35 Burst results for "Marianne"

"marianne" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

02:52 min | 7 months ago

"marianne" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Asking that question. I think that's the question of the conscious person right now. How can I best serve? And we're living the question, living the inquiry. Yeah. Me, no less than everybody else I know. But new connections are being made. You know? It's like an immune system, right? The body survives because there's an amazing amount of assault and injury and illness that the body can take as long as there's a healthy immune system. I believe the psyche has an immune system. It's amazing how much heartbreak and trauma we can take. There's a psychic immune system. And I believe there's an immune system in civilization. And the immune cells are awakening. And when the immune cell, I remember I once fell down. Cut my hands. I was running and I fell. This huge gas was on my hands. It was so fascinating to watch the wound because it was right here. And I remember a doctor friend of mine saying, you realize the red is good news. It means all the white blood cells are rushing to the wound. And that's what I feel is happening right now. Everybody's rushing to the wound. And cells in the body are assigned. You go to the lungs. You go to the heart. You go to the bones and right now we're all being assigned to the area of the wound where we can best make a difference. And I know for myself and for most people I know we're not quite sure where the assignment is right now, but we can wake up every day and do what we can to be the awakening. Yeah. Find the wound that works for that space to you. Right? I feel like so many forms of new media like podcasting, et cetera, play such a vital role in this. It's providing so many people with different avenues for learning and exploring media that just weren't available. Not that long ago. And I feel like that's a big piece in this in the construction of this. Absolutely strong immune system. Absolutely because traditional media is so corporatized and sold. It's that predetermined agenda. And this is independent media. People having a deeper conversation. You know, is Werner Earhart, who said, you can live your life from circumstances or you can live your life from a vision and things such as you're doing, allow us to have a vision of what's possible. Yeah. And from that, anything is possible. Beautiful. Well, you can learn more about Marianne and all of her wisdom by subscribing to her substack, which is pretty new, right? Transform. You just started getting into this and you also have a podcast that transform podcast. Well, is there anywhere else that you want to direct people towards that want to learn more about you aside from your over a dozen books that you've written? Yeah. Or people can go to Marianne dot com and sign up on my mailing list for the various things I do or substack, and the merriam Williamson podcast is on that subscribe. If you go to Marianne dot com, there's a lot you can go get to the substack.

"marianne" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

06:29 min | 7 months ago

"marianne" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"In holding what was by then Chevron accountable because Chevron had tax code. Chevron doesn't even deny that it happened. So Chevron said, we don't want the case tried in the United States. We want the case tried in Ecuador. And if it is tried in Ecuador, if we are held accountable, liable, we will pay whatever the judgment is. The judgment that came down ended up at somewhere 8 $9 billion. That was like 9 and a half billion. That's a while ago. Oh yeah. That's right. This has been going on for years. Chevron said hell no. And ended up coming at Steven donziger. And I have sought to destroy his life. And they had him on this misdemeanor where they claimed that he had there was some money that they said he owed them. They wanted access to his computer. Now, we all know how sac was saying the relationship attorney privilege. The last thing he wanted to do was to give over his computer in which there was all this contact information about Ecuadorian environmental activists. He wouldn't do it. He was filing an appeal, and what happened there was this was just a misdemeanor. New York State said, we're not even going to deal with this. A judge Lewis Kaplan found a loophole and basically gave over the prosecution of Stephen donziger to Chevron. This is very important that we see this for what it is. This is Chevron, and I think in many ways on behalf of the entire fossil fuel industry. Putting its line in the sand, trying to freeze human rights and environmental activism, saying, you go this far, we will destroy you. Stephen donziger was held in home detention for over two years with an ankle bracelet. He was denied a jury trial. And judge preska, these people are all related to the federalist society, et cetera, on behalf of Chevron basically, using a law firm which is Chevron related has now thrown the book at him and he is now in Danbury prison in Connecticut, serving a 6 month prison sentence. And what we want is for Merrick Garland to take this case and several Congress people have written a letter. The UN high commissioner on human rights has called us political prisoner, has said that it is a human rights abuse, has said that he should be released and he should be paid money in recompense, Greenpeace, there is more and more of a building energy of the outrageousness of this. He's basically a political prisoner. And at this point, it's not just that Merrick Garland needs to step up. Merrick Garland needed to step up a while ago. Joe Biden should step up. Joe Biden should step up and commute the sentence now. Yeah, this is such a crazy situation. I mean, first of all, Chevron still hasn't paid the 9.9 billion. But they will pay any amount of money they've said in order to prosecute. Because they realize that if you let this go through, that's the way the fossil fuel companies are looking at this. It's all about freezing environmental and human rights activism. Yeah, it's so crazy that they've been able to amplify what is essentially a misdemeanor charge on a trumped up, I think, fraud claim. Where he's just like, look, I'm not turning over my phone on my laptop. Ordinarily, that would be so there's a contempt charge, right? But that would be a fine or a slap on the wrist or something like that. Two years methan ankle price slip. And the 6 months now. 6 months. It's unbelievable. It is. And it's clearly sending this chilling effect message on anybody to say not so fast, not so far. Yeah, you can't go. It's not so far. But there is so much energy in this case. People are talking about it. And he's been very forthright. He's been doing videos and stuff like that from his home before he went to Danbury and you've been doing Instagram lives with him and stuff like that. And it's a fascinating test case and an example of just how far a company like Chevron will go to make sure that anybody who challenges them in a meaningful way will get put in the grave. Also, I don't think the average American knows I certainly was shocked. Everybody, I know a shock, who knew that there was a loophole. Yeah, I still don't understand how this happened. I mean, I was at the trial. The first part of it, the first day, a Chevron sponsored lawyer. Comes in and uses a U.S. courtroom. This is a show trial. This is the corporate prosecution of a U.S. citizen. This is a corporate prosecution of a U.S. citizen. Right, in the context of a civil trial. Yeah. It's not even criminal court. It's wild. Yeah, it's just one of many things that's quote unquote not supposed to happen in America. But it is happening. And that goes back to what you and I were saying earlier, we can't just influence the conversation. We need to stop this. I can't end this without talking to you a little bit about the idea of forgiveness because that's so central to your core philosophy and perspective on everything. Like, how do we develop the facility to forgive and why is that so important in terms of living our lives in a manner in which to be most whole and complete? Well, I'm a student of a course in miracles and the concept of forgiveness, which is central to a course in miracles. Presents the word in a very different way than it is presented within traditional Christian terminology or any religious terminology. Usually when we think of forgiveness, it's you're a jerk, but I'm so spiritual that I danger forgive you. The condescending. My favorite kind of forgiveness. Judgment to destroy the North America says. But forgiveness within a deeply spiritual metaphysical concept means knowing that we are all created by God as innocent and good, and we make mistakes. And that God does not punish us for our sins, send us an art term, means you miss the mark. He seeks to correct us for our mistakes. And when you are in that place, you realize that the love that is who you are and who I am is real. The rest is this mortal hallucination that.

Chevron Merrick Garland Stephen donziger Steven donziger Ecuador Lewis Kaplan judge preska Chevron basically Danbury prison America Joe Biden federalist society et cetera Greenpeace Connecticut UN New York Congress Danbury
"marianne" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

07:25 min | 7 months ago

"marianne" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Raytheon 8 having it though. Oh, the Brazilian is not happy. But we have to have it. We've got to say it. We've got to stand on it. We've got to run on it. I love the idea, but ultimately do we not have to disentangle campaign finance laws and find a way to prevent this insane undue influence that these industries have on legislatures, like it's anti democratic and it's like, can't we all find some way to fundamentally agree on that? Well, I think the American people do agree. Sure. I think they do too. The undue influence of money on our politics, particularly corporate money, is the cancer underlying all the other cancers, particularly dark money, particularly that which is exploded since citizens united. Ultimately, we're going to need we certainly need to repeal that. But that's not going to happen anytime soon. Ultimately, we will need a constitutional amendment that establishes public funding for federal campaigns. I don't think most people realize that your average congressman spends half their time on the phone trying to raise money. I'll probably more than half their time. It starts on day one. And yet these people were supposed to look at them and go, oh, they're so qualified for leading us forward. It's the Ken and the Barbie doll. Yeah. You were talking about the manner in which money goes into the medicalization of the sickness care system rather than the yeah, exactly. Yeah, we don't care. We have a sickness here. But that also it's metastasized into much more than that, right? We've medicalized sadness and grief, like we're overmedicating everybody. And that also speaks to kind of the undue influence of these huge pharmaceutical companies and their financial interests in making sure that everybody is adequately medicated at all. Absolutely. And that's another reason they came after me actually on the campaign. And that's not to say that medication certainly does has its place in mental health inappropriate situations. But as somebody who understands very well, the difference between what one might consider clinical depression versus grief or having a hard time. And the fact that we're now sort of giving people pills that just are going through something that they kind of need to go through because we're human beings. And life is hard. I look at antidepressants away I look at painkillers. I have a place, but we now know the sacral family Purdue pharmacy et cetera. We know about predatory behavior on the part of pharmaceutical executives, creating profit centers, dangerous, immoral, profit centers, where they did not belong. And I think it is absolutely naive of us to think that that's not happening in relation to antidepressants as well. And the fact that if you even suggest that you are considered naive or irresponsible about mental health is absurd, you're what's happening is how naive and irresponsible people are too so blindly trust. Big pharmaceutical companies. And like you said, they do wonderful things. I mean, my God, I mean, you know, I had surgery not long ago and believe me, I was grateful for those painkillers. Of course they have a place as to I'm sure many people's lives antidepressants. But the fact that you can't even suggest that the over prescription of medication in America is a real issue and we should be able to talk about it. That has to do with the chokehold of big pharma. And the fact that the political system and the media, you know, like when Anderson Cooper came after me, I pointed out how many were talking about that issue. And I said, well, that's interesting because look how many pharmaceutical companies advertise on your television show. And he said, I don't know who advertises. And I wish I said to him. It's constant. Yeah, of course. And by the way, before Ronald Reagan, this was not legal. Pharmaceutical companies could not advertise on television before Ronald Reagan and the orgy of deregulation that his administration brought forth. Yeah. I mean, it's a sticky wicket. It's all one and the same though. All of these issues go back to this inextricable connectivity between government and giant conglomerates. Well, and also you bring in on the sickness issue and one of the things I brought up in a debate was that we have to ask ourselves, why is there so much more chronic illness than the United States? Then among citizens of other equally advanced European democratic societies, for instance, this goes back as you well know, you talk about this. This goes back to our chemical policies, our agricultural policies, animal factory farming. Subsidies. Yeah, it's a whole corporate matrix. We have this corporate aristocracy. We have reverted to an aristocratic condition. And we have to understand what that archetype means. An aristocracy means that a few people are considered entitled to the major resources of the country. We repudiated that in 1776 and we need to repudiate it again. I mean, it's outrageous. The idea that profit making for companies whose practice of capitalism is so predatory. That it is constantly at the expense or at the very least too often at the expense of the health and well-being of people and planet. The American people have every right in the world to push back against this. It is the most traditionally American thing in the world to push back against this. We've never been a perfect union. I mean, obviously, we're not slavery from our inception. We've always been a dichotomy. You know, you had out of the 51 signers of the Declaration of Independence, establishing these enlightened principles. More enlightened that had ever been encoded in the founding documents of a country. 46 of the 51, or is it 41 of the 56. I think it's 41 of the 57. Were themselves slave owners. So we've always been this dichotomy between people who held in our hearts. This flaming love for what was possible versus people willing to transgress in the most violent ways against the execution of those principles. Our generation in that sense is no different than any other. And other generations have pushed back. And I just pray in my heart that we will not be the first generation of Americans who wimp out on doing what it takes to say hell no to that kind of nonsense. All of these ideas and themes are almost perfectly crystallized in this Stephen Don's situation. Speaking about. So explain a little bit for people who don't know this situation because it's unbelievable. In the 1960s, then oil giant, texaco. Went down to the Ecuadorian Amazon swath of the Amazon River. In order now, already, Ecuadorian environmental regulations were less than ours and ours were never so wonderful. So they were even less than ours. Even in violation of those, texaco, in order to save $3 a pit, left their pits online. And they admit that they did this. Thus poisoning that era of the Amazon, the food, the water, even the air. They would actually say to the indigenous farmers down there, oh, it's good for you. This oil has vitamins in it. Its mother's milk. Now, Steven Dons a girl, I know..

cancers Raytheon Ronald Reagan Purdue Anderson Cooper United States depression united Stephen Don texaco Amazon River Amazon Steven Dons
"marianne" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

