20 Burst results for "Mariana Trench"

"mariana trench" Discussed on 10 Bestest

10 Bestest

04:58 min | 5 months ago

"mariana trench" Discussed on 10 Bestest

"It was wild but totally how they did. It like wha- k. and the trees. yeah in fact. i think it's because they do it kind of old school in that way. They're not suck in the tree. Dry right it just like it's when it's a season and it has overflow of that sap or whatever they're getting from it the maple. Yeah and then it's and then when it's done when it's naturally the tree's done properly. Yeah okay trees. Good you know next year. We'll get an extra year type deal and that's how it can be more sustainable so it was really cool fascinating. And that's just one of the things five things that you just talked about that. I wanna know more so very very cool. Can't wait dig into that. My last cool sheet this one. Oh my gosh another one. That has stuck with me for so long. I can't believe i haven't talked about this. It's a video and actually it's ted talk so you can see it on youtube on ted's youtube channel or just sits separate video but this is a talk. It's only a three minute. Talk by derek six. Who's one of my favorite people in the world. Definitely he'll be future call. She can't believe. I haven't talked about him either but he talks about. It's a three minute video about leadership. And he goes this real grainy footage. It's not even a good video. But he and it's Outdoor music concert or we used to have those so great and he talks about this just this crazy lone nut. He's just wearing like kind of like short bicycle. Shorts almost and no shirt. And he's just like flail it along and he's kind of like if you saw you'll be like whoa not a good dancer. But he is a hundred percent. Doesn't care gone for all the way. And so derrick kind of narrates us and he's like okay. Here's you know here he is. But then there's this one person that that comes in dances with him and he's like you have to have that one follower that's the difference of being alone nut and starting a movement and then the the one follower brings his buddies like come on joining the party and then there's all of a sudden there's four people and then they're six people and then there's twenty people and then within three minutes. There's like a hundred people dancing with this guy and he narrates how it happens. How this movement started of this one low nut there was just flailing around like a wild person and and even the person taking the video at the end of the video and the songs over and everybody's just screaming their head off and they just had the best time of their life. The gal taken the videos like how did he do that. And the narration is perfect to because he's like the it's actually the first follower that changes the lone nut into a leader and makes it a movement and it's so powerful. It's only three minutes definitely. Check out how to start a movement by derrick sievers. Wow i got the chills. Kelly like that one follower like you find one follower you need. Yeah and that's so true with anything really. You know if you want to. You're talking on stage if you have just one little nugget. And one person in the audience connects with it and learn from it and they a couple of people And you've succeeded. Yeah yeah it's it's such a fascinating human study and it came out in twenty ten so it's eleven years old now and i still think about it all the time. I i always when. I put on offense when i do things i think about that many. I know it's such a like. I said it's even it's not a well video. It's grainy and it's only three minutes and it's changed my life this is. This is the power of ted talk or just it's the story it's what you can glean from that in itself so he's talking about it but he's also kind of doing it you know like of. He's writing this moment in time. That a lot of people could have saw and just thought. Oh that's weird. Yeah like whatever. There's a bunch of okay like it's kind of cool. But whatever he gleaned this life lesson that basically is one of the driving forces that has changed my life and the way i look at events and starting movements myself like so crazy and i can't believe i've never talked about it until now by now you've i love it. I love it and what a great way to end the show. Thank you all right. Everyone and thank you for joining us. And i'll remind you one more time you wanna learn more about any of the cool sheets that we talk about on any of our episodes. They're all on ten. Bestest dot com. But for each specific episode we have a slash and then a word and today's word.

twenty people next year six people Kelly derrick sievers derek six five things youtube four people three minute twenty ten today one first follower one little nugget hundred people one person three minutes derrick ten
"mariana trench" Discussed on 10 Bestest

10 Bestest

06:42 min | 5 months ago

"mariana trench" Discussed on 10 Bestest

"Cc and again you can check that. On our show notes and stumble through the internet and discover random websites stumbled created and maintained by kevin wa- blick curate a collection of anything. Interesting weird or staunching websites of exceptional quality sites to kill time or learn something new. And it's like you won't find you know click beatty things like other websites might curate. Basically this is like a website form kind of our show. So i love it. They kind of find and curate the cooler things around the web that maybe you haven't discovered yet. And this is. There used to be a either browser extension or a website. I think it was both called stumble on and it has since just vanished. They stopped supporting it and disappeared and it was so tragic for me because it was one of my favorite things to do and somebody that also liked it like me said. Hey if you remember stumble on will this websites just like it. and so. I immediately downloaded on my extension browser and go to the website. And i've already gotten like five cool sheets. I talked to carry the other day. And i'm like oh my god. I got just got like five or ten more cool seats for the next couple of shows. It was all because of this website. So you just a. You hit the stumble button and it goes to cool website. That i've never heard of this is what's so neat about is so many websites that are super super cool. That i haven't discovered. I mean the world wide web is super fast. And there's so many cool things. So i'm very excited that it's just an any. No you can like pages so the no show this this guy. The room says he kind of like science. So then i might get more things like that so you can't curate a little bit but it's also a great way to discover new sites. I'll let you know because there's gonna be some coming up on the next vehicle sheets definitely check out stumbled ou. I love it. I'm going to start getting online from that. Is it'll probably be different right because what you say. It's totally random. It's not like we both in fact. That would be a good thing to test after the show will both go site. Hit the stumble button a high pretty sure. It's random why doesn't say. Oh well they stumble once it goes to this website. Yeah goes yeah on an. I think it's just a jumble while especially once you start liking some and then so we'll so then it will definitely be different apps. Camelina knows what you like. Yeah so you can get close seats from it off. that's amazing. yeah. I'm gonna try and just see and also i noticed something you just said worldwide web. Hardly hear that anymore. But i like it. I like it a better internet world wide web to be bigger because i i really want to emphasize how big it was a worldwide. It's very retro. Feels very nineties say worldwide. But it's i. I like it because nineties kid. Www oh that's awesome okay. I'm going to check that. Thank for giving me the source of what was the show link to so we could. Ooh good idea. Yes so ten. Bestest dot com slash three d. and that's just the number three and then d doesn't get easier than that unless it was just three but three d. o. k. I am to my last cool. She and talk about a blog. And i have to say it's interesting. I didn't mean for this to happen. But all of my sheets have had. At least an inkling of something that's been scienc- or techie. Kind of and this so maybe this is a nice wrap up. This blog is called science unsealed. And it's really a lot of random science stuff that's in little nice snippets like i said it's a blog. And so they'll be like one of these articles is something called the thatcher effect and it's like what's thatcher effect and and it shows it's sort of like a psychology thing where it shows four pictures of margaret thatcher and in one of them her eyes and mouth or upside down but you don't notice it because she's upside has there's some psychology stuff in there. There's another have a few links to subcategories and one of them i noticed was household science and one of the articles in there is about. Msg and i was like. Hey wait a minute. Brian talked about that. I've said one fifty three and they essentially went into some of the stuff. Same stuff that you were saying so. That was cool. One of the blog posts is about the science of making maple syrup which is so cool. Because i use maple syrup actually quite a bit like if i want to sweeten something or in my coffee or whatever i'll use it instead of other things and and i was actually wondering like how do you know. Do they do this. And so i was super stoked to see that and they just have all sorts of stuff like things about five g. I don't know about and different things about drug discovery and why they think you should keep your cats indoors. I did not read that one. I don't have a cat but that was interesting and has to do with protecting the environment. So i want to read that and see what they have to say about that so anyway it is all over the place if you just want small snippets on this is created by the illinois science council so these are scientists in this nonprofit. I'm in illinois. That i've created this and i have found some really good articles in here before and then came across the blog and it's great science unsealed short. Whoa that's really cool. Now get some cool. He's from that. One we can trade. There are a lot in there. That is so cool. Yeah that that sounds really. I was like i wanna know about that. I wanna know about that bread. A former clue sheet from it's alive. Bon apetit brad. Just did a maple syrup rancher where he went to harvest so i basically didn't know how they did it either until he literally they like hooked up a little spigot right to the tree. I have heard it in a bucket so they got like real hard and it sounds like from the eighteen. Hundreds of little house on the prairie..

kevin wa- blick five Brian five cool sheets nineties one both Hundreds of little house four pictures eighteen ten more cool seats illinois science council dot com illinois one of my favorite things one of the articles one fifty three One of the blog so many cool things one of these articles
"mariana trench" Discussed on 10 Bestest

