30 Burst results for "Marguerite"

July 20, 1924: Tehran Declares Martial Law

Today in True Crime

02:26 min | 2 months ago

July 20, 1924: Tehran Declares Martial Law

"On july twentieth. Nineteen twenty four. Tehran authorities declared martial law after a mob killed an american consul. Major robert embry. The decision was designed to give the city a chance to regain order before an international crisis tore the nation. Apart leading up to the death. Iran had been a hotbed of foreign interest. The british had tried and failed to establish a protectorate over the nation. Meanwhile russia had recently vacated its stakes after their defeat in world war one. The newest foreign party to take an interest was the united states and they mainly wanted one thing oil. They pressured the iranian government into allowing oil tycoons to start drilling into the land when robert embryo was killed at the hands of an angry mob. All the foreign actors in the country started pointing fingers at each other. Tehran newspapers and russian authorities blamed the british for inciting muslims into a frenzy. Others blamed the russians who had expelled embry from moscow after he defended his anticommunist beliefs fellow american spy marguerite harrison who recently departed the near east while posing as a filmmaker claimed international intrigue was to blame but above all according to margarite. Embree was to blame for his own death. He had knowingly entered a dangerous situation marguerite also claimed embry made a serious error by fleeing the initial attack at the shrine. According to iranian custom running away proved he was guilty of sabotaging the site. If he had stayed the people would have merely punished him but not killed him. Br guardless of who may have deserved the blame. There was one person who gained from robert. Inbreeds death raza khan commander of the cossack forces on july twentieth con gain control over the massive city declaring he would arrest those responsible for killing embry. While one part of the cossacks investigated another arm reached in a more opportunistic direction. They shut down the presses instituting a news blackout con then arrested his political rivals throwing the muslim leaders who had defined him in

Robert Embry Newest Foreign Party Tehran Iranian Government Robert Embryo Embry Marguerite Harrison Iran Russia Embree Moscow United States Marguerite Raza Khan Robert
JIMENA: Mizrahi and Sephardi Voices

Can We Talk?

02:49 min | 3 months ago

JIMENA: Mizrahi and Sephardi Voices

"Ovid is a dancer and choreographer from aden yemen. She moved to israel as a girl in nineteen forty nine and became a founding member of the inbal dance. Company marguerite recorded her oral history for the gemina oral history project. In two thousand eleven gimenez stands for jews indigenous to the middle east and north africa region that jewish communities thrive in for over two thousand years until the twentieth century. When a million mizraki sephardi jews fled and were forced out of the land of their ancestors. The san francisco based gemina is working to preserve that rich heritage and history producer. Asala sunny poor recently sat down with sarah levin gimenez executive director to talk about some of the stories in the archive as well as their own family histories. A saw worked with sarah on the archives many years ago sayre you and i worked really closely together while i was in college My very first internship ever was with jim messina and working on this oral history project. I like to think that it's what really launched my love of storytelling. I wanted to start by asking you. Why do you think it's important to preserve these stories as told in the words of those who lived it. So i am so happy to be doing this with you a saul. I think that judaism as grounded and stories like that is the legacy of our people. That's the foundation of haha. That's the foundation of what it means to be jewish as passing on stories Were the combination of thousands of years of stories and in regards to gimenez oral history project We collected stories of communities of people who who hadn't been given a platform to share. They hadn't been given a microphone. They hadn't been given an opportunity to talk about what happened to them when they lived and fled countries throughout the middle east. North africa and their stories are an incredibly critical part of contemporary jewish history. And where we are. Today with establishment of the state of israel nineteen forty eight posts showa post arab nationalism and uprisings in the middle east and north africa there was a major disruption of over two thousand years of continuous jewish life in the middle east north africa. Kinda came to an end and that is a huge part of the jewish story. And we have this very unique opportunity to collect the stories from the people who lived through this historical moment in time and it was an honor to collect these stories and hopefully add them to the record of jewish

Gimenez Aden Yemen Gemina Sarah Levin Gimenez Ovid Middle East North Africa Marguerite Foundation Of Haha Jim Messina Sayre Israel San Francisco Sarah Middle East North Africa
"marguerite" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

07:36 min | 5 months ago

"marguerite" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"She infiltrated many opposing. Forces and delivered reports. Were of much use to us military commanders during a contentious period of us. European history meet marguerite. Harrison marguerite was born in baltimore maryland in october of eighteen. Seventy nine to bernard baker and elizabeth. Elton live see. The bakers were a wealthy prominent baltimore family. The owned the profitable passenger and cargo shipping company atlantic transport lines marguerite and her younger sister. Elizabeth grew up in a life of privilege. Still marguerite relationships were strained with her mother and sister and she only truly felt a connection to her. Father marguerite high school academic success especially in her language. Classes landed her a spot at radcliffe college during her first semester. Marguerite struck up a whirlwind. Romance with her landlady's son due to differences in socioeconomic. Class marguerite mother disapproved and immediately pulled marguerite out of school in center to italy and marguerite returned. She began dating thomas. Bullet harris said despite her mother's objection yet again. The young couple married in a summer wedding in nineteen o one and in march of nineteen o to marguerite and thomas welcomed their son tommy into the world their marriage was cut short when thomas unexpectedly died in nineteen fifteen now a single parent with seventy thousand dollars of debt. Marguerite was responsible for supporting herself and her son. She was able to find an entry level job as an assistant society editor at the baltimore. Sun soon thereafter marguerite was promoted to a- music and drama critic with a weekly column the thirty dollars a week that she brought in was enough to support the family in nineteen. Seventeen marguerite began covering the role of women in world war one. She took particular interest in the conditions in germany and decided to apply for a job at the military intelligence division marlborough churchill head of the. Mit was impressed with their fluency in french. German and italian offered her a job in his department for two hundred fifty dollars a month. Marguerite was the first american woman to serve as a foreign intelligence officer in december of nineteen. Eighteen marguerite traveled to berlin to report on european economic political and social matters. That pertain to us. Peace negotiations for eight months. She strategically used her baltimore. Sun credentials to speak to political and military leaders marguerite combined what she learned from the european leaders with her personal observations and sent regular reports back to. Us officials her lack of formal training and espionage did not hinder her ability to get the job. Done marguerite returned to baltimore in june of nineteen nineteen after the signing of the precise peace treaty but life was not the same after experiencing the war reviewing movies and music. Now board marguerite. Fortunately america's spy network in russia was in dire need of support. General churchill task marguerite with reporting on vladimir lenin's regime and the conditions in moscow marguerite sailed to england where she used her baltimore sun credentials to receive for assignment as a moscow correspondent for the london bureau of the associated press after an arduous and dangerous trek to moscow. She was granted two weeks to gather information by embedding herself. In the culture conducting interviews and attending meetings marguerite took quickly to rush in life. And when her stay was extended a month she spent her time further studying the social and intellectual aspects of life there but an april of nineteen twenty a mole at the us state department exposed marguerite as an american spy upon this discovery. The bolsheviks presented her with an ultimatum. She could either be thrown into lubyanka the infamous russian prison or report on left-leaning foreigners in moscow that threatened the regime marguerite resigned and agreed to spy for the russians but she didn't totally abandon her beliefs marguerite worked as a double agent and continued to sneak information about the bolsheviks economic strengths and weaknesses to the mid whenever she could marguerite was able to maintain the ruse for six months before being caught and sent to bianca on october. Twenty fourth nineteen twenty. She was the first american woman ever held in the notorious prison during her first. Four months marguerite was kept in solitary confinement in order to survive. She learned to disassociate from her current reality. After isolation marguerite lived in a cramped unsanitary room with a sizable group of other women while living in these deplorable conditions marguerite contracted tuberculosis and was relocated to the prison hospital. after surviving. The illness marguerite was released from prison and nineteen twenty. One key american relief administration had facilitated a deal in which they offered food and other aid to russia in exchange for american captives when marguerite returned to the us she severed ties with the mit and focused on writing to memoirs marooned in moscow. The story of an american woman imprisoned in russia and unfinished tales from a russian prison. Her work was a first hand account of early russian communism and helped to shape the american opinion of the country. That would become its greatest adversary after some. Downtime marguerite took an interest in east asia. She was travelling to china through siberia when the bolsheviks rearrested her november of nineteen twenty two although she was technically on an assignment she had been transmitting messages about the regional political and economic conditions to the us army in state department this time when her freedom was leveraged with acting as an informant marguerite refused and spent another ten weeks lubyanka awaiting her trial for espionage. Once again her freedom came at the hands of the american relief. Administration marguerite settled back into civilian life in new york city in march of nineteen twenty-three around that time she wrote red bear or yellow dragon described her opinions of russia and china as world superpowers a couple of years. Later she founded the society of women geographers with blair niles gertrude. Matthew selby and gertrude emerson sen marguerite and her fellow trailblazers created the organization to support women in their research of geography and history and to promote exploration at the age of forty. Seven marguerite married british actor. Arthur middleton blake but didn't settle down the two traveled around the world together. This time marguerite was a tourist with no ulterior motives. Marguerite returned to baltimore in nineteen forty nine. after arthur's death. She lived with her son and his wife but continued to indulge her wanderlust well into her eighties on july sixteenth. Nineteen sixty seven at the age of eighty. Eight marguerite died of a stroke as a woman who thrived traveling.

