11 Burst results for "Maria Sayer"

"maria sayer" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

08:13 min | Last week

"maria sayer" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"That's car selling, reimagined, at CarMax. Joining me today is Anna Maria sayer. She's a producer for NPR's alt Latino Anna Maria. Hey, what's up, Steven? Thanks for having me. Oh, it is such a pleasure. I'm so glad we can talk about this record. So Bad Bunny has been streamed billions upon billions of times he was Spotify's most streamed artist in both 2020 and 2021, now his new album on cintiq has set its own round of streaming records this past Friday the day it came out, Bad Bunny received the most streams any artist has ever registered in a single day with more than a 183 million. Benito Antonio Martinez Ocasio is a full fledged multimedia superstar he performed at the 2020 Super Bowl, he won the 2021 WWE 24/7 championship. He's in the forthcoming Brad Pitt thriller bullet train and he's just been cast in an upcoming marvel movie. Now on verano cinti promises to make Bad Bunny and even bigger star, it is a 23 song double length album that sprawls across many genres including pop, trapped reggaeton and much more. It's hard to sum up this album using a single sound or genre or vibe, but it really feels like an expansive summertime mixtape. It's even split into a side a and a side B side a features several guest artists from Puerto Rico, including J Cortez and Raoul Alejandro, while side B showcases a number of women's voices, including those of the marias Bomba Estadio and bus kabya. Anna Maria, what do you think of when varano cintiq? I mean, what do I think of it? That is such a loaded question. I feel like for the sake of, I don't know, like journalistic, ethics, integrity. I have to disclose off the bat that I personally am in love with bad bunnies. So vicious objectivity, just old surgical objectivity. What do I think of the album? I love it. I love listening to it. I think it is a departure for him in many ways and also very consistent. You know, he released these back to back to back projects, right? Around 2020. Three albums in 2020. Crazy. Crazy. With each new one, he broke the mold, I think, a little further. He's obviously known as being this really big that I get to Nero and he went from that to incorporating pop and punk and all these kind of different interesting sounds and what was funny about hearing you list some of the genres he plays with is I'm like, that doesn't even really tap the surface of what he's playing with on this album. Ad plus mambo, bossa nova house, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. And I think this to me is kind of like his victory lap album in a way where it's like there were no expectations in many ways around this album like he didn't have to adhere to anything or anyone. He is the star. I feel and I feel like we get into kind of arguments, soft arguments about this a lot because I'm like, Felix, he's not Latin pop star, Bad Bunny anymore. Like he is just the pop star. We don't even need to talk anymore about crossing over and all these different things that we often talk about with big Latin artists. He is the crossover. He's done it. He can sing in Spanish he can sing in English. He can play with whatever genres he want and people will listen. I mean, you heard those numbers. It's like he could drop like a kid's record. I don't know, like a kid's bop thing and people would be like, oh my God, look at what he did. It's so innovative. But I think he has earned those stripes. I think what he does here is really impressive. I think he really spends a lot of time as opposed to making it, you know, the super paired down tight work, he really spends a lot of time meandering through the different genres through the different locations that he mentions, you know, whether in lyrics or in styles or sonically or whatever it might be. He really takes his time painting this really beautiful homage to Latin America as a whole homage to Puerto Rico, like he always does to himself to his fans. So I think you really get an impressive array of concepts driven home here. Yeah, you said victory lap. And it does feel like that. It feels very ambitious in a lot of ways. Like it really feels like he's trying to showcase everything he can do all at once all on top of each other, but I do think there's kind of an uncompromising quality to this record at the same time that really shines through. As ambitious as this is, as much as this is geared to be the album of the summer. As much as it is geared to be kind of all things to all people, you mentioned the different Latin American countries that he's shouting out, you know, how much this record is kind of trying to appeal to a really, really broad swath of listeners. It would have been very easy for this record to be like an even bigger swing at like a U.S. pop crossover. This is an artist who's worked with Drake. This is an artist who's worked with Cardi B but you look at the guest list on this record and Raoul Alejandro is a huge star. I mean, they're definitely names, but they're not necessarily Drake. They're not Cardi B like I was really delighted as a fan of Bomba estereo as a fan of the marias as a fan of buska booyah. I just loved seeing them get this like huge a list showcase to become bigger and bigger stars. Yeah, that is a huge piece of the intentionality he's bringing here, right? Because, you know, like you said, like, oh, it's made to be the biggest album of the summer. It's made to you all these things. And yes and no, right? We got this album name and we were like a summer without you. That is not an album of bops. That is not like an album you're playing up in the club. That's like me at home by myself at 10 p.m. like eating chips in bed kind of energy. Like that's just a lot of sad box. Well, yeah, for sure, for sure. Yeah, it is true. And on this record too, right? There's sad bops, there's classic reggaeton hits. There's a million other things in between. And I think that to me, he named the album that because he wanted to have the freedom to play in whatever area he wanted to. He was setting expectations at like, you might be able to play these in the club, you might not, but I just want to be able to do what I want to do. And I think that to me is more than anything a testament to a change in how he wants to serve his fans in many ways with his music. I've covered Latin music. I've listened to a lot of these different reggaeton returning from COVID. They're like all off with the hits who have like peppas. You have all of these things that are like made for club play, right? Like they're made for get back out there, get back out in the world. Do your thing. To me, what I hear when I hear this record is I hear Benito being like, get back out in the club, get back out on the streets, get back out with your family in the backyard. This album is not necessarily about oh go and have a crazy time post pandemic. It's really about him wanting to be part of the listener's experience in every part of their day. That really speaks to young listeners, right? Because he's always been able to play with the boundaries of things with the nuance of things. He's always been kind of a contradiction. I think in and of himself and everything that he does. And so I think the title track, unver scene, it has a very somber, not somber, but like melancholic feel to it. And if you listen to the lyrics, they're actually pretty happy. They're pretty upbeat and I think that's just one example of him saying to this global young audience that he has like, I see you, I see the gamut of emotions that you run in a day or an hour or a moment and I'm here to speak to that and to give you something to play as a soundtrack to those experiences no matter what they are. Lord type of love young not that I am a thin, but all of that don't know.