10 Bestest

03:38 min | 5 months ago

"mariana trench" Discussed on 10 Bestest

"You music. I love discovering more music. Excellent okay my next cool. She is a quote and we have recently said how unusual it is for us. To have cousy said are quotes. because what can you say about a quote. Well i have a lot to say about this quote and quote is we create the space and the universe fills it so. Let me give the context to this. This is a quote from leslie and amy matthews taken from a book called yoga anatomy. This is a reference to something. that's inherent to yoga and breath and brandon. Lots of cool sheets about breaths ways of breathing and all that. But what they're saying is also one hundred percent backed by the laws of nature and specifically scientific gas laws so this has to do with the fact that pressure and volume are inversely proportionate so you increase the pressure volume get smaller and vice versa. So when we inhale it feels like to us. From our point of view we are sucking air into our lungs but that perception from us. This is what we're just doing is we're just decreasing the volume of our lungs and it's all the around us or in other words. The universe and those molecules of air they then react by going into our lungs and then the same thing when we exhale by changing that volume are sorry. I think i said it. Backwards expanding that space and so then. All the guests molecules around us will just fill that void does. There's another scientific. Lot has to do with enterprise that causes gas molecules to move and fill. Larger spaces are empty spaces. So it's so cool because this idea this quote again we create the space in the universe fills it we create this our and the gas comes in the air comes in and there's that beautiful metaphor also in our lives like we create space in our lives. We maybe we stopped doing some things and it creates space for something else to come in. We put intention out there. So i love the metaphor that goes with it as well along with the breath work along with the science so i just love that quote we create the space and the universe fills it short Yeah that is super cool and yeah so. That's the first co that you've done. I haven't you had a guest on that quote we done that. That's where we started talking about. Because i was like how would i feel entire two minutes with quote. It's not impossible. Obviously but it's not easy ir so that's so cool that you just did it and yeah. That is very cool. Of course. that's a lot of the Like you said a lot of things. I like science breath. Work philosophy almost like. Oh it's very cool. I had never. I'd never thought about that with breathing. I always think about like oh. You suck aaron. I never thought about as oh. I'm just changing the volume of my lungs. And then the air is just gonna do what they're gonna do so it's just it's super fascinating way to look at him for sure. Yeah which is also very ted like a new way of looking at something. So yeah definitely sparked all of the things that i like yay. He's talking about it so that's very cool. I love it all right. My next clue. She'd is a website and this website is called stumbled and its stumbled dot..

two minutes leslie one hundred percent aaron first co yoga anatomy amy yoga
"mariana trench" Discussed on 10 Bestest

10 Bestest

09:03 min | 5 months ago

"mariana trench" Discussed on 10 Bestest

"It's a little more broad which is just means it's gonna be even better and her first you so a time of recording. She only has two episodes out. But and it's going to be a series and it's just getting to the truth because right now that the time they were living in we've talked about creating science but just science in general is really under the gun lately and so her as a scientist she talks to other scientists like. How did this happen. How did we get here. And what can we do to get out of this where scientists who have been some of the most trustworthy people in the universe forever. How all of us aren't in the dilemma of that and the consequences of that and how we can right their ship. And that's just the first series. I cannot wait for the rest of the show. The dia rose show to yes. I subscribed but i haven't listened to an episode yet. I also you have to and so the first thing. She talks to a scientist and talks about what science. Teach us about discovering truth. And in the second episode she talks about how social media obscures truth. And what to do not and so. She's like i said the series the first series so i don't not sure how many parts will be is just about truth discovering truth. What's true what's not to know the difference. And so now so the first one she talked to scientists the next on. She talked a social media expert. So know i don't know what the next one is. But i'm sure there's gonna be still more about finding truth and figuring so i just i already. She talked about. She's gonna talk sunscreen even. Oh yeah. I'm super interested in like there's so many As soon as i heard the description the little show trailer was like yeah. Ida subscribe auto download. Yeah do you know in the sense coming out. I don't i almost asner. I guess i do know her now. Yeah i've been talking to her about it all flying. I wanted to get the show links. All of the links correct and i almost i still might be like. You could be a little preview. Of like i know given to be summer and needed by another thing of sun sunblock in psych. Which one should i get the dozen. Destroy the coral reefs. That doesn't poison you. There's so many factors. Well can we down to not even well known about titanium oxide. It's so complicated. Super complicated in and now and scientists are as trusted for whatever reason you know. It's gonna make it more complicated. But i know for me. She is very well research she will. Oh she's gonna legit possible. Yeah reliable source so excited for this podcast. Yea thank you for talking about that. Cool okay. we're going to keep in the science vein a little bit and i'm gonna be talking about geography kinda sorta geography oceanography talking about the mariana trench. This is the deepest part of the ocean and the more. I started delving or diving. Deep terrible terrible puns into this. It's just it's so enthralling and so interesting. This is right by guam in. Guam is south of japan and so it was a little bit east of the philippines. And so there's a part of the pacific ocean there that this is the deepest part and so we're going essentially if you were to take mount everest and you were to flip it upside down and put it down into the trench. There would still be like another mile or so that it would be underneath there so this is extremely deep and it is one of those things where back in the day when they had sonar in the nineteen fifties. They i realized like okay. This is really deep ear and then over the years is unveiled more and more and more and there's a really amazing video. I'll link to it from where they show one of the most recent dives in there's one person a guy could fit into this little submarine and he went all the way down. It took him four to get down to the bottom of the trench. He spent four hours down there. He saw some bizarre creatures and there are like huge amoeba. 's the i don't even know if you can see them but they're big and then there's this other crazy fish and spent four hours down there and then it took him four hours to get back up there. The whole time he was there there was a chance that the submarine would get crushed under the pressure but he was willing to do it in fact he went back down again and all these stores. That's just one story about the mariana trench. And what's down there and things that can live down there. It's really incredible. Mariana trench. whoa yeah. That's that's also. I think we're aquaman hangs out too so little time. And i'm and it is also known as the marianas trench by the way i think maybe in another language so on to say that Either one of those names is accepted. Very cool yeah. That is yeah. isn't it. I mean there's still like so many species down below the we have no idea where there's the most unknown as all this deep and that's why because takes four hours just to get down there and you could die. There's something called deep sea gigantism. That's like things down deep. They like grow bigger. I know eat that little sub. I know you wouldn't even know what it was 'cause you could see it. Yeah yeah yeah. The it's super. It is like saifi in real life. Like it's so why. I thought this was really fascinating. They also captured sound down there and they were able to hear a typhoon above the surface. Yes woo okay. I know mine blazing. I know dang so much. We don't know about that kind of stuff. That's so cool. All right thank you. My next cool sheet is a mytalk about a musician and i had a triple check to make sure. I've never talked about this singer. I love her. So much it's kendra morris. She is one of my favorites. This is a singer that i thought was going to blow up big time. She's got this. she's from new york. She has as they call. She describes herself as new our soul artists and loves kind of the sixties and seventies and people like ruth copeland and chaka khan and she also kind of loves The sixties and seventies movies. She's kind of retro and outweigh by her. Her voice is very like the sole beautiful powerful voice when she sings. So you definitely and she also she i i would say if you're a fan of amy winehouse in her music then. I think you'd be a big fan of kendra morris everything she's ever put out. I think i bought every album. You know she's a dropped. A few albums was just a complete and this is kind of unusual for artists in a she released her own solo album. I and then she did a cover album where she did a bunch of covers and big songs like pink. Floyd china new crazy diamonds and some other things. The first song that i ever heard was called concrete wave and it was about. It's about her at these small clubs in new york and she kinda gets a stocker boyfriend and she starts dating and so a very probably realistic for a lot of female singers. Especially more even more. So but then she kinda flips and then she like gets it on him and like kinda ties him up and starts doing torturing him almost about the whole video shot in. This really cool. Pov perspective so. Dan and i were fans of notch. Just because it's great song but also the filmmaking and the story that had told we really enamored with it definitely worth checking out kendra morris Wow i don't know anything about her. I so i just pulled her up on i tunes. Yeah so now. Yeah well after afterwards. But she's so good. Like i was like why has she not blown up yet. Her voice is just so hypnotic and it just hits you right talk about a soul singer. Just hits there in It's so good. I like that description to seoul noir. Yeah isn't.

new york Guam Dan chaka khan four hours second episode ruth copeland Floyd two episodes first one first series kendra morris first one person first song concrete wave Ida one story pacific ocean philippines
"mariana trench" Discussed on 10 Bestest