06:02 min | 7 months ago

"marianne" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Be able to change it. I am responsible for my experience. I was not a victim. I ran for president. As someone said to me, after I was just ambushed in the most unfair way by Anderson Cooper, someone said to me, and they were right. If you couldn't take on Anderson Cooper, what would make us think you could take on Vladimir Putin? Don't run for president if you're not ready to take on what it was. And there were too many ways in which I was unprepared. I naively thought I was going to be judged on the issues. People know I didn't even have any. You know? Or at the very least judged on my actual weaknesses and, you know, the things that are true about me that are not perfect and character defects, whatever. I thought those would come up, but this mischaracterization of wacky girl who doesn't go to the doctor and doesn't believe disease is real. So I take responsibility that's number one. And number two, what I knew I had to do was clear all that. And that's what that year was about for me. You know, it's true. It's a cliche, but it's true. You get better or you get better. I have to forgive myself. Have to forgive others? I didn't want to go forward with a chip on my shoulder. We all fall down in life. But I think the issue is who gets back up and how? Hemingway said everybody, what do you say? Everybody's broken, but some grow stronger at the broken places. So the issue for me is can I be a truth teller and point out what I think needs to be pointed out without playing violins like poor me, what they did to me. Because what they did to me is small compared to the larger issue of what's being done to the planet and to people all over the world. Yeah. I just remember you being on the stage and just kind of very bluntly speaking truth to power in a manner that was very bold and extremely unusual, like perhaps unprecedented for that type of dias, right? To just say, look, we got to confront the dark with the light and in a very matter of fact and convicted way. And I think that's why you ended up getting Googled so much like holy shit. I've never seen anything like this before. What are we going to do with this? Well, the DNC had ideas around that. Of course. But I look at it as almost as if, listen, you knew you weren't going to win the presidency, right? It's almost as if you were this Trojan horse. I'm going to insert myself into this equation. And I'm going to cede the national dialog with certain ideas that I think are hyper relevant and I know that I'm going to be perhaps mocked for them. But I am opening the door, but I'm opening the door for the next person, right? I'm creating permission. So that this can actually occur in the future. It's sort of like you're just you were the courageous adventurer or the first person to kind of say, let's talk about this more broadly. Let's talk about this from a broader spiritual perspective in a situation in which we have the Democratic Party that is kind of abdicated. Any relationship with anything spiritual or religious in any regard, that's kind of been monopolized by the right in a certain way. And has left the Democratic Party like fearful of even talking about these things in a meaningful way. I don't know about fearful. I think that by surrendering, it's as if we just abdicated the moral conversation. Traditionally, on the political right, they talked about issues of private morality and on the political left. There were issues of public morality war and peace is it should be seen as a moral issue, whether to invade a country that didn't do anything to you, is a moral issue. Economic justice should be seen as a moral issue. But over the last few decades, and I don't even know how it happened. I mean, Bobby Kennedy said that the contest was for the soul of America. JFK said we can't afford to be materially rich and spiritually poor. When I was growing up during the anti war movements of the 1960s and 70s, reverend wim Sloan coffin, the barrack and brothers that was definitely a religious left. So this is an aberration that the left in America has become so overly secularized. But I'd like to go back for a moment to something you just said about, you open the conversation. Oh, you brought up the conversation. You know what? Let me tell you something. We don't have time left to just influence the conversation. So yes, in my campaign, hopefully I did what you said, open the door, next person, et cetera. But this idea, you know, sometimes people say, oh, Mary, and you really influence the consciousness of people. The conscious of people is not the problem. You know, that's not where the problem was. The problem was, is in those who are holding the lovers of political and economic power. I have had the experience of quote unquote advising the most powerful people in the country. It's too late to just advise them. We need to replace them. So that goes back to this whole issue of incrementalism. And you don't go through a situation as brutal as running for president, only wanting to influence the conversation, not that I thought that I would become president in that election. But you know if somebody is sending you money to support your campaign. Even if it's $10, you have a moral I think an ethical responsibility to play at a seriously as you can. And I tried. And the fact that I in moments of nervousness sounded silly, clearly was used by those who sought to mock me, but once again, that's my responsibility. I own it. You've spoken many times about the legacy and the impact of Bobby Kennedy and MLK and what their assassinations kind of meant in terms of the chilling effect on activism. This sense that.

Anderson Cooper Vladimir Putin Democratic Party Hemingway dias DNC reverend wim Sloan coffin Bobby Kennedy America JFK Mary
"marianne" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

06:06 min | 7 months ago

"marianne" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Yeah, we can place all our focus on Donald Trump and label him as a malignant narcissist and the like. He's a symbol. He's a reflection of decades of tectonic economic shifts that have led to a situation where people who have been so deprived and unheard for so long. And have to work three jobs as opposed to the one job that provides the car and the picket fence and all of that. Of course, you're going to have anger and resentment and all of the kind of emotions that we're seeing flaring up. It's reflective of that. And it's either going to lead towards some kind of revolutionary act and the dissolution of the union, ultimately, there has to be a reckoning, right? The most healthy way to address it is to have some form of intervention where we can course correct. What has gone wrong and find a way to provide for those people in a meaningful way who have been so deprived for too long? If you look at history, it's very interesting to see not only what conditions provided. The opportunity for it to gain power. But also how the United States and the other allies responded to that problem at the end of the war. At the end of World War I, the attitude towards Germany on the part of the allies was basically reparations in the form of Deutsche Mark till we tell you to stop. Interestingly enough, it was the American president of the time Woodrow Wilson, who tried to warn them that this was a bad idea. He was not listened to and the desperation of the German people at that time became a Petri dish when you have large groups of desperate people. It becomes a national security risk. It is whether it's in a corner of the U.S. city or a corner of the world, because large groups of desperate people become a Petri dish out of which a certain level of societal dysfunction is almost inevitable. Ideological capture by genuinely psychotic forces becomes pretty easy. That's why the Marshall plan. That's why we treated Germany so well after World War II. That's why we treated the Japanese, so well, after World War II, we knew that when people have been defeated, don't keep kicking them, something terrible is going to happen. Even if you don't see it from a moral perspective, just see it from a political perspective. So you're absolutely right for 40 years. People have been kicked down. Vote for us and it'll be better. Vote for us and it'll be better. And at a certain point, one man who I don't think any of us thought could have done that much damage so quickly, who was willing to take advantage of all the anger, all the anger to harness that for his own political purposes, then that coupled with what you've mentioned, the power of social media, and we've gotten not only the problem we have on our hands of a genuinely neo fascist force field, but what should have been seen as a predictable one. And I believe if the Democratic Party had been truly holding to its principles over the last 40 years. Well, listen, if either political party had held to their principles over the last 40 years, it wouldn't be. We wouldn't be where we are today. Yeah, and it feels like the Democratic Party can't get out of its own way. It's very feckless in terms of how it's dealing with this with bullet points and policy initiatives that fail to kind of penetrate the emotional force field of the people who could benefit from those policy shifts the most, right? Like there needs to be a broader conversation where these people are actually feeling heard. Well, these people were told, vote for us, stand in line for 7 or 8 hours, give us The White House, give us the Senate, give us the house, and we're going to make your life better. What happened to the conversation of raising the minimum wage to $15 an hour? What happened to the conversation about canceling the college loan debt? What happened to the conversation about Medicare for All? They are peripherals like it's a bunch of errant children who don't know what they're talking about. Too far left, even though the issues that are considered such as I just mentioned that are considered so far left in America today are considered like moderate centrist views in every advanced democracy except for ours. Certainly in Europe. And so to say to people, it's not just that I don't even think it's just the emotional force field. It is their pocketbook. And now the Democrats ringing their hands, how are we going to win in 2022? I'll tell you what you do. You raise the minimum wage, then people will vote for you. You cancel those college loan debts. People will vote for you. You pass Medicare for All people will vote for you. It's really not rocket science. And it's not just messaging. It's not just messaging. It's who they are willing to serve at the end of the day. And why can't they just get that done? Because they, at the end of the day, are under the thrall of the same corporate donors, whether it has to do with the military industrial complex, whether it has to do with big pharmaceutical companies, fossil fuel companies, big agricultural companies, big chemical companies, not the NRA, but on that one, they are better, but they're still not getting it done. So we all need to awaken, you know, it's like a woman who her friends is to have to say honey is a bad guy. He's not who you think he is. At this point, these people are not doing it because they do not choose to. Yeah. It was fascinating to kind of observe during your presidential bid, like how the media treated you so unfairly the manner in which you were marginalized and I mentioned earlier, I had Andrew Yang in here and he shared a little bit about his personal experience with that, which was kind of a lesser version of what you experienced and he wrote quite extensively about it in his book. But it was quite disheartening to see the manner in which you were kind of maligned and made fun of and marginalized.

Donald Trump U.S. Germany Democratic Party Woodrow Wilson Deutsche White House Senate Medicare Europe NRA Andrew Yang
"marianne" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

08:02 min | 7 months ago

"marianne" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Or wisdom, her courage. And so with that, here we go. This is me and Marianne Williamson. Marianne I'm so happy to have you here today. Welcome. Thank you. Thank you. I'm happy to be here. Yeah, I've been looking forward to this for a long time. Thank you. So many threads that we can pull on. But I think a good place to start is just talking about where we find ourselves right now, obviously we live in very interesting times. It's a very unique period that I haven't experienced in my lifetime in terms of the division and the divisiveness and the acrimony and this era of social media. So, you know, I suppose like I'm just curious like, how are you feeling about this current moment that we find ourselves in? I think all of us are feeling rather discombobulated by the whole thing. But what we're thinking about, I think, is very important. I think we're living in two simultaneous realities. I think on one hand, it is the fall of Rome, on one hand, it is the dissembling of a civilization, a kind of cratering of American civilization in many ways. And on the other hand, it is the dawning and the struggling to be born of a new world, a new renaissance. I think they're both true. And I think that we are called upon to be both death doulas and birth to us. It's our job to help that which in many ways has to die. To die tenderly and with us little harm as possible and with us just a transition as possible. And to passionately and vigorously give birth to a world that works. And it's just like when we were children and we were taught about evolution. If a species moves in a direction, where it's collective behavior is increasingly maladaptive for its survival. One of two things will happen, either that species will go extinct or a mutation will occur. It will involve in a different direction. And I think that that's what's happened in many ways to our democracy and certainly it's happened to the entirety of the human race. We're moving in directions that are increasingly maladaptive for the survival of the species. We will now turn. We will now move in a different direction. We will now mutate and evolve or global cataclysm, catastrophe on a level that most of us can't even imagine is a very real possibility. Yeah, it does feel like this epic arms race of light versus dark, which is obviously like a touchstone theme in your teachings and what you talk about. And I think the difference if we kind of root this in the political landscape, the difference in tenor of our moment is this ticking clock in the background, right? We could quibble about policy changes and the direction of the country and where we're at as a collective consciousness. And address those items in a kind of incremental way. But now we have this looming existential threat that elevates the urgency of all of this. And I think also exacerbates the antipathy and everything else that's going on right now that makes it like this crucible where it's very difficult to figure out the best way forward. And I'd like that idea that you mentioned around kind of evolution of the individual and how that is reflected in society at large. It's this idea of ontogeny, recapitulates phylogeny. Like you can't evolve the whole without the evolution of the individual. I think the issue of incrementalism that you mentioned is very relevant. I think it was in the letter from the Birmingham jail that Martin Luther King talked about incrementalism and he said, if you take an incremental approach to change, then the status quo, which will never seek to disrupt itself. We'll simply co opt the ideas. So what's happening right now is that even those who were standing for workable solutions and a more sustainable future. There's a tendency of the economic and the political system to provide too little too slow too late. We have taken it to a point now. So many of the solutions of being offered for instance even right now by the Biden presidency, et cetera. They should have been offered in 1995. We are now at a point where it's not just that we must move in another direction, but we must move quickly. Because as you said, the risk is so great. You know, even like when I think of things like protests against the Vietnam War. Passionate, important, huge, but when we thought about the worst that could happen, global cataclysm was not the worst that could happen. We're now living at a time where the worst that could happen global catastrophe on a level like I said, we can't even imagine. It's a complete shift psychologically. I think that we have to move into. And if you make that move without any consideration of larger more expanded sense of possibility, almost from a metaphysical perspective, then you are left with understandable nihilism cynicism, anger and fear. Because if you only look at this moment from a rational perspective, it could be argued, it's over. It could be argued that the gig is up. I think about much like when the Israelites were standing at the Red Sea. If they go forward, they'll drown if they go back, pharaoh decided he wanted his slaves back. It's an assaulter to go get them or to kill them if they refuse to come. That story like all stories of miraculous transformation. Indicate that there was a level of consciousness at which the laws of time and space as we know them are transcended. You know, if you think of the abolitionist movement, there was no reason from a rational perspective to think that slavery could be abolished given how ensconced it was within the economy of the south. If you look at the women's suffragette movement, there was no reason to think that women could gain suffrage given how infused the system was with the institutionalized oppression and suppression of women's rights. Even if you look at the civil rights movement, there was no reason from a rational perspective to think that it could succeed given how embedded the systemic racism and institutionalized oppression of the rights of black people were within the systems of segregation in the American south. And yet these changes occur, they have occurred in American history and they've occurred throughout the world, and I think we need to keep our eyes on those moments where very quickly, in a way that no one might have predicted the right prevailed. Love prevailed. Justice prevailed. Mercy prevailed that there was such a burst of yearning and passion for those things within enough human hearts that you managed, it moved in that direction. Yeah, I suppose there is a seed of hopefulness that can be mined in thinking about those instances, but I can't help, but reflect upon the inadequacies of a democratic system that is that is sort of systemically ensconced in an incremental way of progressing change with this ticking clock and this existential. Like, do we have enough time? Is there adequate political will? Is there too much denial is the kind of corporate stranglehold on that political will to powerful to really create the change that we're going to need in order to survive as a species and as a thriving planet? Well, let's deconstruct that. The problem is not democracy. The problem is the anti democratic force field represented by the corporatized political duopoly, that now is keeping the will of the people from being expressed in political terms. If you look at issue after issue, the problem is not the American people..

