need to do this is what you visit me in business boy. He said. Well, what it is, if I don't know we need to do. We're gonna make where make food and we're going to deliver it to people. What do you mean business plan, And some people might right now be saying it can't be as simple as that. But it actually wasn't simple as that, right? I like that. Gertie quote that boldness has genius power and magic. So I think that was a bold move and obviously had genius power behind it. Well, I think a lot of it has to do with youth, doesn't it? You don't know what there is to be scared of yet. Well, it was. It was kind of funny that I was talking to a friend about interviewing you. And she was saying, Oh, I volunteered for that when I was in U C l A and they wanted my cool professors brought us down there and, you know we got to do this and How it was such a Yeah, great experience for her. So the ring of the fact that it had on so many people is something you can't even measure. Its. Uh It's one of those things that goes on and on and on. Sure you're proud of it, And it's just it's such a great example of just Throwing your hat over the wall and saying, Hey, I'm going to go get it, And I'm not sure how I'm going to go get it, But, you know, here I go. I didn't even know there was anything to go get. I just thought we were going to do this. It was real like, Hey, Mickey. Hey, Judy. There was one conversation that I have not forgotten because I think it was very significant. I said to my mother. This was about founding the original center for Living. I said to my mother. Well, you know, I want to start this nonprofit organization, but I just don't know if I should, she said. Well, what would the organization do? I said, Well, you know there are these people, mommy, They have AIDS, and they're really sick and other people who really sick and I thought, if we just had a place that they could come every day, you know, a lot of people would volunteer to do therapy with them. And they can watch movies and we could have massages. And one of these people feel very unloved. And we could make food. I just think I'd be really good. And she said, Well, it sounds wonderful. Why wouldn't you do it? I said, Well, mommy, and then if I did that, I think that I could only do it and integrity. If I assumed I would be here for at least five years, and then you can start something like that. And then just know I might leave next year and you have a real responsibility to be raising money. Be doing this. So I would really owe it to people to stay for at least five years, and my mother's response is scared with me, she said. I feel so sorry for your generation. That you're so afraid of someone needing you. Wow, he said, you're old enough that you should show up for being needed by others. Powerful staff. Mhm. So a message I think invites all of us a bit, and, uh, something that we can all work on it just like you had said earlier that these Spiritual awakenings and not always Eureka. Moments there, pieces of progress that we make along the path absolutely. The small epiphanies, the small with a skull and a moment of clarity. Moments of forgiveness. Moments of just showing up in a different way than you did yesterday and realizing that the new way really does work better. My life is.

David Kessler Marianne Williamson Judy LA Thursday Mary Ann Gertie Mickey Monday next year yesterday this week John today Mat over 13 million meals Covid one least five years Johns
Tulsi Gabbard Named Democratic Nominee After Discovery Of Obscure Rule That Grants Nomination To Whoever Wins 0.7% Of The Vote In Missouri

The Topical

03:37 min | 2 years ago

Tulsi Gabbard Named Democratic Nominee After Discovery Of Obscure Rule That Grants Nomination To Whoever Wins 0.7% Of The Vote In Missouri