10 Bestest

05:52 min | 5 months ago

"mariana trench" Discussed on 10 Bestest

"Okay my next cool sheet. I'm going to be talking about an article. And i loved this article so much possibly surprisingly probably not it has to do with creating which is this supplement that lots of people have been taking for years usually male bodybuilders. Or do you like to work out. Whatever is the you know what people think of. I think of creating but this is what happened. Is that the journal of international of the international society of sports nutrition realized that there were so many people who were still thinking all these different things about creating and there's a lot of discussion about them. There are a lot of people who were still arguing. Irish should say debating on different things about it. So they're like okay once and for all or at least this year. This is pretty recent came out in the last twelve months years. So i think it's either from twenty twenty or twenty twenty one And so what they did is they got all the exercise scientists together from each of the different quite main questions that people are still debating and they got each of them to answer all these questions. This article has two hundred citations. So they're all scientifically backed. And i'm like yes. This is my kind of article. It's all like i can trust this gay. Okay so i'll give some examples of some of the debates and so one of them has to do with water retention and they say yes over the short term there might be a little bit but then over long-term no. A lot of people are confused as to whether it's an anabolic steroid. No it is not if you look at the chemical structure it's not does it. Cause kidney damage or renal dysfunction. No it does not. Does it cause hair loss or baldness no. It does not so it goes through all these things. And there's way more than this that i have time for but One i wanted to point out is that it is beneficial for older adults and it is beneficial over the lifetime of females at various points in their life so some of these might be surprising to some people. But i think it's really helpful for people who are trying to understand creating so again. The name article is common questions and misconceptions about creating supplementation short. This is really cool. Yeah creating. I've been using on and off since i was twenty. You know that was when it was really yes thinking infancy and yeah was huge all the guys anybody that lifted eighteen and you had a new this weird like you stacked it in the first week and so that's not trying you don't have to do the goodness that anymore because it was a real pain in the butt but yeah i still have creating supplement and so i'll go like a week where i remember i just i always forget to kind of take it. Yeah but i always have a really good source. And i have some because yeah. That's one of the things out of all the body building things that i've read about sense. Twenty to forty five twenty five years read about end done myself That's the one that is one of the only ones that has lasted the test of time where they've actually said it's actually better than we thought. It does more for more people than even we thought back. We're first testing and it looked so promising. I mean aside from like eating healthy getting sleep and drinking water yet right. you know. Those are the obvious ones you know. But like even protein intake that's overrated and you know most people e wait especially the united states diet way too much protein and then bodybuilders. Still think you have to have like massive amounts of bodine and you do not. It's totally but creating super backed by science. And yeah that's really cool that you're talking about that because i kind of forget one of the things that i know because i've read about it for twenty five years that i forget about i. I must admit. I just sort of blew it off. The app stereotype for. Yeah but then. I guess it was. Two years ago. I started working out and lifting and stuff and i heard about it and i was like okay. You know my trainers told me about all right. I'll try it. So i got it and that was like well. This may be but this article nailed it. And i was really stoked to read all this about it and now i feel really solid with it. Cool that's so cool. Well thanks again for sharing this. Oh my pleasure right. My next cool sheet is a new podcast from a former cool sheet. Who used to have a podcast. She stopped doing that one. But it's as she's been a koshi like five times. I don't know how many times but it's called the doria row show so she started a new podcast. I've talked about her individually. I've talked about her as the food. Food est which was our old podcast in book. And i've talked about mindful eating. I think that that i learned from her. She was salem speaker. And so i feel like I'm i am a fan boy. There's no denying that but but it's because she's doing so many amazing things and she's super super smart. she's also a scientist and a doctor in really knows her stuff. And this new podcast. Because she wanted to kind of food. This was a lot about food. Obviously it's in the title in nutrition and things and all these things that are super important to me but she wanted to even a broader scope than that. Because there's other things that that make you healthy and it's mental health. It's physical it's diet. it's everything else and so right away. I was like this is going to be an amazing podcast..

twenty five years Two years ago twenty eighteen two hundred citations five times twenty twenty united states first week each One first testing this year international of the internati last twelve months years Twenty to forty five twenty fi one nutrition Food est them
"mariana trench" Discussed on 10 Bestest

10 Bestest

04:07 min | 5 months ago

"mariana trench" Discussed on 10 Bestest

"Welcome to ten bestest where we sift through the noise so you don't have to each week. We share our ten favourite things of the moment. Anything goes welcome everyone to ten bestest karen mcfarlane holman. And i'm brian hurt. And we've got another great episode. I get to go first. And i'm just going to go right into it. I have for my first cool sheet and innovation. It is three d. printed homes the url the link to find all of the cool sheets that we'll be talking about is ten bestest dot com slash three d. and that's the number three d all right so three d. printed homes. This has to do with three d printing. Neither of us or any of our guests have talked about three d printing. I would say that's a cool sheet right there. But i'm specifically going to talk about three d printing in the context of a way that people can build homes can build. Small tiny homes can build energy efficient homes and can build them very inexpensively so there is an article on a website called interesting engineering dot com. And they've got this wonderful article that shows that seven of the most beautiful. Three d printed houses and cabins and it is so interesting. Not only how they all look so different but all of the different kinds of materials that can be used to three print homes first off a three d. printer and we're all used to printers where it's going down on a two dimensional piece of paper. This is now where you have to use some kind of material like plastic. Those the ones i've seen but it could be some other thing like hemp fabric hours or rice materials or something like that and so it needs to be able to print in three dimensions. Just like what it sounds like and so they do have to have these three d. printers be quite large. They need to be able to sit on different kind of terrain. That could be a different angles. But once they get that setup with their nozzles and being able to print these out you can actually construct a house for about ten thousand dollars and it's looking like they'll be able to bring the costs down to about four thousand dollars. Check out this article. That shows all the different designs they have. They are quite beautiful. Very amazing three d. printed homes short short. Wow that is pretty wild. Yeah yeah i really wanna see. I've check out the show notes. And go to the link. Because i wanna see what does it kinda show. What the three d. printers like the scale of how big they are and how that works or not so much the completed. Yeah you know what the picture of it. Three d. printing. You don't get a good feel for the actual machines that are doing it. You see the homes in the end but if you do some investigating on three d. printed homes you'll find a lot about people who are interested in homelessness and building homes for people for that as well as you know people are just like. Oh this is an inefficient or this is an efficient way that we can go to. Maybe you know there's a remote location where they want to build some houses. They can do that way. There's lots of different applications super interesting. Yeah so it sounds like the even they prey on site yes like they would play printed on the lincoln logs or whatever and then ship those and then build the host but doing it on site. They can do it i think. Yeah now they would need to ship the material so a lot of them. They're they're made out of concrete but they don't need to be and this is another thing that's been done is building i'm instead of out of concrete. That's more permanent. Is to build them out of biodegradable materials. And so then you could have temporary housing. Oh well like in case there's a hurricane and all the houses went down to like okay. Let's quick three. D print some shelters from some homes for people and then without the idea that they're going to be staying around for wild us pretty cool. Yeah shape that out i. It makes sense. I had never heard of this until recently..

"mariana trench" Discussed on Absurd Hypotheticals

Absurd Hypotheticals

03:45 min | 11 months ago

"mariana trench" Discussed on Absurd Hypotheticals

"If you're like six feet tall you're a fifth their height. That's that's like like me height of. If i saw a person up to my knees i would regard them as something upsets. It's like dog height. I would say. Yeah but if i if you saw something dog height that looked like you you would have a reaction to it. I feel like that's a pretty. Like uber's lloyd right like if you saw a one point two foot person sneaking around your house so what. What are the like the chances of them being not from hostile toward you is less because you're less threatening to them. That is probably true. Yeah so the way the way. I'm seeing it right now. Is like the giants. I think are the cooler one to have exist. Like if you look at okay. What if i found a village of small mice people. It'd be like okay. You dislike excavate and pick up their village and bring it to like a show or something and you have like a really cool exhibit i guess and exploitative yeah yeah we're not making money off this. What are we going to change our ways. God of course making money off it or just figuring out. We'd try to be like friendly with them. Are we no longer leading. Our fish friends the mariana trench so that they may be squished. I mean we eat fish anyway. We don't eat tiny. My span found him yet. Also they're all bony. I just feel like it's like like the dynamic you're going to have between the relation like to the giants. You're going to be kind of their pet but to the mice man. You're going to be like their god. Yes it'll be like gulliver travels right. And i've actually it but i know who scenes from it. It'll be like Night from the museum her night in the museum. Yeah so do. I just want to deal with a whole bunch of little people like i think when it comes down to for me if they wind up being friendly the giants are way cooler and my opinion is i don't know if i want to take that risk and the chance of them. Being friendly is higher. Probably also i think that if the mouth people aren't gonna matter all that much shooters i don't really know what they can. Do you actually think the most people will really not change your life at all. Right cool you go on your way. Yeah that's kind of my first impression to now imagining building them. Little lego houses to live in this is the best values. Pretty great is tricky. I think my gut like i think. There's a lot of logical reasons to pick people's malls mice with the main one being that you are in control that situation as opposed to the other way around but man is gonna live a little and pick land of giants on this one. It's just. I'd rather that one be true. I think that would be more exciting. Yeah if you if you saw a person the fifty your size your instinct is to kill them questions. You wouldn't try to harm them. Yeah so. I think there's a good chance that they'll be friendly. And for that reason i picked giants. I think i think as i mentioned assuming they're friendly giants who is cooler so young john s awesome. We actually all agree. The giants were cool in little. People are shift tastic agree with randy. Newman yeah exactly what What's his name..

