16 Burst results for "Maria Schneider"

"maria schneider" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:31 min | 2 months ago

"maria schneider" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Right now he is John schaefer with today's giggler Composer and band leader Maria Schneider used to call her group the Maria Schneider jazz orchestra but the word jazz felt limiting especially as she began collaborating with people like David Bowie and incorporating more sounds and techniques from classical composition into her music Earlier this year Schneider was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in music for her two record set called data lords a remarkable musical response to the incursion of big data into our everyday lives This piece called Sputnik is part of that set Sputnik by the Maria Schneider orchestra they play two shows Sunday afternoon and evening at NJ pack in Newark For details go to new sounds dot org Mostly sunny.

John schaefer Maria Schneider jazz orchestra Maria Schneider David Bowie Pulitzer Prize Schneider Newark
"maria schneider" Discussed on All Songs Considered

All Songs Considered

03:10 min | 2 months ago

"maria schneider" Discussed on All Songs Considered

"The show before, tell us what Remy le booth's doing on this one. For one thing, he is showing what the state of the art sounds like when it comes to large ensemble orchestration in the sort of contemporary post post bop landscape. I mean, that's a mouthful. But there's this really interesting sort of bumper crop of wonderful big band composer arrangers at the moment, which is kind of a miracle if you think about the economics of the thing. You know, he is an alto saxophonist who made the decision to use this large canvas, and he's drawing on languages that have been refined by people like Maria Schneider and John Holland Beck and Darcy James argue. But there's a real unforced affinity here with this kind of atmospheric indie rock ideal, you know? I think you definitely hear it on the melancholy architecture of storms, which is sort of a title track. But you hear it elsewhere. And of course, he also covers a Bonnie bear tune on this album. So this stuff feels really natural. It really is such a, an intentional move when you've decided that you're going to work with such as you say, a large canvas, I think that's a great way to put it because it is its own kind of sound and brings so many more challenges than if you were just say three people improvising together. Absolutely. And it's important to note that when you have this large ensemble and you're a composer, a ranger orchestrator, there can often be this temptation to move towards complexity. To really lean into, like, man, I've got all these pieces at my disposal and you can create this kind of clockwork, complexity. And I think partly because of that, I don't know, maybe it's that indie rock thing that's so in his DNA, but what you really feel on this album, I think is a kind of transparent emotional arter, you know? This music really is suffused with feeling. And so all of those pieces, you know, the wood winds and the brass. It all feels like it's being pressed into service of this kind of lyrical and emotional intention. Remi la boof is the artist a composer, his new record, architecture of storms. Thanks so much Nate. Thank you, Robin. Okay, be sure to get our newsletter at NPR dot org slash music newsletter all one word music newsletter and check out our expanded playlist in Apple music Spotify and on our website at NPR dot org slash all songs. You'll find full versions of all the tracks that we played on this week's show, plus a whole bunch of singles that dropped this week. You can also see a list of what we played in the podcast description of this episode. And that'll do it for this week's show for NPR music and all songs considered I'm Robin Hilton. I hope you have a great weekend. Be well, and treat yourself to lots of music..

Remy le booth John Holland Beck Darcy James Maria Schneider Remi la boof NPR Nate Robin Apple Robin Hilton
"maria schneider" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

03:39 min | 7 months ago

"maria schneider" Discussed on The Big Picture

"Chris you you are oh okay. We'll for drama Michaelangelo antonioni's the passenger. Which is a really really beguiling. Movie about A journalist in africa play by jack. Nicholson who basically decided to take on the identity of another man who is staying in the hotel that he is in. I think it's chad. Or i can't remember what country in africa you stay. Nba he's just basically decides. He wants to be someone else. It's typically antonioni like very sort of. I guess i would say mannered nine manner but just patient. It's a very patient execution of identity but just in terms of a sense of place. It's stunning visually stunning. Maria schneider's also in it and nicholson gives us a really good performance in this like. I just always loved that. Nicholson at this. Time was just like trying stuff with different directors. You know like it's always amazing to see the biggest actors. Also take chances on on on different filmmakers. And i think a lot of you know a lot of it had to do with his reverence for the form and for antonio as a filmmaker if you watch on criterion think for the if one of the extras any other lung or or one of the laboratory like you can see a basically a video essay of just jack. Nicholson talking about antonioni for like seven minutes. And it's incredible but yeah i just i really like the passenger. I think it would actually. And i think it just. It plays really well now. I think a lot of our ideas about the fluidity of who we are and how we could change those things using. Certain identifiers is really. It's it's really cool. Also one of the most famous kind of like a long take final shots ever very similar. The mid would be king kind of like. Make sure you sick around for the last few minutes of this movie because it's very important could pick one of the last movies antonioni ever made Okay man you've got your final two picks So in wildcard. I think it will surprise. No one that i'm taking greg gardens. Which is the males brothers cult classic cinema very documentary about big d and little beady little. Edie bouvier bill. Who lived at the hamptons home of sorts called grey gardens and is a startling look at it to women and identity and communication in a mother daughter relationship and also fame and how people relate to a camera and to their sense of cells. I referenced this documentary. A lot during my personal lockdown felt a little bit like we were turning into a little grey gardens of in communication style. If nothing else it can be a little queasy making this documentary. Certainly hard not to watch it now. Not think of every single reality show. That came afterwards in terms of these people who agree to be on camera and are being. I would say exploited in celebrated simultaneously like they have become pop cultural icons but maybe not in the way that they would have understood it when they agreed to be a part of the documentary. But you know just a landmark fascinating Entertaining if sometimes difficult or uncomfortable to watch. Yeah i i still find it to be a tough set. It is unsparing in.

Chris Maria schneider seven minutes nicholson antonio Nicholson Edie bouvier bill two picks jack africa greg gardens antonioni single reality show Michaelangelo journalist gardens one last
"maria schneider" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"maria schneider" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Another piece that just it's like a prayer that I didn't mean to invoke Madonna. You know, it really is like a real prayer. It takes its title from the poem March 20th by the poet Ted Cruiser. Let's Listen. Do the poem there. I can say it. I know it. It must be to someone that I am alive and walking and that I have written these poems this morning, The sun stood right at the end of the road and waited for me. Move. Yeah, To me. It's an affirmation that this world this life the sun good things are at the end of that road and they're waiting for us If we look up if we have our eyes up and looking to each other and within ourselves to connect to ourselves and what's important to ourselves to our world into each other. It's my hopeful message at the end of the album. Grammy winning jazz musician Maria Schneider, speaking with Robin Young about her Grammy nominated album and Data Lords ceremony is on March 14th. This is here and now Mm hmm. Explore the.

Ted Cruiser Robin Young Maria Schneider March 20th March 14th Madonna Data Lords Grammy this morning
"maria schneider" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"maria schneider" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From the listeners of W. Bur BOSTON where the program is produced, and your NPR station Loomis Sayles and investment partner working to navigate challenging financial markets around the globe. An offering investment strategies to clients worldwide since 1926 learned Maura at Loomis sayles dot com. And NPR and Morning edition on this station tomorrow morning. What happened while you were sleeping and the news interviews and analysis for the day ahead, National International and local news tomorrow on morning edition. From NPR and W bur. I'm Tanya mostly and I'm Peter O'Dowd. This is here and now the Grammy Awards are less than a month away, and jazz musician Maria Schneider has a chance to add to her collection. He's won five Grammys and is nominated for two more, including best large jazz ensemble album for Data Lords for release with the Maria Schneider Orchestra. She spoke with Robin Young when data lords came out last August and today we're gonna listen to it again. We're used to big sounds and big thoughts from jazz musician Maria Schneider. With her Maria Schneider Orchestra. She's created pieces like the Grammy winning cerulean Skies, which took bird sounds and incorporated them into a large, lush work reflecting her middle of the country roots. But Snyder's new release has even broader scope. Data lords is a double album that takes on both digital and natural world as subjects one CD each. Here's the title track..