Raoul Alejandro Anna Maria Anna Maria sayer Benito Antonio Martinez Ocasio J Cortez varano cintiq CarMax Puerto Rico Spotify Brad Pitt NPR Steven Cardi B Super Bowl Bomba estereo Nero buska booyah Drake Felix Latin America
"maria sayer" Discussed on All Songs Considered

All Songs Considered

03:59 min | 2 weeks ago

"maria sayer" Discussed on All Songs Considered

"Time thinking about don't you girl ultra, Elsa is the record. This song is Bombay and here to talk about girl ultra is a surprise special guest. All Latinos on a Maria sayer. How's it going Robin? This was a late ad this week and probably new for a lot of people so tell us about girl ultra. It's a fun record, right? It's like I'm bopping my head. I'm imagining listening to it in the club. It really is kind of one of those dancer EPs and I think that's really fun for her as an artist because everyone's like, she's such a pioneer because she's really been working in the R&B space, but out of Mexico City and so people were like, wow, she's such an innovator. Look at what she's doing. And now she's like, yeah, I do R&B and I do punk and pop and electronica and all these different genres. And it's really her repping her city in a really special way. A lot of people may not realize Mexico City is this enormous urban center with all of these sounds that are a part of it. Four on the floor can absolutely drive me bonkers. I mean like it is just a relentless jackhammer. It's irresistible. It is. She makes it irresistible. It's like, I never thought four in the floor could be subtle, but it is subtle on this record. It's just kind of slide the way they do it. You got to listen to more house music. Chicago house did. Don't forget, not just houses, but Chicago soulful house music gotta listen to. That part. It's funny because she actually has a background as a DJ. That was what she came up in, and then she was like, now I'm going R&B, and now she's like, I'm done with that. I've been trapped in my house for however long because of the pandemic. And I think you can literally hear that. You can hear her itching to get back out there and dance. Like that sound to me is the predominant thing that's happening on this.