"Massive news from the Democratic National Convention today. US. Representative. Tulsi Gabbard has been named the party's presidential nominee. After DNC vice chairman, Peter may burst into a press conference brandishing dusty copy of the democratic. Party's original eighteen twenty eight charter to announce shocking discovery an obscure rule granting the nomination to whomever wins zero point seven percent of the primary vote in the state of Missouri Opr. CHEAP, political correspondent. Dirk mullins was on the scene and joins us now dirk this was quite a one eighty, right leslie truly one of the most unexpected political turnarounds in US history Tolsey Gabbard, the representative from Hawaii who dropped out of the presidential race and nearly six months ago has now gained the nomination mere moments before Joe Biden was due to become the party's official nominee take a listen. Please folks folks. Let me finish. And I quote from the document itself. Sorry. It's a little dusty. It is here to unanimously decreed. That the candidate, whomsoever procures betwixt the margin of six tenths and eight tenths of the vote in The Majesty state of Missouri Beneath the Pale blood moon. In fallow season shall be made our party's nominee for chief executive. It is a dramatic shakeup that caught even the DNC off guard after they discovered the parchment based rule book locked away in a hidden chamber sealed deep below their archives well. It would've been nice to know this back in March. Obviously. We're GONNA need to destroy a lot of Biden twenty twenty merchandise and we had a lot of folks voting during a pandemic for primary that was essentially meaningless. But ultimately, my hands are tied she one zero point seven percent of the Missouri. Vote. What else are we supposed to do while truly unprecedented but what does this mean? For? Democrats in two, thousand, twenty well, it's not good representative or I should say nominee Gabbard has virtually no name recognition and she's pulling in the low single decimal points no one has been able. To get in touch with her either due to her lack of any staff or campaign infrastructure. Frankly, we're not even sure what platform consists of something like ending foreign military bases. I don't really remember now Tulsi Gabbard cheese the senator from Massachusetts. Correct. Now I believe you're thinking of Elizabeth Warren Mistake, it's the one with the crystal the self-help one Marianne Williamson Oh interesting. well, I've got to admit I have no idea who you're talking about then but with that said, she did win the exact sliver of the vote in Missouri that counts in terms of receiving the presidential nomination. That's all that matters right now, what does the Biden campaign saying? This must be a disappointment for them. It certainly is they're searching for a workaround by arguing this decision is superseded by an even. Older precolonial taxed that magnificant democracy him from sixteen, Eighty two. That's the old pamphlet about how to keep Goblins from emerging out of hell and overrunning a functioning democracy. Right? That's right now, those passages suggest only papist like Joe Biden for example, has the power to resist the quote devils. Karnal source laments so far though the Democratic Party has stuck to its guns on this point seven percent of Missouri principle though. Tolsey two, thousand, twenty or bust incredible. It looks that way. We haven't seen this big of a shakeup since John Quincy Adams to the White House due to a loophole in the Electoral College granting the presidency to any candidate born with six toes on his left foot. Really stunning news. Thanks for the report dirk that's Dirk

Joe Biden Missouri Tolsey Gabbard Dirk Mullins Representative United States DNC Democratic Party Tulsi Gabbard Vice Chairman Peter Chief Executive Elizabeth Warren John Quincy Adams Marianne Williamson Karnal White House
Elizabeth Warren's Presidential Bid Comes to an End