Elizabeth china berlin seventy thousand dollars eight months thomas two weeks october vladimir lenin blair niles gertrude december of nineteen july sixteenth italy Arthur middleton england october of eighteen march of nineteen germany siberia east asia
"marguerite" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:11 min | 7 months ago

"marguerite" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"The conflict. That is until she hit. Another roadblock marguerite was in the midst of combat when she received orders from the us army to leave korea at once the lieutenant general walton h walker had decided that correo was no place for a woman marguerite intended to argue her case to lieutenant walker but was forcibly put on a plane to tokyo when she landed. She was greeted with good news. General macarthur wrote a personal message. Overturning the lieutenants orders it read ban on women in korea. Lifted marguerite hagans held and highest professional esteem by everyone marguerite return to korea and continued her work as the only female journalist covering the war. She escaped merely certain death in a night. Time ambush an even volunteer to assist overwhelmed. Medics when troops were particularly distressed marguerite traveled to north korea and documented the stories of escaped prisoners of war. She also teamed up with the chicago. Daily news correspondent keys beach for several excursions in nineteen fifty. One marguerite returned to the united states. She married major general william hall who she met while serving as berlin bureau chief together. They had two children that same year. Marguerite was awarded the pulitzer prize for international reporting her colleagues. In the korean theater homer bigger and keys beach also received. The honour marguerite went onto write best selling book war in korea the report of a woman combat correspondent in one thousand nine hundred eighty five. She wrote another book about her travels through. The soviet union called red clash and black bread that same year. She published a book about journalism. Entitled news is a singular thing marguerite never showed signs of slowing down. She visited vietnam ten times during the vietnam war and wrote a book on the conflict. Our vietnam nightmare in nineteen sixty two. She reported on tensions mounting between the united states and cuba that proved prescient during marguerite visit to the in nineteen sixty five acted leash manassas a tropical parasitic disease. She passed away from the disease on january. Third nineteen sixty six. She was just forty five years old. An honor for exceptional wartime reporting her body was laid to rest in arlington national cemetery. Tenacious and unrelenting. In her ambition marguerite higgins blazed a trail uniquely her own at a time when american society was uncomfortable with women. Filling roles typically performed by men marguerite refused to take no for an answer and proved her bravery and skill in the face of immense danger. All month were talking about journalists for more on why we're doing what we're doing. Check out our newsletter. We'll manica weekly. Follow us on facebook and instagram at encyclopedia. Monica special. thanks to liz. Caplan my favorite sister and co-creator as always. We'll be taking a break for the weekend. Talk to you on monday. I want to tell you about another. Wfan show. i think you'll love. Most americans know firmly where they stand on reproductive rights. But how did we get here. How did abortion become one of the most contentious political debates in the country. That's where ordinary equality comes in from wonder media network ordinary equality. Co hosts jamea wilson and kate. Kelly are unpacking the history of abortion from before the founding fathers to rule v wade all the way to present day. They're seeking to understand why everything related to women's rights does indeed seem to come back to abortion and how abortion access is tied to our fundamental rights and freedoms even more than you think. Listen and subscribe to ordinary equality wherever you get your podcasts..

jamea wilson vietnam tokyo kate january north korea Kelly arlington one thousand monday Monica Marguerite two children liz korea forty five years old walton h walker vietnam war ten times facebook
"marguerite" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

06:39 min | 7 months ago

"marguerite" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Hello wonder media network. I'm jenny kaplan and this is encyclopedia britannica. Today we're talking about the only woman to serve as a war correspondent during the korean war unrelenting and her desire to capture the events of frontline combat she reported on many of the twentieth century's most momentous conflicts and earned the pulitzer prize for international reporting. Let's talk about marguerite. Higgins marguerite higgins was born to lawrence daniel higgins and marguerite go on september third nineteen twenty in hong kong marguerite. Father was an american. Who joined the french army as an ambulance driver in paris. When the first world war broke out. Her mother was a french local. Who was in paris for work. The two met one day during an air raid. They both took shelter in an underground metro station. Both lawrence and marguerite had adventurous streaks equality. They would eventually pass on to their only daughter after they wed. Lawrence got a job with the pacific. Mail steamship company and the couple moved to hong kong where they lived for five years then in nineteen twenty five. The family moved back to lawrence's native california settling down turned out to be harder for the higgins family anticipated lawrence became a stockbroker but thanks to the great depression. Money was tight margaret's. Mother taught french two prestigious all girls school where marguerite was offered a scholarship by the age of sixteen marguerite decided she wanted to become a journalist and never looked back in nineteen thirty seven. She enrolled at the university of california at berkeley and immediately joined the staff of the student newspaper. The daily californian marguerite was tenacious journalist from the get go. She worked doggedly for the school paper and was even accused of stealing weeds from fellow students. Anything to get the story. She graduated from berkeley with honors and packed her bags for new york city. She applied for every newspaper in the city for work. But no one was willing to hire a woman. Fresh out of college undaunted. She decided to pursue a master's degree at the columbia school of journalism. While balancing a part time job and school. She managed to nab an interview. With madame. chiang kai shek the wife of the nationalist leader of china. The interview is such an impressive gatt. That marguerite was offered a fulltime job as a news reporter for the tribune around this time. Marguerite married stanley more. A philosophy student who shared marguerite politics and intellectual drive. Shortly after they married stanley joined the air force and was sent to europe. It was the height of world war. Two and marguerite was stock covering stories at home but long to be on the front lines. In europe after petitioning her editor relentlessly. She was given an overseas assignment the tribune center to london. Which by chance was where her husband was stationed. The couple lived together. As marguerite covered bombings winston churchill the role of women in the war and much more while her stories flourished her marriage did not within a year marguerite and stanley were formerly separated. Thanks to her. Fluency in french marguerite next post was in paris while she was there she captured on the ground accounts of war torn france but still she longed to be on the front lines of the action in march nineteen forty-five she got her wish. Marguerite joined the us. Seventh army positioned in germany to report firsthand on the final weeks of the war. She documented the americans. Freeing polish french and russian laborers from german concentration camps she arrived in the buchenwald concentration camp only hours after it was liberated. She filed stories depicting the mass suffering and devastating deaths in the camp as well as stories from survivors from their marguerite partnered up with journalist. Peter i from the army newspaper stars and stripes. The two traveled through the german countryside and arrived at the dock. Cow concentration camp. According to margaret's report from the time and later confirmed by her biographer marguerite. And peter the first two americans through the gates marking the formal liberation of the camp for her courageous covering of daqiao marguerite was awarded the army's campaign ribbon for outstanding and conspicuous service with the armed forces under difficult and hazardous conditions. She was also given an award by the new york newspaper. Women's club for best correspondence. All in marguerite was only a world war two correspondent for approximately six weeks regardless she made quite the impact after the war she was made the tribune's assistant bureau chief in berlin from her post. She covered divided. Berlin the beginnings of the cold war and the nuremberg trials in nineteen forty seven at only twenty seven years. Old marguerite was promoted to bureau chief. She enjoyed a successful career in berlin. Throughout the remainder of the nineteen forties in april of nineteen. Fifty marguerite was reassigned and became the tokyo bureau. Chief for the tribune. She was not happy about this move. It took her thousands of miles away from mounting tensions in europe but on june twenty-fifth nineteen fifty north korea invaded south korea launching the united states into a proxy war with communist china within two days marguerite was on the front lines of the conflict from the moment she landed in. Seoul marguerite was regularly under fire. It was during these early days that she earned the trust of general. Douglas macarthur the commander of the united nations far east forces in addition to being alive combat environment marguerite had to navigate company politics a few weeks after marguerite arrived the new york herald. Tribune sent it. Star reporter homer bigger to cover the war. Baker told marguerite she was no longer needed and might as well head home. Marguerite wasn't having it. She ignored him and continued covering.