Maria sayer Mexico City Elsa Bombay Robin Chicago
"maria sayer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:18 min | 3 weeks ago

"maria sayer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Tell me they use what their kids or they use with their friends to try to identify well what do you actually experiencing that is not healthy or not good in this relationship And down the road I hope this will be required curriculum in every school in this country That was Katie hood She's the CEO of the one love foundation Katie thank you so much for spending this time with us Thank you so much finally today big news in a Latin music world I gotta go back to the door when you don't get up on the team Seem like you but I sure the artists known as rosalia announced a massive world tour for the fall She'll hit 15 countries in 46 shows in a tour running from July until December And that makes sense because rosalia has become a huge star all around the world both in English and Spanish language music The folks at the NPR music podcast alt Latino have been following rosalia for a while now noting her unusual path to the top and the Latin music world in her atypical approach to making music Co hosts Anna Maria sayer had a chance to speak with her and she is going to tell us more about it Anna Maria welcome Thank you so much for joining us Thank you Michelle I'm so excited to be here Me too So rosa Lee just released her full length album motomami last month it debuted at number one on Spotify's global album chart It also debuted at number one on billboard's Latin pop album chart How did she do it And what's your take on why she's had such a strong impact so fast Wow yeah I mean you're looking at an artist who actually believe it or not made her first major project while she was still in school She's an artist who's all about making music really authentic to her experiences so the story is she kind of follows her instincts and she tries out making this experimental flamenco pop fusion project as a thesis for a music conservatory in Barcelona She actually almost goes broke doing it in the process She releases the album el mal care is the name in the world goes wild for it It goes number one on the Latin music charts it wins her 5 Latin Grammys It makes it on Rolling Stone's top 500 albums of all time How does somebody go from being a music school to being a global sensation I'm just curious why do you think this has hit so hard so fast You know I think we all have been wondering that same thing for a while who have been watching this It feels extraordinary to be sure Most of this industry as least as far as I've observed is really based around this perfect storm of who you know and having the right publicists in the right people behind you and I think that's the true magic of la rosalia right Because what she was making was so captivating and unique it didn't matter where or when or how she was gonna blow up She's just that good She really is remarkable Well I don't know I'm really curious to hear what rosa Leah told you and your interview And I want to point out she doesn't give many So we'll let you take it from here Sound good Oh my God absolutely thanks.

rosalia Katie hood Anna Maria sayer rosa Lee Katie Anna Maria NPR Michelle Barcelona Rolling Stone la rosalia rosa Leah
"maria sayer" Discussed on All Songs Considered

All Songs Considered

06:19 min | Last month

"maria sayer" Discussed on All Songs Considered

"Is my pick for the best music released in March. Diaspora problems by soak oil. This is a band from Philadelphia that has a wall of spaghetti approach to making punk music except that this spaghetti is splash hammers. I think the chaos has served them well in the past is their second full length album, especially on such an unstable platform for the vocalist here, starting to spit and scream and run on sentences. Have you guys heard this record? Oh, this is a real ear opener for me, Lars. I wasn't real familiar with the band before this, but definitely a fan now. I was just surprised at the singular alloy of punk and rock and rap and metal and hardcore. Then the big cherry on top of everything is the surprisingly confessional lyrics that might give Joni Mitchell a run for her money. I mean, very deep inside his emotional world talking about his successes and failures and suicide and a really strong record. This is their debut for our epitaph records, which is a big bump up and the punk world. And I've seen people compare it to the album, the shape of punk to come by refused, which is not an unfair comparison, but sokolo has the benefit of hindsight while the shape of punk to come was of landmark moment, blast and together different extreme sounds to make a really forward thinking punk record. Some of it sounds really dated now. But sokolo, there aren't just wrap parts in metal parts and punk parts. It's a shared root system of black music. And that's what I find so thrilling about this. They've hit a groove whereas in the past, it just felt like they were just, again, throwing spaghetti at the wall. But there is even a song on here called thumbsucker that has a horn section, essentially making a third wave ska song, which is like my mortal enemy and yet here I am skanking and washing all the same. Talk about emotional vulnerability. It's a song that to a large degree is about how his grandmother takes away his cookie monster doll, and he goes through this chronological list of what happened in his life from crying and thumb sucking to therapy and then anxiety disorder, all in the span of like three minutes of amazing wall of sound. The faith that I like about this runner three albums we just did at the keel quiche American girl classic objects by jenning ball and Diaspora problems. And different ways they're about the destruction of whatever we thought the American Dream was supposed to be. And whatever we think capitalism is supposed to solve it really feels like deep interrogations, both at a personal level and institutional level to understand why these things consistently fail us on why we just got to keep pushing back. It also feels so matter of fact to me too. Yes, they're exploring these topics and they're going through all of these things and like almost like they're preaching there being prophetic about it but not in a way that feels too contrived. It's just like there's this authenticity to the exploration that's really cool. And that's something that I have seen more excitement, especially around the black punk scene, the black metal scene, black hardcore. It's like, I am being exposed to the black experience in a way that is both personal and on a wider scale. And personally, as a white dude, never truly understand what the going through, but I'm so glad that it's being put out there in a way that allows other people to either conduct to or understand and that's been the revolution for me in punk for the last ten years. More voices allowing for more ideas and thoughts to connect to everything together. There was an interview with lead singer pierce Jordan and he was asked all about the emotional problems that he addressed in the record and he said all these problems are very unique to us as black people in terms of the way we experience them and there are some things that just can't be translated outside of that path of experience and he talks about them specifically tied to our context as a people who have been scattered across the world and that relates to the title of the record Diaspora problems. That's the album Diaspora problems by sokolo that's so glow without a W at the end. We're going to come right back to talk about more great music released in March, but first we need to take a short break. Support for NPR and the following message come from State Farm, the 2022 lead sponsor of NPR music. For the past three years, State Farm has supported the tiny desk contest, NPR music's called a musicians to submit their video of an original song. Songs can be from any genre and artists can get creative. They just need to have a desk somewhere in the frame. Entries have featured surprises like cello paired with an electric guitar or a song performed at a lemonade stand, and it pays to catch the judge's attention. The winner gets to perform their very own tiny desk concert. State Farm is proud to support the contest, entered by thousands of musicians and bands, giving listeners the chance to discover new artists and genres. Explore entries at tiny desk contest dot NPR dot org and keep the discovery going when you check out State Farm surprisingly great rates. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there. Welcome back. It's the best music of the month from all songs considered. I'm Lars, got rich. I'm joined by hazel selves, Tom Heisenberg, letitia Harris, and Anna Maria sayer. Rozalski is an artist from Madrid with just a few singles to his name. Here's the latest. This is pequito..