giants mariana trench lloyd gulliver john s randy Newman
They Call Us Asian in New Zealand

They Call Us Bruce

03:51 min | 11 months ago

They Call Us Asian in New Zealand

"A low unwelcome. Today calls bruce unfiltered conversation about what's going on in asia america and other parts of the world bank less affected by covid. I feel you have yang. And as phil has served telegraphed we are connecting with another part of the asian diaspora in the form of very special guests old friend. Who is actually a dialing us in from new zealand from the code. Free paradise of the medicaid seeming mark. And thank you so much for joining us. I killed a koto carta. Yeah all the way from my little island safe-haven aspirational destination of all of us. Who are currently huddled. Sorry we both a wall. You don't want people from shithole countries like america company. How does it feel well. I mean okay. So let's begin where we begin and obviously you are there You actually have been in your from new zealand out born in new zealand. Yeah there are chinese new zealanders again part of the espera that we don't really kind of talk about enough here in in our american centric place now of america and one of the things which has actually been a delight Over the years we've known each other has actually been hearing from a different perspective. What if what. Asian america looks like from people who are asian but not american and i. I am kind of curious what america especially looks like from the perspective of somebody in new zealand at this point. What looks like. Oh you want me to say i don't wanna like i'm you walked. It looks like i. I honestly i wanted to press you. We just sitting here going. Holy shit you know holy shit. We knew it was gonna be bad with the guy you know for four years. It's basically as bad as if anyone could have imagined that could get so we. We have elected him out. The only person who can not really acknowledge that is donald trump out Hopefully means things will get better but he really did kind of dig a fricken marianas trench for us and through us in there and he still to acknowledge again that the rule of democracy is is is operated. And it's like guys yeah you know. He lost the election but he won. really damaging the democratic process. And a still doing so as a as a kind of like a political scientist you guys are in like a bad situation with regards to keeping democracy functioning and not becoming like a regime that really recon uphold its democratic institutions. And something that you know compared with new zealand I just like you sit around on my god. I'm so lucky that i have a functioning government that has a loyal opposition by the concept of an opposition that supports the democratic process that supports like peaceful transition of power. A wicked human rights longtime right. So using tim's that we use you know amnesty international About how this is not a peaceful transition of power. Will people really excited. Because maybe you're going to have a peaceful transfer of power. It's like you shouldn't be getting excited about a peaceful transfer of power. You develop develop democracy

New Zealand America Yang Bruce Phil Asia Donald Trump TIM
"mariana trench" Discussed on High Adventure Podcast

High Adventure Podcast

07:22 min | 1 year ago

"mariana trench" Discussed on High Adventure Podcast

"Long days and warm nights but may also the middle of the Everest climbing season? The summit of Everest is twenty, nine, thousand, twenty, nine feet above sea level. Will you see level as a baseline because it's something we can all understand that it's the place where land emerges from the ocean surface. But as C. Level, actually the most accurate way to measure elevation. The deepest part of the ocean is the Mariana Trench. The bottom of that Ocean valley is thirty, six, thousand, two, hundred, twenty, nine feet in reality. This is the actual base of the crested to the earth. The deepest part of the ocean is the Mariana trench the bottom of that ocean values thirty, six, thousand, two, hundred, twenty, nine, eight. If the oceans were to magically dry up how how would we measure the elevation of the Earth's land masses and would elevation even be a relevant measurement? Does it really matter how high or how deep something is. Live. Is experienced at the moment and in that spot you're standing on. Every other thought or feeling you have about elevation and it's meeting our irrelevant at that moment. Without the oceans and surface of those oceans being our benchmark for elevation. With the absolute base, the mountains be at the bottom of the Mary a trench. What would the terrain that submerged look like? Is it walkable climb -able I. Think most of the world's mountains would remain unclaimed in by unclaimed iming never summit. I think we can all believe that there would certainly be people who would be excited to try. If we took this fantastical view Mount Everest would send sixty, five, thousand, two, hundred, twenty, nine feet high measured from the bottom of the Mariana trench at over twelve miles above the absolute base of the Earth's. Ever sits about thirty, five, hundred miles from the Mariana Trench in geographical. That's the same neighborhood and the connection from the bottom of the earth's surface to the top of the service are clearly connected. May tenth is as good. A day to stand on the summit of Everest is any other. On one particular may tenth. That's exactly what a team of climbers had planned. Plans and the big mountains of the world are just that they're plants. They're more ideas than absolutes. Nothing is a given in ever straddle not comfort not success, not even life itself. Nothing can be taken for granted when moving through terrain that's killed more than three hundred people. If you choose the same route. You'd pass approximately two hundred of those bodies on your way to the summit. If you make it that far. On, one particular may tenth with clear skies at a clear vision for success a team set out for their summit attempt. It was busy on the mountain and crowded. Crowded seems like a strange word to use about one of the most unforgiving places on earth but crowds do arrive for their chance at fame or infamy in. Those crowds can present a problem. This was not new and the leader of the team was experienced in was well aware of every situation that could hamper their success he summitted. Everest that amazing five times and was sure he could with his experience mitigate any obstacle whether it be geographical physical or even mental. There's a strategy these days on Everest that has become standard when attempting to reach the summit. There is in fact, a magic number that magic number is two. Two is in two. PM. If, you reach the summit by two PM. There's enough time to make it back to your camp before dark once it gets dark on Everest and if you're still trying to find your way down and there's a very good chance, you're not gonNA make it. Darkness Subzero temperatures lack of oxygen fatigue and disorientation are potentially deadly factors. But if you add a storm into this region. A storm can mean a blizzard of hundred mile an hour winds in white out conditions. Tragedies can and do occur. The hold up near the summit of Everest is a spot called the hillary step. The Hillary step is essentially the last barrier to the summit after several days of climbing. There's an issue with the Hillary step though. The step is a forty foot high section of nearly vertical rock for average climbers at sea level navigating the step would be a small warm-up climb. But at an elevation of Twenty, eight, thousand, eight, hundred, and thirty nine feet. The Hillary step is more than two thousand feet above the entry into what is known as the death zone. The death zone refers to the altitude in which the pressure of the oxygen is insufficient to sustain human life for an extended time. While in the death zone without supplemental oxygen, you are in effect dying very very slowly. So the physical side of the Hillary step at that elevation is demanding. The mental side is just daunting. As you climb the forty foot high rockwall you can look to the right and see in veal the pool of a ten thousand foot drop. Okay so you don't look in that direction. If you move your eyes to the left and you'll see and feel the gravitational pull of eight thousand foot drop. Traditionally over the last several decades fixed secured ropes were attached to the top of the Hillary step and this meant you could use the fixed ropes to ascend the rockwall and not having to risk your life making it through this last final obstacle I may tenth there was an additional problem the fixed lines were gone. They would have to be re hung, which meant someone would have to actually with hands and feet climb the rockwall attach new ropes. This would take some time. At. Three PM on May tenth. There was a long line of climbers still waiting to ascend the Hillary step. They were well beyond the two PM curfew of standing on the summit with time for a safe return. But as you can imagine, after hiking several hundred miles acclimatizing for thirty days at base camp, and now finally within fifteen hundred feet of the summit, it's a hard call to pack up and turn around and go home. Add cognitive impairment and decision making becomes unreliable. It takes experienced people on the team to know that no matter what you must turn around at two. PM These are non-negotiable. Decisions. At three. PM Several Sherpas who summited and were on their way back down came across the struggling climber. Advised him to turn back in with them go back down the mountain with them. So he refused a bit later Rob Hall, a team leader reached the Sherpa, and the climber. A New Zealander was working as a paid guide and was leading a team to the summit which for him would have been his six time standing on the summit of Everest. Rob Hall was more than respected in the Himalayas he was revered. The struggling climber was part of Hall's Party of paid clients. When Rob Hall reached his client he learned that the clamored used up all of his supplemental oxygen both his main and auxiliary tanks his refusal to turn around and.