Marguerite five years Lawrence jenny kaplan europe london Douglas macarthur Baker berlin paris germany Peter i twentieth century Today Berlin world war two china thousands of miles april two days
EU accuses Amazon of breaching antitrust rules

Daily Tech News Show

01:10 min | 11 months ago

EU accuses Amazon of breaching antitrust rules

"European commissioner marguerite vest ear announced a preliminary conclusion that amazon has violated anti-trust rules in the way it treats european merchants after a year long investigation. The european commission determined that amazon breached competition rules by accessing non-public data from merchants to help its own products and services. Amazon will have a chance to respond in the coming weeks. Amazon says it uses sales and store data to improve the customer experience. They admit that but things like suggesting items. You're interested in or what they say they use it for. Amazon says it prohibits employees from using quote non-public sellers specific data to determine which private label products to launch. So they're saying no. We don't do that. Your also said the. Eu has opened a second formal antitrust investigation into whether amazon gave preferential treatment to its own products and to sellers who paid extra for amazon logistics and delivery services so they have a preliminary allegation. That amazon can respond to that. It violated antitrust rules for using data collected from third party sellers but there's investigation into whether it actually gave preferential treatment to its on products whether it used that date or

Marguerite Vest Amazon European Commission EU
Amazon Faces Antitrust Charges From European Regulators

Daily Tech News Show

01:22 min | 11 months ago

Amazon Faces Antitrust Charges From European Regulators

"Right. Let's talk about those antitrust allegations. European commissioner marguerite vest ear announced a preliminary conclusion that amazon has violated anti-trust rules in the way it treats european merchants after a year long investigation. The european commission determined that amazon breached competition rules by accessing non-public data from merchants to help its own products and services. Amazon will have a chance to respond in the coming weeks. Amazon says it uses sales and store data to improve the customer experience. They admit that but things like suggesting items. You're interested in or what they say they use it for. Amazon says it prohibits employees from using quote non-public sellers specific data to determine which private label products to launch. So they're saying no. We don't do that. Your also said the. Eu has opened a second formal antitrust investigation into whether amazon gave preferential treatment to its own products and to sellers who paid extra for amazon logistics and delivery services so they have a preliminary allegation. That amazon can respond to that. It violated antitrust rules for using data collected from third party sellers but there's investigation into whether it actually gave preferential treatment to its on products whether it used that date or not and don't forget the us federal trade commission is also conducting. Its own investigation into amazon. No findings on that have been announced yet but Amazon under the gun in a few different places

Amazon Marguerite Vest European Commission EU Us Federal Trade Commission
"marguerite" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"marguerite" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"Has been the the century Katie is now available on iheartradio apple podcasts wherever you get your podcasts. What's up everybody? We're comedy troupe, Obama's other daughters and we wanted to share one of our favorite moments of our podcast. You Don presented by target committed to offering an elevating `black brands including black owned beauty brands is all part of targets belief in good. We can all AFFORD VISIT TARGET DOT COM to learn more. shoot is one of my favorite moments. Were there any dates that really left an impression on you secure? What's yours I? WanNa know I guess I will go with my worst. This guy was like I'm so excited to finally GONNA stay He said he's GonNa take favorite place he picks me up to say me get fro the worst part is like I was trying to like not ice cream like I was trying to be healthy and I hadn't had dinner and I was like, weren't you hungry? Hungry, I was annoyed and I was like going to waste my time. That was one of the worst states I've been. That was the worst day you went on with a man secure frog. No. I'm just saying you live a life of privilege that sounds like that sounds like I would take it as my worst date. How everyone welcome to the show I'm eaves and you're listening to this day in history. Class. A show that uncovers a little bit more about history every day. The day was October nineteenth nineteen o nine. French nuclear chemist and physicist Marguerite Paret was born in Bela Mamba. France. A suburb northeast of Paris. Paret is known for discovering Francia M-, the eighty seventh element of the periodic table and being the first woman elected to the French Academy of Sciences. Paret was born into a middle class Protestant family as a child. She took an interest in science and wanted to study medicine. But her father died in nineteen fourteen leaving her mom to take care of her and her four siblings. Her mother gave piano lessons but the families still faced financial hardship and Marguerite could not go to university. She did however attend local. Law Technique Feminine a school for Female Technicians. Her education, they are qualified her to become a chemistry technician, and after she completed her studies, she became a lab assistant at the radium institute Paris where physicist and Nobel. Prize winner Marie Curie was Director Curie acted as a mentor to Paret. Radio activity the focus of parades work. Her job was to purify actinium a radioactive element that was discovered in eighteen, ninety, nine by chemist Andrea Gibson. Paret was skilled when it came to preparing radioactive sources and she eventually became curious personal assistant. After Kennedy died in nineteen, thirty four Andre. debbie-ann became the director of the Institute and Parade continued researching the properties of actinium. The spectrum of the radioactive elements Barium and strontium. By this time parades work in radio chemistry was well recognized by others in her field but the discovery she's best remembered for happened in nineteen thirty eight. Scientists were trying to find element eighty-seven on the periodic table. One of just a few elements that they thought were missing from the periodic table. In her research paret realized that the actinium she had purified was emitting unexpected radiation. After a series of tests, she came to the conclusion that she discovered a new element. One that was predicted by Dmitri mental as periodic table. It was element eighty-seven with an atomic weight of two twenty three. She initially called the element Actinium K., but it was later renamed Francia after her home country. Jan, Perrin announced the discovery to the French Academy of Sciences in early January nineteen, thirty nine. Paret began working on the chemical and nuclear properties a France and studying artificial radioactivity. She got a grant to study at the Sorbonne in Paris and in Nineteen forty six, she got her doctorate of physics. Parade went on to work at Francis National Center for Scientific Research and she studied the biological effects of Francia at the University of Strasbourg where she was made head of the Department of Nuclear Chemistry in Nineteen, forty nine. By the late nineteen fifties a nuclear chemistry lab she directed Strasborg. Part. Of a larger nuclear research facility. In nineteen, sixty two, she was elected as the first female corresponding member of the French Academy of Sciences. She remained head of her lab in Strasbourg until her death. In her last years, she continued to receive awards and the press recognized her as a notable scientist. Unfortunately her story was also a cautionary tale about safety measures that are necessary when working with radiation. Paret was diagnosed with cancer in the nineteen sixties. After years of dealing with that diagnosis, which was a result of her prolonged exposure to radiation. She died in France in May nineteen, seventy five. I'm used up coat and hopefully you know a little more about history today than you did yesterday. Feel free to share your thoughts or your innermost feelings with us and with other listeners on social media at T.. D.. H C, podcast. If emails, your thing send us. This Day at Iheartmedia Dot, com. Thanks for listening.