WSJ What's News

05:41 min | 3 years ago

Elizabeth Warren's Presidential Bid Comes to an End

"Senator Amy Klobuchar former South Bend Indiana Mayor Pete Brundige and former New York City mayor. Mike Bloomberg have all called it quits and today. We're adding Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren to that list. I will not be running for president in twenty twenty but I guarantee I will stay in the fight for the hardworking folks across this country have gotten short into the stick over another. That's been the fight of my life and it will continue to be so warrants progressive policy driven campaign caught fire last fall making her an early favorite to win the nomination but she had a disappointing showing in the first elections in the primary season. Including this week Super Tuesday with more on the rise and fall of Warren's candidacy we're joined by Wall Street Journal reporter Tarini Party Tarini. Last fall senator. Warren was one of the front runners for the Democratic nomination but today she became the last remaining woman among the top tier candidates drop out. How expected was this announcement at this point. Given what we saw on Super Tuesday Warren was essentially left with no choice. But to drop out there was all choose facing a lot of pressure because she didn't win a single state she came third in her home state of Massachusetts. And so you know as this race drags out with Joe Biden on one side and Bernie Sanders on the other. The more candidates who stay in the longer the Democratic primary could become. And that's something that party leaders are trying to avoid They WANNA be trump and so they think that the field should sort of consolidate And so they can have a nominee sooner rather than later and she just didn't see a path forward a viable path forward. She did not end. You know ahead of Super Tuesday. Her staff had said that they were looking at a contested convention as one of the ways that were left for her to essentially be the Democratic nominee. They were hoping that she would pick up enough delegates on Super Tuesday to make that case but she didn't get that far and at this point. She said she just saw no path forward. Let's talk about the rise and fall of her candidacy. Tarini people were talking about her back in two thousand sixteen. When Hillary was running right she chose not to run in two thousand sixteen. And this time around you know. She started off with a few missteps She really did get her footing back. She focused her campaign on Ground Game Organization. She built out a huge campaign that focused on raising money online That really Invested in field organizers in in the early states An early on she did start getting a lot of traction. You know if you go back to the late summer early fall. She was starting to become the front runner in this primary. And then that slowly started That's that's slowly. Went away as more questions about her health. Care plan started. Cropping up she eventually put out a Medicare her own version of Medicare for all And you know wasn't really able to sell that both to moderate voters and progressive voters which she said today in her press conference was interesting. She said that when she started out she was told that there were two lanes in the Democratic primary the the Progressive Lane and the The moderate lane and Joe Biden would be the front runner in the moderate Lane and Bernie Sanders was in coming on the Progressive Lane. She was told she said that there was no other path. And she said she Set at the time that she didn't believe that that she thought that she could change things and she said today that that she was wrong It seems based on the way that this primary has played out who among those remaining candidates Former Vice President Biden or Vermont Senator Sanders Might Benefit from Warren's exit. So we'll have to see you know if she decides to endorse. She said today that she's going to take some time to think. And figure things out you know a lot of her supporters. Are you know more progressive? And if you in that sense they could be. You know they could move to Bernie Sanders but she also does have a lot of college educated women who aren't necessarily you know the Bernie Sanders Type of voter so she could. You know some Some of her supporters could also back Joe Biden Tarini. Warren's departure leaves two white men in their seventies competing to run against president trump another white man in his seventies. What are we to make of the fact that this was historically diverse. Field has whittled down to this. It was historically diverse. We had six women. If you know if you're including Tulsi Gabbard and Marianne Williamson. We had six women running Tulsi Gabbard is obviously still in the race but has not gained any traction she elizabeth. Warren was the you know the the last top tier woman still running. She sort of addressed that in her in her press conference one of the hardest parts of this is all those all those little girls. We're going to have to wait four more years. That's going to be hard. What affected Warren. Have on the two thousand presidential campaign and we'll see continue to influence it going forward. I think she will continue to have Influence and be a big voice especially if she decides to endorse either Bernie Sanders or Joe Biden. Going forward how they bring up some of her policy ideas and whether they choose to incorporate those in their own campaign that will be interesting to

Senator Elizabeth Warren Bernie Sanders Joe Biden Tarini Party Tarini Senator Amy Klobuchar Massachusetts President Trump Progressive Lane Mike Bloomberg Senator Wall Street Journal Tulsi Gabbard New York City Pete Brundige South Bend Indiana Medicare Reporter Hillary
Marianne Williamson drops out of presidential race

Pacifica Evening News

00:18 sec | 3 years ago

Marianne Williamson drops out of presidential race

"And a new poll shows democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders leading among likely caucus goers in Iowa well new age author Marianne Williamson becomes the latest candidate to drop out of the race from KPFA Berkeley and KPFK Los Angeles this is the pacifica evening

Bernie Sanders Marianne Williamson Los Angeles Iowa Kpfk Pacifica
Spiritual guru Marianne Williamson ends 2020 White House bid

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 3 years ago

Spiritual guru Marianne Williamson ends 2020 White House bid

"Democrat Marianne Williamson is suspending her campaign for the presidency saying she did not want to make it tougher for progressive to win the college drop out and former nightclub singer from Texas rose to prominence as a spiritual lecturer philanthropist and bestselling author she raised eyebrows by arguing that the United States needs to have a moral and spiritual awakening they're a lot more people in this country who love them to hate but those who hate it was seriousness and they are politicized Williamson out lasted more than half a dozen democratic candidates but barely registered in the polls and struggled and fund raising she might offer entire campaign staff at the end of December Jennifer king Washington

Marianne Williamson Texas United States Lecturer Jennifer King Washington
Marianne Williamson announces she is suspending her presidential campaign

All Things Considered

00:45 sec | 3 years ago

Marianne Williamson announces she is suspending her presidential campaign

"Less than a month before the Iowa caucuses the democratic field of presidential hopefuls has now shrunk to thirteen candidates and Pierce got the two reports author and spiritual adviser Marianne Williamson has dropped out Marianne Williamson had missed the cut for every debate after the first two and recently laid off her entire campaign staff in a note to supporter she said she had quote stayed in the race to take advantage of every possible effort to share our message the spiritual authored focused her campaign on big picture ideas like the power of love but Williams and did not see a way forward with the actual voting caucusing just weeks away she said I don't want to get in the way of a progressive candidate winning any of that of the thirteen remaining candidates six have qualified for next week's debate which will be held in