Everest hillary Earth Mariana Trench Mount Everest Rob Hall foot drop Ocean valley team leader Himalayas
"mariana trench" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

06:09 min | 1 year ago

"mariana trench" Discussed on Here & Now

"Spaceship eighty. But it's it's cozy comfortable. But there's one big problem with it and that's. It's kind of one hundred percent. Electric's going into water. Right, and there was an issue with that I will say by the way that I am not old enough to have watched I. Dream of Jeannie when it actually was on the air, but I did see just about every episode on Nick at night. Time ago. Now, I assume it's very difficult to. Be Socially distant in. This tiny vessel, so how do you deal with coronavirus expeditions during an age of global pandemic are an absolute nightmare and who knew right? So what ended up? Happening is the first thing was that the US has Theodore Roosevelt, which was a a US. Which might remember? The news came into the port of Guam dropping off a of Kogo nineteen sailor. We were going to depart from Guam so that made. This whole expedition already at risk because I did not want anybody coming into Guam whence they have the covid nineteen problem. The second thing is that. we didn't want to go onto a ship where we would potentially have a problem with covid nineteen, so what we had people coming from seven different countries and five states, so what we decided to do was to have everybody test. For covid. Before they came into the ship, and that would satisfy the government of WOM that would satisfy the captain of the ship that would satisfy victor as the owner, and that would certainly take care of the passengers state of mind. Once, we got onto the ship on mass came off and it seemed for that. You know twelve days a bit of normalcy. You've not only visited the depths of the ocean. You've also climbed the highest mountain. Is there difference in your mind, or how do they compare? I found you know the process inexperience of some things very similar. Cramps of sub versus the Kremlin of tents says you're going up. There both low oxygen environments. So I can draw parallels that make it seem like you're almost doing the same thing, but the reality is, is that climbing Everest is much more physical pursuit any high altitude mountain, although it looks physical, there's a lot more mental. Capability that goes into it because whenever something is endurance oriented. There's a mind over matter aspect to it. So at some point, there's going to be something inside. That says turnaround. This is uncomfortable. You're higher than you've ever been, and you've got to overcome that negative voice a bit like running a marathon if he will were you just gotTa? Persevere and push through, and that's why I think you know having that mindset that says I can do this and to overcome those little hurdles that try to set you back is important. Before you became an adventurer. You were in the banking industry I wonder how you look back on that experience. Now given the things you've seen. Does it feel? Frivolous to deal with finance after you've sort of explored the the heights and depths of the world. Well I'll tell you what what business does when you turn to exploration. Is. There's the softer skills which you can use like leadership and. Teamwork and those things which of course transferred immediately into an expedition. But also risk management can't be underplayed that's very important in the dynamics of exploration, and then the softer skills around people teamwork leadership, being able to make decisions because. Things are never going to go as planned, so it's always important to be able to make a call and have sort of that plan B. C. D., whatever is necessary to either turn around or saving expedition in a different way when your business background also allowed you to finance this trip, right? Yeah. I think sometimes you have to be creative and how you do it and sometimes I, do you? Can't you have to put it off? You have to save for you have to look for sponsors. In most cases what I've found is that expeditions tend to be a game of numbers, because there's going to be some x number of fixed costs, and you want to share those fixed cost over a certain number of people. It's more financially viable. There was a scary moment when you were down there. And maybe we've. We've finished with that. Tell us what happened when you were down so far beneath the surface of the ocean. We. Had some of the batteries run out. It was the batteries on the starboard side. And the Nice thing about any equipment is that there's a lot of built-in redundancies, so the first thing is is never panic. You know there's plenty of oxygen. There's plenty of ways to get up. Things were to really fail We're certainly not gonNA. Swim Up. Put it that way, but. We just started troubleshooting and thinking through. Okay, you know if the starboard batteries are are off. Can we borrowed something from the other side, or can we shut off things and will it recharges itself so you just start troubleshooting mostly? What I'm doing is talking through things with the pilot. And having him talk to me out loud. More from the psychological point of view, too, because my job is mission, specialist was really to collect rocks, and that's what I trained on the robotic arm for take pictures, she survey. I think when when things don't go according to plan. You want that person with WHO's not gonNA panic, but who's going to just be that calm presence. You just have to remain really really calm. specially. Calm the most calm in the worst.

Guam US Jeannie Theodore Roosevelt Cramps victor Everest Kogo B. C. D.
"mariana trench" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"mariana trench" Discussed on Here & Now

"To that. That is the BBC's Samir Hosh me joining us from Dubai. Thank you. Thanks a lot. The challenger deep is the deepest place in the ocean. It's in the Mariana Trench in the Western Pacific, only a handful of people of ever descended into it, and until this month they were all men mountaineer Vanessa Brian is one of two American women who made the voyage earlier this month. Astronaut Kathy Sullivan is the other O'Brien has now been to both the highest and lowest points on the earth and joins us now from New York on skype Vanessa. Welcome to hear now. Thank you Jeremy. Griggs speak with okay. We'll have a lot of questions for you, but first of all. What is it like down there in the deepest place in the ocean? Well, it's it's really cool and very interesting. I mean at first you feel like almost an intruder to a very foreign place. It's very serene, and it's almost like visiting moon. If it were underwater, it looks like sand, but you know it sediment because this is where the tektronix plates. Come together, so the oceanic plate slides under the continental plate. But as you're moving along and looking at the settlement, which looks like sand, you can see little things like crawling underneath, so you know there's lives better. But it's curious what that life is because it's dark, so whatever lives there doesn't need is for example, and the pressure is so great. This is sixteen thousand pounds per square inch of pressure eight tons. Of You know I don't know if it's capable of having a vertebrae for example with that kind of pressure. Well I know it takes about four hours to get down to the bottom Do you see a lot of life along the way down? So you know if if you watch some of the youtube videos, they're quite cheeky and very cute. What they do is they put the entire possibilities of all things you can see on the way down in one place, which is amazing right, but the chance that it's going to be in your purpose view on the way down is probably point zero zero, zero zero one percent, so you don't see a lot when you're going down. The reality is I think by the time I was done talking to pilot victor of the Schiavo and saying Oh what's that? What's that? What's that? It was already dark, so it gets really really fast. You're in this little mini submarine called limiting factor What is it like inside there? So the coolest thing is actually for me the experience of actually getting into the hatch. You know the Porthole picks up in your. You're going down into this hatchet. It's got little handholds on the side so your feet are are. Kind of stepping down into this very very very long. Hatch and at first you're going in, and I'm fine fine fine, and then I get to my shoulders and I'm like Oh, no is am I. Actually GonNa, fit and then suddenly. You are dropping down into a seat. And my first impression. And I'm going to give away a little bit of an age range here was. An I dream of Jeannie or Barbarella. You're sitting in something. That's a little bit like wow. It's like a little, a bottle or a magical place and part of what made me think of. That was because last thing the whole ceiling are these oxygen canisters. White in their tubular? And then there's all these. Lights right of the command centers. It's little.

Vanessa Brian Schiavo Samir Hosh Jeannie Mariana Trench BBC Dubai tektronix Kathy Sullivan youtube Griggs Jeremy Western Pacific skype New York O'Brien
"mariana trench" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"mariana trench" Discussed on Here & Now

"Myself right now. Robert Carol. Again his latest book is working researching interviewing writing. It's a must read for anyone who wants to attempt to do any of those things and also read his great volumes. He's been called the greatest political biographer of our times. Thank you so much. Robin. Events around the world have been affected by the pandemic, and now that includes one of the biggest the annual Islamic pilgrimage known as the Hajj because of the pandemic Saudi. Arabia is banning international pilgrims who normally visit Muslim holy sites each summer joining us now is the BBC Samir Hosh Me. He's on skype from Dubai Samir. How are people reacting to the fact that they won't be able to make this pilgrimage this year? It's a of a disappointment for many people across the globe because when you talk about Hutch. More than two million Muslims from across the globe. Come down. To visit, Saudi Arabia and visit the holy site, so it is one of the mean blurs of Islam for many people agreement to go for hajj, perform honey once in their lifetime, and they save money. All Day lives in many cases just to make that trip, so for all those ready in preparing themselves to make the pilgrimage It has come as a huge disappointment though. Many people if not all were expecting that it would have been pretty unlikely for the Hutch to go ahead given the situation on the ground, because the Corona Juarez pandemic where the borders are still shut in many places. Even in Saudi Arabia number of cases have been pretty high when it comes to go with nineteen. Regarded over one hundred sixty thousand cases and more than thirty debts is here. But Saudis will still be able to do. This is just people from the outside who won't correct. That's right, so the government has announced the Saudi government has announced they will be holding Hodge for a very limited number of people, and will be only Saudi citizens and people be guested before they are allowed to make the script. It's going to be a symbolic touch They're going to sect. Where if you people? Them, for this pilgrimage? Now. It is of the most significant moments on the Muslim calendar. Just tell us in a normal year. What is the significance of it? And what does it look like when it happens? For any Muslim, who is heavily in good physical shape and financially sound it's mandatory for them to make this pilgrimage once in their lifetime, so a lot of Muslims across the globe the prepare themselves to make the trip, and it's for five days. The split image is five days in spread across. Macau and Medina do all these days. Are Muck is where it starts and also heads. In Montgomery. There are some other important volley sites where the pilgrims have to go now what happens is that all of them travel at one point of time together to all these places we have more than two million people. Staying in the same area had the same time, so it's really crowded, and all of them are dressed in white robes. For those five days before they come back to America to enter pilgrimage you. If you talk to a lot of Muslims their described this as a once in a lifetime experience, and that's why it's so significant for the Muslim world. So if it's a once in a lifetime experiences that means that the people that won't be able to go this year, we'll try to go again next year or the year after that well, that's right. That's what's going to happen. Most likely though the Saudi government had issued a circular in April, saying that asking was limbs around the world, not to make the booking for Hudson this year because it's a process people. People have to start looking for a month in advance since so many people have to come down and there are costs for every country, so they can really get X. number of mental defect published that country so those people would be allowed to apply next. Yeah, so it's not a dream is oh, but clearly for many of them were hoping to make this pilgrimage to see how they weren't able.