Marianne Williamson Marianne Rome Martin Luther King Biden Birmingham Vietnam Red Sea pharaoh American south
"marianne" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

01:55 min | 7 months ago

"marianne" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"The problem is not democracy, our system is so corrupt. It's become a system of legalized bribery. People know it. It's not like people are not aware, and it's not like people are not upset. But we're all living with this conundrum. What do we do? We are now at a point where it's not just that we must move in another direction, but we must move quickly. We must open our hearts and still passionately disagree, form boundaries just like you have boundaries and personal relationships are boundaries and political relationships, but you can do all of that with love. You can do all of that with respect and humility. To me, that's the portal. Through which we can walk to a more sustainable world. The rich role podcast. Greetings Internet, it is I rich role, your host, welcome to the podcast. My guest today is Marianne Williamson. Marianne is a teacher. She's an activist, a thought leader. A badass and absolute legend in spiritual circles. And the author of 14 books, four of which have been number one New York Times bestsellers. You may know Marianne because she quite famously ran for president in 2020, but if that's the sum total of your relationship with this human, I think you're in for a ride today because she is a force of nature that extends well beyond that singular life chapter. This one is both fascinating. It's fun and it's coming right up, but first. Real quick, a word from the awesome sponsors that make this show possible, like athletic greens, AG one, because let's face it, you guys, life is complicated. We're all crazy busy..

Marianne Marianne Williamson New York Times
Carlson, Maher Discuss the Current State of Affairs in Canada

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:27 min | 8 months ago

Carlson, Maher Discuss the Current State of Affairs in Canada

"Just some sound here. We're going to play a bunch of sound just about what's happening in Canada. And kind of some of the public opinion around this. So let's go to cut 54. A trucker says, look, this is a defining moment in Canada. You have declared martial law, which is totally true. Trudeau has declared martial law on the people of Canada play cut 54. So let's be clear. This is a defining moment in the history of Canada in the history of the English speaking west. The emergency act is martial law. It has never been invoked in the history of that country. Now, by law, the emergency's act has allowed only in emergencies. Urgent and critical situations that seriously endanger the lives, health or safety of Canadians. What's happening now does not qualify what's happening in Canada now is not an emergency. So it's Tucker, not a trucker. Sorry. He's misreading my sheet. Let's go to cut 43. Bill Maher blast Trudeau for his comments on the protesters, play cut 43. Or maybe this is September, but he was talking about people who are not vaccinated? He said, they don't believe in science. They're often misogynistic, often racist. No, they're not. That was not part of him at all. Right. He said, but they take up space. And with that, we have to make a choice in terms of the leader as a country. Do we tolerate these people? It's like tolerant. Now you do sound like him. And recently he talked about holding holding unacceptable views. I'm surprised to hear that Trudeau said those things. You didn't see the black face? Is that that crystal woman? What's her name again Mary Ann something? She's the, she's the person. Marianne Williamson, the crystal woman. That's right. So Trudeau was very, let's say adamant and supportive behind Indian protests when the protesters in India, the farmers were protesting. Even though it deteriorated India, Canadian relations. But when it came to actually supporting the people of his own country, that actually might have some concern, he's very much involved in the dehumanization of the people of Canada.

Canada Trudeau Bill Maher Tucker Marianne Williamson Mary Ann India
Bill Maher Hosts Panel Over Canadian Truckers

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:59 min | 8 months ago

Bill Maher Hosts Panel Over Canadian Truckers

"We scoop Bill Maher. The vac Rama Swami is on this panel. And former Democrat presidential candidate Marianne Williamson. So that's the panel. You got Bill Maher, the entrepreneur that ramaswami, who we interviewed last week and the former Democrat candidate Marianne Williamson, I want you to hear this segment from HBO's real time with Bill Maher. The beautiful thing about a democracy is that so far, thank God this has been a peaceful set of protests. I hope it stays that way. That's part of the messiness of democracy. It's part of what makes it beautiful. You're all ready for that one. I've been watching. I agree that democracy is messy. And that's the price you pay in a way for free society. As long as we're going to honor free expression, protest is important, but also protest is inherently disruptive. So the line we have to find for ourselves is where does disruption become harm? These people have spoken, they have expressed themselves. They have a lot of passion behind their message, obviously. And what the Canadian government and any government has to then balance is at what point does this now move over into more than your grievances, but the grievances of people such as workers in Detroit and elsewhere who are finding economic harm because of these protests. I think it's interesting. And why truckers? And I thought, you know, like during the pandemic, you know, I talked about this many times. You know, we would see these Ed rolling it together and I think, no, we're not. No we're not. Some people who stay home and some people who bring them the food. You know, if you're just ordering Amazon and you don't ever have to go out and your job, you can do remotely. But who's bringing the Amazon things? The trucker,

Bill Maher Marianne Williamson Rama Swami Ramaswami Canadian Government HBO Detroit ED Amazon
Bill Maher Hosts Panel Over Canadian Truckers

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:59 min | 8 months ago

Bill Maher Hosts Panel Over Canadian Truckers

"We scoop Bill Maher. The vac Rama Swami is on this panel. And former Democrat presidential candidate Marianne Williamson. So that's the panel. You got Bill Maher, the entrepreneur that ramaswami, who we interviewed last week and the former Democrat candidate Marianne Williamson, I want you to hear this segment from HBO's real time with Bill Maher. The beautiful thing about a democracy is that so far, thank God this has been a peaceful set of protests. I hope it stays that way. That's part of the messiness of democracy. It's part of what makes it beautiful. You're all ready for that one. I've been watching. I agree that democracy is messy. And that's the price you pay in a way for free society. As long as we're going to honor free expression, protest is important, but also protest is inherently disruptive. So the line we have to find for ourselves is where does disruption become harm? These people have spoken, they have expressed themselves. They have a lot of passion behind their message, obviously. And what the Canadian government and any government has to then balance is at what point does this now move over into more than your grievances, but the grievances of people such as workers in Detroit and elsewhere who are finding economic harm because of these protests. I think it's interesting. And why truckers? And I thought, you know, like during the pandemic, you know, I talked about this many times. You know, we would see these Ed rolling it together and I think, no, we're not. No we're not. Some people who stay home and some people who bring them the food. You know, if you're just ordering Amazon and you don't ever have to go out and your job, you can do remotely. But who's bringing the Amazon things? The trucker,

Bill Maher Marianne Williamson Rama Swami Ramaswami Canadian Government HBO Detroit ED Amazon
"marianne" Discussed on Hay House Meditations

Hay House Meditations

04:59 min | 8 months ago

"marianne" Discussed on Hay House Meditations

"marianne" Discussed on Hay House Meditations

Hay House Meditations

02:45 min | 8 months ago

"marianne" Discussed on Hay House Meditations

"Others as well. And thus may my day be blessed, may I be blessed that I might be a blessing? Every situation shall be a lesson for me. And for those with whom I am in contact, may I be my more loving self, teach me God, how to bless and no longer blame. To forgive and no longer judge. To receive. To be at peace. To be a channel for your love. May myself may this world may all living things be blessed, this precious day. I send the love and the blessing and the healing of God. To all war torn regions of this world. For those who are hungry, May they be fed. For those who are sick, May they be healed? For those who suffer. Dear God. Please comfort them. To those who are unjustly treated. Hope dear God. And use me as your vessel. That I might help you. Help them. Give meaning to my life. Health to my body. And graciousness to my heart. On this day and every day may your will. Be done. On earth, as it is in heaven. For me and for all human God. Amen..

"marianne" Discussed on Hay House Meditations

Hay House Meditations

04:34 min | 8 months ago

"marianne" Discussed on Hay House Meditations

"And ego and pain. Released now to the possibility of unlimited grace and radiance through the power and the presence of God. This is the day that the lord hath made. The power of God's light now poorest into you through the top of your head. This divine alchemical elixir. This golden light now pours down through the top of your head. Through your brain, down through your neck, relaxing the muscles of your face, filling your blood, your bones, your organs, your eyes, your nose, your mouth. The light travels down now. Into your torso, filling your heart, your lungs, your abdomen, your liver, your spleens, down your spine. Down your arms through your lower body. Into your legs. Every place in your body, every cell, receiving the slight receiving this healing. This light replacing all darkness of body of mind of spirit of feeling. All falsehood now melting away. All this ease. Now melts away. All cellular functioning,.

"marianne" Discussed on Hay House Meditations

Hay House Meditations

04:02 min | 8 months ago

"marianne" Discussed on Hay House Meditations

"All living things, thank you God for this day. Thank you for this new chance. This new opportunity at life. We call to mind now. Everything that will happen on this day. Call to mind all of the people in your life. For the relationships that are good and peaceful and abundant. Give thanks in your heart. And commit within to participate.

Democrats Come to Grips With Looming Election Reform Defeat

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:00 min | 9 months ago

Democrats Come to Grips With Looming Election Reform Defeat

"There's a really interesting new snippet from Politico. They do a daily deal called playbook, most of it is garbage to be honest. It's kind of gossip. It is the closest thing that has been created in D.C. to kind of page 6 of politics, not to say that it's poorly sourced, but it's kind of gossipy. It's one off sources and people read it like that, but this one was super interesting. It says this that, and this actually cites a New York Times article from Katie edmondson. That's a good Swedish name. With the latest state of play and Sarah faris and Marie Marianne Levine and Nancy vu. My goodness, a lot of authors of that article. Democrats are starting to come to grips with the quote looming election reform defeat and quote grapple openly grappling. With what to tell their voters when they come up short. Frontline House Democrats eager to boost their prospects in November are urging their party leadership to break up build back better into a series of votes on popular planks. Even if that means giving up one grand Bill, even if those bills have no shot of becoming law. But Washington posts Mariana Sotomayor reports that leadership has been cool to this idea so far. While some front liners want to focus more on selling the infrastructure law and other accomplishments, steny Hoyer says, quote, the tension was surfaced in a meeting earlier this month. And the second highest ranking member of their caucus. Susan wild from Pennsylvania says I don't care. Telling Hoyer that House Democrats should spend the year sending bills to the Senate with the hope of bipartisan deals that could be reached on issues important to a broad range of voters. These Democrats are talking more like Japanese kamikaze pilots than

Katie Edmondson Sarah Faris Marie Marianne Levine Nancy Vu Frontline House Politico Mariana Sotomayor D.C. New York Times Susan Wild Steny Hoyer Washington Hoyer Pennsylvania Senate House
'The Case for Christ' Author Lee Strobel on the Biggest Christmas Misconception

The Dan Bongino Show

02:52 min | 9 months ago

'The Case for Christ' Author Lee Strobel on the Biggest Christmas Misconception

"You out there I want to welcome back to the show A good friend to the show for his second appearance a guy who wrote a book that changed my life The book was called the case for Christ it's a magnificent book Lee strobe Lee welcome back to the show Well thanks so much Dan Merry Christmas to you and your listeners Merry Christmas to you as well my Friends so we spoke last time and will be rerunning that interview I got so much feedback about your book the case for Christ Little background folks again Lee Yeah people loved it Lee was a journalist writing a book and again leaf I mischaracterized his stomach but trying to discredit he existence of Christ and found himself becoming a believer while writing the book and wrote about his journey in a book called the case for Christ It's magnificent I just learned today Lee then you have a book as well called the case for Christmas So I am going to be picking this up today and it turns out there are a lot of misconceptions about Christmas that you've discovered in your work You want to go through some of them for us Yeah sure One of the big misconceptions I think stems from the fact that there's a certain Greek word that was mistranslated in the original King James version It's a work Catalina which is a Greek word that refers to a guesthouse And so when you read the story about the Christmas you know everybody's familiar with It's a Marianne Joseph go to Bethlehem for the census And the returned away by the mean oil innkeeper and so she has to give birth either in a cave or in a stable or something like that Well there was really no innkeeper that really wasn't all in The word can't Lima that's used in by the gospel writer Luke refers to a guest room And so what this means what actually happened is in the first century in a Jewish home in Bethlehem it would be one big room divided into two places One places for the animals to come at night and they would keep the animals indoors and there was a major there with some hay for them to eat built into the floor And a few steps up and then a living area which is where they would cook and sleep and so forth And sometimes the animals would come upstairs there's a couple of stairs there into the living area and so they had a major there as well Now some of the wealthier two families would have a second room A guest room called the Catalina And that's what the Bible is referring to And so what happened was Mary Joseph come into town and there was no room for them in the guest room of the house But there was room apparently in the family room and that's where she gave birth not in a cave not in a stable But there were animals around because they were allowed into the home at night And so that part would be accurate So I think people get the misconception that says all in keeper that somehow shun Mary and Joseph from

Lee Strobe Lee Dan Merry Lee Yeah LEE Marianne Joseph Luke Refers Bethlehem King James Lima Mary Joseph Shun Mary Joseph
"marianne" Discussed on The Coachable Podcast

The Coachable Podcast

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"marianne" Discussed on The Coachable Podcast

"Jor. We will learn who pain you're gonna take care of your environment and stop the madness of the fossil fuel industry. Then we're going to be able to mitigate this you're going to not learn the lesson expect more hurricanes expect more floods expect more tornadoes. Expect more of the insanity you know. When you and i were children we learned about how evolution were and we learned that when a species is behaving in a way that is maladaptive for its survival. Something is going to happen. It will a mutation will occur and it will evolve in a new direction or it will go extinct. Species go extinct and this one could as well and we are on a trajectory right now of such collective self-destruction most americans aren't dealing with the fact. The united states alone has seven thousand nuclear bombs right. Okay now. I see the great religious. Jesus buddha moses thera i see them as the exempt the mutation. They are displaying for the for the human race for this species. There's another way we could do. We could let love rather than money run the show we could let humanitarian principles rather than economic principles guide off and individual. And if we do that we will move in a different direction. And that is what we must learn to do on nine eleven if if if you said to marianne ooh of all the people you've known in your life named five people who are the kindest sweetest most wonderful most fabulous examples of humanity. And if you wanted people in the world to say oh that's what an american is. Tell me the five people one of them would have been my friend. Barry who died on one of the planes on nine eleven. She was great individual. Couldn't have been more spiritual more beautiful but we're all reaping collective karma right. Now i think we can all send us come. None of us can buffer ourselves. You know you talk about about health and children. You can drink green jews and you can be gluten free..