Iowa Pierce Marianne Williamson Williams
Marianne Williamson lays off 2020 campaign staff nationwide

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 3 years ago

Marianne Williamson lays off 2020 campaign staff nationwide

"Hi Mike Crossey a reporting Marianne Williamson lays off for twenty twenty campaign staff nationwide democratic presidential candidate Marianne Williamson has laid off her entire twenty twenty campaign staff but the best selling author and spiritual guru vows to fight on according to two former staffers Paul holds a former U. S. representative who served as Williamson's New Hampshire state director confirms he and others in the national campaign were laid off another former campaign aide told the Associated Press Williamson laid off her entire campaign staff on December thirty first because of financial concerns

Mike Crossey Marianne Williamson Paul Representative New Hampshire Director Associated Press Williamson U. S.
Williamson lays off entire campaign staff

Pat Thurston

00:22 sec | 3 years ago

Williamson lays off entire campaign staff

"Candidate Marianne Williamson has laid off her entire twenty twenty campaign staff but is pushing ahead with her White House bid Williamson's New Hampshire state director and senior campaign adviser confirmed he had been laid off and others in the national campaign have been laid off a former campaign aids as Williams and laid off her entire campaign staff on December thirty first because of financial

Marianne Williamson New Hampshire Director Williams White House
Julián Castro drops out of presidential race

Mike Slater

00:19 sec | 3 years ago

Julián Castro drops out of presidential race

"Julian Castro has dropped out of the democratic presidential race the only Latino candidate in the race Castro champion progressive policies but did not find his footing in the polls often holding on it one or two percent also showing signs of dropping out Marianne Williamson who just laid off for entire campaign

Julian Castro Marianne Williamson
Outsider Marianne Williamson moves beyond the fringe in Democratic debate

Feminist Utopia

01:46 min | 3 years ago

Outsider Marianne Williamson moves beyond the fringe in Democratic debate

"I do feel we have to discuss marianne williamson in her much better performance in the second round of debates. The first rounded debates. I i've never actually seen the moment when somebody's edibles kicked in until i watched her and that debate <hes> it she overshot so been there done that so williamson's presence this last time was much better. She actually said stuff. I agreed with it feel slightly insane well. I was thinking you know even a broken. Clock is right twice a day and i kind of appreciated did some of those fringe candidates that you know aren't gonna make it but they're there for the sole purpose of holding the front runners hearst feet to the fire bringing up these hard things and raising these issues and her issue of reparations really <hes> resonated well she. You spoke honestly about race in a way that no candidates have really done until this election cycle. The fact that it's officially part of words platform or reparations plan plan and beto also spoke eloquently about race but i think williamson really got to the emotional part of it in a way that none of the other candidates stood when she was talking about we can't be wonky about this kind of stuff. We're not gonna reach people this way. We can't be insulting with our reparations offers. We behalf to understand that we caused great harm. This is a debt that is owed right and not in or grams or kickbacks the actual cash in the hand kind of reparations yes so i was pleased with that but she needs to go