Saudi Arabia Saudi government Robert Carol Arabia Samir Hosh Dubai Samir government Robin BBC skype Montgomery America Hodge Hudson Macau Medina
"mariana trench" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"mariana trench" Discussed on Here & Now

"Aina moved to the hill country in Texas to get closer to the people there who are very closed off year. New Yorker. And I. Can anyone tell that you have to move in and really with your wife? Get to know these women and it's astonishing what you find out. There was no water. No electricity in this area to Lyndon Johnson brought it. Talk about not just discovering the hardship of the these women's lives, but realizing if maybe the story wasn't going to get told Wilson in the hill, country are about seventy five feet deep. That's the that's the water table and I. I remember one of these very elderly women saying to me, your city boy, so she went to a garage, and there was her old water bucket with afraid Roe still attached. She took me over to the well that was covered with boards. She pushed the boards off and she dropped the bucket into the well, she said now pull it up and tell you it was heavy, and there was this heavy bar would like cattle. Where like house where? She said we put this on, so we could look at a time. And then you knew I was from New York and one thing I noticed, was the women the hill country seem to me to be much more stooped than city Wilma. And I learned that the expression was bent. We got bent thoroughly. This one woman said to me I swore I wasn't going to be bent like my mother that as soon as my kids started to come, and I had to carry the water I knew I would look exactly like my mother looked so Lyndon Johnson is a political genius. He's running for Congress and he joins the magic warned he says if you will elect me, I'll bring. To this country and you won't look like your mother looks, and it seemed impossible, there was no damn. There was no source of water power or any other power for electricity. A dammit bill started on a river at the edge of it, but it was the depression. The damage stopped, and you've. They built the dam. How were they gonna Lay Loins, thousands tens of thousands of miles of lines across these Empty Hill's connect these scattered form, but he persuaded the President Franklin Roosevelt to do it. And that was his verse rated shavings. Robert Caro, you say you wanted people readers to see the epoch grandeur the majesty in the storytelling, and by that you meant. Obviously these people, these you know not just the powerbrokers, but the ones affected by them, but also the powerbrokers you know Moses. He built the bridges that make New York look like a Christmas tree. At night, he built the parks. He did these great things, but then terrible flaw brutal to to people who got in his way Johnson. Will you just described what he did? For the people of the hill country, he also rammed through civil rights legislation, but then. Fell, because of his escalation of the Vietnam War in places in the book working you say how you you when you think of each of them. At certain times, you could just cry. How do you feel about these two men? Oh, it's very, that's. Terrific questions mixed? The take Lyndon Johnson so now it's the latest book in the series Johnson sort of course Vietnam as a major. Part of it, and that's the tragedy, but you'd think. Also Johnson had a compassionate people and a genius for turning that Compassionate to government action. You know ten Jack Kennedy is assassinated. Four days later Johnson has to make this first speech to a joint session of Congress. He's still living in his home down in the kitchen for his aides and speechwriters are around kitchen table, writing the speech and they they said well. We're really not ready yet, but there's one thing we all agree on. Don't make civil rights priority. If you do even win tag Anais the southerners who controlled Congress. You're going to stop you legislative program just like they stopped sanity, don't. Don't do it and Johnson says to them will what the Hell's the presidency for that? And he goes out, and he makes his first speech, and he says my first priority is to pass Jack Kennedy Civil Rights Bill and as he's saying he's saying it to this row of southern senators sitting right in front of him, his fight for civil rights and voting rights is epic. It's an epic of triumph of what government can do. Just as Vietnam is an epic of tracking. Carol I'm thinking of some of the tips that you give and I'm going to abide by one. You say that when you're doing an interview. Silence is a weapon and you constantly right as you're taking your deep notes, you constantly right? The letters s you. What does that mean? Lead shut up. I talk too much so I learned that. If you could just not talk, yes, good question, the guy doesn't want to answer it. One of the best things I found that I can do is not say the next line. There's a silence and we're all human. We feel we WANNA. Fill it up. But if you don't set up. Often Dell's it. and. They'll sell it up with something. They wouldn't otherwise have said so. Yeah, if you look through my notebooks. Renewed see a lot of you, Israel. I'm writing myself right now. Robert Carol. Again his latest book is working researching.

Lyndon Johnson Vietnam Congress Jack Kennedy Wilson New York Robert Carol Texas Aina Robert Caro Dell Lay Loins Roe Franklin Roosevelt Israel President
"mariana trench" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

06:56 min | 1 year ago

"mariana trench" Discussed on Here & Now

"It. Might wearing the mask view you. ME, Roderick Bradley is in Brandon collies, fifth grade class along with his friend and classmate Byron Puertas, Ruddock's. It was relaxing being at home, but very requirements Miss School because. Your friends again this along. This was a good idea. Why do you think? Because I get like the teacher gets. Help me. If I. Don't get something I could just ask for your help. I really wanted to come back to work. Kelly was one of several teachers who volunteered to hold virtual classes from their classrooms. Eighty percent of Kelly's students were doing fine with distance learning, but were not, and now he can help them in person from nine to eleven. Am I'm a person to person kind of teacher and It was just really odd try to get it all done through zoom, but it's not lost on Kelly that. This is all a big risk. California is seeing outbreaks of Covid nineteen on the rise, and we know the virus can go from adult to a child who then a symptomatic can spread it to others, I'm questioning myself of. HOW CLOSE DO I get? Less than wash hands, use hand sanitizer. There's lot of filtering going on that. Is Hard to get used to write and I'm constantly worried about kids. Being human beings in the sense of being close and talking and touching, and that's been challenging this week. Superintendent Garcia is welcoming eighty students here for summer school. In the fall it could be the entire school of one hundred twenty students Garcia's convinced. The can do this safely. If there's enough investment by the state to create smaller class sizes for here and now I'm Julia mcevoy. In the age of zoom interviews, books convey credibility. In fact, libraries are being called on to send out books to fill shells, but many are already populated with the huge volumes of Robert Caro. He is instant, cred his Pulitzer Prize, winning books on the brilliant but flawed New York Builder Robert Moses and lawmaker then president Lyndon Johnson are considered the best in historical biography, the powerbroker about Moses and four books about Johnson the fifth on the works way in at thousands of pages, Robert Caro spent years on each tracking down. Families carelessly displaced by a Moses. Moving, his own family to the Texas Hill country to understand the people Johnson came from both of Carroll's subjects had power Robert. Caro found out why readers can now find out how he did that. In Twenty nineteen, he published this slim beautiful book working about how he researches interviews and rights and Robert Carroll joins us now on skype. Welcome. Nice to be here on skype. What did you think we with your books? Showing up on those zoom interviews with truth that was sort of storytelling and humbling. My Wife I noticed that she said the powerbrokers behind everybody's head with A. I. Would you feel good about it? You know because that book came out forty six years ago and to see young political reporters using it now that sort of to be honest with you. Throw it into me well, and I was also thinking about the years. You spent writing a book on Robert Moses, the man who ruled New York golding all the bridges. The Parks Jones beach on. On, long, island, he was like God created New York, and you know however many years, but you also felt insane. You had no money, your wife Aina. She's also a research partner sells your home without telling you just to get cash. What kept you going? The more I was finding out the more said you know. No one understands how power works I said Robert Moses was never. Never elected to anything, he held power for forty four years. How did he get that I? Felt it was important to finish the book so that even if I never got to do another one people would understand how our really works in cities, and you learn right off the bat, a one thing that's precious to the researcher. You become files. You're young reporter at the Great Late A. A Long Island Newsday. There's a battle over building an airport. You get a call on a Sunday. You're there alone. Someone at the FAA says I like what your papers doing I'm just GonNa. Leave a door open, and there's going to be some boxes on a table and there you walk in, and you have this treasure trove. Talk about that part of the work finding the papers. Everyone else who's at a picnic on fire island? So no one had a cell phone then so I had to go myself. I remember I worked the woman I. I wrote a memo then I went home and the phone rings and the Managing Editor as secretary, and he was an old time newspaper man who always looked askance because I was from Princeton, his name was Alan Howarth where she wants to see right away, so I said to my wife I'm about to be fire, but instead he makes you an investigative reporter. Because of what you found in those files. You tell him I don't know how to do that. He says what you said. Just remember one thing. Turn every page. And I remember that and sort of try to follow it will my life. WELL NO KIDDING! You later find Robert. Moses papers tucked in a huge building in new. York you discover you know people making deals. Road gets moved. Moses is northern boulevard was supposed to go through this rich guys private golf. Course it juts down four miles away to as you write. Protect him from the Hoi. It leaves the rich alone and destroys these. This road destroys these small farms. Now. You could have just written that off. This road was moved and it went through farms, but you didn't. You went and found the farmers that was a moment of awakening for me Robyn who was the moment that I realized that, if I really wanted to write about political power, I would have to right not only about the men who wielded power, who had power I would have to write also about the powerless. The people who didn't have power and we slow wires were affected for good or for ill and chained to me when I. was interviewing one of these forms, actually saw his wife he had died, and said that they Robert Moses took off. Home was the day or lives were ruined. When you heard that you suddenly said that's an aspect of power to what government can do for people and what it does to people. Well, we mentioned you and your wife..