sokolo jenning Joni Mitchell Lars Philadelphia pierce Jordan anxiety disorder State Farm NPR NPR music hazel selves Tom Heisenberg letitia Harris Anna Maria sayer Rozalski Madrid
"maria sayer" Discussed on All Songs Considered

All Songs Considered

01:47 min | 5 months ago

"maria sayer" Discussed on All Songs Considered

"The news moves fast. Listen to the NPR news now podcast to keep up. We update stories as they evolve every hour, so no matter when you listen, you get the news as close to live as possible on your schedule. Subscribe to or follow the NPR news now, podcast. Oh, let me hand it. It is art Latino producer Anna Maria sayer here solo on the mic. Felix is out taking some much deserved time off. So I'm taking this time as an opportunity to let you all in on a little secret. I've been racking my brain trying to think of what to get Felix for the holidays. And all I keep thinking about is how he loves alt Latino more than anything in the world. Well, anything besides the Grateful Dead, but you know so that's when I came up with a not to toot my own horn, brilliant plan to come to all of you with a small request that will make one wonderful Theo very happy. If you're able to give anything at all to your local member station and show them that you love alt Latino and everything Felix pours into it, you'd be making his holiday dreams come true..

"maria sayer" Discussed on All Songs Considered

All Songs Considered

02:46 min | 5 months ago

"maria sayer" Discussed on All Songs Considered

"Up and going. To see I think continental you said it earlier it's your favorite time of the year. This is definitely my favorite time of the year when you get together and hang out with you guys and talk about music. So thank you all again for joining us and talk about the best albums of 2021. Anna Maria sayer, Isabella Gomez. Catalina Maria Johnson, Marisa bonar Ruiz, Stephanie Fernandez. Thank you all so much for joining us. Thank you for checking in from all over the country from everywhere. Thank you so much. Thank you very much. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. You can find all 15 of the Latino picks for 2021 on our website at NPR dot org slash el Latino. And don't forget to check out our weekly playlist in Apple, Spotify, curated by the groove master, Rihanna Cruz, and also it's gone by already, but again, go back and check out our Hispanic heritage month, tiny desk concert series, there's still a lot of great music there that you may have missed before and just check out the archive in general. There's a lot of great music on the tiny desk archive. I am Felix Contreras. You have been listening to Latino, thank you so much as always for listening. Next week we're going to talk about the best singles of 2021 with a whole new group of experts. So standby for that. Thank you all so much for listening..