"maria schneider" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"maria schneider" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

"And, uh, the covered 19. Pandemic. Obviously still with us and expect will be for a while, So please do be careful. Around this time of year normally, uh something we might do would be to look at some of the best recordings put out over the year. A bit harder thing to do with covered. As UM, releases haven't been exactly the same as usual. There's a fair amount of good material coming out this year. It also complicated by the fact that Lost Frank Kimbrough yesterday morning Great piano player. Shocked me had a heart attack, so I'm not expected. At all. Right at the age of 64. Usually from North Carolina rural area outside of Durham. Chapel Hill. And the man who Ah Set up a nice career. In piano. In earlier years involved with the Jazz Composers alliance. Basically some musicians who got together in Nam. Worked several projects together, including the Herbie Nichols project, which put up some four releases. I believe Of all. The workings of the great Piano player and under sun musician Herbie Nichols. And also played on each other's albums. Other players in the just positive alliance were Ben Nelson Run, Horton, Ted Nash. And others and we may get some of their music. Also Frank Held down the piano chair with Maria Schneider Orchestra. Also plain And do what recordings with vibraphonist Joe lock. Most of his other material solo and trio work and Occasional quartet, so we'll be playing. Music of Frank Kimbrough for well then, uh, Only stretch out and get into a few things. That Are of import that happened this year. Or major stretch on in general, Of course, one of things that was important about Frank Kimbrough is his real knowledge of Music. And Embracing the music of the Masters, including Thelonious Monk. And one of a really remarkable projects that he was involved with. This is putting out a six CD set. Called monks dream. Complete competitions. Of Felonious Fear Monk, which was a shared Project. Basically headed up by Frank on piano, but with Scott Robinson Interesting. Frontline because he plays not only various reads but also plays. Trumpet. Rufus Freedom based on Billy Drummond on drums, and I thought we'd start off. Tonight show. With.

Frank Kimbrough Herbie Nichols Thelonious Monk Pandemic Chapel Hill Jazz Composers alliance Joe lock North Carolina Durham heart attack Ben Nelson Maria Schneider Orchestra Billy Drummond Occasional quartet Rufus Freedom Scott Robinson Ted Nash Horton
"maria schneider" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:19 min | 1 year ago

"maria schneider" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"TV serials roadkill. It's a really neat score by Harry S. Scott. Probably better known for his film work than TV scores, although he's done a lot of both, and this particular soundtrack featuring the noted pianist kit Downs. And the three short excerpts. We just heard present a kind of variation on a theme. So we heard the chess game shuffle the first of the three, which presents the theme. And back in the game, and then finally, the Sharks in the swimming pool, which takes that thematic material. And, as I say, various it a little three short excerpts from Harry S. Scott's Roadkill soundtrack. Before that music from the Maria Schneider Orchestra from her to LP set called Data Lords, which takes A dim view of the big digital media and social media companies, and we heard a piece called Sons in in from the Maria Schneider Orchestra. New releases from the month of November on this first new sounds program of December. Well, listen next to another work that ostensibly has its roots in the Jazz world is both Maria Schneider and Harry S. Scott. Do But while quarantining in their Harlem apartment together the heart player Brandee younger and the bass player Desmond Douglas. Decided to do a kind of weekly live brunch stream for their friends, and they have now decided to take a compilation of those performances and to release them as an album and It's all over the map. I mean, the combination of harp and bass doesn't lend itself to a lot of straight ahead jazz repertoire, although there is some, but they also did arrangements of Pop songs. There's a Kate Bush tune, and they wrote some of their own and the piece we're going to hear. Has quarantine and pandemic written all over it. It's called toilet paper romance. They wrote this one early in the pandemic back in the spring, when You know, toilet paper was in the headlines s. Oh, Here's the piece from the Thies Quarantine at home Performances by Desmond Douglas and Brandee younger. Okay? Okay? That's called toilet paper romance on early quarantine work from Desmond Douglas on base Brandee younger playing the harp, the two of them doing these weekly live streams from their Harlem apartment. And now compiling them under the name Force majeure, which is a wide ranging set of music for harp and base. And one of the new releases on tonight's edition of new Sounds. When we continue in a moment, will you Cast our net further a field geographically, as we hear some music from Mongolia, the Republic of Georgia and then back to England, but firm or central Asian inspired music. So stay with us. I'm John Schaefer. And you're listening to new sounds Listen to support is powerful. Do you support W n Y C. You make a statement that stands for.

Harry S. Scott Desmond Douglas Maria Schneider Orchestra Harlem Maria Schneider kit Downs Sharks Thies Quarantine Kate Bush John Schaefer Mongolia Georgia England
"maria schneider" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

14:31 min | 1 year ago

"maria schneider" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The new releases that will be listening to in the next hour on new sounds. This piece, by the way, is called a tar, which means the best steeds. Horses being a key part of the culture in Central Asia. John Schaefer and new sounds usually ends each month with a look back at that months. New releases We're a day late, hopefully not a dollar short with with the November new releases. And a pretty diverse bunch. Itwas bit later in the show will hear some ambient electronic music from a trio calling itself three point circle. New group, But at least two of the members are familiar names from from years gone by. We'll hear this music based on Central Asian throat singing. We'll hear some genuine Mongolian throat singing from the band called KUSA Oakton. And a little bit of music to begin from Maria Schneider and her orchestra. Maria has for many years, maintained a big band here in New York in the face of all of the logistical and financial Hardships that come with that on dis year. Of course, the big band the orchestra couldn't play live so They have contented themselves with a recording. An ambitious to LP set called Data Lords, and from It will hear a piece called Sons. Then in Which one of the things I've always liked about. Maria Schneider's music is sort of like Gustaf Mahler with his symphonies where he didn't throw the whole huge orchestra at you all the time. She is also very Particular and very telling in her use of instrumental color and especially in a piece like sons and in which will start the show with Then we'll hear some of the music from road Kill. This is a BBC TV series that stars Hugh Laurie. It's running here in the States on PBS masterpiece and The Music is by Harry S. Scott, who's done a fair amount of TV and film work over the years. And features the pianist kit Downs so well. Here's three short excerpts from the road Kill score by Harry S. Scott. First we'll hear this piece by the Maria Schneider Orchestra for those of you listening alive. If you're listening later on the website, we don't have the rights to stream that. So you'll just go straight to the Harry S. Scott music. Either way, getting a started on our new releases edition of New Sounds. Help me. That's my favorite. Everything. Anymore. Me. Father. Yeah. Mm hmm. Mm. Mm hmm. That is music from the BBC..