Marguerite Paret French Academy of Sciences France actinium Paris physicist Obama Actinium K. Francia Katie Don Director Curie apple Department of Nuclear Chemistr radium institute Paris Strasbourg Paret Bela Mamba Female Technicians Andrea Gibson
"marguerite" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

07:51 min | 1 year ago

"marguerite" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"This episode is brought to you by Candle Wick press publisher of all thirteen when twelve boys in their soccer coach entered a cave looking for some adventure rising floodwaters soon, blocked their path out they were trapped for the next seventeen days. The world watched with bated breath as an extensive rescue operation work together to get the team out safely blending science suspense in cultural insight. All Thirteen is a true story that reads like a heart pounding adventure. All thirteen by Christina's invite available wherever books are sold. What's it like to drive the Volvo xc ninety plug in hybrid? The thrill of four hundred horsepower t eight twin engine. The joy of impromptu road travis. And the serenity. Of Electric Power in pure. Ego. Mode. Visit DMV Volvo retailer today to experience the XC, ninety recharge plug in hybrid for yourself. Hey y'all eve's here. We're doubling up today with two events in history one for me and one from former host Tracy v will thin on with the show. Welcome to this day in history class from how stuff works dot com, and from the desk of stuff you missed in history class. It's the show where we explore the past one day at a time with a quick look at what happened today in history. Hello and welcome to the PODCAST. I'm Tracy v Wilson and effect Tober Nineteenth. Members of the military attack the National Palace in Guatemala on to stay in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four during the Guatemalan revolution. This revolution had started earlier in nineteen forty four as students and young military officers rose up against president. Biko he had been elected president in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty one and his early presidency included campaign against government corruption improvements to public health an overhaul of Guatemala's infrastructure and helping to stabilize the country's economy. But by nineteen forty four, he had gotten rid of all political opposition and he was governing as a military dictator. His policies had also increasingly favored elite landowners and corporations. Especially, the US based United Fruit company which owned a lot of the arable land in Guatemala, but wasn't actually using most of that land meaning it wasn't available for anyone else to use either he had also implemented things like decree eighteen sixteen, which exempted landowners from prosecution if they used violence to defend their land up to. Murdering, someone. He had also abolished a series of forced labor laws, but then replaced them with vagrancy laws that were very similar in these really amounted to indentured servitude and a lot of cases the so called vagrants who were being forced to work were from Guatemala's Maya. Peoples Ub coup also developed close ties with the United States in the United States was providing Guatemala with armaments and with favorable tariff terms this whole situation. Though, was not unique at all to Guatemala other nations in Central America had various similarly unyielding dictators and control with similar social and economic effects. Similar reliance on one food crop for the economy similar connections to the United States and united. States based business interests and one dictator Maximiliano Arnez Martinez was overthrown in neighboring El Salvador in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four this overthrow became an inspiration for a similar campaign. against. Yukiko in Guatemala. Not just inspiring the students and other young people to rise up but also inspiring in Yukiko a fear that the same thing might happen to him. So he cracked down on civil liberties he put people who were loyal to him in charge of the university. He basically tried to do what he could to ensure his own power. This had the opposite effect of what he wanted a series. Of protests followed with students at Saint Carlos University petitioning for changes to the university teaching staff and other reforms. Lawyers petitioning for biased judges to be removed from the bench teachers were demonstrating for pay increases and all these initial demonstrations were violent. They included things like boycotts and strikes the Guatemalan government responded to all this by deploying tanks and troops, and using tear gas on the demonstrators placing the capital under martial law. But the demonstrations spread even as the government was placing participants under surveillance and deporting foreign supporters of the movement. Finally at the end of June, tens of thousands of demonstrators were gathered at the Capitol, and because support was really eroding. He resigned July first nineteen, forty four and placed the government under the control of military triumvirate although he allegedly remained in charge, the National Assembly elected one of the triumvirate General Frederick Ponce Vitus, president he promised to their. Free. Election was going to follow but by October, it was obvious that it just was not going to happen and Guatemala was sliding farther and farther away from democracy. The protests continued students and teachers called for a general strike on. October. Sixteenth students and members of the military began taking control of the capital on October eighteenth. There was an attack on the National Palace by members of the military said at the top of the show on October nineteenth. Violence spread through the capital, the presidential guard rebelled and the general finally surrendered on the. Twentieth. This didn't put a total end to the violence or the unrest, but new elections did follow in. December and they were one of the freest elections that Guatemala had seen in decades a new constitution was drafted in one, thousand, nine, forty, five. This constitutional rule lasted for just less than a decade before President Kobo. Arbenz was elected in nineteen fifty one and he had been part of the revolution. He instituted a lot of land reforms including redistributed a lot of that unused land that United Fruit company had been buying up. The United States isn't like that the United States was also threatened by the fact that he legalized the Communist Party in Guatemala. So so the CIA helped overthrow the democratically elected government of Guatemala in Nineteen fifty four thanks to Jeff coat for her research work on today's podcast and Tar Harrison for audio. On this show, you can subscribe to this day in history class at apple podcast, Google podcast, and wherever you get your podcast and you can tune in tomorrow for a political purge. Hi. I'm Katie lowes and on my podcast Katie's Cribb I talk about the ups and downs of parenting no-holds-barred here a few of my favorite moments from Katie's crib presented by target. This halloween target has introduced adaptive Halloween costumes, parents a differently abled children can shop their collection to make sure their kids can express who they are and want to be for Halloween. It's all part of targets belief in good. We can all AFFORD VISIT TARGET DOT COM to learn more my girl Kristen Bell I said to my husband I. Don't want to do antibiotics. If we can get this out the baby is not sucking hard enough I need you to be a team player here and he was like gross he sits down nurses and it was a while I mean it was like thirty minutes. This is very gross. He started getting the block out he started getting his show because. It's Gooey, and then he had to get a cup. He was like gagging which I don't blame.

Guatemala United States president National Palace United Fruit company Candle Wick Christina Yukiko Katie lowes DMV Volvo Kristen Bell Tracy publisher Guatemalan government Tober Nineteenth Maximiliano Arnez Martinez Saint Carlos University Biko
How Philanthropic CEO Carmen Rojas Learned to Lead as Her Full Self

Latina to Latina

06:14 min | 1 year ago

How Philanthropic CEO Carmen Rojas Learned to Lead as Her Full Self

"What would you do? If you had millions of dollars at your fingertips let me clarify what would you do if your job was to take that money and spend it in ways that would make the world a better place that's the question that Carmen row house is confronted with every day. Carmen is the president and CEO of the Marguerite Casey Foundation. She stepped into the role justice cove nineteen hit, and this moment is inspiring big questions about generosity giving and the future of philanthropy. Permanent. Thank you so much for taking the time to do this. Oh thank you so much. I'm such a fan of you of your show and so I'm so glad to be here. I. Love When Interview Start That way? much of your career has focused on improving the life of working people across the country what about your own upbringing drew you to this work? My mom immigrated from Nicaragua and my dad immigrated from Venezuela they landed in San Francisco and the immigrated at this really weird moment and Hyman US history where it was the peak of the civil rights movement, the peak of the Labor movement, the peak of the feminist movement, and so my parents with middle school education's both from very rural places came to San Francisco and we're able to make lives for themselves in for us for their kids that were so far beyond the things that they could imagine. So my parents. For Middle School and I got a PhD from Berkeley I. Think a lot about how that time that my parents emigrated SOC shaped the opportunities that were available to me, and how from that moment to today we've seen that window of opportunities shut for the vast majority of people both immigrants people of Color. Native folks black people that this moment in time we were expected the squeeze the juice out of a grain of sand. And I looked around me and one. was exhausting to be one of the only women of the very few women of color one of dot of Latina's in rooms and just made it very. Sort of. Clear decision to really focus all of my energy on making sure that I'm not going to be the only one that I won't be the last generation of people that gets to benefit and enjoy from these moments in time and to try to figure out ways to create more moments in time for more of us to be better off. Growing up how was generosity displayed in your home? My mom is one of seventeen and my dad is one of ten. Seventeen all birthed by the same woman, all birth by the same woman. My mom was the first one of her siblings, the MIGRATES, united, States, and my dad was as well and so my mom tells these really amazing stories. Her siblings were sisters especially wanted to come to the United States. She would like work all day work most of the night, spend the nights like filling out immigration paperwork, taking them in for seventeen siblings and our house really became sort of a beacon I can't remember a time in my childhood where we didn't have other people living in our house. My Mom, my mom worked cleaning office buildings. She worked sewing clothes worked at last LEVI's factory in San Francisco, our? House? I feel like was what what I think is true philanthropy this desire to give this desire to open up. Some might think of yours but others think of hours so that so many more people can enjoy the ability to live lives of dignity. When did you first learn about philanthropy as a formal concept for disseminating help? Yeah. I was an Undergrad I. got this really interesting fellowship at this organization in San Francisco called the Green Lining Institute my summer project was to try to figure out in the state of California of all of these institutional donors how much of their money went to organizations led by people of Color and immigrants and it turned out these numbers haven't changed much but it's like less than five percent. and. So my job was to call us institutions to do the tally board and be like, okay, blessing one percent and it was really striking to me because philanthropy is one of those things that is benevolent and powerful we think about is inherently something good to give but we don't ever tell the back story like philanthropic institutions again, like my own are often built on twice stolen wealth wealth that's extracted from our economy on the one side and on the other side, won't that people aren't paying taxes into our social safety net into our government to actually try to resolve some of the instant issues that foundations are trying to solve. Once it became visible to me that these institutions existed that these people were giving money and that they were only giving money to sort of social service programs are to help people from the base of generosity. But these were actually shaping our political and economic experience. We can tie the rise of charter schools to philanthropy. We can tie the rise of privatizing public goods philanthropy wants it became visible to me. It was something that I couldn't unseen and I. Now am in a really interesting position because I in this moment the moment that the covert moment, the economic crisis moment, the social unrest moment. Has Really, invited me to think about philanthropy as this intermediary step