Marianne Williamson Beto
Highlights and analysis of the debate

Left, Right & Center

11:35 min | 3 years ago

Highlights and analysis of the debate

"And center I'm Josh barro of New York magazine on the right is Megan McArdle of The Washington Post on the left is plain old also a columnist at The Washington Post and when it Lopez of business insider is our special guest all right so we talked about trade but obviously there was much much much more than trade whole lane who won these debates I'm I don't think anybody won these debates actual lay I think everybody I went through and read tons of commentary at one point and came to the absolute conclusion that everybody thought the candidate that they like the most won the debate I read impassioned defense you know a passion Biden won the debate Warren when the debate Sanders won the debate I even saw John Delaney won the debate I saw in this way I mean it was across the board and conversely people generally thought whoever they didn't like didn't do particularly well so you saw well you toward in Sanders only did well because they teamed up and you know they were against some lilliputian and you saw well by now only did well because you know he was against terror out send and so on and Harris only did well or you know whatnot because she wasn't fully attacked the way she deserved and so on down the line and I think it just sort of became a sort of wash and I think the pop that was the public's reaction to I mean barely anybody watch I think it had viewership of about eight million at fat and to be honest it's actually already it's Friday it's already kind of hard to remember very much of it so I mostly agree with that with two exceptions one is that I don't really think I saw anybody saying that they thought Kamel Harris had a good night even people who work fans of commerce he didn't work for her campaign you probably weren't saying that she won the debate and and then the flip side of that is I saw a lot of people saying they really thought Cory Booker did a good job in that sort of elevated himself above the the lower tier position that he had managed to hold on to in this debate I Meg and I know you wrote about Kamel Harris this week yes I think that there's no question that she lost the debate in in part because you know she her last debate she was definitely the clear winner rich she went into the debate point seven percent she comes out pulling at fifteen right that is a major move and that is because she she took the fight to Joe Biden sort of questioning him about his history opposing federal school busing efforts and people thought here is the fighter who can really dismantle trump on stage but the problem with that is that she then went into this debate as a front runner and people were gunning for her and it turns out that she's all offense and no defense and so when people started landing punches she was just reeling and really not able to mount an effective response on the other side of that I thought Elizabeth Warren did well enough I mean I think she slightly improved her position she looked very good but mostly she siphoning voters from Bernie who I think did not do well in this debate not because he did badly but merely because he's just holding steady it's not really widening as support Cory Booker I agree absolutely like god himself noticed finally after months and months of waiting for this to happen I think enter Yang also I don't think he's gonna be president but I think that you know he went into this debate with almost no one knowing who he is he made a couple of very well timed jokes sounded very coherent and you know plausible if not to me personally very convincing on things like his signature universal basic income initiative so I think there were a number of people who really committed this to be looking much better but in part that was because of what the for one of the sort of great white hopes came out looking much worse can can we and and I hope this is the last time in my life I ever have to say this phrase can we talk about and Yang for a moment alleluia the Ted talk version of politics yeah I I don't get it at all I don't get the people who are you know talking about you know good night friend Riang I mean I guess you know if you're if you're not really Yang gang if you're judging it like a like a high school debate competition and you know he won some points that might be right but the the problem with Andrew gang is that is central idea that virtually every problem in society is best addressed through universal basic income of a thousand dollars a month is both wrong on the merits and also it doesn't speak to any particular constituency in the Democratic Party and he has this idea that basically the problem is that our jobs are being automated away which is if it's if it's ever gonna happen it's not happening yet if that was what was happening you would see really fast productivity growth in the economic data because the robots would be doing all the things that people used to do and yet right productivity growth is actually pretty slow and then you know what what kind of Democrat is supposed to be into the entry on message if you you know if you just want things to go back to normal and you want a third Obama term he's not your guy if you're very concerned about inequality and the concentration of wealth in the hands of certain of a few powerful people of political and economic power he's not your guys you're very concerned about racial justice he's not your guy he said the sort of bizarre thing about how basically it's too late on climate change and we need to give people money so they can afford to move to higher ground I do not get at all what this suppose it gang constituency is supposed to be I've actually gone to so I went to an injury Yang rally so I can actually talk about this okay so you go to a rally right and it's a bunch of guys it's a thirty five and under many of whom like have to pause for a minute went before the answer a question like who did you vote for two thousand sixteen they often can't remember if they voted in the primary if you ask them if they very who they voted for in the general there's also this pause and then they also Hillary Clinton and I'm not convinced if that means they had to think about it whether they are voted for trump and no they shouldn't say that or if they actually like you to vote I mean I'm not convinced but I'm not convinced of any of those but what I think it does is it appeals to this kind of people who I don't wanna say they're disenfranchised because their tech guys by definition are not