Harry S. Scott Maria Schneider Maria Schneider Orchestra BBC New York Maria Central Asia Gustaf Mahler John Schaefer road Kill Hugh Laurie kit Downs
"maria schneider" Discussed on The Military Veteran Dad Podcast

The Military Veteran Dad Podcast

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"maria schneider" Discussed on The Military Veteran Dad Podcast

"Page. Peter dropped so much value on us on Monday. It's still Rippling through me and that is the big question that I emailed out in my newsletter this week of who are you becoming before I dive into who are you becoming if you have not signed up for my Weekly Newsletter I email out some different things in my life. My story whatever is going on something a deeper connection to that week's episode. All of that happens in My Weekly Newsletter where I email all the different things that have happened on Military veteran dad and if you would like to get signed up on that go ahead head over to military veteran dead.com and there is a form there to drop your email and you will be subscribed and you'll get me in your inbox. I never want to spam you. So I will only email you when I have something valuable say or we've got something to share and I also try to always cumulate different things in one email. So I don't want you getting 5 emails from me and throughout that week and every week There's not something I want to do. So your email is saved. Mean, but let's dive back into that question of who are you becoming this question when Maria Schneider dropped it on us on Monday and again on myself. I've heard it now three times and I've heard feedback from several listeners who have listened to that episode not twice not three four or five times and listen to that episode because each took a listen to it Morgan digs a little bit deeper into something that they weren't hearing before on their heart. And that was the case for me. I've read the book twice. I've listened to that episode now three times in the episode still is ringing in my ear of what's going on in my life right now. And who are you becoming really hit me as a core question on a reman needs to face in his life. It's probably not a question. We're aware that we need to face. It's not something that we think about it. We might think about it on a very long time. Service level of like yeah, we probably know we shouldn't be doing that. We probably know we shouldn't be doing different things at work or no matter what it may be whether it be a vice whether it be pornography whether it be all these different things booze. Drugs doesn't matter. You probably already know. It's probably not doing a lot of good for you, but you still haven't shifted out of that and this is a question of who you becoming really hit me because it hit me because of this when you think of a vice or anything that you're doing and for me, it's often just like something like ice cream sharing my kids trying to share a moment. Maybe it'd be a dinner..

Morgan Peter Maria Schneider
"maria schneider" Discussed on The Military Veteran Dad Podcast

The Military Veteran Dad Podcast

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"maria schneider" Discussed on The Military Veteran Dad Podcast

"Morgan Page. Peter dropped so much value on us on Monday. It's still Rippling through me and that is the big question that I emailed out in my newsletter this week of who are you becoming before I dive into who are you becoming if you have not signed up for my Weekly Newsletter I email out some different things in my life. My story whatever is going on something a deeper connection to that week's episode. All of that happens in My Weekly Newsletter where I email all the different things that have happened on Military veteran dad and if you would like to get signed up on that go ahead head over to military veteran dead.com and there is a form there to drop your email and you will be subscribed and you'll get me in your inbox. I never want to spam you. So I will only email you when I have something valuable say or we've got something to share and I also try to always cumulate different things in one email. So I don't want you getting 5 emails from me and throughout that week and every week There's not something I want to do. So your email is saved. Mean, but let's dive back into that question of who are you becoming this question when Maria Schneider dropped it on us on Monday and again on myself. I've heard it now three times and I've heard feedback from several listeners who have listened to that episode not twice not three four or five times and listen to that episode because each took a listen to it Morgan digs a little bit deeper into something that they weren't hearing before on their heart. And that was the case for me. I've read the book twice. I've listened to that episode now three times in the episode still is ringing in my ear of what's going on in my life right now. And who are you becoming really hit me as a core question on a reman needs to face in his life. It's probably not a question. We're aware that we need to face. It's not something that we think about it. We might think about it on a very long time. Service level of like yeah, we probably know we shouldn't be doing that. We probably know we shouldn't be doing different things at work or no matter what it may be whether it be a vice whether it be pornography whether it be all these different things booze. Drugs doesn't matter. You probably already know. It's probably not doing a lot of good for you, but you still haven't shifted out of that and this is a question of who you becoming really hit me because it hit me because of this when you think of a vice or anything that you're doing and for me, it's often just like something like ice cream sharing my kids trying to share a moment. Maybe it'd be a dinner..

Morgan Page Peter Maria Schneider