San Francisco United States President And Ceo Carmen Marguerite Casey Foundation Nicaragua Middle School California Hyman Berkeley Venezuela Green Lining Institute
Summoning the Courage to Change the Power Structure

Latino Rebels Radio

06:56 min | 1 year ago

Summoning the Courage to Change the Power Structure

"So. Gardner has welcome to Latino rebels radio. I. Thank you so much for having. So I have a lot to talk to you about and I know we are going to talk about covert and incarceration and health but. Obviously this week I think the entire nation was shook with what has happened in Minneapolis and I and I just wanted to get your thoughts about the death of George, Floyd or how? Trauma and how outrage actually? I WANT WANNA. Get your two takes like how you. How do you feel like looking being in a someone? This week in the middle of Pandemic when this is happening, but also just like the health implications of constant trauma, and I just had a really I'm from privilege, and I'm having problems with this, so I'm going to get your thoughts i. Yeah. We're in the same boat I. Today's my first day as President at Marguerite Casey Foundation. Got The right day. And I feel and. On. The one hand really devastated not only. Because of the murder of George. Floyd also because of the murder of Brianna Taylor, because I'm not of Tony mcdaid that. We are living in witnessing. Sort of the constant assassination of black people. By a state that does not value their lives and I'm really torn up about it I on the one side I feel. Like my sector, like philanthropy is often at the edges on not willing to be abolitionist, not willing to call on not only police accountability, imagining supporting organizers in leaders in our communities to imagine a world where detention and incarceration and policing aren't the only ways that we resolve the issues that we have with each other. and on the other side you know we really quickly as an institution, we put out. Six hundred thousand dollars to leading black led organizations in Tallahassee in Minneapolis. In Louisville. That are at the front lines, both of the abolition, the fight for abolition and and to try to address the issues that are happening today, and so the health consequences for all of our families for all of us is a extreme like. How can we imagine a different world a different future where being killed every day when brothers and sisters are being killed everyday when our aunts and uncles in MOMS and dads are held in detention and put into prison when our political leaders are. Corporate leaders are nonprofit leaders Fine the courage to actually step up and say we deserve better. Our families deserve better. Yeah, I'm devastated Julio. Frenk I I'm really glad you. I wanted to ask you that question and I. Really I really appreciate you like putting it in the context of what you do because I do think. In this world sometimes we're taught to you know. We can only stay in one lane, or and I think you know even me as a journalist like. I've struggled this week. And in the context of like Cohen teen in the context of what you wanted to talk about as well which I also think you know. It's funny because we just published on Friday. Three letters from migrant detainees inside of a immigration jail in Illinois. That, twenty, trans queer weblog reached out and we. We published their words. He's people are saying these conditions. You know I am worried I am. I'm not getting any help. I'm being dehumanized and we just decide well. These these letters came out so there's a risk because you're like they WANNA come out in public, but then when you come in public, it's like. It's a criminalized system. People are speaking out. Talk to me how this is interconnected in the in the work that you do because you're like the reason why we wanted to talk about what you're saying you. You mentioned abolitionist them. You've mentioned. Detention jails, and how this is how society is just not getting it especially now, especially during covert so. How do you begin to connect it all? Yeah, you know philanthropy is really weird, and on the one side I am clear that philanthropy isn't. Better of a functioning democracy and are robust and fare economy right that philanthropy exists mostly because he's our tax dollars that are not. That are awarded. And rich people, and then they're rich institutions get to be the arbiters of who is deserving of resources in a moment. What ideas are deserving of being lifted up? What leaders should be resourced, right? I. I I am clear that I'm like in A. that. I'm holding contradiction right that I believe in a functioning stage with the safety net that taxes are most. Wealthy at the benefit of all of us and I work at an institution that as as been created because of these failures and. I think that. Many of my peers in philanthropy have given up. The ability to actually contest for power to use these positions and the resources that we have Julio. We are one institution right? We have seven hundred over seven hundred million dollars in an endowment. That we get to us not only to try to supplant government or take the place of government, not only to create a band aid on the cancer that our communities are facing. We can use these resources to support leaders organizations to start to create evidence that our families can be more powerful to start to create evidence that our government can actually for us that it could be more responsive than it can look like us. That I can talk and feel like us. We can create evidence that our economy doesn't have to work only at the expense of our most vulnerable workers right. And many I think many of my peers don't see that

Floyd Minneapolis George Murder So. Gardner Marguerite Casey Foundation Brianna Taylor Louisville President Trump Illinois Cohen Tony Mcdaid Tallahassee
"marguerite" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"marguerite" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A gap under the iron swing bar in that gap this is an idea actually love gives parents an idea Marguerite view the full Marguerite she's hiding in the backseat her mother squeezed into the trunk so sweat stains on his shirt yes he drives his convertible serene check top down host lowly to the customs armed guards motioned him over for inspection yeah but it's not just the opposite here I come for your inspection but is there thanks gone these past the concrete barriers to world between shouting officers but that's not the case as much as possible the gate is closed as well but right here out of his tires taken the windshield office car and last moment racing toward freedom hi doctor sees head and goes under the with his future wife and mother J. the stuff right good stuff well today instead of judgment we're.