Jesus buddha moses thera united states marianne Barry
Tracking Growth Marketing in 2021

Equity

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Tracking Growth Marketing in 2021

"Gonna be talking about growth marketing day. All kinds of really important subjects obviously was fintech as focused jonathan. You're up here but you're muted. Because twitter likes to annoy people that way. John are you there i am. Hello danny how are you good. We're getting people through this tunnel one next. We're going to get marianne set up here in just a second but in the meantime i'm going to introduce our speaker today. So jonathan metric is the chief growth officer at portage ventures or advises a global portfolio with companies including wealth simple in canada albert in the us and clark in germany previously. He was the chief marketing officer of policy. Genius when the largest intertek marketplace's leading a division of forty plus growth marketers in scaling revenue. Kennex over three years jonathan. Welcome thank you thank you very much. It's great to be here and excited to be on this new pop pharmacist by twitter spaces. Hang out so. I'm excited to see kind of how this goes and great to chat with you to today but growth and fintech absolutely. Well i will say it's gone from alpha to beta at this point. It was pretty janke the first few times we did this. Maybe two three months ago. And i think the android app is now working at doesn't crash every five minutes. Good started when you think about growth and twenty twenty one i i to me growth has been the uber story of the entire year in every company is growing. The marketing channels are getting congested. Cat costs are going up on almost every pay channel. It's more competitive than ever on organic. What are you thinking about these days when it comes to growth in two thousand twenty one. Yeah i mean. I think you you hit the nail on the head there right and i think you know if we dial it back a little bit to the beginning of cova. I think there was a bit of a pause on you. Know is the sky falling. Are we going to be growing all right. And i think you know a couple of months after that in twenty twenty we saw immediate rebound with folks just kind of shifting attention to online direct ways of buying products that weren't necessarily in person direct to consumer. And you know. I think growth really road that way right and when i think of gross you know i think it's more around folks who are looking at driving revenue for their business and that can involve marketing can involve product and Components performance marketing.

Hello Danny Jonathan Metric Portage Ventures Kennex Jonathan Janke Twitter Marianne Clark Germany John Canada United States
"marianne" Discussed on The Poetry Magazine Podcast

The Poetry Magazine Podcast

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"marianne" Discussed on The Poetry Magazine Podcast

"I've <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Advertisement> written a <Speech_Female> lot of poems about <Speech_Female> racism that <Speech_Female> i've experienced in childhood. <Speech_Female> But i think <Speech_Female> now <Speech_Female> that. I think i worry <Speech_Female> that sometimes if i <Speech_Female> only write about those <Speech_Female> poems <Speech_Female> and those expenses <Speech_Female> that happened in childhood <Speech_Female> that white audiences <Speech_Female> might think that <Speech_Female> it was in the past <Speech_Female> and they don't feel implicated <Speech_Female> as much <Speech_Female> so <Speech_Female> just thinking about <Speech_Female> situating <Speech_Female> in contextualising <Speech_Female> racism <Speech_Female> in everyday <Speech_Female> situations. That <Speech_Female> happen with <Speech_Female> even friends. <Speech_Female> I love <Speech_Female> my husband is white <Speech_Female> so <SpeakerChange> thinking about <Silence> our relationship to <Speech_Female> yeah. I <Speech_Female> think that <Speech_Female> One strategy that maybe <Speech_Female> both of us use <Speech_Female> lisa. <Speech_Female> I think there's <Speech_Female> a talking in both <Speech_Female> of our aesthetics <Speech_Female> and also. <Speech_Female> I try not to <Speech_Female> shy away from narrative <Speech_Female> and i think <Speech_Female> that sometimes <Speech_Female> it's sort of taboo <Speech_Female> to have <Speech_Female> too much narrative <Speech_Female> in in your poems <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> I really <Speech_Female> like narrative poems. <Speech_Female> And i think that <Speech_Female> that can add to the <Speech_Female> emotional impact <Speech_Female> in the clarity of <Speech_Female> the poem <Speech_Female> than so having a narrative <Speech_Male> arc to <SpeakerChange> home. <Speech_Female> I think can be helpful. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Yup i i want <Speech_Female> to make space for <Speech_Female> if you marianna. <Speech_Female> Lisa had <Speech_Female> anymore <SpeakerChange> questions <Speech_Female> for each other. <Speech_Female> So lisa <Speech_Female> your armpit poem <Speech_Female> you mention <Speech_Female> the future daughter <Speech_Female> who you hope <Speech_Female> will not <Speech_Female> think about white women are armpit <Speech_Female> hair as much as you. <Speech_Female> You're thinking about <Speech_Female> it and so i'm wondering. <Speech_Female> How <SpeakerChange> much are you <Speech_Female> thinking about. <Speech_Female> Parenthood as well. <Speech_Female> Yeah <Speech_Female> in your poems <Speech_Female> or in general <Speech_Female> or general. <SpeakerChange> Yeah <Speech_Female> yeah i think. Parenthood <Speech_Female> is such an <Speech_Female> interesting <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> topic to <Speech_Female> think about the future <Speech_Female> in terms of a way. <Speech_Female> That is <Speech_Female> not just <Speech_Female> yourself kind of like <Speech_Female> you were saying marianne and <Speech_Female> i'm really excited to read <Speech_Female> your new work to <Speech_Female> In which. <Speech_Female> You're engaging that. <Speech_Female> I don't <Speech_Female> know i think parenthood <Speech_Female> is sometimes can <Speech_Female> be a shorthand <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> especially for <Speech_Female> somebody who doesn't have kids <Speech_Female> can be a shorthand <Speech_Female> for <Speech_Female> thinking about <Speech_Female> dreaming. About <Silence> what could be <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> i think. Marian i <Speech_Female> have <Speech_Female> similar wanderings <Speech_Female> that you have <Speech_Female> in your palm <Speech_Female> of your therapist <Speech_Female> being <Speech_Female> with a white person <Speech_Female> and thinking about <Speech_Female> parenting <Speech_Female> an interracial <Speech_Female> child. I think is something <Speech_Female> that. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> I think that <Speech_Female> i'll have to kind of <Speech_Music_Female> work through myself. <Speech_Female> A lot <Speech_Female> and yeah. <SpeakerChange> We'll see. <Speech_Female> i'm not sure. Therapist <Speech_Music_Female> asked if i grew up <Music> in biddle city. <Speech_Music_Female> There are lots <Speech_Music_Female> of little cities <Speech_Music_Female> everywhere. She tells <Speech_Female> me <Speech_Female> i didn't know she <Speech_Music_Female> knew about biddle city. <Speech_Music_Female> I thought <Speech_Music_Female> it was a <SpeakerChange> place. I <Speech_Music_Female> made up. <Speech_Music_Female> I realized <Speech_Music_Female> what <SpeakerChange> was wrong <Speech_Music_Female> along. <Speech_Female> I say <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> i'm not an <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> interracial person. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> But i'm afraid <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> that i'm white. <Speech_Music_Female> I'm afraid <Speech_Music_Female> that i made myself <Speech_Music_Female> white that <Speech_Music_Female> chosen whiteness. <Speech_Music_Female> Along time ago. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> I see myself <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> crying on <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> a square on my <Speech_Music_Female> computer screen <Speech_Music_Female> like <Speech_Music_Female> this. My face <Speech_Music_Female> looks undeniably <Speech_Music_Female> asian. <Speech_Female> I try to relax <Speech_Music_Female> so that. it's no longer <Speech_Music_Female> crumpled in this <Speech_Music_Female> way but it <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> doesn't move. <Speech_Music_Female> It's frozen like <Speech_Music_Female> this in its <Music> rectangular box. <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> I have more <Speech_Female> questions than answers. <Speech_Music_Female> Which i think is <Speech_Female> a good place to be <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> after talking <SpeakerChange> about poems <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and poetry. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Thank <Speech_Female> you so much <Speech_Female> do in maryalice <Speech_Female> was really <SpeakerChange> fun to <Speech_Female> deal with. The you llosa <Speech_Female> great to do this with <Speech_Female> you too. And i love listening <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> to answers lease and <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> thanks for all the good questions <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> sues <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Advertisement> grade <Silence> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female>

biddle city lisa marianne Lisa Marian
Movie Musical 'Annette' Is a Straightforward Story yet a Directorial Fever Dream

All Things Considered

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Movie Musical 'Annette' Is a Straightforward Story yet a Directorial Fever Dream

"Opera. Annette got this year's Cannes Film Festival off to a boisterous start. The crowd gave a full five minute ovation for stars Adam Driver and Marianne Cockatiel, also for the band Sparks, which composed the music. Our critic Bob Mondello, says that the festival audience going crazy kind of make sense because the film itself is kind of deranged. Before there's anything to look at on screen and there will be astonishing things to look at. We hear the voice of director Leos Carax telling us that he intends what we are about to see to be literally breath taking. Breathing will not be tolerated during the shell. So please take a deep last breath right now. Thank you, And then he gathers his cast. So may we start and they sing their way out of the recording studio. So may we start and into the streets of Los Angeles to start a story of odd couple, Henry and Anne entertainers of radically different temperaments. Henry calls himself the shape of God and stops the comedy club stage. I'm here to make you laugh tonight. A green hooded bathrobe, scowling and muttering at his audience. Yes, laugh laugh. Wow, I'm not sure I can do it tonight. I'm not sure I should. Even trying Making people laugh is, uh, disgusting. He means that alienating paying customers is his stick and has played almost psychotically by Adam Driver. Henry is good enough it insulting patrons. It's amazing. He still has any. But on this night, his rant includes the confession that he's gotten engaged to a far classier celebrity who's played by Marianne Courtyard. No, this ain't a joke so far. Yes, and different throw stuff. What's wrong, Lady and in me, you disagree. Why is she too Perfect. Yes, I and I some loads some insect. Okay, I'll accept that

Adam Driver Marianne Cockatiel Bob Mondello Leos Carax Cannes Film Festival Annette Henry Anne Los Angeles Marianne Courtyard
The Disappearance of Kim Ghelkins and Her Ties to Pee Wee Gaskins

Pee Wee Gaskins Was Not My Friend

02:36 min | 1 year ago

The Disappearance of Kim Ghelkins and Her Ties to Pee Wee Gaskins

"It didn't take long to zero in on gaskins as a suspect. Investigators were aggressive pounding the pavement looking for leads. That's when they met the mother of dennis. Bellamy diane bellamy and johnny nights. She reported her three children or also missing Mrs night brought the story to ahead. Marianne griffin began it permission. I gave information. That people in the neighborhood are all missing. They would also learn jesse. Judy and johnny sellers were missing and the common denominator in these missing persons. Was pee wee gaskins when they arrived at his home peewee. Wasn't there but the detectives did me sandy. The donna gaskins. It was the ex wife. Sandy who gave the detectives the lead they were looking for. Sandy snell gaskins told the police that peewee and cam often in prospect. Knowing kim was last seen with pee wee gaskins police quickly obtained a search warrant for pee-wee's trailer ninety miles away in prospect. It was there. They found clothing. That belonged to kim calkins. They also found a stolen car on his lot and he was arrested that same day for auto theft and contributing to the delinquency of a minor took her out across county allows. It was a minor charge as far as compared to murder was certainly series and have to put him back in jail still. There was no sign of kim calkins who had been missing for nearly sixty days. Police detectives tracked down walter. Neely pee-wee's close friend and applied pressure. Walter buckled but. He had no idea where kim was. He didn't know we had taken her to stay with his daughter. Shirley and gaskins and her husband howard evans. Police knew she wasn't there anymore. Shirley ann thought camp had gone to indiana where she had some family. So police were in a bind. Walter had taken them to pee wee's burial grounds and they were knee deep in digging up bodies but still no word on kim calkins dead or live.