"maria schneider" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"maria schneider" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Piece that just it's like a prayer that you invoke Madonna, you know is like a real prayer. It takes its title from the poem March 20th by the poet Ted Cruiser. Let's Listen. Give the phone there. I can say it. I know it. It must be to someone that I am alive and walking and that I have written these poems this morning, The sun stood right at the end of the road and waited for me. Yeah, To me. It's an affirmation that this world this life the sun good things are at the end of that road and they're waiting for us If we look up if we have our eyes up and looking, teach other and and within ourselves to connect to ourselves and what's important to ourselves to our world into each other. It's my hopeful message at the end of the album. It's Grammy winning jazz composer and orchestra director Maria Schneider. Her new double album with the Maria Schneider history is called Data Lords. And by the way, one way you can use the Internet and you know, good and healthy way..

Maria Schneider Ted Cruiser director
"maria schneider" Discussed on DAVIDBOWIE: ALBUMTOALBUM

DAVIDBOWIE: ALBUMTOALBUM

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"maria schneider" Discussed on DAVIDBOWIE: ALBUMTOALBUM

"It's just outside, Iowa staffing! It's called the magic bar actually. Far You. Have you WANNA? Look it up. I. Wonder He might have. You might even have like a facebook page. Betty does actually so I was out there on tour and the guy who booked a GIG. You told me the story and they took me out there. So I went out, and they were actually doing the first day of recording, and they were doing version of heroes. You know to to owner David and It was great. It was great to see the guy who had so much love and respect for the history of it. You know and he's trying to do right by and was I guess like three or four years ago now so so i? Don't know I haven't followed up with him I haven't seen him since that night, but it felt like. Like! It was good chance you know again. It was in the hands of somebody who really wanted to do right by and continue the legacy in his own life. Thank you for telling me that that is just so love. Lay fight that just warms my heart. A piece of the magic shop still lives on. Someone cared enough to give it as you say the respect of keeping it service, keeping it operational less so cool. Love that story. Thank you is really nice to hear a story like that. Where there is such a wonderful ending to go back to the beginning. There's this wonderful story about how Bowie came into a club in Manhattan to see one night. Maria Schneider. I've been in her group. Gosh maybe fifteen years or something and. She called me one day and said that somebody from Bowie's team had reached out to her that that he was interested in collaborating with her, and she was getting ready to make her her own record. called the Thompson fields and Maria. Somebody who you know goes in deep, but she's doing her own project. I mean it's a total of experience on her end. You know just for months or a year or something so I think essentially the at the beginning kind of debating whether or not to take on this thing David, because because she would also, she never does anything without being fully committed to it and so we ran vimy, and and I remember essentially saying. Hey, you ought to do this. Good idea and also knowing that her music was in really good shape for the record. We did playing and and whatnot, so yes, so then I guess we talked again. She been in contact with David and was starting to kind of put the put the pieces together, and the had started meeting and I think I think he was going to her apartments and sitting at her piano, which is in the living room, and they're working on on Su so you know they didn't you call me one point in discussing? I recommended March Alesana. Thought would be great for this and I. Don't think our normal drummer kearns pen could make. It didn't use talking with me about different ideas around it, and then another day she called, and said Hey. you know David was describing rhythmic underpinning what he was hearing on sue and I thought of you and I and I played a record of yours, and it was a record call casting for gravity and I told him he should do something with you and your hand. You know so. Thank you. I was I was pretty surprised. And obviously you know it was really mean meaningful that she would she would do that. You know and some more time went by, and she called again said that she recommended again David and that he was interested in. He had told her that he saw that. We were playing at the fifty five bar. Which is this club and so you know, she said okay. We're GONNA. Come down and check you out, so she told. told you advance kind of. She told me in advance and new the component. He ended up pressure. Get component of leaving out his at some of these calls were around setting up the workshops for her for the SUV version that I'm a part of because I'm Marie his bandage shoes? You know she wanted to put together. Just a few people from the band myself Mark John Anderson on Bass rank, trombone, and to start work. Shopping this piece so. That was about a week after this game at the fifty five bar. I know that they're coming. That happens to be like the last rehearsal before gig before. We're going to record some music a mind so all the stuff going on. I think I told. Mark about it, because he knew because he was going to be on the on the thing with Maria didn't tell the other guys they came. The fifty five bars is very very small place in the West village that I love and love and love played so much music there I've learned so much there and they were there and I. Didn't you know I think? I saw him out of the corner of my eye, but it's as you can imagine it's. It's something you don't want to focus on. You just want to focus on the music and being president being in the moments, not thinking about what could happen or this or that because it just you know just didn't feel like it would serve me well so so I just tried to stay in the moment, and then you know we finished the sad and people came up and they were gone, so I didn't even I didn't meet him or anything and And it wasn't until a week later when it went to the first workshop for Su-. Why met David and that was David Tony Visconti. and Um Coco Schwab. Assistant was there and Maria is mentioned. Mark, Jay and Ryan Myself. What did you know of? Bowie beforehand you kind of familiar with his music to see you knew where he's where he was in the Pantheon of rock and roll, and so on. How much of a big deal was this for you? I mean I would say I had a headed general knowledge of his music I mean. the record..