Marguerite J.
A Moment in Time, with Shari Belafonte

B&H Photography Podcast

11:27 min | 1 year ago

A Moment in Time, with Shari Belafonte

"Today. We're GONNA be talking sheriff about photography. So let's get into it Sherry. Welcome to our show. It's so great having Jose here so you have grown up around cameras now as a little kid all my life cameras aimed at you most again. Your Dad was Trenton Center. He was big deal. Back in the fifties sixties seventies. He broke down a lot of walls. Again everybody's familiar with his music and his acting and everything else. So you're smiling laughing about so. I was very hyperactive. Attention deficit as a child. I still lamb a little curtail with certain things now making native American blood you know wearing a bright orange camp right now you WanNa talk about it. Yeah Orange there you go. There's fast on. Go ahead I'm sorry. My Grandmother gave me my first Brownie camera. Now that's how far back I with the fan flash that you put the light bulb shit so I had that one. I was four years old. How many megapixel was and you would get this little tiny roll of film that you would put inside that Yummy and That was my first foray into being behind the camera and then instamatic semantic when I was I think I had a funny little polaroid camera that we had them all And my first legitimate camera was a pentax when I was eleven years old. Okay I was in boarding school by Matic or h three the it was. You know I can't remember I just. It was a thirty five millimeter Pentax Camera. That was dad's I know. Dad had a SPA top. Any passed it down to me so my entire high school was spent in the dark room. I smell like smoke. That was really attractive. Smell coming out of the yellow fingernails sitting in the dark. You Know Rolling and Rolling Rolling Rolling and then you know praying that you could put it in the CAN. It would come out and it wasn't all crumpled and you know so. Yeah I spent a good part of my earlier years behind the camera. And then of course like you said being Harry's daughter you know when we when he was on tour somewhere and there's Paparazzi or people taking pictures of us all the time and then Harry took pictures of us all the time that we never saw and it was the biggest joke because he was he always got get over there. Get OVER THERE. Get over there. Stop Stop Standards There. Hundreds and hundreds of pictures that were taken by. Harry and we've never seen a single one single. And why do you think that's the case? He just too busy to Kinda know if he ever developed and I don't know if there was even filmed the camera I think he had these Lycos and he just you know he just kept shooting once in a while. We saw him because he would. When he was a touring he would have these The program with this and it was always the big color program that would come with new. Buy A ticket and there would be pictures of us you know in there and we go to dad. Shoot that picture around. The house was photography kind of a respected medium. Was it an art to be an art. He did have a darkroom which he never went into. He just had it in the back next his recording studio but he did use a recording studio. Did use the recording. But Yeah we always have been shutterbugs. I think the whole definitely me more so than I think my siblings but Harry was definitely behind the camera. He was into like us us a very like a like like like scandal. And what about the Paparazzi and stuff? Maybe it wasn't. I can't even say that it wasn't like it is now because Paparazzi but was it A pain in the bud. Was it something that you guys so I was so used to? You know because what happened is my hair Harry. In Marguerite. My mom was marguerite. She passed away a few years go but they divorced. When I was very young actually separated woman was pregnant with me so there was always that kind of people trying to take pictures of that that was going on but there was a little more of a sense of decency for lack of better words with authorizing I mean. Now it's like Oh goes the there were lines. That were not crossed back then. I mean chances and stuff like that and they they definitely probably got onto your skin right probably worse today and usually think it was more of a magazine would come in. Ebony magazine would come in and say you know. Can we shoot you at home or and you know there was a story that was behind it and maybe the attorneys would go yet. It's good idea. Let's let's push that you know. Yeah we've always been around cameras for yourself. It's often family. What kind of things interested you would sort of you know? In the days I was in boarding school in Massachusetts so I I've always been a fan of black and white. I never learned how to process color and of course slides for the first things. You sort of learned. I never learned how to process but I was always into the dynamic of black and white so with the snow in Massachusetts. There was always the lights and shadows and you can stream you know falling through the ice no save. The camera saved the camera. Shot landscapes mostly landscapes. And then I shot everything and then as I got older and could start a fording stuff. I actually stopped shooting for a while and then when Sam. I got married thirty five years ago. Sam gave me my first Yoeskamnoer. I had by then already onto Canon cameras. But you know hey a one and the that great but then Sam gave me my first Kammer after maybe not shooting for ten years and we went on our honeymoon to Italy and I just shot like crazy like bags and bags film was carrying at the time. Kodak made what was called recording fill in the recording. Four seventy five four and as soon as you develop it would turn into a corkscrew that you can never hold flat that I didn't know because by then I wasn't processing okay but Three hundred you could you. Could you could set the The whatever you wanted I mean you couldn't with any film but this was if you decided to shoot at or if you wanted to shoot one hundred thirty two hundred or sixty four hundred. Just remember what you shot that at and you'd process it like if I shot four hundred three sixty I process it at four hundred by shoot at three sixty and I mean the detail was. It's crazy it's like mega pixels eight thousand and I just fell in love with that and then when Kodak stopped making it because they said well you know nobody's buying it because it was twelve dollars a roll and I know buying it. No please keep making and then shortly after you know film just kind of went by the wayside and now it's coming back. Is it coming back to us? Sales were up twenty percent last year. So you now actually have to try and find a film camera. I still actually have a rebel. Okay okay isn't it rebel? Originally rebels were killed. What was called the digital rebel? No megapixel but I did have for the Canon thirty and I was started shooting movies of Friends of mine. Who were directors said? Would you shoot stills movie and I remember get going into get a sound blimp made for my digital camera and the guys in you and Steven Spielberg's guy or the only people that have blimps for you. These eight thirty eight sixty. Whatever I add albertson blimp. Right Jacobsen Jacobsen recently closed down. There's no need for any other. No ex- exactly. I've got this this whole box downstairs in the garage is because like don't need the blimp. Next time lenses by the I worked on a movie as recently as Twenty fifteen and with a digital camera and they recorded a blimp ahead to go rent one. I mean even even that little clique. If you're onset now we have an issue thousand frames so that one was especially digital you shoot so fast. The first movie I did shoot I had asked me me. Leaders a friend of mine and she also is the executive producer and director of the morning. Show but at the time going back. You know fifteen twenty years. Whenever it was that I was shooting this I said to her. You know this is the first time shooting for a movie. What she's just keeps shooting shoot. Shoot shoot shoot shoot shoot shoot so I did. I shot eight thousand seven hundred and seventy eight frames and thought okay. You know. I'm their mom. Put them all and give them. And then oh no we just need your best hundred. It took me like three weeks to go through every single one of those because I really looked like I was shooting movie. Everything was so slightly different. They know what would you take away from that experience? Really get an editor back to that five role mentality you know. They'll have a budget for three to five roles. And that's what you did shooting digital change anything when you when you shoot because obviously it did change a lot for a lot of people in this idea of shooting maybe too much or a lot or just the freedom they can give you. Some really changed a lot of people's now you know everything is it cyclical now. I've barely picked up my camera now. Also have a Sony seven hours and shooting with my Samsung Galaxy's the galaxy the first galaxy thing. I had a four note for one of the earlier. Ones the best pictures I've ever seen. I went on my God. Look at these pictures that I'm getting on my phone and now I have a lot of my family's mostly apple. Nothing you know not against apple but galaxies have much better pictures you know the Samsung just really has the better technology shooting with your phone and I know friends of mine even say your pictures are so much better than mine. Why is that slow data Samsung if Samsung only made and take get another phone? Get Your Samsung Stolz. But I still like I still like the weight of having a camera and shooting the cameras a different different animal. But now you know. There's a difference for photographers. I never was would call professional photography gallery shows and stuff but I'm not like Greg Gorman. Who was a friend of mine? I didn't shoot and I'm not making money like that as a photographer. And right now so many you can take so many pictures. I mean anybody can get good picture with their phone. You know you can. It's easier to get good pictures now than it used to be. You know you'd have to have a professional photographer do that. Well now I you know people take headshots their phones movies with your eyes. You can do anything. Us forces us to kind of rethink what I should be taking pictures of. And how many pictures should be taking reassessed kind of the nature of it and that's happening. I think you know this return to film. We're seeing people kind of wanting to slow back down a little bit trying to figure out what what's the basis of it. That's really what it is. It's it's a medium. It's like if you're an oil painter if you're into acrylics or if you're doing you know pencil drawings if you're into sculpture it's a it's all worthy it's just a matter of what your taste isn't what it is that you're shooting at that

Samsung Harry Canon SAM Massachusetts Sherry Apple Kodak Trenton Center Director Ebony Magazine Jose Lycos Greg Gorman United States Matic Jacobsen Jacobsen Steven Spielberg
Do genetic ancestry tests know if youre Palestinian? A cautionary tale of race and science

Science Friction

08:49 min | 1 year ago

Do genetic ancestry tests know if youre Palestinian? A cautionary tale of race and science