Robert Moses Robert Caro New York Robert Kelly Robert Carroll skype Lyndon Johnson Moses Superintendent Garcia Roderick Bradley Miss School fire island Pulitzer Prize California Robyn Julia mcevoy Byron Puertas FAA
"mariana trench" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

06:45 min | 1 year ago

"mariana trench" Discussed on Here & Now

"From NPR and WBZ, I'm Jeremy Hobson I'm Robin Young. It's here now. Today's Senate Democrats blocked a Republican police reform bill from advancing calling it an inadequate response to police violence. The House will vote on its proposal tomorrow. Meanwhile of early results from yesterday's primaries are a sign of what's to come in November. People who are currently holding office should be worried. Progressive Democrats say a wave of support lifted their candidates in some of the five states where the polls were open amid social unrest in pandemic that has led to a surge of mail in voting. That is delaying results NPR national political correspondent. Mara Liasson has been pouring over these results Emara let's start with New York. Longtime Congressman Eliot Engel appears to be losing by double digits to the Progressive Newcomer Jamal Bowman and Carolyn Maloney. These are both senior Democrats barely ahead of her challenger Suraj Patel what is the message? Do you think the Democratic voters are sending? I think that the message. Democratic voters are sending these very blue districts is that they want their representatives to move to the left the center of gravity and the Democratic Party is moving left, maybe not as far and as fast as the center of gravity and the Republican Party moved to the right. But. There's no doubt that the base of the Democratic Party which is extremely energized this year. Is Voting for newer younger, more Progressive Democrats. They aren't huge ideological issues, but this is very much like the Alexandria Cossio. Cortez, versus. Crowley race, he was a member of the leadership. She was young. She was Latina and so i. think that that's that's the trend in democratic districts. What we haven't seen yet is very progressive candidates. The kind of candidates that Bernie Sanders and AFC would endorse flipping a red district blue that we haven't seen yet, but in the suit, these super blue districts. Districts there are older establishment Democrats who are in danger of losing their seats in a primary. We'll speaking of trying to flip a red seat blue. Let's talk about what's been happening in Kentucky where they're trying to figure out which Democrat is. GonNa Challenge Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell in November, there was a primary yesterday, and it looks like Charles Booker who's Kentucky's. Kentucky's youngest Black State lawmaker is doing pretty well in the early results against Amy McGrath, who was endorsed by Senate Minority Leader? Chuck. Schumer, what do you see happening there, amy? McGrath is the establishment candidate. Nobody expected Charles Booker to surge in the way that he has. He's an unabashedly progressive candidate. He's had a very powerful message. He runs ads talking about from. From the hood to the Holler in other words, he's going to unite a coalition of low income. White Rural Kentucky Inns and Inner City African. Americans I. Don't think that either McGrath or booker have much of a chance to unseat Mitch McConnell. He's the majority leader in the. Senate has a pretty firm grip on seat. Kentucky is a very Red State But Charles Booker's surge. Really surprised everyone graph represents the kind of thinking in the Democratic Party that the only way you win in a red state is to be pretty centrist. She's a military veteran. She you kind of stay in the middle, and you hope that you can kinda thread. The needle Charles Booker has a different approach. He's a progressive. He thinks that you can unite people who are hurting economically whether they are culturally progressive or not from the hood to the Hitler. That's what he thinks. On the Republican side there was a primary and twenty four year old newcomer. Madison Cawthorn, who was not endorsed by President Trump one anyway in a runoff race in North Carolina Fil chief of staff mark. Meadows is see this breaks streak that president trump had where all the candidates he had endorsed were winning their primaries. That's right. This is a very red district. It's not gonNA flip. It's just an insult to trump. It kind of stings, trump of course turned around right away and congratulated him. really young guys. You said twenty four year old newcomer Madison Cawthorn. He's a partially paralyzed because of A. automobile accident, but yes, it just takes some of the shine off of trump, and it seems like no. He doesn't have complete control over his party. Now the reason that we don't have these results in a lot of cases, today is because of a lot of mail in voting because of the pandemic. What do you see when you look at that and think about what will happen on election night in November may not be clear. Who wins the night of the election because of all the mail in ballots? That's right. We probably it's very possible that we won't have a on election night and I think there's. There's going to be a big effort to educate people that even if that is the case, we have to wait. A little while doesn't mean that the election is illegitimate. You Know Donald Trump has been saying a lot of things about mail in ballot, saying that they represent huge fraud, which is not backed up by evidence, and as a matter of fact, republican officials in many red states and swing states want to use mail in ballots and they're fine. But Donald Trump has been very adamant over and over again. He said that. If we have mail in voting, the election will be rigged so I just think people have to get ready were not necessarily GonNa know who wins the presidential election on the evening of November third. Just briefly Mara this defeat in the Senate today Democrats Blocking the Republican Bill on police reform the house. Is GonNa vote on its bill. Tamar, do you see them being able to come together and make something happen here? That is really unclear. I think a lot of this depends on the president a week ago or two weeks ago, he seemed very eager to sign a police reform bill. He immediately got on board with Tim Scott. Bill in the Senate the Democrats of. Course think that doesn't go far enough. And there are a lot of places we're. The parties can compromise as in choke holds, but there are other areas like getting rid of some of the immunity. That police have legally is going to be much harder place to compromise. N., P., R. National Political Correspondent Mara Liasson. Thank you. Thank you? We'll schools across the country are working out how they might reopen in the fall. Many implementing new safety protocols changing just about every aspect of schooling in Sausalito California, one elementary school has been piloting in person classes cake Julia. mcevoy went to see how it works. Outside Bayside Martin Luther King Junior Academy in Sausalito parents are pulling up to drop their children off. They've been doing this since.

Charles Booker Senate Kentucky President Trump Mara Liasson Amy McGrath Democratic Party Mitch McConnell national political corresponde NPR Madison Cawthorn Republican police Republican Party president Sausalito Congressman Eliot Engel
"mariana trench" Discussed on The Culture Quest

The Culture Quest

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"mariana trench" Discussed on The Culture Quest