David Tony Visconti. Maria Schneider Bowie Mark John Anderson facebook Iowa Betty president kearns pen Manhattan sue Coco Schwab Ryan Myself Jay
"maria schneider" Discussed on Shut Up I Love It

Shut Up I Love It

12:26 min | 2 years ago

"maria schneider" Discussed on Shut Up I Love It

"To the PODCAST. My pleasure leisure. How was your ride? Here you know what trafficky but la tasks back. I would say you know you take the good and the bad in La. Sometimes it means in sitting in traffic for forty minutes. It does but I really waste my way around I post. I took Mulhall left turtles. It took a lot of left turns just just prayed and turn it makes you feel alive ways has made me appreciate the gift that God gives me every day in a way that I did not before it tests back to for you know that Gift Chris. What did you bring to this podcast? Oh I am so so excited to bring one of the best movies ever made. This is better Nado but a lou cheese stealing beauty see because most people at this point with think that it's conformist right if you say we're not a birth Lucci 'cause that's like the movie that put him on the map. I think significantly but then people have to think wait. But that's not what this podcasters because we're they read the title so there are no people just my imagination. People lo-look okay. Maybe there's someone who's got their podcasts player set to auto play they just finished an episode of of the daily and automatically the new episode. Shut up I love it. Started and they don't know what the topic is. And Yeah you're right you're right. They are right now thinking. Oh they're talking talking about the conformist but we're not now we will never talk about. CONFORMISM doesn't fit the theme. No it's popular well. I don't know too well. No He's never seen it is I say why not. I don't care about it do you care about any other. Bertolucci moves. Besides his name one. Great what is the one that you can name. They say I'll say it again. Stealing beauty starring live tyler. We're going to say it as many times during this episode so great. Yes yes stealing beauty tyler vehicle. Is it her breakout film. Yeah yes yeah. Her debutante breakout film because they're only work thus far had been like aerosmith aerosmith videos because it's nine hundred ninety six thousand nine okay three. LVN Live Tyler Vian. Oh Lord of the rings thanks very time. Yeah Yeah. This is indeed her breakthrough role. She plays Lucy Harmon an innocent American Eric and girl in my cannon she's related to Dan Harmon sir like second cousins. She will be so happy then she travels to Tuscany. Italy beautiful place never been but I is now like nephew. If you've seen the movie it's gone because they do show He. League goes there just to lose her virginity according to the summary that I I saw them film. Soon it Stephen. That's why she's motives. There's other this is a this. There's she has a lot of once that's true. She I guess she does. What Nicola Niccolo Nikola Nikolov? It does seem like she wants to get it from nickel who doesn't not me. I'll tell you I had to pick any man in this movie. It wouldn't be Niccolo. Would it be Alex. Christopher Yeah. Christopher played by young Joseph fines. Is this cast ridiculous. Where you guys being like this class is I don't want to get into it? You guys. Yeah I mean we can't get into it we should. It's a star studded. Cast besides live Tyler Moore some other names in this film cradle Vice Rachel his Bare boobs right away. But did you see your Bush to Bush. Probably I saw tyler's batch straight up do you know that. There's a the way to seal of Tyler's badge. When she is at some point like it's her it's not a body double I think because you can really see like she turns around and she's not wearing underwear? Because I think this point somebody took it off might have been. Christopher is the one who ends up. It's like Oh oh no. It's yeah it's all small douse house. Volvo roles are over at right and she turns her knees. And you see this trip. Glimpse of device Stephen. You missed it. Wide rewind the ages honey but you also see her breasts as well or abreast backed up. No when she's being painted by her phone folks. I love this movie. We not great okay. So she didn't lose virginity in two hundred five but it was touch and go there. I this is a so as we said. The Lucie is an American in Tuscany. Husky for many reasons not just to lose her virginity. She staying with some friends of her deceased mother. Ian and Diana Grayson. Nobody bothers stew. Explain who these people are like. She arrives there and there's a good ten minutes of us not knowing what's the longest happen. Things you know develop develop organically in this very slow moving European film. It's very European in Europe. Look I've only ever been to Ireland for a few you days from what movies have taught me about Europe. It's a place where nine people who are totally unrelated to each other. All live on an estate together and spend their alive together having sex in various different combination talk about each other's desired to lose Virginia. Because you know spoiler alert. There's a big moment where Lucy finds south that everybody's talking about her. Try to bang somebody a real soap opera move on the part of Alex parish played. What's his Jeremy Irons? I don't know why forgot his name. Stand Out Carrie. Threats Dying of disease. Hey you go. Who Cares answer? No he said it's not infections right either cancer. It's padded infections cancer. I Guess AIDS is not infectious on the less you are exchanging bodily fluids but it would have impossibility movie. Nobody explains what exactly Alex's illnesses and we just know it's not infectious and eventually kills him. It question mark goes away. Yeah Yeah big question where he goes away. That's what we know hospice or but you know it's like Europe so once they're in hospice like not listening to date is a hospice. So I keep saying it's here by look at you. Saw You know it's era patty like as if you know like you know what it is. This is the Europe of your youth. This is how you grew up right. I grew up in Asia but yes. This is the very very warm lots of wine making people at the pool. hoops everywhere boobs so like the setting basically is just that the villa right. That's really it. They got one open on a travel. Mont Open the creepy inhaled shots of live tyler. title touching her dressed badge but nonetheless roosting camcorder footage of every possible angle of live tyler drooling ruling a little bit yeah. She travels from America to the villa. She's asleep that's why she's drooling just says cleaner some random dudes like taking like video of her and then makes makes her get off the train and tons of shoes. I miss her flight and then hands her a tape that I he's been with. He's been traveling with her since the airplane here. I've been videoing you here. You go what she was like. Oh that's crazy okay. This is the place where every single man is going to harass me. It is that character. Is Monsieur Guillaume that. That's what they're trying to like. Yeah 'cause later monsieur. GM WHO's this well known figure in the community right right. He comes to the village connection. Gardening has that me is because he has a bracelet bracelet with Shell on it hookah shell the rental of a single poop. Shell Bracelet but really. That character is Bernardo Bertolucci himself. Oh you aware of this. Super Creepy director trickled Tinto brass. I actually pretty familiar with Europeans loans. Huzzah conform us a few times. But Tinto brass is this guy who used to be like really cutting cutting edge dude. He was supposed to direct clockwork orange but then he changed from Auburn Guard to eroticism and I mean like straight up poor or basically porn like corn with nice lighting and storyline. But yeah so like he's director Actually Salon Kitty if anybody knows and Colella which is pornographic drama alright so which he did disavowal though. But then it's weird because he disavowed Caligula because it was too sexual he thought to pornographic but then he started making his movies like cheeky. He wishes straight up foreign film and a lot of it is a think there's a character. Listen Chic which I saw and I couldn't believe my eyes old man basically tickly molesting like a youngest women probably over eighteen. But it's like the proxy for the Director Lake. Who's just getting the everywhere where he? Yeah yeah problems per note of Lucia. I think there's been some talk of the last few years. Have not. Were not kind to him because as you know. He and Marlon Brando made some very poor decisions so right when they decided to stick the border into the butt of What was her name why? Rip I pee. Schneider died Maria Schneider. She came out in like two thousand eleven or whatever issues like that see in last tango. Impairs is there's this sodomy scene between them and that's the scene that she cares thousand and joy like she doesn't want it because there's a lot of sexual encounters encounters between her character and Brando's character. That are consensual but this one is not and he sodomized her and he uses uses border to lubricate her and Schneider like who was like eighteen or nineteen at the time and they didn't do it to her right. Nobody like. She felt very violated and Brando probably dominated every single scene with his. You know he's all the way older. Yeah the tension onset was probably like not very dissimilar from the tension in the scene right and I think they did like cross boundaries that she felt should have been in place in terms of breath the conduct with the you know the the the way they were depicting the sex but our AP marsh yeah please the rest so yeah. He has some some issues. I haven't seen last pairs either. It's very sexual. I don't remember much about it but because it's used to be like a movie that Oh my God you don't see like you don't see it because it was so out. There like prohibited hit in many countries. Like not like different cuts over exists and everything. So it's up what I had to watch it to be like. What's the big talk about it? The same I just watch. I Know Corey. Dot which means in the Realms of census Japanese film where spoiler alert the main character. The female cuts solve demands penis at the end of the film and then runs on the toy listeners. That is truly a spoiler alert. I hope you adhere to it so that was also like super sexual anytime. There's a movie that makes a big splash warlike was so pornographic. I'm like I have to see what's the deal about. What's your body body to get? But we're not here to talk about penises. Being caught off in Japanese films. You know that's why I had to go see justice league because everybody was talking about how sexual pornographic the graphic and I didn't really get it to be the lion king. Yeah the version of. Can you feel the love tonight. John McEnroe's Lion King Disturbing can you give us a brief.