"Welcome welcome to size friction on the tension ritual in. Today's episode is Genomic Science to go to striking story for you of the shocks. You can engage when you take a genetic ancestry tests and the problems are not in your Diana. They are in the science. Oh man so so I want you to make mercury eight to buy. Oh my gosh. So she's an American Palestinian cartoonist illustrator. Leaving in Brooklyn New York and when Shae Shea started to draw well I kind of helped his stop making sense of the world. When I was younger all I wanted to do withdraw from Warwick fantasy characters? who were you know exploring some fantasy world adventuring trying to figure out the meaning of war? Yeah you Matz I. She was an intense keyed. He'd sigh relate to that. I'm not even joking. That was my first comic when I was like thirteen or fourteen trying to figure out the meaning of war yes the law plot. What was really hard? Core rate was trying to figure out the world her family stories. We're helping figure out a self my family. So my my Palestinian side of the family were originally from Ramallah they came to the US in the sixties after the nineteen sixty seven war. And and. That's where my father. My mother my mother is mostly of British and Scottish ancestry and they met in DC and the register and Marguerite was born. She grew up in San Francisco but she understood whole lot about the deep heritage in history. If if family I lived with a lot of my extended family on my father's side and and the constantly I mean I think it's a very Palestinian thing to talk about loss. I'm sorry to say Palestine and talk about what was lost in talk about how it was and things like that so I heard very much about out where we were from and how it was there and everything and there is actually a book. That is a congenial logical history of Ramallah so my family needs to say his in this book. This is actually a book that was done maybe thirty years ago. There's actually a recent effort to update the books so this is kind of a big thing and it's very much a Palestinian thing to try to keep memory alive. It's a need to assure after that. Hey you know we exist who've had the we had this entire history. We're going to write it somewhere. We're going to you know. Put it somewhere. I wish I could've seen Palestine back in the day honestly because it just sounds really chill a nice. I'd like to go okay. Okay so mercury thought. She had a pretty clear idea about her ancestry but then she sped into a test tube. Well first half-brother on her father's side spat into a test tube. He decided on a whim to take a day and I taste and he got the results back in he was just blake. Yeah you might want to take a look at these results. He's her kind of weird. Well we'd in an intriguing conaway. Our understanding ending was that from my Dad's side. We were fully half Palestinian half Arab but these results they suggested something different so so we were just like what so marguerite decided to do an ancestry test to this was back in two thousand sixteen. They went through twenty three and me did the all spit in a tube and she said it off to the company twenty-three May and literally Chino. Even more surprises would be in store for her so the saliva gets to our partner lab. The DNA is extracted from that. and My name Ms Joanna Mountain and I'm senior. Director of research at twenty three and me and previously at Stanford with Joanna also did her PhD and specialized in human evolutionary evolutionary genetics. So when customers sign on with the genetic testing and Analysis Company twenty-three May which is headquartered in Silicon Valley. He's what what happens to this speech sample around a half. A million positions in the DNA are analyzed and we get the genetic variants at those half million positions genetic knitting variant. Now that just means some kind of unique variation in your genomes deny say quance so then twenty three and me use an automated computerized Haraz prices to p different stretches or windows of your day and I and then I compare those two James off a reference group made up of individuals individuals from different populations globally. Now what ethnicities are present or missing from that reference group. That's K. as you'll he'll IDA and and we look at each one of these little windows and we say to which people is this individual most genetically similar and we continue as we stroll along the genome looking and saying well at this point this genome looks very similar to people from say Iberia and then we get a little further down in. Wow it looks similar to people from commoner and even in further down. It looks similar to people from Ireland. So there's a method we have that classifies each little patch of the genome by saying. Is this more similar to people from Ireland Orland or from France and then the algorithm says okay the probability that's from Ireland and appropriately. France in whichever is highest. Is the winner there so then we patch it all together come up with percentages for each individual so it's a multi step process and that's what we present to the customer okay so back back to margarite radium waiting for the results from twenty three and May to land in her inbox and sure enough. I got I got the results back and Some of them made sense. You know I knew enough about my mother's side of the family told me that okay. HALF OF ME is British and Scottish Scottish. Okay cool makes sense what came next made very little sense to her. Other half is going on percent Italian Elian it said thirty five percent Italian and then the rest was Arab Specifically Oh what did it say. Think specifically had said western Western Asian or something they actually tried to give me a breakdown of what regions of Italy it came from but they couldn't actually detect wherein Italy. It came from at all Wade. It'll Italian come from and actually I think is sweet coincidence. Is it true that your husband is Italian. My husband is Italian and I did actually when I got the test I did ask him like do I look talion. He was just like no suddenly just like that. Migrate was possibly thirty percent Italian and only fifteen percent western Asian and north African and canete slightly saving detail that she is Palestinian heritage. We'll wait until you hear what happened. Win Twenty Twenty three and may updated her results two years later. It's fairly incredible. I though Hel genetically different we really well at the genome scale there. Her over three billion nucleotides that make up our genome. So My name is Sarah Tishkov and I may professor of genetics awesome biology at the University of Pennsylvania and she's hugely influential Sarah and colleagues published the first pipe to support the out of Africa hypothesis of human migration using analysis of the DNA inside cells Nuclei and has conducted the largest studies of genetic variation in in African populations. We differ at about. I would say less than point. One percent of the genome. So that's a relatively small mall amount of difference to give you an idea of we. Compared the human genome to a chimp genome. It differs at about one point. Five percent of the genome less than point point one percent and yet what is contained within that variation that difference the majority of variation is not functional and in fact that variation is very useful for making inferences about evolutionary history about population history demographic McGrath history tracing migration events and so on the part of the genome it actually is influencing variable traits is important for understanding how how we adapted to different environments during human evolution and also understanding why some people are more at risk for certain diseases than others

Palestine Marguerite Ramallah France Ms Joanna Mountain Sarah Tishkov Italy Ireland Mercury Eight Genomic Science Warwick Shae Shea Twenty Twenty San Francisco Brooklyn United States New York
"marguerite" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:05 min | 2 years ago

"marguerite" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Before we dive in I have a quick request were eager to know more about our audience so we created a short listener survey to help us learn more about you questions she also refused to say the church establishment should be the guide toward spiritual growth the theologians questioning her thought her beliefs the hierarchical church establishment wasn't into it in thirteen hundred the Bishop of Cumbrae condemned love of God there is a direct connection with the divine she scoffed other theologians who favored strict reason over love and that people don't need spiritual intermediaries like priests or bishops in order to achieve spiritual communion with divine as you might imagine I'm begging communities still exists today the fact that the begins existed outside of the typical church hierarchy made them targets for the authorities Margaret it was likely and especially appealing target in her writings she suggested there was no need for mass or prayers or the light around twelve ninety marguerite published the Mirror of simple souls in it she said that when a person is in a state of contemplating Marguerite was born at the tail end of the thirteenth century in France little is known about her early life but he IRV simple souls ordered the book burned and dragged Marguerite before the Inquisition Marguerite refused to answer the inquisitors she said that someone who's achieved a relationship of love with God has surpassed the regular church and ascended to a Higher Church of the spirit with you off or by serving as nurses they typically agree to remain chaste while living in the beginning community but were allowed to leave and Mary at any time all about witches and saints throughout history women have been celebrated and condemned for wielding spiritual power this month or highlighting women who made it incredible contributions to and through religions as well as those who were charged and punished for alleged heresies or supernatural abilities Asia the beginning movement was initially started by upper class women and eventually spread to those with less money the communities often supported themselves by selling lace they differed from nuns in that the begins didn't take vows and worked in the local languages in Germany France and Holland instead of sticking to Latin the language of the churn interestingly it was no longer seen as dangerous or outside the establishment wants it no longer for her name this suggests that Marguerite identity they were telling the stories of women from throughout history and around the world you may not know about the definitely should each month is themed and this month is all uh marguerite was excommunicated from the Church and was burned at the stake thirteen ten com slash survey you can also find the Lincoln episode notes was Kaplan talked on Monday

Cumbrae Margaret France Marguerite Mary Asia Germany Holland marguerite Kaplan IRV Lincoln
"marguerite" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

06:07 min | 2 years ago

"marguerite" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"It's eleven fifty nine in Hollywood California and night call is on the Air I'm Emily Yoshida I'm tess Lynch and I'm Molly Lambert and every week the three of us take your calls and discuss our favorite mysteries conspiracies and pop cultural oddities of the week give us a call at one to four zero four six night and we'll discuss your ghost story do just be sad listened to worst you're ever on apple podcasts the iheartradio APP or wherever you get your podcasts.