Pee Wee Gaskins Bellamy Diane Bellamy Johnny Nights Marianne Griffin Kim Calkins Gaskins Donna Gaskins Sandy Snell Gaskins Dennis MRS Judy Jesse Johnny KIM Neely Pee Sandy Howard Evans Shirley Ann Walter
Education and Incubation of Nurse-led Innovation

Outcomes Rocket

02:37 min | 1 year ago

Education and Incubation of Nurse-led Innovation

"So talk to us about your organization. How are you guys adding value to the healthcare ecosystem. And what you do. Today you are so at ten nursing. We really have been systematically they knew about how to integrate innovation into the curriculum and beyond for our nursing students faculty and staff and so it starts out obviously with education and we've started creating courses around innovation. Health foundation's of design thinking. That is our one course as well as how we integrate these types of wor ses and information into other classes and the curriculum throughout penn nursing so though we teach one class i say it all the time one class is not make an innovation program or infrastructure and so looking at from undergrad. All the way through to the doctoral level how we can infuse this knowledge. These skill sets for our students and then on a extra curricular side how we can also have. Our students engage in some of these programs. That also teach you not just from classroom perspective but from a hands on active learning perspective about innovation and design thinking in how it's used in health and healthcare so whether that's through our penn nursing innovation accelerator program weren't urging students to join events like the nurse. Hack for house. All these things are being integrated into the infrastructure of what we're doing at penn nursing to host educate our students with knowledge but also provide them with the skills tools and resources to take that knowledge and move it forward again in whatever place they practice. That's fantastic and you know. It is critical marianne. And it's so great to hear you say this that this type of curriculum be embedded that we integrate innovation that we integrate technology into the curriculum. Because it has been lacking for a long time. So i love that. You guys are embedding it into it. Yeah we really are trying to think about it in that way and we really do want in all the courses that were teaching our students to just think differently and that's really what design thinking innovation human center design is about. it's a different mindset in house and healthcare these days. there's no denying we have a plethora of wicked problems that need to be solved and we need to start thinking differently about how we're solving them and we can only do that. If we start to teach our students how to think more creatively in different ways including what we're teaching around innovation and design thinking. It's not that we want to exclude any other ways of learning and solving problems. This is just one more tool in the toolkit

Health Foundation Penn Nursing Marianne
Brooklyn DA Vacates 90 Convictions Tied to Cop Facing Perjury Charges

NBC Nightly News

01:28 min | 1 year ago

Brooklyn DA Vacates 90 Convictions Tied to Cop Facing Perjury Charges

"Here in new york district attorney has asked the court to dismiss nearly one hundred drug convictions after an nypd detective was accused of lying there. Stephanie dusk tonight in brooklyn dozens of drug convictions tossed out in more likely to calm all ninety of the cases involving one narcotics detective. Joseph franco can no longer stand by detective. Franco's were have lost confidence in his reliability franko pleaded not guilty in two thousand nineteen to more than a dozen charges including perjury for his work on for drug cases. One in april. Two thousand eighteen franco said he witnessed a deal. Go down in this manhattan building. But according to the indictment security video showed no drug sale in the lobby and other video showed franco was never close enough to observe what happened. Franko was still awaiting trial. His attorneys throwing out the cases has created a toxic atmosphere. That is prejudicial to mr franco's constitutional right to the presumption of innocence marianne casey and represents more than a dozen people whose convictions were vacated. People have carried these convictions on their record for many years and they've prevented them from securing employment from maintaining housing. These are lasting effects. Franco's criminal charges are based on the detective. Work he did in manhattan the. Da in brooklyn has not been able to prove similar misconduct but he says he has lost confidence. In the cases were franco was an essential

Stephanie Dusk Joseph Franco Franco Nypd Franko Brooklyn Mr Franco Marianne Casey New York Manhattan
Suez Canal ship partially refloated

Sports X Radio

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

Suez Canal ship partially refloated

"The shipping snarl at the Suez Canal gets untangled that skyscraper size ship that had been blocking the Suez Canal has been partially free by salvage crews. That's according to Bloomberg News and the Wall Street Journal. It's unclear at this point when the canal reopened for trade, but this is definitely huge relief as the narrow water route accounts for roughly 12% of global trade. That's folks is Marianne

Suez Canal Bloomberg News The Wall Street Journal Marianne
New York Gov. Cuomo Investigation: Eighth Accuser Reportedly Comes Forward, Current Aide Alyssa McGrath

Closer Look

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

New York Gov. Cuomo Investigation: Eighth Accuser Reportedly Comes Forward, Current Aide Alyssa McGrath

"Has come forward with sexual misconduct allegations involving New York Governor Andrew Cuomo as NPR's Sally her ships report. She's at least the eighth woman to allege Cuomo acted inappropriately and the first current employees to share her name publicly, according to a report in The New York Times, 33 year old Elissa McGrath says while working for the governor over the past three years. She was repeatedly subjected to inappropriate behavior. The time says Cuomo told McGrath she was beautiful and asked about her pending divorce. At one point, she told the Times when called into Cuomo's office to take dictation. Quote he was blatantly looking down my shirt. The governor's office did not immediately respond to our request for comment, but he's repeatedly said he's never consciously made anyone uncomfortable. My grass lawyer, Marianne Wong, confirmed the story with NPR via email, she wrote. The governor's deflections are not credible. This was not just friendly banter. Sally,

Cuomo Governor Andrew Cuomo Elissa Mcgrath NPR Sally The New York Times Mcgrath New York The Times Marianne Wong
New York Times: Current aide accuses Cuomo of sex harassment

Conversations from the World Café

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

New York Times: Current aide accuses Cuomo of sex harassment

"Another woman has come forward with sexual misconduct allegations involving New York Governor Andrew Cuomo as NPR's suddenly her ship's reports. She's at least the eighth woman to allege that Cuomo acted inappropriately, according to a report in The New York Times, 33 year old Elissa McGrath says while working for the governor over the past three years, she was repeatedly subjected to inappropriate behavior. Time, says Cuomo told McGrath. She was beautiful and asked about her pending divorce. At one point, she told the Times when called into Cuomo's office to take dictation, quote. He was blatantly looking down my shirt. Governor's office did not immediately respond to our request for comment, But he's repeatedly said he's never consciously made anyone uncomfortable. My grass lawyer, Marianne Wong, confirmed the story with NPR via email, she wrote. The governor's deflections are not credible. This was not just friendly

Cuomo Governor Andrew Cuomo Elissa Mcgrath NPR The New York Times Mcgrath New York The Times Marianne Wong
Another ex-aide calls New York Gov. Cuomo's office conduct inappropriate

Safe Money Radio

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Another ex-aide calls New York Gov. Cuomo's office conduct inappropriate

"Or accusations against New York Governor Andrew Cuomo of inappropriate behavior work, according to The Wall Street Journal on a list claims Cuomo asked her if she had a boyfriend, called her sweetheart and kissed her hand listens the third former female aide to accuse the governor of misconduct. Two male aides telling The Washington Post. The governor routinely berated them with quote explicit language. Fox is Marianne Rafferty. In a

Governor Andrew Cuomo Cuomo The Wall Street Journal New York The Washington Post Marianne Rafferty FOX
US forces: Rockets hit airbase in Iraq hosting US troops

Red Eye Radio

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

US forces: Rockets hit airbase in Iraq hosting US troops

"Rocket attack on the base housing U. S and coalition military forces in Iraq. Multiple rockets have targeted Iraq's al Asad air base, which hosts US coalition and Iraqi forces. According to local media smoke could be seen rising from the base and Anbar province. A spokesman for the U. S. Joint Operations Command confirms 10 rockets and they're described as grad rockets fell in the perimeter of the air base, but there are no known casualties at this time. Things is the same air base that was attacked by Iran last year in retaliation for the U. S drone strike that killed Major General Custom Soul Imani X is Marianne Rafferty. So far, it is not known if Iran is behind this latest attack

Iraq Al Asad U. S. Joint Operations Command U. Anbar United States Iran Marianne Rafferty
Trump pardons dozens in final hours, including ex-aide Steve Bannon

Eric Harley and Gary McNamara

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Trump pardons dozens in final hours, including ex-aide Steve Bannon

"His last day in office, President Trump issued dozens of pardons and clemencies. Not surprisingly, the list includes Steve Bannon, Trump's former chief strategist. Bannon faces a federal case accusing him of defrauding donors of more than a million dollars is part of a fundraising campaign. Reportedly aimed at supporting Trump's border wall. President Trump also granting clemency to former Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick, a Democrat. He resigned back in 2000 and eight after being convicted of perjury and obstruction of justice. He's currently facing a 28 year prison sentence. Also receiving clemency. Rappers Lil Wayne and Kodak Black who were prosecuted on federal weapons offenses, boxes, Marianne Rafferty. One noted

President Trump Steve Bannon Donald Trump Bannon Kwame Kilpatrick Detroit Kodak Black Lil Wayne Marianne Rafferty
YouTube deletes Trump video and suspends new uploads

Mornings on the Mall with Brian Wilson

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

YouTube deletes Trump video and suspends new uploads

"You can watch the reruns. But there will be no new material on President Trump's YouTube channel for at least the next week alone company temporarily blocking President Trump's official channel from uploading anything new quote After review and in light of concerns about the ongoing potential for violence, we removed new content uploaded to Donald J. Trump's panel for violating our policies. In case you didn't know YouTube has a three strikes policy. The first strike is a one week free He's on the ability to upload anything new. Those strikes expire after 90 days, the second strike and you lose the ability to upload for two weeks. The third strike your channel is terminated. Fox News Marianne

President Trump Donald J. Trump Youtube Fox News Marianne
Goodbye to Alcohol - Series 3 - Episode 10 - Mary Anne Shearer - the Natural Way - burst 01

Goodbye to Alcohol

27:17 min | 1 year ago

Goodbye to Alcohol - Series 3 - Episode 10 - Mary Anne Shearer - the Natural Way - burst 01