Anna Maria sayer Isabella Gomez Catalina Maria Johnson Marisa bonar Ruiz Stephanie Fernandez Rihanna Cruz NPR Spotify Felix Contreras Apple
"maria sayer" Discussed on All Songs Considered

All Songs Considered

03:31 min | 7 months ago

"maria sayer" Discussed on All Songs Considered

"Great and good nature Chennai from NPR music and jazz night in America. Welcome Nate. What's happening Steven? It is great to have you here, Nate. Tell me more about homeward bound. This is a really luminous record. That's a great word for it. You know, as you noted, Jonathan Blake is one of these musicians who has just really lifted any number of bandstands. And he's been kind of a figure who plays with his elders. You know, a whole bunch of any a jazz masters, as well as with the younger cats. And so I see him as a real bridge builder. And on this recording, he's leading a band. He calls pentad, which features several of the bright young lights on the scene, including alto saxophonist Emmanuel Wilkins, vibraphone is Joel Ross. Those are both his blue note label mates. Wonderful pianist named David Verus and bassist Dez Ron Douglas. So this is like a real New York power crew. And this album, it really showcases his sort of quiet confidence as a band leader and the way that he's able to make this ensemble cohere, everybody shines and yet everybody feels like they're a part of something. To me, this album more than maybe anything else I've heard this year is like a perfect snapshot of the New York State of the art post bop sound. You know, like this is what it sounds like right now at the highest level, but also like on the street. There's nothing like a drummer as a band leader, man. You know, the last time I hosted this show, you talked about Andrew surreal. Right. Who's another great drumming band leader? And there's just something about the way guys like that make space for other players and just kind of make space in the overall mix. Yeah. There's an extraordinary dynamic sensitivity that someone like Jonathan Blake has, you know, and it's funny that you say that about space because the stereotype about drummers and as band leaders might be that they're, you know, it's all flash and noise and chops, right? But in the case of a musician, this advanced. And this sensitive, you have space, you have color and texture. And you know, support. That's really the beautiful thing here is there's a real communal vibe to this recording. Part of that commitment is lifting each other up. And that's really what I feel here. Well, that's a perfect spirit to end our show on. That is homeward bound from the drummer and bandleader Jonathan Blake, that'll do it for new music Friday. Thanks so much for joining me Nate. My pleasure, Stephen. If you want to hear all the music we've featured on this week's show along with a bunch of other great new music out today, we've got expanded playlists in Apple music and on Spotify, search for NPR's new music Friday playlist in either of those apps and a reminder as always to sign up for our weekly newsletter. It is put together by the stupendous Marissa larusso to subscribe go to NPR dot org slash music newsletter. You can follow us on Twitter at NPR music. You can find me at I dislike Stephen, you can find our guest Lindsey McKenna at Lindsay Mackay, Christina Lee is at Mina Anne Lee and powers is it and Kay powers and hazel sills is it hazel sills that sills with a C, Anna Maria sayer? Is it Anna sayer that's S a Yar? Ayanna Contreras is at reclaimed soul, Julie height is at right by her roots and nature and is at Nate Chennai. This week's show has been produced and edited by bob boylan and Ron scalzo from NPR music and all songs considered. I'm Steven Thompson, encouraging you to be well, take a break and treat yourself to lots of great music..

Jonathan Blake Nate Emmanuel Wilkins Joel Ross David Verus Dez Ron Douglas NPR Andrew surreal vibraphone Chennai New York Steven America hazel sills Marissa larusso Stephen Lindsey McKenna Lindsay Mackay Christina Lee Mina Anne Lee
"maria sayer" Discussed on All Songs Considered