"In a golden spike is a geologic marker created by global event that leads to long lasting global changes can be used indicate a change in geologic time division. Basically. A golden spike is something that we can relate to a specific time period and it's geologically evident like we can see it in the Strada. Like I said earlier, it's not an arbitrary choice. So when it comes to the prophecy, there are two schools of thought the. I. Stands for choosing a point that is any amenities recent or earlier passed as the starting point of the encompassing in the second stands for choosing a point that is in the. The future like one that we can point to as an absolute point of no return about the first one is much more popular. It's much more likely to be chosen out of the two. So focused on that one. So let's discuss potential starting points, markers or golden spikes for the enthralling. So very popular suggestion, the nineteen fifty. There are quite a few candidate markers for human activity that stands for that time period. One big one is plastic. It's been mass produced since around the nineteen fifties It is found now in almost every environment on earth including the deepest parts of the ocean. There's this Guy Victor. Vo He went down to Mariana Trench in submersible vehicle and Maria Trench. If you don't know, that's the deepest point in the world's ocean, it's just under eleven kilometers. He claims that when he went down there, he found a plastic bag there and I think that's the third report of plastic and Mariana Trench. Basically, we find plastic everywhere and due to the fact that plastic is an artificial product which has a considerable effect on the environment and it is long lasting the environment. So it's a very popular potential marker. Other possible markers are aluminum and concrete. both are widely used. The aluminum that we use industrially is not naturally occurring, which makes it as artificial plastic and ninety percent of the production of aluminum took place after the year nine, hundred fifty. Concrete while invented by the Romans sites uprise only after World War Two. Both are suggested as martyrs for the anthropoid and are referred to as techno fossils and one other very interesting. Suggestion is nuclear processes byproducts. Nuclear weapon testing began in July of nineteen forty-five. Since then artificial radionuclides are spread detected a significantly higher rates than before. These originating nuclear explosion testings in nineteen fifty, two others come from nuclear energy production methods, and other artificial processes. A suggestion for another starting point is the beginning of the industrial revolution and the invention of the steam engine. It's considered to be the point at which technology started developing at an increased rate. The very first interference with the greenhouse gases. Started at this point in time, which is it tightly with global, warming a staple, the rapping. There are a few specific dates in consideration all in the eighteenth century and another third suggestion setting the starting of the therapist seen around eight to twelve thousand years ago. This suggestion is based on the time period in which farming became widely used by the suggested starting point. Around a thousand years ago, humans have reached every habitable continent farming and agricultural techniques have began to make there impact on the earth..

Mariana Trench Maria Trench
"mariana trench" Discussed on Lightfin Casefiles

Lightfin Casefiles

02:58 min | 1 year ago

"mariana trench" Discussed on Lightfin Casefiles

"Detective Lighten case one. Five six the Ghosn aunt in the short detective was swimming around thinking that maybe it was time for a snack. His last meal had been free days ago and he was starting to feel a bit peckish. He was close to the Mariana Trench. Which almost ten kilometers in depth was the deepest point in the ocean? Although light fin had never swum all the way to its ballroom himself he was more interested in the number of good Sushi restaurants nearby before he could pursue that thought he was interrupted by thrashing. And Rory Sound Ahead. He saw that it was Humphrey. The blue whale the source of the massive thrashing in the water clearly Humphry was in some distress. The cause appear to be a long fishing net. That was entangled in his giant to might fin wanted to help his old friend Humphrey but he also didn't want to get turned into fish paste by mighty tail Humphrey. In Response Humphries thrashing eased the little. Humphry Holt still. I'll see if I can help you. Humphry stop thrashing entirely and turn to see who it was coming to. His aid light fin. Thank goodness can you? Please get whatever that is off of me sure. Just don't make any sudden movements okay. Swim around to see Humphries tail which took a little bit of time as Humphrey was huge. He was twenty nine meters long. That's like seven. Cars parked end to end huge. He also weighed almost one hundred seventy tons so about thirty elephants huge as well. When light fin reached the tail he could see the net had wrapped itself around Humphries tail flukes. It would not be easy to remove but as a shark light fin had a good set of sharp teeth so he carefully bit into the net and swam forward and only forward. Sharks can't swim backwards. The net strained against life ins- teeth and jaws but he keeps swimming and swimming as hard as he could just when he thought it would never loosen the net suddenly came free and life in shot forward no longer entangled. Humphry Legge a full blown. Well cry the sound of a happy will life.

Humphrey Humphry Holt Humphry Legge Humphry Humphries Mariana Trench Ghosn Sharks Rory
"mariana trench" Discussed on Dem Fancy Dinosaurs Podcast

Dem Fancy Dinosaurs Podcast

04:41 min | 2 years ago

"mariana trench" Discussed on Dem Fancy Dinosaurs Podcast

"Awards fucking every way. All right. So why you shaky head because you make a very good point. Okay. To be remade. Or do we want, like next to some of these movies, only like ridiculously give you get like an x pot like dot crystal? Looks to be continuation. It's awesome. I would love like continuations stories like that would be again, because I'm like they did with goes buses and stuff. And then try to remake the movie continuation that was a complete route. They also Jewish. Take anything of the old movies into consideration. Really felt like that should have been like a continuation with, like it was the old ones was still potted. I know I think is the reboot should all the negative should be put in a canon and take into the Mariana trench. So next time James Cameron goes down there. He goes on Titanic. He takes his back. Should buckle? And that's really at comes up. Cook. Like Deb, you got he that he create these smut this year. Think that real yet is just the Mariana trench reversed. That is the apex or older really is Atlanta's not real yet. He's fucking. Trooping was. Let's move on. Okay. Wait going back to the doctor is still yet. I'm Jim Henson, probably because he died down. Probably son doesn't. Hansen now but after he died, I think the movie shelf for, because it was always it was always going to be made. Yeah. No one wanted to give money. But now Netflix is like, hey everyone take my money. Here. It's more like, hey, jury member? Nostalgia. Let's let's, let's play to your nostalgia, even more. What's most, what's more nostalgic than fucking doc? Crystal just the only reason anyone. Mccall with the labyrinth just like this ad some movie that should be read. How lady Gaga Bill like people already sheeting on people already sheeting on like unreal. New Aladdin follows like he's twelve years old. Does he really I haven't seen it yet eight but I saw the trailer and Jaffar looks like he's a teenager going through puberty. Okay. Let's see what I would love to see another movie of would be Logan's run Vigo saying loons running. Yeah. With, like the people who have to go get moded because they live for too long. It's kind of like a post apocalyptic world. It's disturbed and I wouldn't call it post-apocalyptic. Well, it's like the it's the it's the future and the only surviving humans are in this kind of, like bubble and the only reason that they have to be killed off today to a certain age. It's because his on resources for all of them, but hoping that he's running away from them. So let's not do it at he wrote Logan. Actually, he's fine. People who are running, and Logan's run is just Bladerunner. Player on. Okay, said blade runner is just Logan. Androids, too long. Yeah. What should be rebate as a series for Netflix? Think it's wreck whacky races on. I agree with that. Keep to kickstart out that had wacky races report backup. Right. Amazing Austin would be such a good Taylor character. Yeah. I think what we talking about that time that dick Dawson Lee was just like, oh fuck this. I'm just gonna win because motherfucker has enough time to just. Just. Elaborate traps and then fuck ever. And also, we've all. The school because he had an extended nose code. Sheedy really. Like I haven't seen those movies at Cerlo. It was all part of it was called shit. Well, the Bob era, maybe it was doing that Jews during the heart a hat. I joined the air. This is America. As well, like was, it was Yogi bear news. More people like doing stuff was pot of it, the, the white The white race. race..

Logan Mariana trench Gaga Bill Netflix Deb Jaffar James Cameron Jim Henson Sheedy Mccall dick Dawson Lee Hansen Atlanta Cerlo America Vigo Austin Taylor twelve years
Garbage found at the bottom of the Mariana Trench during deepest dive ever

America Trends

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

Garbage found at the bottom of the Mariana Trench during deepest dive ever

"And a man who just completed the deepest solo dive in human history says he found garbage at the deepest point. On earth. Retired naval officer Victor Vesco of Texas using a submarine to head to the bottom of the Mariana trench in the Pacific Ocean. He made it down to a depth of thirty thirty six thousand feet, and he says he found a lot of new crustaceans new species. But also a lot of trash

Victor Vesco Mariana Trench Pacific Ocean Officer Texas Thirty Thirty Six Thousand Fee
Squeezed Potassium Atoms Straddle Liquid and Solid

60-Second Science

01:29 min | 2 years ago

Squeezed Potassium Atoms Straddle Liquid and Solid

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds sites. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. There's solid and there's liquid and now there's something inbetween called chain melt, the Tomac level you have this interaction and this mix up between liquids and solids Andreas. Herman is a condensed matter physicist at the university of Edinburgh, what he and his team of discovered using computer simulations is that under certain pressures and temperatures potassium can be both liquid and solid at the same time. Specifically, they squashed simulated potassium atoms with really extreme pressures two hundred four hundred thousand atmospheres, that's at least two hundred times greater than the pressure. In the depths of the Mariana trench at that pressure. The atoms form two interlocking crystal lattices add heat to that you don't need too much. Just a little bit above the boiling point of water in one of those lattices begins to melt while the other remained solid and Walla chain melt the. Sales are in the proceedings of the National Academy of sciences Herman says there's no reason to stop it potassium. Either. Half a dozen other elements have this crystal structure to as for what will do with them. But we haven't relooked by application is quite with untold research. I would say one thing's for sure any real world tests will face immense pressure. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata?

Christopher Dodd Yata Herman Mariana Trench Christopher Don National Academy Of Sciences Physicist University Of Edinburgh Sixty Seconds Two Hundred Four Hundred Thous