disenfranchised but they see themselves as disenfranchised and you know this is kind of you know vaguely lake we could rent okay higher episode on these guys right exactly taken over the internet this is not a large box and enter right now it's not all it and expect it might not even be a voting block is again as I said I'm not sure how many of them vote but you know this is a sort of stuff that looks really great on an internet chat board I mean this is like a plaque right exactly it's a platform for internet chat board it is a platform that appeals to people like engineers who lake systems with very simple rules right that's actually like I've been lot of libertarians in that camp rate is the lake extremely simple operating rules and then it's kind of set it and forget it government and I think it does appeal to those people and I should point out that while it is true that probably most the people coming out for him don't didn't vote in twenty sixteen certainly in a primary truck did pretty well in twenty sixteen by mobilizing those people because in fact even though they're not a big portion of the electorate the primary voters are not a big portion of the electorate and so if you can get people moving you can get a fairly small group to swamp primaries especially in early races that said I do not think enter Yang is gonna be present and at what I want to ask is like is that the point right so yes if you if if you're asking like why would he be doing this if it's not this kind of classic democratic lake little bit from column a little bit from column be little bit from column C. coalition building politics that is how democratic primaries usually work then yes it's it's not a good strategy but is the goal to actually become president or is the goal to get himself noticed to make himself higher profile to get his ideas on the board and I think he did that in that debate when I want to give you an opportunity to talk about anybody other than Andrea ang and Marianne Williamson I haven't you haven't gotten it yet on the on the one question what were your big takeaways went winners and losers my big take away is that the progressives won in the moderates just found it blocked they just sounded like they didn't have any answers and they sounded like they were not willing to make that the sweeping changes that I think a lot of Americans want to see I think that the progressives are right a lot of people are not happy with their health insurance as much as I hate to say bill de Blasio was right and I think that you know when you hear guys like John Delaney and Tim Ryan talk about confronting China on green tech or and the technological space at all they say things like well I'm going to hire a chief manufacturing officer it's like that's not a real plan Mister Ryan that's actually nothing you need to put your money where your mouth is China has spent ians and billions of dollars and has spent eight spent a lot of time planning their technological advancement the United States needs to at least match that effort to be able to go toe to toe with them to see what you want about the A. O. C. new green deal at least it matches the problem in scale even if you don't agree with that the actual mechanics of her plan and the moderates just sounded like they were petty like they didn't have any real solutions and that they were not up to the task of winning the next century or the next generation or whatever the next monumental thing it so here here's what I don't get about this if if the if the democratic primary electorate is is hungry for a bold progressive who wants to you know really radically re imagined what government is for once things like single payer health care that sort of thing white is Joe Biden have such a persistent poll lead I actually I thought it was it was weird how much of the analysis of this debate of the campaign generally has sort of glossed over the existence of Joe Biden there was a an op ed by Bret Stephens in The New York Times this week complaining that quote Democrats are not up to their historic responsibility unquote he's this you know conservative columnist who wants the Democrats to not be such a Liberal Party it is because he doesn't care for Donald Trump he's complaining you know you had John Delaney and Tim Ryan up there making these good points but nobody's voting for them but people are are are intending to vote for Joe Biden and you had Joe Biden up their forcefully pushing an incremental this message and pushing back on some of the ideas from the progressive candidates saying basically that if you take away employer provided health insurance the polls show that's on popular you're gonna get beaten up over that there are a lot of people who wants to insure that everyone has health insurance but who don't want to do that saying that a lot of these plans that involve big tax increases you have to tax the middle class for them and that's impractical and that that incremental is message basically saying you know we can't have maximum change here's what we did in the Obama administration was built on that that does seem to have a lot of appeal among voters in the democratic primary I point out that a lot of Biden's appeal at this point seems to be that people think he can beat trump and name name recognition in general were early yeah yeah we're we're not that early I mean to and Bernie Sanders has has very very high name recognition and had and as the champion of this message and Sanders is nowhere in the polls I kind of think of all these debates completely as prelude to September when we will finally get all of the major competitors on one stage and I think at that point you might finally see some movement among the competitors that is actual real movement and will hold as opposed to for instance after the first debate where Biden fell after fairly weak performance and then slowly crept back up as people kind of forgot about it so make in one of the things that we heard when you're having these conversations between the center candidates in the left candidates as you would talk about one of these ideas like like getting rid of employer provided health insurance and you would speak that someone would say that some popular and then the progressive candidate would say that's a Republican talking points this is not a Republican talking for it this has nothing to do with the Republic Republican talking ports your question is a Republican talking point we cannot keep with the Republican talking points on this you got to stop the thing is in what again the thing that I take from Joe Biden's poll lead is that