"It was his guys talking roland hydra one year and end the sky was the and he came up to me after he said like. I'm here to help me recover from alcoholism. I don't want to rehab. I've just come to detox. My buddy what. Can i do to stop caving. Alcohol acid right. This is what you gotta do. Every morning you get up and you have as much fruit and a nice handful of narrow nuts or seeds with just eat as much food as you can stuff. Your face doesn't have to be early in the morning but it must be a first meal of the day and eat as much as it. If it's a box of mangoes and eat the box of mangoes op done that. Eaten a box magazine taya watermelon. And you might do that for three months and eventually what happens. Is you end up eating one mango in. It's really sweet sausage. I into stuff your face. Full of lucas. In every natural glucose fresh fruits nuts every time. You crave alcohol. Just reach out for some dates or some raisins or even like a hundred percent pure grape juice or you know have sparkling grape juice. It satisfies your cells needs for glucose that craving will stop welcome to goodbye to alcohol about calls from wealth without wine with you. Want to say goodbye to alcohol. Revie said goodbye. Twelve called over the on just so this is the podcast few. We've got recovery stories to in spy experts to inform you plenty of advice on how to drink and change your life. Hello hello and welcome to the good. By twelve coal podcast. My name is john goran. I'm the founder of wealth without wine. And i'm your host for this podcast. My hero wealth without wine we help people to change their relationship with alcohol over the past five years. We've helped hundreds of people to do just that and we created world without wind because we believe it's really really halt to change your drinking alone so wealthed without wine wit all about community each week we're going to feature a community voice just to give you a flavor of the also. Try his somebody from one of Subgroups hello everyone. So i have a little friday when which happened last night Myself my family celebrated thanksgiving with our american bamiyan states Remotely and it was the first time in twenty-six days at i would becoming face to face with an actual bottle of wine so i was a bit concerned and i knew that i had to have some safety precautions. Set in place for myself. So i had my phone Close by me. So i could contact group if i needed to My also got some alcohol free wine that was recommended by this group and And the support of my family so my mom and i enjoyed some lovely alcohol free wine. Which actually wasn't as bad as i thought it would be. We served at super chilled and it was actually super delicious and refreshing. We skype with a family overseas headed delicious meal and i didn't have a drop of alcohol And then at the end of the evening we weren't bid. I finished off my class of savvy. Rich in the candlelight listening to some chile music Went to bid and the biggest one of all was waking up this remembering exactly what happened last night and without a headache I'm super proud of myself. Never ever in a million years thought that this was possible. But it did it and today is day. Twenty-seven machine all a fabulous wonderful weekend wherever you are in the world if huge cut to join our woman welcoming community and get a bit of support. Just go to weld without wind dot com and click on the membership top. So let's get my guest today into being a lady who's pretty well known here in south africa. Her name is maryanne sheera now. Maryanne is a woman before had time. She wrote a book called the natural way more than twenty years ago. An only now is the way of life. She advocates going mainstream on apart from being an author. Marianne is a motivational speaker. And she runs a very successful pekan restaurant as well as running natural health programs. I'll begin by asking maryanne satele to bit about herself. I had serious health problems which included being bipolar had kids at had ear infections tonsillitis runny noses that was high blood pressure so we had these kind of. I call him normal health problems because it wasn't like the big three cancer heart disease diabetes. It was just all like niggly stuff that was affecting our relationships and was affecting the way we functioned from day to day. And i have always been interested in the human body i prob- i might have become a doctor. But i'm i'm glad i didn't because it made me look for answers and other places so i was fascinated with the human body studied physiology anatomy and chemistry in the sciences and i was fascinated with the how the human body worked. So we're not. We started having these problems and we were being treated traditional medical way with anti anti-inflammatories and antihistamines for a head allergic dermatitis. On my hands and the kids with antibiotics just didn't make any sense because nobody actually got well. all it doesn't seem to do is suppress symptoms. And then they'd come back two weeks later. I saw the athol up. Gotta find answers. This was long. Before the era of google that really dates meet And just go and do a search on google. And the closest i've got to google was on several occasions sneaking into the fits medical library in johannesburg and he are trying to find says there and looking at books in the archives and just like nobody really had answers to my questions had to find the myself now. I really believed because i could see the. You'll buddy actually repays itself if you cut your finger to paint it stop. You don't need to go and you know cost a spillover it or go to the doctor. My fingers cut itself. Please can drug. I mean unless you chopped to finger off you'd want to beg on but just a cut finger. Paper cut irritate you. It hurts but you it just eventually repays itself and and if you study the human body like a did you find out that the liver you can actually cut off your liver out. Remove it entirely donated to somebody else. Give the small lobe to somebody else in the big global grow and then you've donated your smaller that logo groesbeck like this is the most amazing thing and yet when it comes to lever cancer you told is no cure for it. You're going to die while you would because you're going to be given all these drugs and you live a second will just get sick and pick up than you will die so i was looking for ways to correct the looking for the causes and then ask trying to fix the causes. I did find that. Nutrition made a huge difference. When i changed my diet. Took after find sugar and my by pella symptoms when my crazy periods of manic unbelievable highs. We are could take on the world. And i was going to change the world and i'm actually by nature very idealistic person and my mission in life is i want to change the world. One person at a time. I want to get them healthy enough. Got the goal to reach. A million people wrote a book called the natural way it came out in nineteen. Ninety-one was a runaway bestseller according to the publishers and it sold as i say of three hundred thousand copies it's been published in the united states. The funny thing is it seems to be taking of now first published in the states in two thousand five fifteen years not getting traction. So it's like if it does take off and i happened to reach the new york times. Basically nobody can ever say was an overnight success at this pathetic years. So you're a woman before your time. Someone emission to really help people if i can get rid of my bipolar symptoms and be completely sane And and thinks straight and have a brain in and and bow bowels and bladder that works properly all the time and be living in that sweet spot of health than anybody can do it. Because i had terrible problems. Janet listening to all calls from weld without wine. Marianne take me about you just mentioned alcoholic parents. It that intrigued me wondering if that was one of the reasons why you want it to research to health unle- to healthier lifestyle was that of a trigger. I think it. I think it was. I think you know even mentioned to some one time that i want to try to get drunk when us fourteen and jank moms cara pheno one and didn't like the way i felt i felt out of control and i think that sense of not being in control of my immediate environment and i wouldn't say i'm a control freak but i needed to be common working properly and audley at the sense of order i think that comes from growing up in the chaos of alcoholic appearance at home and my mom was a party animal. She was functional alcoholics. She could party all night and go to work the next day in absolutely fine my father however party will not and he wouldn't work for six months and that was you know he'd worked for six months and then not work for six months to a year or two years so we grew up with that sort of chaotic and then my parents got divorced because my mother said she had four kids anita fifth one. My father married. Somebody was crazy as he was. You know do things like pour petrol over my stepmother and threatened sitter a lot this crazy stuff that chaos does makes you want to live an ordinary that the thing. That really got to me when i was a kid. My mom had this medical encyclopedia. And i would pour over at the age of four hundred. All these gory. Pictures of people as innocent large thyroid landed was like the size of pumpkin and the knicks and these open ruins and at sit there and cringes kind of not. Wanna look at them. But it's fasten. The human body fascinated me from a very early age. My mom was kind of forward thinking as much as she was a party animal. She told us we couldn't chew gum or drink. Physical because our brains would fry and and we went lottery comic books either. So i had the sense of trying to do the right thing I think it also grows up with you know you grow up with a parent. That's a bit narcissistic. i think. Alcoholism in a sense is a narcissistic habit. Because you just carrying about a million myself. And i'm trying to numb my pain. You know not thinking about the responsibilities of life you know growing up with it. I had the saints. That i wanted to please my mom and do the right thing so i was considered the goody. Two shoes in the family just always trying to do the right thing in an nfl had to take it back to pregnancy was a need to just have off in my life Feel like yeah. Things went as chaotic. As they've seen. We moved a lot as kids. You know doing a geographic alcoholic. Parents do that things. Don't work you just move somewhere else. Yeah i've i've come across two different reactions when people have Parents they are do what she did. And react against the kale. Some won't control an order in their life all they they tend to say well. You know sin family. I'm bound to be that as well and then kinda give up unsolved drinking as well so Is that been your experience as well. Do you think people tend to go. A different one of two was party. Animal ended in two brothers. That partied hard. I mean they crashed a few calls when they were aided. And that god they've grown up and grown out of it and They've so but very working my two brothers especially very sober and very hard working And and i just think. I think what you you learn the learned behavior sydney. I look at myself is it. I may not have been addicted to alcohol. But as very addicted to sugar so ahead addictive side to me that anita to the sugar made me feel good in that space. So i suppose in a sense. I was doing much what people do with alcohol when us feeling unhappy or was feeling sad or on feeling like a done something. Well i would reward myself or console myself with suga whether it was fragile candy or cake. So is scream. It didn't really matter how much as i said. Even propane sugar staying out of the sugar bowl. As i got older. I became health conscious. South for made fudgy using brown sugar. That was really good. But you're that that that needs that sense of of you don't you you know parents at properly as if you growing up in an alcoholic home so you learn. The navy is that that it's a k. To satisfy yourself for full let need with a something in a with some people it could be gambling. All pornography will with made was shook end and food as a compulsive overeater. And the only reason we're glad clinically obese of always been physically active and and if i was not eating properly and exercising. I wouldn't ever sleep. I would. And i think that looking at having dealt with so many people in our family and with people have met of the years that alcohol sometimes puts people to sleep just eventually knocks you out so eventually do sleep when you're very active brain not taught how to look off draw brain. How what does alcohol do to bring. What is caffeine due to the brain so one minute drinking coffee over here and then that's like over stimulating central noticing. Make all your nerve cells five. Ab rapidly and then you'd having alcohol too. Because that's a natural depressant than you take the to calm you down and put you to sleep and then you wake up the next morning and you hung oversee start with the coffee again in the brain goes into overdrive. Then you would lots of sugar into the coffee. So you just getting on this treadmill and i think i think if we were taught the staff about how everybody body reacted to sit and things from when we were kids. Part of the reason assorted school is that we would understand how our body worked and figure stuff out pretty soon and make good choices. But that's me probably being idealistic as well if you were talking to someone. That was drinking super too much. They weren't really aware of what it was doing to that office. That brains. what what would you tell them. How would you summarize the home that it does to us. Gee i'm the first thing we know. Is it really damages the central nervous system in the brain. And we've now these quite a lot of research showing that parkinson's disease which michael j. fox got a really young age and he has a. He was a big drinker. Huge drinker everything. I've read on him. The alcohol played a big role in. He's laughing was younger. That can damage your central nervous system. and it doesn't do it alone. Units alcohol and sugar and bed diets and bed living but alcohol plays a huge role in that. It really affects a whole lot of things affect your central nervous system in your brain so you don't handle stress well and lacewell you handle stress. The more you're going to drink because it numbs you. Eugenic feel you can just numb yourself. you stop feeling in dozen courage assistant behavior because it becomes all about my feelings and my stress and my money to numb in. I mean we all know this. We would go without food in a hassle appearance drink and i've seen it in other families. The mother a single mumble drink because she's lonely or because she feels a failure whatever. Her reasons are and there'll be no food in the fridge. Another normal alcoholic friggin. Look on his nets moke in there in a piece of cheese. And that's about it if you lackey Most just don't have food in them. And i know as kids if they was cheese enough ridge. We would flatness in like half an hour because he's a no win. The food was going come which didn't help but encourage things like a compulsive over eating so a central nervous system and that's the one side the other side that in a fix and impacts really badly as the indicating system and that's a system that controls every single part of the buddy janice it controls your liver your lungs your kidneys digestive tract your muscle tone. You sleep your menstrual cycles. Your facility these nothing. It's not in your breathing. Your lung function your hair. Growth your nails. You'll skin it it. It affects every single part. The endocrine system produces hormones in different parts of the body in those hormones may chemical reactions take place which makes the body function properly. Have alcohol's interfering with it function because what it does is it actually pushes your blood sugar up really really high so you feel like good on alcohol woo and then your blood sugar over produces your body produces over produces insulin. 'cause you're about to go into a diabetic coma and in your body's designed to repeat itself over produces the insulin brings it all the way back down and as it starts to slide mcdonagh feeling really tired immaculate and sleep and pass out if it gets really bad And then you you. You might have something like coffee or tea or another drink to try and raise your blood sugar again so when you blood. Sugar fluctuates fitting brain and central nervous. System your endocrine system and your immune system and you can understand the not explaining this very well with the whole covid. Nineteen they send. People are drinking and having caught accidents but alcohol suppresses immune function. That's what it does. So the government instead of educating everybody in showing us adverts over and over which i think would help better than just locking everybody down and telling you you know these content touch alcohol reagan so ridiculous. You can't buy alcohol during the on the weekend so everybody's just by way more so every restaurant selling wine under the counter to the clients you know because they can't make money selling food during lockdown. It was bizarre to see the activities that going on at the end of the day understood. Exactly what it does. And how it suppresses immune function we must take these things a little bit more seriously than being wrecked on the knuckles suck educate people that teach them the stuff so i think other thing that it does and this is fascinating. Refined sugar does exactly the same thing is alcohol does just desert loose something called reactive hopper blah seamier. Which when the blood sugar shoots up to high we over produce insulin and brings it right down so down so far down your blood sugar that the part of the brain your frontal lobe that controls moral behavior planning and forethought will just shuts down completely. Okay and the part of the brain that takes over as part of the brain that controls aggression appetite and sexual function. And i think this is probably really important to help people understand these blackouts that they have so you can have a blackout but you not passed out you just living life. I mean. I know a girl that poured wax all over yourself. Hot wax in that state couldn't remember how she got burned from this x. She took all our clothes often. Did this is absurdity. Because the people that were they told her what she does. She could not believe she did something like that. I had a woman that came and spoke to me. Because i was when i speak often speak about the stuff because it played such a role in my life and how important it is to make. Sure you're getting the right kind of glucose about in a while. And she came up to me after she said. I'm embarrassed to raise my hand and tell you what i do but cannot speak to you privately. Acid short can understand when she told me the story. She said i'm going to tell you. I'm very very committed. Christian person go to church regularly. my husband's actually involved in the leadership of the church. We go to bible study on wednesday nights. We go to between one and three services and the sunday we we're involved in the charitable work and stuff but she says periodically. I wake up in another town or another suburb in strange man's bid. And i have no recollection of how i got the and i say to you consume and she said. Nah don't i said are you a sugar addict. And she said yes osama title sugar addict and it does the brain. What alcohol does we. You just black out completely. Obviously you've got to be extreme amounts of sugar to do this but alcohol does the same thing you drink. Extreme amounts you'd binge drink and the knicks thing you wake up and you in somebody else's bid and like how the hell did you get in the shame of all of this is worse than you start drinking again and this whole thing goes on so what happens is when the primitive brain takes over. You either going to get aggressive. You're going to just eat and eat and eat canoe appetites. Just nothing's gonna be enough or you. Could your sexual function could take over. And you become extremely promiscuous and that's clearly very dangerous because besides possibility of fathering all mothering a child you could end up with terrible sexual diseases. So it's it's a huge problem and people don't know this until somebody like me comes and tells him and nobody studies this. Because you take the average psychologist or psychiatrist. Dr they studying medicine and how to cheat you when you sick with medicine and surgery than looking. And what is the cause of all these problems and vivian often. It's a physiological or physical course an and utrition is something that's kind of just ignored and net. That study was done with reactive. Hoppy glycemic was done by women. Called baba read stood. She lived in the united states and operated in stable municipal area and she was in charge of the juvenile delinquent and criminal juvenile delinquent and the prisoners. The adult prisoners in the end the juvenile delinquents and she found that of them something like ninety three percent of the people that she'd work with suffered from this reactive hypoglycemia and in that state of blacked out. Where you can't remember what went on people will kill the family. They'll the children we ask you. Yeah then they will beat somebody into coma they'll be do the most. They'll they'll commit a crime. And they have no recollection of course when you committing crimes being something people like as easy to say you lost your mind and you can't remember but it's an actual condition where you had no recollection of went on. It's completely blacked out. You listening to reply to alcohol. The podcast from world without one if eat lights join our tribe. Please check out website. That wine don't cold so yeah. Apparently those many people in child but have done that have a blackout killed somebody. You cannot in jail recollection too. Many people in jail i mean. Can you imagine Horrendous but blackouts very common in all community. We talk about the loss of people have blackouts. I used to have the have them as well Boston is like all it was a walking talking blackout because I was with some friends for afternoon. And apparently i seem quite normal. You know i was walking around talking. We'd walk quite a long way together. I have no recollection. I mean we'd been drinking since frightful Drink but i. It just hit me over the edge. I lost an entire. And you know i used to have blackouts where the end of the evening was a bit fuzzy Quite remember how it may be. But this one was really serious Hated the idea thought woking talking blackout the fat my brain was so alcoholic couldn't even make memories nazi Absolutely terrifying and here's the thing that people don't understand is that you'll cells and your buddy a designed to consume glucose. Nothing works in your in your at salable. You got thirty seven trillion cells in your body. They desperately need glucose they needed to make. Atp a denison triphosphate which is what creates energy your monaco andrea desperately. Need that your every little organ nelio in the plasma critical in these tiny little things inside the cell that you can't even see with your naked eye it needs glucose your brain and central system can't work without glucose and if you're not getting enough you going to crave alcohol or sugar and barbara read stood say we knew feed children refined sugar growing up on any level. She said you're actually preparing them for alcoholism because they get into the cycle. The blood sugar going up and it's coming down and they feel that the sugar satisfies and then you you graduate from a kid to adolescence or young young person in your twenties wait sitting stuffing faced with ice cream and chocolate says locked kind of interdict so will have a drink and it does. What sugar to to you. And now you recognize that. Except that the alcohol gives you even a bit of feeling takes you higher disrupts you lower so if we understood that we need need proper glucose for body's natural glucose and and so often when i've done a talk i actually say to the audience and i remember reading this one year at a secrets convention at sun city outside johannesburg. The were probably five hundred people Woman and i said to them. Okay if you do any of you crave sugar and they've just everybody put the hand and i said when you craving sugar. What is it that you put into your mouth. What is it you put. And what is it that you actually craving an attempt to get the point across. Imagine yourself in the garden of eden and you craving something sweet. What would you eat. And there was a stately silence and this woman blonde voluptuous woman sitting in the front rows in this deep voice. Adam evan rumor osc that christian. I'm thinking this woman. It was really funny at the time. But it's just interesting because i've often christian in los angeles of austin in the republic of hot bay of austin zimbabwe of austin the uk. Austin all over the