All Songs Considered

02:04 min | 7 months ago

"maria sayer" Discussed on All Songs Considered

"Or hint days and the song we hearing from it is combat lachey and for this when we welcome back felix. Contraire synon- maria sayer with. Npr's out latino podcast welcome. Both of you was having robin. Thanks for having us so. We're gonna talk about several albums on this week's show but let's start with this really gorgeous record from the veteran proving singer susana baca. She really is the granddaughter of any form of latin music latin america. That's how big of a deal she is. She's in her late seventies and for fifty years. She's been the primary example the principal example of the country's african heritage and that's a very specific form of afro peruvian. Music has become well known and recognized around the world and she is largely responsible for that listening to her. There's just such a rich history. I think to everything that she does like for me. As a young person is almost like every track is a new history lesson in her music. It's not museum music because it's still very vital. It's still very present right. It's also important to note that in twenty eleven. She was named perused minister of culture. And she's only the second afro peruvian in that country's history to hold a cabinet position. So she's she's a big deal in any way you look at it. Why love how she's like. You know what i'm gonna just say whatever. I want to be speaking some truth on this record not to worry what others think and you know. She doesn't hold back she sings about you. Know everything from like. Peruvian independence fighters in the country's history of racism conflicts between urban and rural communities even towards the end of the record touches on global warming. She's very outspoken. Always has been. I think that that's part of the magic. And part of why people respect her so much. So i just going back a little bit in one thousand nine hundred seven. She really came to the attention of the world outside of peru when david byrne in his luaka bop label released an album by her. Like a back. I think it was ninety seven and that really just like opened a world to who she is like you said she hasn't changed at all. She's always spoken that truth. She's on a bucket. Is the singer. Her new album palabras.

Contraire synon maria sayer susana baca felix Npr robin latin america cabinet david byrne peru
"maria sayer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:52 min | 8 months ago

"maria sayer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Predominantly white neighborhood And so it was hard to find makeup that matched my skin complexion It was it was hard I just didn't fit into what Instagram standards were at that point And so that caused a lot of uneasiness Yeah how was it when you would post a picture of what happened after you would post a picture of yourself So I post a picture and I would gain likes in the more I edited my picture the more likes I found that I would get if I get this amount of likes then I'm worthy or if I get this amount of likes then my peers will comment on it And if you don't get the certain amount of likes that you think that you're gonna get it makes you feel a little rejected and it's kind of overwhelming This month you were diagnosed with an anxiety disorder and I understand that the tipping point that made you want to seek out help was something that actually happened on Instagram Can you tell us about that So Instagram is supposed to be a place where you can share different points in your life But that's not exactly what it is anymore It's just you share what looks good You share the ups you only see the ups And so not really thinking about that I shared a post about losing my dad in the grief behind that And I remember editing days after my caption days after because I was just like it's a little too sad I want to have an optimistic approach so people think that I'm okay even though I wasn't and it was a heavy subject And that was when I realized that my relationship with Instagram was a problem I shouldn't have been that anxious to share what I was going through but I definitely was And what did your doctor tell you about that when you got your diagnosis My doctor said that the pressure I feel to present myself as something other than my authentic self in that moment was a key factor to my diagnosis It's hard because you can't stay off of Instagram in this generation Instagram is a place where I am in contact with peers and I'm in contact with future employers It's not something that I can just delete And I think that would make me even more anxious because I'd feel like I'm missing out on something But I just try to not so much like critique what I post and not overthink what I'm posting and what I'm saying And I try to leave my phone and not just watch the notifications pop up and see who commented and see who liked it and see who didn't like it But it is a process 'cause I was just diagnosed this month So I got a long way to go but I think the first step to that is realizing that you have a problem and pinpointing it and then working through that That's destiny Adams a senior at Oklahoma state university who's been writing about the negative mental health impacts of Instagram on her generation Thank you very much Thank you We are in the middle of national Hispanic heritage month and the folks at NPR music have come up with something very special this year They are featuring nothing but Latin music on the tiny desk concerts for the whole month Ten performances featuring 8 different countries and cultures Let's go there and Ana Maria sayer are here to tell us more about that Felix nana hello Hey Lulu Hey thanks for having us It's good to have you both.

Instagram anxiety disorder Oklahoma state university Adams NPR Ana Maria sayer Felix nana
"maria sayer" Discussed on All Songs Considered