Josh Barro Megan Mcardle The Washington Post Lopez New York Thousand Dollars Seven Percent
South Bend Indiana, Massachusetts And Bernie Sanders discussed on Bill Leff and Wendy Snyder

Bill Leff and Wendy Snyder

01:30 min | 3 years ago

South Bend Indiana, Massachusetts And Bernie Sanders discussed on Bill Leff and Wendy Snyder

"All right to debut night of a two night debate tonight is the second half with the second ten candidates Steve balik Montana governor and mayor Pete but a judge of south bend Indiana former Maryland Rep John Delaney who looks very much like will Ferrell to me former Colorado governor John Hickenlooper Minnesota senator Amy Klobuchar former Texas rap at Rourke Ohio rep Tim Ryan Vermont senator Bernie Sanders Massachusetts senator Elizabeth Warren and author and friend of Oprah Marianne Williamson all right last night's debate what's your take well and you do just to the roster for was there and you'll be saying goodbye probably the most of those people before September comes around the next debate just because of what it takes to qualify for that next debate the making it tougher you know what you had last night one of the questions was what everybody go after Joe Biden even though he wasn't there he's the front runner answer is nobody touched up last night was a battle between the progressives which would be Warren and Sanders and then pretty much everybody else being moderate voices and how would that play in a party that's wanting to be more progressive that seemingly wants to take that leap to the last waltz what happened last night was that Sanders and Warren seem to have a pact with each other not to attack each other for that progressive spot and what you had was everybody else basically saying look this Medicare for all plan you want to do it doesn't work people don't want to give up insurance when they're happy with it they took some hits they held their own but I think the moderates also put a focus on what the future will hold in terms of

South Bend Indiana Massachusetts Bernie Sanders Tim Ryan Vermont Ohio Texas Senator Minnesota John Hickenlooper Colorado Maryland Pete Montana Steve Balik Medicare Joe Biden Marianne Williamson Elizabeth Warren Amy Klobuchar Ferrell
Marianne Williamson Tops Google Searches of Candidates After Second Democratic Debate

Hugh Hewitt

05:02 min | 3 years ago

Marianne Williamson Tops Google Searches of Candidates After Second Democratic Debate

"A moment but I do want to give you a little bit of what I promised into used in the last segment there and that is a little bit if you did not watcher of the the star of the Democrats debate it wasn't Elizabeth Warren wasn't Bernie Sanders it wasn't Robert Francis o'rourke it was not mayor Pete people to judge the star of the debate according to virtually everyone was Marianne Williamson who yeah author Marianne Williamson who was the most Google candor it after that debate during and after that candidate among the entire ten that were on the stage last night she took the internet by storm his people you know listen to or and and and get you some in a mocking way and some just in a in an amazing way listen to her talk about some of the strangest things including psychic forces dark psychic forces that are controlling via the trump administration and and even are behind the flint water crisis listen to Marianne Williamson on the stage last night could fifteen all the water crisis is that is just the tip of the iceberg I was recently in Denmark South Carolina where it is there's a lot of talk about it being the next flint we we have an administration that is god and the clean water act we have communities particularly communities of color and disadvantaged communities all over this country who are suffering from environmental injustice I assure you I live in Grosse Pointe what happened in flint would not happening rose for it this is part of the dark underbelly of the we're having here tonight if you think it is walking this is going to deal with this dark side could force of the collectivized hatred that this president is bringing up in this country and I'm afraid that the Democrats are going to see some very dark days we need to say it like it is it's bigger than flat it's all over this country is particularly people of caller ID particularly people who do not have the money to fight back and if the Democrats don't start say in it the why would those people feel that they're there for us I'm sorry the more high pitch you got the faster she went give her a channel yeah no kidding that was some kind of special particularly the the environmental intolerance or environmental injustice and particularly out is targeting minorities now she has made it very very clear that she you know the only in road she's gonna have into this thing is to identity politics our way through and and try to pander for every black vote she can get you mention that black and Latino and minority votes period but to particularly the black vote which is why cut number twelve is so important as well first of all it's not five hundred billion dollars in financial assistance it's five hundred billion dollars two hundred to five hundred million dollars payment of a debt that is that is what reparations we need to be telling when it comes we don't need another commission to look at evidence I appreciate what congressman over his head it is time for us to simply realized that this country will not heal all the country is a collection of people people hill when there's some deep truth telling we need to recognize that when it comes to the economic gap between blacks and whites in America it does come from a great injustice that has never been dealt with that great a job has had to do with the fact that there was two hundred and fifty years of slavery followed by another hundred hundred years of domestic terrorism what makes me qualified to say two hundred to five hundred billion dollars I'll tell you what makes me qualified if you did the math of the forty acres and a mule given that that was four to five million slaves at the end of and for every family of four if you did the math today would be trillions of dollars and I believe that anything less than a hundred billion dollars is is an insult and I believe the two hundred to five hundred billion is is politically feasible today because so many Americans realize there is an injustice that continues to form a Thomas city underneath the surface and the most single turbulence thank you very much senator emotional turbulence two and what's fascinating about all of that in in its insanity is she's talking about forty acres and a mule she's talking about the sleeves of that were they were freed an emancipated in eighteen sixty five and she's talking about exactly how many of them that are still alive today to claim their payments see if we did reparations in eighteen sixty six we'd have a discussion but the fact that not one single taxpayer to bury held slaves not one single beneficiary of so called reparations worse in slave we have a very different conversation than we had