Am I Drinking Too Much How Do I Stop Drinking Janet Gourand Worldwithoutwine Alcoholic Alcohol Free Alcohol Roland Hydra Revie John Goran Maryanne Sheera Maryanne Satele Cancer Heart Disease Diabetes Allergic Dermatitis Marianne Cara Pheno Google Anita Maryanne Tonsillitis Parkinson's Disease Knicks Lucas Johannesburg Skype Headache
"marianne" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

07:20 min | 2 years ago

"marianne" Discussed on WGN Radio

"The thirteenth is if we don't have enough to worry about any Marianne is on the line here Merion guess who guess who felt great this morning I woke up before the alarm you know this is the first time we're talking today so yeah I wake up first and I text you to see it here okay yeah but but as as the show has progressed I have felt worse why I think it's because I was into any grocery stores yesterday trying to fulfill your shopping list yes I'd never ask you to go to six places Bob effect stop at one place and that's it yeah I know but I thought there'd be some free food samples somewhere but nobody had it but I I I don't know whether it's just because I'm over thinking it and I was around too many people and I've dealt with too many medical experts and talked about this too much I'm not sure how I feel right now okay well I will tell you Bob you feel great I do yeah I know you never believe ninety six do you know I don't I mean well I rarely do because you don't get sick but but you get sick in your mind you know like you think oh I should be sick because I was around a lot of people's so well start feeling a little sick but then you're you forget about it you know it's going to be on my tombstone Marianne I told you I was sick all right now Merion has been researching a book that's going to be out later this year a savvy guide to life you can find out more about that at savvy dash planet dot com savvy with the dash in the middle of a planet that calm and one of the things you've done you've talked to people about and this is very timely now about germs in the house in the dirtiest places and some of these we know about but there are few surprises what what turned up on on your list well I started looking at this because now we're all staying home everybody is home and also it's like time for spring cleaning so where do germs who lived in your house well yeah like you said the places that we know about that would be you know we always read about is like the remote control and it's really you know super Jeremy and you should wipe the remote with a bleach or an alcohol wipe if you can find one at the store you still have not and then the other commonsense places your computer keyboard which by the way research has found that like nearly half of all computer keyboards have harmful bacteria including E. coli and staff grill don't eat over your computer keyboard and constantly clean it with alcohol or bleach wipes again also the mouse but again if you have those well he did not create one you know at home okay did you ever think about this the kitchen sink like so you know we put all the dirty dishes in there and then the food creates it's it's like a breeding ground for P. E. coli and salmonella and then a lot of people just rinse their sinks with water and they assume that it's clean but they're not so you need to sanitize your sink and you know use the solution of bleach and water once a day that often make sure make sure what does that make sure that the solution runs down the drain and also speak with the drink plug and the the sponges and brushes in the dishwasher every night see I would think that the same could be clean but I guess not no it isn't okay you want to hear gross one oh wait a minute let me you're only given a warning here if you're eating breakfast right now stop it going ahead okay your toothbrush but I'm gonna tell you why this is a gross part first of all if you use it twice a day and all these germs you know breed in this Maurice atmosphere because you know you always put it away damp but also it's in the bathroom and in the germs from the toilet when you flush the toilet it sends a spray of bacteria all over the bathroom and the virus contaminated water droplets go in the air and the land two hours later and sometimes they land on your toothbrush that's great don't keep your toothbrush near your toilet and also cover the toilet after you flush it and continue to yeah okay all right that's enough of two more quick places wanted your salt and pepper shaker what studies have been done that shows that that the salt and pepper shaker for some reason like half of all of them tested were they tested positive for cold viruses so when you're cleaning up and wiping down the kitchen wipe off the salt and pepper shaker to and see all that makes sense when you think about but we don't think about that we don't think about that and the bath tub you would think that the bathtub is really clean because that's where you take a shower and also biz but studies have found that it's one of the dirtiest places ever and and they find a lot of staph bacteria in the the tubs that are tested and it's even worse for the whirlpool tub because for the world pools they find bacterial growth in the pipe and in the bath tub the results have come back as well there's a lot of fecal matter in the yes I know so the only way to get you know really clean the pipe you know to to really clean up the local if the clean the pipe and as far as the the the tub goes I mean you must use bleach or bathroom cleaner after beating and then try it with a dry towel that's why I shower hello my father never did I'm glad he lived to hear about his bath being like this all right thank you I think merry and leave this was something that makes us feel better in usually is I feel better when I hear you speak Spanish can you say sent a letter like keep calm and carry on in Spanish it's a learning support followers nine is this idea this is V. that but updated by any gold medal Sam being in Delhi have dispersed did you slip in there some secret message to your fellow humans at all but thanks I feel better already see you later hi Bob eight forty six and here's your weekend weather update Steve we're gonna see sunshine today plenty of sunshine today high near forty six it'll feel more like the thirties though mostly cloudy tonight low down to thirty two some clouds tomorrow maybe even a few snow flakes south of the city high near thirty seven and then on Sunday mostly sunny with a high near forty one right now in Chicago thirty five degrees the PGA tour pulls the plug on the Players Championship and the next three tournaments leading up to next month's masters.

Marianne
"marianne" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"marianne" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Santa Claus comes down Santa Claus lane and all this rain there's one on the right now thing and all Marianne hangers talking nine here comes Santa Claus Santa Claus lane not a bag toys for boys and girls again here those Santa Claus comes here comes Santa Claus here comes Santa Claus right down Santa Claus lane he doesn't care for he loves you just the same Santa Claus knows so comes comes Santa Claus right down Santa Claus lane come around one time bring out that it's Christmas morning and he's com yeah thank.

Marianne
"marianne" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

The Erick Erickson Show

11:16 min | 3 years ago

"marianne" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

"Board your local Department of Transportation Your your local city your local county your state government is impacting you more of this very moment than Washington. DC I guarantee you. If you're stuck on the stage the person in front of you who's impacting you and the person for that person more than the Donald Trump is a donald trump has not negatively affected any of your lives an indirect way. They're certainly long-term. Economic Comic is used to deal with that Washington. X Tax cuts Washington certainly effects that a combined effort but in your day to day daily lives your local community effects you way more than Washington in DC and many of you are fixated in Washington and notch local community. Many of you are fixated not in the city in which you're an exile looking for its welfare but in Washington DC where you're not gonna find welfare because Washington wants to put you on welfare. What about the homeless guy many of you passed a homeless his personality you know the person's name? Do you know where that person goes when the weather's bad where that person eats or Do you know where the local homeless shelter is where the local food bank is avid helped. Do you have any inclination to help. Open your local community. I'm not trying to guilt you. I'm guilty of this as well. I'm not really practicing what I preach. I have a hard time because I worked too but I think all of us should good apply ourselves better to doing something for our local community instead of fixating on Washington. DC tonight after this is over. I got a group of people coming into drink my bourbon because they assault the welfare of the city which they were in exile. They gave money to children's healthcare of Atlanta during our telethon are on the they were looking to seek the welfare affair of their local community and those of their community and we'll be they'll be coming tonight to to eat barbecue with me and suburban with me. and I I gotTa tell tell you this is one of the problems with lonely isolated young men is they're not seeking the welfare of the city wish their exile. They're they're trying to build a community online because they have no community offline and when all reverse them you me when we build a community online we find people who look exactly like us in think exactly like us and so we don't actually have community we can our next door. Neighbor may be a Democrat the person we're friends with on facebook. I bet you is it unless they're they're direct kit or you know them some way. What actually happens as you go out and you find people who think exactly like you who share your values who share your your either? Faith values are mostly political values online and you lose the ability to relate to people who don't you rarely encounter those people if you're not out in your local community and because you're not your local community sharing and breaking making bread with someone who've used politics differently than you but cares about the exact same 'cause you have a harder time relating to those people and you fixate more on Washington. DC and that's what's happening with these young men who become radicalized online they have no offline community and Avalon was right on that. I don't think he should have done it on nine eleven but I think all of us myself included need to do better job of focusing on our local news and our local politics and our local people in need need than just talking about Washington. DC where your day to day life is not actually impacted as much as you may believe hi there it is Eric Erickson here the phone whole number if you would like to be a part of the program eight seven no that's the wrong number. That's for the other show. I've been waiting for this moment to come. Normally I'd do it on the other show. This number is four zero four eight seven zero seven five zero or one eight hundred. WSB Talk the other day nearly gave out my cell phone number yes you you know doing five hours. Radio Day can be hard. Sometimes I now it's not nearly as hard as Marianne Williamson trying to come to terms with reality. Marianne Williamson was on a hot mic talking about things. She didn't expect to be heard publicly. Have you heard this audio. It happened just a while ago say hey that Fox News is nicer to me than the lefties are what does it say that the Conservatives are nicer to me. It's such a bizarre now world. I'm such a lefty. I mean I'm a serious left there so I understand why people on the right call them godless them. I mean it's like I didn't think the left was as mean as the right they are. I'm just a yeah She didn't think the left was as mean as the right. Which tells you I mean she went into this thinking that the right was mean and she thinks everyone you know people are nasty these days you know I I am aware of a person who suggested that the reason my wife got lung cancer was it was the it was the Almighty creator tried to Cajole me into supporting deporting Donald Trump in two thousand sixteen? I wish I was making that up but she actually said this that it was it was to Cajole me me toward reconciling that Donald Trump was God's chosen one or some such nonsense just nastiness from people the number of people in the left left who have cheered on my wife's and my health problems over the last couple years that that it was a good riddance we should die. having people show up at my house. Also having people yell at my kids. There is a lot of nastiness in the world and I it's it strikes me that I have seen it from both sides and it is only now that Marion in Williamson outside of her bubble is seen it from from her own side would have found to be particularly as they embrace secularism as religion to be far worse than than a lot of what comes from your typical right-of-center political activists now speaking of of secularism says Roy. I gotta go on and do this. This is this is appropriate. It's just going to hurt your head in fact. Let me let me give you this admonition. If you're in the car driving please keep your hands on the steering wheel. If you're not in a car or a where you can use your hands off the steering wheel or something unique you need to press the left palm of your hand into your left temple and the right palm of your hand into your right table because otherwise your head is going to explode with what you are about to hear your head is going to explode. I don't even WANNA use east. You may have heard the sorry I I'm not even GonNa tell you what it is. Just understand your warning. If your head explodes you cannot sue me because I've warned you that your head is going to explode when you hear this what we wanted to do was to take the opportunity pizza raise the whole conversation with guests who contrary to the aquarium just to raise the exact point that there is a difference between gender and sex and in terms of the the way that we manage the colony at the aquarium we wouldn't manage them differently based on whether they are females while males what we wanted to do with this chick was give guests an opportunity but unity to meet that individual and learn about his personality without assigning it any sort of preconceived gender roles like we would if we were to so when you say that it is common for Jen to penguin chicks to to be genderless what what exactly you mean by that. Are you saying that there are no sex-specific or gender specific behaviors news gingy penguin a really sort of difficult subjects and navigate specifically you will get small differences in terms of behavior based based on whether they are male or female boy. Penguins are playing football and ghetto penguins are doing the knitting or something signed gender roles gender roles. Can you assign to a Penguin Ingrid exactly. I and I think that's that's the key thing you don't really see it. In the Animal Kingdom there is a little bit of conversation going on at the moment in terms of whether we we might be seeing gender roles in some higher primates which like we're often compared to the higher primates because we're so similar but with penguins there's a there's a difference between sex differences says and with generals penguins would have to have some sort of society but with the penguins were potentially putting pressure on little baby penguins and that they should be more masculine and feminine and things like that so what we wanted to do was give guests the opportunity to not be putting those assumptions on till chance. Ha I they don't know about y'all but when I go to the zoo I don't say oh look. It's the Boy Ping Lin or the girl you I would. I go what are the Georgia aquarium and the loping Windsor swimming around following you as you all pass out oh well. That's a stalker because it's a boy Pe- England or oh that little girl roping winds up said what the heck is this if you're not following along because you're totally confused at what you just heard the London it didn't zoo has decided to raise its newest penguins as genderless animals. Yes genderless animals. I who cares I mean wh wh- what we need to know. Is You know the Boy Ping Wins Not GonNa lay the egg now. There's something else you need to know about out this penguin chick and why it's really in the news what you need to understand about this genderless being one is that it's parents parents are gay no. I'm not making that up either. It's a gaping wound couple raising genderless penguin chick now. How can there taping which will there aren't actually there aren't gaping ones but the left is emotionally invested in the idea that homosexuality rears its head everywhere naturally in nature and so there are two Ping dudes who hang out all the time they they are they don't have relationships with the Female Ping winds there with each other and they don't actually do what male and females can do together they? They don't do any of that but they've decided at the zoo that this is a gay couple I mean it could be. They think everyday is Saturday in Saturday's for the boys from what I'm told on Instagram but they yeah it's it's these two dude. Penguins England's taking care of the now you should know that it is very common within Ping Win communities that the Male Ping wins do care for the each chicks it is the Female Ping wins who go off hunting yeah and so we're supposed post to say that these two male penguins doing what is very typical opinion from Antarctica to your local zoo that there's somehow.