"maria schneider" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

09:22 min | 2 years ago

"maria schneider" Discussed on KGO 810

"Heard of your life Strange's, jaw example, I know smeller right armpit sniffer member. There's there's that. Job. They have to smell people's armpit. Why they do that? I'm sure to say that the product of make it not smell work. Right. So there are jobs. I mean, I want says a kid had a job where we would go. We drove a truck around with a high pressure water hose, and we clean Exxon bathrooms. So we would open up the bathroom and take this detergent, sprayed all the wall. So it up on the walls and blasted trying to be as far away as we could. But you'd have to get in there a little bit because it was around the corner right guy in there once. But how about this? How would you like to be an intimacy coordinator? What does that mean, that's HBO has this person to make sure the sex scenes all work, right? You're. That's good. It's a new thing. They have ever since remember the Maria Schneider deal. She was the woman had been in last Tango in Paris. And she said that Marlon Brando. Oh, yeah. They still buttering or something like that will also there's this show on Showtime that just got cancelled called smell f-. And I know it. Anyways. I particularly thought it was funny. I thought it was funny. But it was a woman an actress, Shannon, pretty significant role in it. And apparently, she was very unhappy with how a sexy and was handled who is in the room and how it was filmed. And she quit the show. I I'm gonna say this that I'm gonna hear Heather scream from the other room. But I mean, do we really need sex scenes, and we do a lapse what can you have just like heavy kissing and then they fade to black. Oh, oh, this is like it'd be graphic. It doesn't always worse for the woman though. Because the guy gets is usually reserved to be naked. I think that you could definitely sexy. Although james. Always gets mad now. My husband. He always gets mad when like, you know, like on HBO, whatever they'll tell you if there's nudity or whatever. And he always, yes, there's nudity. And then he's like, but it's probably going to be a guy because now the tables are turning now you see guys now their recollections, it's not a rack. But you'll you'll see you'll see the giants. Like, you won't say it like I just wreck shin you go. They'll see. But I mean, this is this is we are in some ways part of America is very conservative about this. They don't wanna see sex and their movies. And and I think about like the of really hot scene is in one of the born movies. The first one where he's you know, the girl kisses him in the bathroom got into the field. I mean, I mean, you can have really sexual scenes without seeing anything. And that's what I mean. Like, I think that that's what we're talking. I'm talking about like scenes where you see people on the covers the naked. Yeah. What was like, I know that they ask women they the script and they want a job, really bad. But this is in the script that you gotta do this thing. And if you're not a well known actress, you gotta do it. Well, yeah. And because for a woman, I mean because of our society being topless is is exposing yourself, by the way today, it'll be all of the internet because it'll be out on DVD and people to say, I mean, you do see a lot of, you know, male butts in movies, that's real. Really common. I remember in Tango and cash. Remember Sylvester Stallone Kurt Russell had that they were in the prison shower and they were walking away. And he saw both thereabouts. I was young. Then I remember that was a big deal these people's butts on like, you know, I'm I'm standing male. But guy I did that for a while the in my but many times. Victor. But I that weird to you. I have the most unattractive, but I got a flat. But that's unfortunate. I is really. I mean, I understand big butts. But I think that view flat, but you can't have one. That's I don't really think about my. But that much, but I don't care. So then this woman is an intimacy coordinator for age. What does she have to do? That's interesting. I guess it's a woman in this case. Her name is Elise. Alicia Rhodus as she says there are no actual sex acts that happened on set so much of it is smoke smoking mirrors. Right. There's another woman who is an intimacy choreographer doesn't move. You. Move your elbow here, and you go there. She says she has a great responsibility to uphold standards of the sounds like an HBO release this for them. We have the great responsibility uphold standards of consent on every set. Despite the fact, only twenty intimacy directors are currently working in Hollywood, I feel that every room I'm not in as a potential for an actor to be hurt. I don't know, man. I just, you know, first of all I'm glad I'm not married to an actress because I don't know if I could do that. Groping. Yeah. I remember and bull Durham when they do that bathtub and their tongue. You can see the French kissing. If you hit movie level, you've kissed a number of people. But for me, I think that if you're already in a movie, and you have an intimacy coordinator or choreographer that helps you it is that that is that separation where you might not feel comfortable telling the director, but having someone check in with you like, hey, this scene calls for are you okay with us, and you can kind of be like or talked to them beforehand, and they could be your advocate. And I think that's what it is an advocate that can speak for you. Because you might feel too much pressure to keep going. But the other is like, Nope. Nope. That's not okay. The contract or we're in real small underwear. They have covers and stuff like that. But I mean naked topless. Yes. No. I wouldn't want some guy grinding my wife. I think that you would have to definitely. And can you have a double, you know, can I have somebody Sandra Bullock to death for some of you had a double the kissing, and like, you know, but I don't want him to actually I don't know. I don't know how movies that's what I'm seeing. What makes movies hot? Obviously sex sells movies. Chip comes not good movies. They don't that is not tell me a great movie that would have been less. Great without a section. You can't give it some thought. Well, eight ten tell me a movie, I just love making scenes. The hand on the thing that was all to see and the boob. When they did. He he he drew her was very romantic and sexual and no sex, no intimacy coordinators necessary. The only thing you saw they were kissing the back seat. Then you saw steam and handle. I know that there are movies where it was like may list remains go down the Ristori movies. You don't need them. And I approve here. I'm just saying I'm doing this for women. I've seen the winning style men are talks. I've heard this before from who told me this. Well, my buddy, John, John John Carroll. He's married to Susan's friend sister. And so mayor to tells me stories that Susan told her over the years about just guys pigs, you know, that just are on the set, and they're not supposed to be doing what they're doing. And they do it. I mean, this whole thing we're either in on this. We're not it. I don't know if a woman doesn't want to have sex in a movie, they should redo the scene in a way instead of casting somebody else that will show their bum and their boobs, right? I mean, I get what you're saying. And I am not one to. But I I don't know. I don't mind sexiness appropriate sex as I do like the idea of intimacy coordinator to help the actor actress I like that. But again, you know, there's twenty min Hollywood, and how many moves you being shot every day. Right. You know, I don't even talking about the ones that the wa wa. Pedal. Steve. Hi, you're on chip and Nikki. Okay. GO? What do you think of my thought is that maybe you look at some of these movies like the born there's really hot scene, and you know, they're they're kissing. Somebody's naked and the next morning. She wakes up and bed by herself. And he's wiping down the room. It was perfect fit right in. I never saw that. Well, I mean identity person, okay, that's sex comedies and my call, Amy. Heckling the director of fast times ridgemont high said Phoebe Cates. Tune through mind didn't want to do the iconic topless scene. Yeah. Which takes over the movie she's coming out of the pool slowly, and she has a red bikini on just goes. Out of around. That's not sexy. That's just like. Sexy. Closet or whatever. Yeah. That was. Coordinator, whatever they're about forty year old. Virgin, right. You don't see anybody have sex. It's a whole Larry's movie and it's about comedy though. Just talking about comedy fast times as a comedy, right? Yeah. But I mean anything about like, Basic Instinct or some of these. There's just movies where we're like love movies. Like, I don't know the notebook. I dunno some movies were it adds to it. It's gratuitous is you're seeing anything, but yeah, they're having sex because it's part of the story. You see any problem with it? I think you can add one more thing. Yeah. Head. You're just you mentioned that particular movie. It's interesting shown stones said, she didn't realize that she was lit that way. When she did that scene. Oh. Just a famous leg scene. Yeah. Exactly. By.

coordinator HBO Hollywood director Marlon Brando giants Maria Schneider Shannon Susan Sandra Bullock Sylvester Stallone Durham John John Carroll America Paris Heather james Alicia Rhodus Coordinator Victor
"maria schneider" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:01 min | 3 years ago