Five Hundred Billion Dollars Forty Acres Five Hundred Million Dollars Hundred Billion Dollars Hundred Hundred Years Fifty Years
Janet CNN, Marianne Williamson And White House discussed on This Morning with Gordon Deal

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:41 sec | 3 years ago

Janet CNN, Marianne Williamson And White House discussed on This Morning with Gordon Deal

"Janet CNN's democratic presidential debate in Detroit offer Marianne Williamson was one of ten candidates taking shots at the current occupant of the White House if you think any of those walking this is going to deal with this dark psychic force of the collectivized hatred that this president is bringing up in this country and I'm afraid that the Democrats are going to see some very dark days senator Bernie Sanders said the way to beat Donald Trump is with bold solutions like cancelling student loan debt for example we need to bring millions of young people into the political process in a way that we have never seen by among other things thank you and universities which are free and cancelling

Janet Cnn Marianne Williamson White House President Trump Donald Trump Detroit Senator Bernie Sanders
Second Debate Lineup: Warren and Bernie Face Off, Kamala and Biden Get a Rematch

Hugh Hewitt

00:41 sec | 3 years ago

Second Debate Lineup: Warren and Bernie Face Off, Kamala and Biden Get a Rematch

"The second round line up for the democratic debates he is all set to debate you're being held over two nights July thirtieth and thirty first in Detroit senators Bernie Sanders Elizabeth Warren headlined the first night along with senator any club which are better Rourke mayor Pete but a judge governor Steve bullet congressman Tim Ryan former governor John Hickenlooper former congressman John Delaney an author Marianne Williamson former vice president Joe Biden and senator Carl Harris are matched again in ninety two but senator Cory Booker entrepreneur injury Yang Julian Castro mayor bill de Blasio senator Michael Bennet congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard senator Kirsten Gillibrand governor Jay Inslee Rhonda rocks to

Tim Ryan Jay Inslee Rhonda Kirsten Gillibrand Tulsi Gabbard Michael Bennet Bill De Blasio Yang Julian Castro Senator Cory Booker Vice President Marianne Williamson John Hickenlooper Elizabeth Warren Steve Bullet Mayor Pete Bernie Sanders Detroit Carl Harris Joe Biden John Delaney Congressman
Democratic candidates debate in Florida to kick off the 2020 election

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:56 sec | 3 years ago

Democratic candidates debate in Florida to kick off the 2020 election

"The second batch of democratic presidential candidates gathered in miami for their first debate last night former colorado governor john hickenlooper warned that the democratic socialism embraced by some of the hopefuls could hurt the party against republicans senator kamala harris referenced her experience as former attorney general of california we need a nominee who has the ability to prosecute the case against four more years of donald trump and i will do that former vice president joe biden was confronted by spell democrats from the outset including on foreign policy by vermont senator bernie sanders voted for that wall helped lead the opposition to that which is a total disaster mr biden was also pressed by thirty eight year old california congressman eric swallow who urged him to pass the torch and allow younger democrats to lead the party tough start for marianne williamson who had two week twenty seven minutes to make her first

Congressman Vermont Vice President Attorney Kamala Harris Senator Colorado Marianne Williamson Eric Swallow Miami Mr Biden Senator Bernie Sanders Joe Biden Donald Trump California John Hickenlooper Twenty Seven Minutes Thirty Eight Year Two Week