Washington DC Donald Trump DC Marianne Williamson Ping Win Department of Transportation Washington facebook Ping Lin WSB Instagram assault Atlanta Fox News football Eric Erickson Georgia Avalon
"marianne" Discussed on Best Case Worst Case

Best Case Worst Case

14:32 min | 3 years ago

"marianne" Discussed on Best Case Worst Case

"I mean obviously many homicides especially of women. I think Z. When you're talking about married women it or any really married person. Then the I suspect is the spouse well and he was a suspect. He was on the scene when the police arrived. I believe that he had called the police his he had two sons one of them. Omar was on the scene he had been upstairs asleep with his girlfriend which I remember at the time thinking that was pretty liberal of his parents to let his girlfriend stay overnight but she was up there. They're younger son had gone off to soccer practice in the morning. I believe the best of my recollection. All of those people had been taken to police headquarters by the time I got to the scene and then when we went back it was pretty obvious use. That doctor always was a suspect. He claimed that his wife had been attacked. He had conflicting stories. He's told police she'd been attacked act. He said she fell. He said he had not touched her. Even though he's a physician and instinct would say that you would if you found your wife in a pool of blood as a position particularly you would see if you could help if she were dead. He said he hadn't touched her and yet he blood everywhere but the the particular kind eddie had was it was blood splatter on so you can you can you explain that k now listen very sophisticated listeners and so there are big true crime fans so they may know the answer this but for the new ones what is the difference between say blood splatter and what you might get if you kneeled in someone's blood to try hi to render aid or or revive them so typically blood splatter is caused by. Let's say in this instance. We ultimately determined that the victim had been struck in the head repeatedly so the first blow. There's you know there's no blood spattered. That comes comes back. What happens is that. The head is hit for example and then blood starts to to come out of a wound and then the weapon comes uh-huh again and if the weapon is in pulled back from repeatedly that is set action of pulling the weapon away from the from the object or the victim and then bringing it down again the spat or calms both from it can be sort of two different ways flying off the end of a weapon as that weapon is brought back or by that we tend to see on the walls or when the victim is struck again the blood will actually spurt up or spouse splatter up up spattered up from the wound onto the wall or an object or in this case the physical person of the husband and so he had specks of blood blood on his eyeglasses on his clothing his belt his wristwatch. It was pretty obvious that the story that he had told the police about her are falling or being attacked didn't make any sense because it was inconsistent with the physical evidence that they were saying well actually it did make sense but it made sense only in the sense that he must have been present for the attack for him to get blood splatter on him right so so he he gave information that was inconsistent with somebody else attacking her unless of course he just setback and watched it right but often we catch defendants giving these false exculpatory statements that are so inconsistent with the facts or with physical evidence that it's those lies that cat but we catch them in that helps establish their guild so he was arrested that day. The police recovered a all of the items of clothing that he had been wearing that were that were covered in blood ultimately they were tested in the blood was found to be his wife's The Sun was interviewed the son that was home all mar he said that he had been asleep with his girlfriend that he heard his mother scream aim for his scream his name and call for help and that he had run down the stairs and found her at the foot of the stairs in the basement and by the time he got down there she was obviously dead so that's what we knew at that point the son had no blood on him his clothes recovered. It was pretty clear. He was never considered a suspect aspect pretty clear that he had not been involved and the girlfriend also corroborated his version of what I told you about being awakened by the the victim screaming for help so you have an obvious suspect the husband you've got a woman who's clearly been murdered through some sort of head trauma and you've got got kind of an eyewitness there who's obviously not guilty. What what steps did you guys. Take X to try to either charge someone or figure out whether the husband could be charged while he was he was charged that day based on the physical evidence based on the inconsistent story that he told as most investigations do this one got better over time in during the investigation. We learned that the victim Marianne carry-on always had had been away most of the summer Dr Waste was born in Egypt he had dual citizenship in Egypt and the US and she had gone to Egypt for the summer had taken some Arabic lessons and some scuba lessons and fell in love and had an affair and doctor away said come over about a week before the murder of his wife and learned that she had been unfaithful and physically assaulted her so we had some corroboration there she had gone to the US embassy they took pictures of her injuries juries he was supposed to stay a couple of weeks but went on home and she meanwhile had consulted as as usually happens with matters matters such as this the victims computer was analysed. There were emails to a divorce lawyer. She was in the process of trying to get a divorce mum. The the lover in Egypt was interviewed. It was pretty clear that his motive was jealousy and anger over her infidelity she he had just returned home from Egypt the night before she was killed and then there were some other inconsistencies in the other things that developed in the investigation that that made it very clear to us that this was a planned attack on her. It wasn't something that happened in the heat of the moment and we were putting a case together for first degree premeditated murder and were those kinds of evidence evidentiary items. You're talking about those things like on his computer. Did he searched for how to kill your wife or did he go out and buy the hammer or whatever the murder weapon was. What would that look like while there were a couple of things that happened we his his staff in his office in D. C. was interviewed and he had actually left his home on the morning of the murder dressed in his clothing business clothing however he would be tired tired going to his clinical office in DC to meet with patients and he had called his office assistant on the phone and said he wasn't feeling feeling well and that he was going back home. He drove a a Red Jetta while the Red Jetta was nowhere to be found because what he did was park at somewhere out out of sight and then our theory was that he snuck back into the house so that he would not be seen by anybody and that he planned to kill his wife. Otherwise is what I just described as a make any sense there was no evidence that he wasn't feeling well and it didn't make sense that his Jetta would have been you know found around the corner her so we didn't really have any there weren't any tell tale browsing the Internet of sites that would indicate anything else. It's been it was that leaving the home and trying to establish an alibi and trying to be away from home that made us believe that that it was premeditated and then the case really really started to come together when Omar came forward to tell the truth about what he knew had happened. That was the son that was there in the house so he was actually he was actually not not asleep than upstairs. Is that what he was what he had omitted to say when the police I interviewed him was what actually had happened. After he came downstairs and found his mother town his father the office so there was an interior entrance from the basement through the the the stairs that connected the first floor in the basement and then there was an office that was adjacent to the place at the end the stairs where she was killed and there was an exterior terrier door that led out to the driveway and that door was open when Omar came down the stairs and so he ran out to sea Z. Ran Out to see who might have been there when you know his his attention was caught by the open door at a found his father standing in the driveway with a Bloody Rubber Mallet Annals Santos and Omar said we need to call an ambulance. We need to call the police and the father said wait right there. I'M GONNA go. We'll get rid of this hammer and throw it in the creek. He's gone not read Joetta but with another car and came back and and and then they call the police and not surprisingly at that time Omar was twenty or twenty one and imagine what a terrible position he was at he had reason into believe and did believe that his father had killed his mother. It took him a while to feel that he could come forward and reveal that makes them a difficult wait as I can only imagine that if if this case went to trial which I'm going to ask you about a minute but that you'd have to put Omar on the stand and that is a very difficult position to put a child in even though he's an adult adult now you're talking about. He's already lost his mother and now he would be an absolutely critical crucial witness to put his father in prison. Yes and it's even even worse than that. he actually in terms of he was in spite of the withholding of information that that he didn't come forward with. He eventually became when he decided to tell the truth was very cooperative witnessed. He's a very honorable young man and he felt that it just what had happened. It was wrong and he just did not feel that he could in good conscience led his father get away with having murdered his mother so he wasn't a hostile witness at the trial he was very very cooperative but he was in a terrible position because the rest of his family completely ostracized him his mother's family a his mother was German and her family was in Germany. None of them came over for the trial that we were in contact with them but all of the defendants family only had an older brother and some cousins and all of them completely ostracized Omar during the course of the proceedings they wouldn't talk to him and to make matters. It's worse the defense was that Omar get it. Oh Wow and so but but wait did they go to the creek and find that et millet now they they went but they weren't able to find it. It was at least I want to say eight to ten days. After the murder before Omar came forward and so they did look you know they weren't able to find it but the mallet that he described was as I mentioned they had a pool in the backyard and this mallet was used to they had sort of those old fashioned covers that you have steaks that you pound under the ground when you're ready to cover the pool at the end of the season and that mallet is what they used to drive the stakes to cover the pool for the season. It's absence was is the evidence I guess it's absence was the evidence we also were able to buy a one that was identical wasn't admitted into evidence it was used just uses uses demonstrative piece of evidence and the medical examiner testified that Marianne the injuries were consistent with having been caused by an implement like that so it was it was vivid. We just didn't have the actual murder weapon in. I just feel so sad for Omar. I I was in a similar position. I feel alike in almost every child sexual abuse trial that I had because the child would come forward and sometimes the mother would support the child often the mother would not and sat on the other side of the courtroom with the defendant's family leaving the child with just a victim witness advocate from my office. It was such a lonely thing especially of course heart wrenching for a child to go through but I can only imagine what that was is like for Omar to have to testify against his father with all of the relatives on his father's side. Yes very difficult and also to know that the defense is that you did it. His father didn't testify but at some point that the case was continued several times. It's the first time because he his original lawyers oasis lawyers withdrew they had a an ex partee discussion the court and he allowed them to withdraw but you know we theorize that it was probably because he was asking them to put forth. This defense that they knew was not true who knows knows. We'll never know exactly what happened but you know it was something that is his next defense. Attorney had no trouble not just suggesting that arguing to the jury and it was ridiculous. Just because of physical evidence didn't wasn't consistent with that but it was. It was really all they had now again. No Slam Dunk case. I don't ever say that but this was a pretty strong case by the time it went to trial it was two thousand and three continued for several reasons but this was also before the days of really good information information from from Cell Towers now we can really pinpoint where a person cell phone was at a particular point in time and we had actually tried to figure you're out where how far away from the house away..

Omar murder Egypt soccer Marianne eddie Cell Towers Attorney US Joetta D. C. Germany DC Dr Waste Annals Santos ten days