All Songs Considered

05:01 min | 8 months ago

"maria sayer" Discussed on All Songs Considered

"Kimmy five. This is bomba is stereo. Their new album is called. The song we're hearing from an is called agua. We go back to latinos. Felix contrasts and ana. Maria sayer for the one and felix. It's a bit of a concept record. Yeah yes it is. It's been a long time coming. Al met vocalist. She handles most of the lyrics. This album is a deeply profound musical meditation on the physical world. The earth the water in our places in it and then going back to what we said about a j galvin bumba steady has been around a little longer quite a bit longer actually but again it marks like musical maturity right. They are looking at the world around them in their place in in. That's all throughout this record. There's something so grounding to me about this album. Like i think just the way that they put it together and it's kind of like this really nice mix of sweet cool vibes. That really are reminiscent of beechy. Beach house kind of retreat. That they talk about going to work on. This album also has the really electronic house. Upbeat tempo to it as well and i think that the two of those together just really make something that you can feel that sense that this has been owed to something beyond ourselves. And i think coming out of the pandemic especially. They're very reflected in not sentenced to and robin to give you some insight in how he used his original idea and take it expanded on it. Imagine if the beatles had started not with meet the beatles and the whole boy band thing but instead if they started with the like the sonic majesty of sergeant pepper and then advanced from there. That's what bomba steady has done. They were initially like psychedelic columbia. That's how they were described something completely new and this guy's sima mahia man. He's just like he gets better and better with every record. It was definitely worth the wait. Baba stereo is the band. Their new album is teha arianna maria felix. Thanks so much. Thank you robin. Always striving so we were going to wrap up this week. Show here but we've got a late addition to our list of the best albums out now in september tenth from the rapper baby keam. Npr's tiny desk producer. Bobby carter here to tell us about it real quick. Hey bobby will saw rob how you doing all right. So the album from baby team is called the melodic blue tell us who became is and why people will probably be talking a lot about this record for the rest of the year. I've been on team baby. Came for a while is a rapper out of california. He's he's a west coast. He dropped the project a couple years ago from our bitch and this is the up and this feels like the arrival of baby came. And the more i listened to it. There's a word that he says one of the first songs and it's risky. This is the riskiest thing. I've heard in a long time. He says something like i'm not taking risks. And when i say risk he takes risks with the production choices even his inflections and his and the keynes's like differ rap styles. He's just all over the place with this album. But he's raising the stakes. He's trying things out here. I don't know if you remember the the cartoon he man but there was. There was a character by the name of manny faces. This is what's going on here. You never know what you're going to get his big cousin kendrick. Lamar has quite a few appearances on here. And like i said you know he can go from something like range. Brothers which is like a chaotic masterpieces rambunctious. Something like deeply personal where he touches on his relationship with his mom but in a song called scars. Let's go out on it. Then with one of the songs at kendrick's on you mentioned it rained brothers. It's really hard to give you a full range of sounds that was just such a little clip. But you'll hear a little bit of the change of since you were talking about on this. One baby team is the artist and his new record is the melodic blue. Thanks bobby thank you rob on a half of the day after sixteen. Forty seven praying. Okay okay come in okay and that'll do it for this week's music. Friday remember to check out our playlists and apple music and spotify and be sure to sign up for our weekly newsletter from npr music. It's a great way to keep up with the latest tiny desks new music and more you can get it at npr dot org slash music newsletter and for npr music. And all songs considered. I'm robyn hilton a great weekend. Be well treat.

Maria sayer sima mahia Kimmy beatles arianna maria felix agua Bobby carter robin Felix felix ana Beach house Al bobby Npr rob columbia kendrick west coast manny
"maria sayer" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

05:45 min | 10 months ago

"maria sayer" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"Welcome back latisha ice. Even thank you. Thank you and also we have ana. Maria sayer producer for latino. Hi ana maria. Hey how's it going. It's going well. I'm so glad you guys are both year. So billy island has kept busy since the release of her first album. She's put out a handful of standing singles including everything. I wanted which one record of the year at this year's grammy awards her james bond theme no time to die won a grammy and is likely to figure into next year's oscars race assuming it ever comes out now. She is back with a new album called happier than ever. These songs are entirely homemade. They are written and performed and recorded by just two people that it'd be billy irish and her brother phineas o'connell who's a producer and multi instrumentalist and engineer not to mention a singer songwriter in his own right. The two of them made happier than ever. During the pandemic. it's existence was basically made possible by the fact that they couldn't tour and it feels appropriately. Interior this is a headphone record. That touches on heartbreak and self acceptance and societies treatment of women the perils fame sonically and thematically. It feels to me like a departure from the album. That made billy alicia star. That album delved really deeply into anxiety. And coming of age this one grapples more with fame and bad relationships as seen with the benefit of perspective speaking of the benefit of perspective..

Maria sayer billy island ana maria billy irish phineas o grammy awards james bond oscars grammy connell billy alicia