"maria schneider" Discussed on KQED Radio

"E D the time now is five twenty. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Michelle Martin. We're going to go back to a question that consumed the US government. In fact, led to a partial shutdown of the government last month the question of additional physical barriers along the us Mexico border. There already are some barriers as you probably know. But the argument is over whether additional ones would actually make a difference or are worth the cost as you probably also know President Trump has made this a high priority. But we've been asking a different question is it. Moral house speaker Nancy Pelosi among other Democrats, and some activists have laid on a very specific marker on the wild calling. It an immorality last week. We heard from Sean, Casey theologian and former State Department official who's written widely about the intersection of faith and politics is currently at Georgetown University this week. We are hearing another prominent thinker from a different perspective, the Reverend Robert Jefferson. He's pastor of First Baptist Church of Dallas, Texas. He's one of President Trump's closest evangelical advisors, for example. He offered prayers at the opening of the US embassy in Jerusalem, and he is with. Us now on the live from his church in Dallas pastor Jeffers. Thank you so much for talking with us. Once again, great to be back with you, Michelle. So speaker Pelosi might be the most high profile person to make the argument that the wall is immoral, but she's not the only one I take it. You disagree? Well, I do and look I mean to say that a wall is immoral or is the pope said earlier this year unchristian, I think is beyond reason walls are not moral or immoral and enough themselves. It depends on the purpose for which they're being used and for government to use a barrier to protect its security and its sovereignty. I believe is in keeping with what the bible says is the God given purpose of government. You know, I preach the sermon on inauguration day for President Trump and his family, and I told the Old Testament story of Nehemiah whom God ordered to build a wall around Jerusalem to protect the citizens. And as an aside, I said, Mr President God is not. Against walls. Are there are other texts though in the bible that bring down walls that are also quite well known? I mean, and the holy text of the Judeo-Christian ethic are also a very clear about the need to offer. Welcome to the stranger to protect the vulnerable. Is there a biblical warrant for a wall in your view? Absolutely. When God told the Israelites to be kind to take care of the aliens and the foreigners in your land. But he goes on to say the reason for that he said to Israel because you were once aliens and foreigners in Egypt, and that's the key. Michelle to understanding what the bible is saying Israel came to Egypt as welcomed guests not as illegal immigrants. They were invited to come Phero invited Jacob and his family to come and settle there. And I believe America is the kindest most compassionate nation in the world to those who come in. Our country legally, but there is no biblical basis for illegal immigration for those who take a different view. I don't know that it's so much. A question of the wall itself is that what is the duty to people who are fleeing oppression and suffering, and that I think they consider to be the higher duty than maintaining this physical barrier to keep people out. So how do you understand that? Well, again, I think we need to be sympathetic toward those who are fleeing oppression. I think is a practical basis there's probably a limit to how many people America can take. But I think government has to balance that call for compassion with the call for protection. And so I think government has to do a balancing act here. And you know, I know somewhat of the heart of this president. I don't believe he's a mean spirited, man. I believe him to be very compassionate. I've said in the Oval Office with him in her in. Agonize over the DACA situation wanting to help the dreamers in fact, wanting to do much more than the Republican establishment wanted to do and before we let you go. Let's just go back against something. You referenced surly, which is what do you think your role in? This is I know that you're a very strong supporter of the present. You just tweeted just a few just a little while ago. Thank God for this president in your specific concern that you're referencing was abortion policy in this country. So I know that you're a strong supporter of him. But what do you think your role in this debate is I believe my job as a preacher of God's word is to speak to what God's word says about every issue, including immigration, and I think people need to understand that God has created the church for one purpose. He created the family for another. But the third institution. He created was government and governments distinct responsibility is to maintain order and protected citizens. And I think it's wrong to vilify. President Trump or any government official whose trying to fulfill that God given in unique responsibility of government. But you disagree with other political leaders? I mean, there are other political leaders who don't think are doing their job to protect the public. And I mean, if if supporting government in all of its decisions was biblical than there wouldn't have been an American revolution with their. Oh, I don't support government and all of its decisions. I think for example. New York state Virginia. They're late term abortion. Bills are barbaric and ought to be opposed at every level. I think Roe v. Wade is barbaric ought to be opposed. I don't have any trouble calling out government when they're wrong that is Dr Robert Jeffress. He is the pastor of First Baptist Church of Dallas. And we reached him at his office there a pastor Jeffers. Thanks so much for talking to us. Always good to be with you, Michelle. Thank you. It's award season for the movie and television industries, which are still as other workplaces are grappling with the fallout from the metoo movement. But unlike other industries entertainers are often called upon to have intimate contact with each other in ways that would be totally uncalled for another workplaces. So how to prevent abuse and harassment onset to that end some production houses are now hiring so-called intimacy coordinators to oversee sex scenes HBO announced this fall that they were staff every one of its television shows and films that have intimate scenes with an intimacy coordinator who wanted to understand more about what this work in. Sale. So we've called to O'Brien she is the intimacy coordinator for the new Netflix show sex education. She's with us now from London, MS Brian, thanks so much for talking to us. Thank you very much for fighting me. So first what's the job description? What does it intimacy coordinator due for a production coordinator is someone who is practiced in putting in place a clear structure and a process to go through one choreographing a sex scene. So allows for to serve the director's vision. Make sure the writing served, and then putting a structure in place, and then the actor can choreograph the sex in safely, and then it means that they come to then actually acting and filming it to everybody knows exactly what's happening, and then they can actually create an act the sex in in a way better way than has been done before. If you weren't there who would be doing that the director. Yes. Yes. Absolutely. And and of course, what's happened in the past the lot of bad practice hasn't been because anybody's beans. Harassing or abuse. But just because the hasn't been talk to put in place and some very different scenarios would happen. Like, the director might talk about the scene very clearly about what they want. But then just not know that the next stage is actually not just leave it to chance, but then to create the structure and start the sex scenes of the everybody knows exactly what's happening in the past. They would have spoken about it. And then go, right? Just go for it. And then you've got a situation where the actor. Improvising. As best. I can was asked oven another scenario. That's happened. Is again, the director. We'll talk about it, really. Clearly, you know, the director isn't someone who's practiced in helping to choreograph physical bodies and physical bodies moving. So then they'll say, okay, you to go and work out yourselves. So then you're in interesting situation where actors left in rather than still being in a professional situation that suddenly thrown into a private situation that might goes there trailer or they might go to rehearsal, and but the left to their own devices in Sunday's like, okay? You know, what you have to wait? And you get situations where perhaps at an actress, no experience in might take the lead and. It's basically no brainer. No one. I bring this work and everybody goes, oh my goodness. This is just so obvious. And why hasn't it happened before now? Well, that was what I was thinking in the sense that fight coordinators have existed for years in Hollywood that they choreograph fight scenes. It's interesting though, that this work has only recently become part of the experience. But I think people are familiar with the abusive situations, I think the one that comes to mind for a lot of people as last Tango in Paris. Where Maria Schneider says. For those who are familiar with the film, but it was nineteen seventy two. It was a huge. Moment in film history with a scene of violence between Maria Schneider, and in Marlon Brando and Maria Schneider says that the director who is a man Bernardo Bertolucci and. Marlon Brando knew what was going to happen. But she didn't. And the director says that he wanted her to react, you know, he wanted her to really feel the humiliation of the scene. Well, there's been a huge outcry about the subsequently many people have industry talk about how just really wrong is. But that happened in nineteen seventy two and yet your work has only just when his has your role really become become institutionalized. Okay. So semi understanding of is unfortunately money speaks and the thing is that a production is going to take care when they've deemed to be a risk. There was a time. I think it was about thirty years ago when people will do stunts and there wasn't a stunt coordinator that just go ahead and do them. And of course, people were injured. So for years as you said last time comparison the seventies that we've known that doing is an intimacy where your intimate and private personal bodies being violated results an injury. But that injury. Is emotional and psychological. And and my sense is that that hasn't been taken into account. It hasn't been deemed something that is that they need to take care and that someone might be able to to call a redress call out a missed a wrongdoing, and and therefore take action and be able to. From the shift has been post Weinstein. So post Weinstein, the time's up the fact that. You know, you are being listened to and heard, and that's a different the understanding that the injury it can be physical. But it's it's emotional and psychological is nothing given credence and codes of conduct is about what we don't. We don't want abuse. We don't want harassment. But the intimacy guidelines intimacy onset guidelines gives a clear process of allows for transparency and for the and consent. So that then everybody is on the same page, and then you can get fabulous sexy. And you can get a fabulous moment of passion. What the show that you worked on sex education centers on sexual situations. I mean, it's about a high school student who is the son of a sex therapist who gives sex advice to his peers with the reason I'm curious about this as it in part because of the the whole question of of consent is very very important when it comes to people who are underage. But the also other question I have is these are people who want assumes are still pretty new at this game. Right..

director president President Trump Michelle Dallas coordinator Nancy Pelosi First Baptist Church US Jerusalem Jeffers Michelle Martin harassment official NPR Mexico Maria Schneider Robert Jefferson America Israel
"maria schneider" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:52 min | 3 years ago

"maria schneider" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Michelle Martin. We're going to go back to a question that consumed the US government. In fact, led to a partial shutdown of the government last month the question of additional physical barriers along the us Mexico border. There already are some barriers as you probably know. But the argument is over whether additional ones would actually make a difference or are worth the cost as you probably also know President Trump has made this a high priority. But we've been asking a different question is it. Moral house speaker Nancy Pelosi among other Democrats, and some activists have laid on a very specific marker on the wild calling. It an immorality last week. We heard from Sean, Casey Afia gin and former State Department official who's written widely about the intersection of faith and politics is currently at Georgetown University this week. We are hearing another prominent thinker from a different perspective, the Reverend Robert Jefferson. He's pastor of First Baptist Church of Dallas, Texas. He's one of President Trump's closest evangelical advisors, for example. He offered prayers at the opening of the us embassy in Jerusalem. And he is with us now on the live from his church in Dallas pastor Jeffers. Thank you so much for talking with us. Once again, great to be back with you, Michelle. So speaker Pelosi might be the most high profile person to make the argument that the wall is immoral, but she's not the only one I take it. You disagree? Well, I do and look I mean to say that a wall is immoral or is the pope said earlier this year unchristian, I think is beyond reason walls are not moral or immoral and enough themselves. It depends on the purpose for which they're being used and for government to use a a barrier to protect its security and its sovereignty. I believe is in keeping with what the bible says is the God given purpose of government. You know, I preached the sermon on inauguration day for President Trump and his family. I told the Old Testament story of Nehemiah whom God ordered to build a wall around Jerusalem to protect the citizens. And as an aside, I said, Mr President God. Is not against walls. Who are? There are other texts though in the bible that bring down walls that are also quite well known. I mean, and the holy texts of Judeo-Christian ethic are also a very clear about the need to offer. Welcome to the stranger to protect the vulnerable. Is there a biblical warrant for a wall in your view? Absolutely. When God told the Israelites to be kind to take care of the aliens and the foreigners in your land. But he goes on to say the reason for that. He said the Israel because you were once aliens and foreigners in Egypt, and that's the key. Michelle to understanding what the bible is saying Israel came to Egypt as welcomed guests not as illegal immigrants. They were invited to come favorable invited. Jacob and his family to come and settle there. And I believe America is the kindest most compassionate nation in the world to those. Who come into our country legally, but there is no biblical basis for illegal immigration for those who take a different view and under that, it's so much. A question of the wall itself is that what is the duty to people who are fleeing oppression and suffering, and that I think they consider to be the higher duty than maintaining this physical barrier to keep people out. So how do you understand that? Well, again, I think we need to be sympathetic toward those who are fleeing oppression. I think is a practical basis. There is probably a limit to how many people America can take. But I think government has to balance that call for compassion with the call for protection. And so I think government has to do a balancing act here, and I know somewhat of the heart of this president. I don't believe he's a mean spirited, man. I believe him to be very compassionate. I've said in the Oval Office with him and hurt. Agonize over the DACA situation wanting to help the dreamers in fact, wanting to do much more than the Republican establishment wanted to do and before we let you go. Let's just go back against something. You referenced surly, which is what do you think your role in? This is I know that you're a very strong supporter of the present. You just tweeted just a few just a little while ago. Thank God for this president in your specific concern that you were referencing was abortion policy in this country. So I know that you're a strong supporter of him. But what do you think your role in this debate is I believe my job as a preacher of God's word is to speak to what God's word says about every issue, including immigration, and I think people need to understand that God has created the church for one purpose. He created the family for another. But the third institution. He created was government and governments distinct responsibility is to maintain order and protected citizens. And I think it's wrong to vilify. By President Trump or any government official whose trying to fulfill that God, given your unique responsibility of government. But you disagree with other political leaders? I mean, there are other political leaders whom you don't think are doing their job to protect the public. And if supporting government in all of its decisions was biblical than there wouldn't have been an American revolution with their. Oh, oh, I don't support government in all of the decisions. I think for example. New York state Virginia. They're late term abortion. Bills are barbaric and ought to be opposed at every level. I think Roe v. Wade is barbaric off to be opposed. I don't have any trouble calling out government when they're wrong that is Dr Robert Jeffress. He is the pastor of First Baptist Church of Dallas. And we reached him at his office there a pastor Jeffers. Thanks so much for talking to us. Always good to be with you, Michelle. Thank you. It's award season for the movie and television industries, which are still as other workplaces are grappling with the fallout from the metoo movement. But unlike other industries entertainers are often called upon to have intimate contact with each other in ways that would be totally uncalled for another workplaces. So how to prevent abuse and harassment onset to that and some production houses are now hiring so-called intimacy coordinators to oversee sex scenes HBO announced this fall that they were staff every one of its television shows and films that have intimate scenes with an intimacy coordinator who wanted to understand more about what this work in. Tell so we've called to O'Brien she is the intimacy coordinator for the new Netflix show sex education. She's with us now from London, Mr Brian, thanks so much for talking to us. Thank you very much for Viking. So first what's the job description? What what does it intimacy coordinator due for production? So an intimacy coordinator is someone who is practiced in putting in place a clear structure and a process to go through one choreographing a sex scene. So allows for to serve the director's vision. Make sure the writing served, and then putting clear structure in place, and then the actor can choreograph growth sex in safely, and then it means that they come to then actually acting and filming it to everybody knows exactly what's happening, and then they can actually create and an act the sex in in a way better way than has been done before. If you weren't there who would be doing that the director. Yes. Yes. Absolutely. And and of course, what's happened in the past the lot of bad practice hasn't been because antibodies beans. Set of harassing or abusing. But just because the hasn't been talk to put in place and some very different scenarios would happen. Like, the director might talk about the scene very clearly about what they want. But then just not know that the next stage is actually not just leave it to chance, but then to create the structure and stealth the sex scenes at the everybody knows exactly what's happening in the past. They have spoken about it. And then go, right? Just go for it. And then you've got a situation where the actors improvising. As best. They can was asked of them. Another snow. That's happened. Is that again, the direct? We'll talk about it, really. Clearly, you know, the director isn't someone who's practiced in helping to choreograph physical bodies and physical bodies moving. So then they'll say, okay, you to go and work out of your cells. So then you're in into a situation where actors left in rather than still being in a professional situation that suddenly thrown into a private situation might goes the trailer or they might go to rehearsal, and but the left to their own devices and Sundays, right, okay? You know, what you happy with? And you get situations where perhaps an actress more experience, they might take the lead and. Basically no brainer. Bring this work and everybody goes, oh my goodness. This is just so obvious. And why hasn't it happened before now? Well, that was what I was thinking in the sense that fight coordinators have existed for years in Hollywood that they choreograph fight scenes. It's interesting though, that this work has only recently become part of the experience. But I think people are familiar with the abusive situations, I think the one that comes to mind for a lot of people as last Tango in Paris where Maria Schneider says for those who are familiar with the film, but it was nineteen seventy two a huge. Moment in film history. A scene of violence between Maria Schneider, and in Marlon Brando and Maria Schneider says that the director who is a man Bernardo Bertolucci and. Marlon Brando knew what was going to happen. But she didn't. And the director says that he wanted her to react, you know, he wanted her to really feel the humiliation of the scene. Well, there's been a huge outcry about the subsequently many people have industry talked about how just really wrong there is. But that happened in nineteen seventy two and yet your work has only just when has has your role really become become institutionalized. Okay. So so my understanding of it is unfortunately money speaks and the thing is that a production is going to take care when they deemed to be a risk. There was a time. I think it was about thirty years ago when people would do stunts, and there wasn't a stunt coordinator there that just go ahead and do them, and of course, people were injured. So for years as you said last time comparison the seventies that we've known that doing an intimate scene where your intimate and private personal bodies being violated results an injury. But that injury. Is emotional and psychological. And and my sense is that hasn't been taken into account. It hasn't been deigned something that is that they need to take care and that someone might be able to to call a redress call out. Amidst a wrongdoing, and and therefore take action and be able to sue for me that the shift has been post Weinstein. So post Weinstein, the time's up the fact that. You know, you are being listened to and heard, and that's a different the understanding that the injury, it can be physical, emotional, and psychological is nothing given credence and codes of conduct is about what we don't want. We don't want abuse. We don't want harassment, but the intimacy guidelines the intimacy onset guidelines gives a clear process that allows for transparency and for agreement and consent. So that then everybody is on the same page, and then you can get fabulous sexy, and you can get fabulous moment of passion. What are the show that you worked on sex education centers on sexual situations? I mean, it's about a high school student who is the son of a sex therapist who gives sex advice to his peers with the reason I'm curious about this as it in part because of the the whole question of of consent is very very important when it comes to people who are underage. But the also other question I have is these are people who want assumes are still pretty new at this game. Right..

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