California Emily Yoshida tess Lynch Molly Lambert apple Hollywood
Witches & Saints: Jeanne d'Albret

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:43 min | 2 years ago

Witches & Saints: Jeanne d'Albret

"Spiritual power throughout history this month or highlighting women who made incredible contributions to and through religions as well as those who were charged and punished for alleged heresies or supernatural abilities today. We're heading back to the sixteenth century. French wars of religion are women. If the day was one of the most powerful female political figures of the period alongside Queen Elizabeth I and Catherine Domenici she played a leading role in the religious conflicts that dominated the second half of the sixteenth century as the acknowledged spiritual ritual and political leader of the French huguenot movement. I'm talking about John. Dall Bray Queen of Navarre John was born in fifteen twenty eight at a royal palace outside of Paris. She was the only child of Marguerite of Navarre King Henry the second Lavar a tiny sovereign Afrin St stuck between France and Spain Henry also claimed sovereignty over a number of territories in the south of France. John's mother Marguerite Greet was an incredibly accomplished woman. She was a celebrated author of courtly novellas and spiritual works and she was also an early patron of the Protestant reformation. John was heavily influenced by her mother and was drawn to reformed Christianity specifically calvinism as well as humanist just thinking in fifteen forty seven John Married Antoine de Bourbon Duke Vendome with whom she had five children. The only to to a son and a daughter survived past childhood after the death of John's father. She antwon ruled jointly over their territories in south southwestern France. John continued to be drawn to protestantism. Even after her mother's death in fifteen forty nine on Christmas Day fifteen eighteen sixty John publicly converted to calvinism and declared calvinism the official religion of her kingdom that made her the highest ranking Protestant Austin in all of France and designated enemy of the Catholic Church and the Catholic Counter Reformation Movement after converting John joined the Huguenot movement in their fight against French Catholics. The HUGH DOTS were an ethnic religious group of French. Protestants concentrated in the south and west of France as their numbers and influence grew. The Hugo knots were persecuted by French Catholics leading to a series of religious conflicts known as the French wars of religion region fought on and off between fifteen sixty two and fifteen ninety eight when war broke out in fifteen sixty two John worked behind the scenes to fund fund the humane what's she used her own vast fortune and mobilized patronage networks. She also used her influence at the French court to plead eight for their cause. Still she stayed pretty publicly neutral during what became known as the first and second wars when the third war broke out in fifteen fifteen sixty eight John faced both the threat of a noble rebellion and Royal French invasion of her territories. She was forced to flee to the hugh. You cannot stronghold of Larochelle on the Atlantic coast of France with her two children into a pond John's arrival she became the de facto leader of the city the and began publicly directing the Protestant insurgency while and La Rochelle Genre letters to foreign rulers sympathetic to her cause asking for assistance assistance she even used her own jewelry as backing for a loan from Queen Elizabeth I of England she assumed control of Huguenot intelligence gathering fortifications of Larochelle finances and maintaining control of the civilian population of the city that included taking care of the many Edison refugees looking for safe haven. John also played a major role in military activity. She even went to the battlefields. During during intense fighting to rally the troops inspect their defenses in fifteen sixty nine John wrote a memoir entitled Ample Declaration Shen in which she defended her actions and those for fellow Hugo noughts a year later in fifteen seventy. John was the primary force of negotiating the peace treaty with Catherine Domenici. The de facto ruler of France at the time to end the third war as part of the Treaty Sean reluctantly agreed to an arranged marriage between her son Henry and Catherine's daughter Marguerite in exchange for agreeing to the marriage hugh cannot gain the right to hold public office in France after signing the marriage contract. John took up temporary residence in Paris to prepare for the wedding two months before the big day gene fell ill after a day of shopping five days later on June ninth fifteen seventy two Jean died not long after her death a rumor spread the John was actually poisoned by a pair of perfumed gloves given to her by Catherine de Medici though the story persisted over the years. There's no evidence to support the claim. There is evidence that John may have been suffering from tuberculosis access despite her death John Son's wedding happened and he eventually became King Henry the fourth of brands the first of a long line the French Bourbon kings tune in tomorrow for the story of

John France John Married Antoine De Bourbo Marguerite Greet John Son French Huguenot Movement Queen Elizabeth I Catherine Domenici Paris Navarre King Henry Henry French Court Hugh Dots Catherine De Medici Antwon Hugo Noughts Catholic Counter Reformation M Larochelle Edison
"marguerite" Discussed on The Dave Chang Show

The Dave Chang Show

10:25 min | 2 years ago

"marguerite" Discussed on The Dave Chang Show

"Bear in mind. You're building restaurant for not five years or even two years out forever. You're trying to and what happens with employee number ten thousand how they know the history which is why talk about religion. All that and i think something that was one of the early things i forced you on was coda finding some of this <hes>. I remember when we started. There was always this idea. Which i i totally get that. If you start to notify these things you start to write them down. They start to lose their meaning. You know i've been to major corporation offices that have been giant decals. You know their their core values on wall and it's like makes you wanna puke <hes> so so what i've been struggling with over the past couple years is how do you record some of this. How do you almost give a new hire. Tool kit understand not what they're supposed to do but how they're supposed to think because we're all broken records right. We say the same things over and over again like you know and how do you make sure that when a new hire here is you say donut ended ended in your head or a new hire. Here's you say well. Gosh you're get us. They're they're not hearing it for the first time they already understand the logic behind it so we've been working on some steps got and trying to really put together orientation. That's not just factual kind of conceptual to some degree and use it almost as our our indoctrination to the way of thinking so no data yet as to whether that is going to work or be successful but we had to try something new in that your ability as the the company gets bigger and bigger. It's about you and i and forcing these principles. It's about everyone who is currently here doing it and then passing it on to the next person who comes in <hes> <hes>. What's the next future look like from. What do you want to happen i want. I want a couple of things i want. I was a focus more on the things that matter. I think we're in a process right now of putting a lot of systems in place to kind of streamline some of the things that we don't think that are honestly make operators better so giving them more tools to manage their business. Make decisions think critically early so that we can continue to grow. I think we have a really unique growth style and not we do open one off restaurants where we empower the chef in the general manager to run the show oh into treated as their space and that means that there's a lot more latitude in terms of what they can do and what they should do. <hes> we don't have a cookie cutter <unk> boxer recipes or or wade operate <hes> and so kind of how you at least get the fundamentals down so that they can focus on the things that matter they can focus on where they're touches coming in what they're designed change <hes> as opposed to it being just a free for all every single time <hes> so making their lives more efficient while still focusing on on what matters letters on there is that i think diversifying ourselves out of restaurants <hes> you know i think we had a real run recently but as i'm sure dave has mentioned on many episodes <hes> the restaurant businesses really dumb business and you put so much time in love and care and creating these spaces uses and your inherently your margins are always going to be shut and they're getting harder and harder every year especially in new york <hes> labor's up to thirty five to fifty percent restaurants strong. That's insane and were totally supportive in that people need to be paid more for their work. So how do you make margins higher so that you can pay people more so we're looking into to you know we have some new concepts coming out in the next year that you know i think figure out more efficient ways using labor. I think also consumer packaged goods and you know how do we take what we are good at in the restaurants which is kind of creating a flavors that are unique to us <hes> and how do you kind of amplify that message <hes> especially with you on hulu and netflix you don't. We're getting exposure so much more than ever before. And how do you make sure that it's not just if you live in the few cities we have restaurants that you can experience a part of what our company is and what we value and the thing that i'm always the most proud of is. We've never made a product doc that we don't use in our restaurants like for me. The kiss of death is like making canned soup for you. Know tomato sauce that you'd never touch in your own restaurant. Everything we put out we we treat with the same intensity and scrutiny that goes into our restaurants <hes> and it's the same thing that restaurants like i always joke about how like we don't have a secret restaurant in like in cancun that we don't talk about like <unk> stay tuned but we treat all of our restaurants equally the same attention and the same canal city and it's going to be the same thing for everything. We're doing barred. I think <hes> the world's going to see just how talented you are and how dedicated you are and what a giving person you are to the people you work with. What a great daughter. You are to your family and i really believe that you're a rare talent and i'm couldn't be proud of the fact that you represent this company and everything that we try to be better at so if anything i again i'm thankful to your your parents into your whole jose of our family family because they've done a remarkable job of of a teaching you the right values and everything and <hes> excited to see where you take momofuku. I got you're back and we have a lot of exciting projects and i've always gotten too much credit for everything. Momofuku has done so hopefully people can see very clearly with enough evidence that there have been many people changing. The future of what moments ago is now. It's under the stewardship of marguerite agree mayor scowl so we'll get you out of here. I know you hate doing this shit but i'm telling you you're going to get better get used to it because people are gonna wanna talk you a lot. I i see a lot of conferences <hes> keynote speaking bullshit in.

cancun hulu general manager marguerite new york dave fifty percent five years two years
EU commissioner on $5 billion antitrust fine: Google has to 'stop this behavior'

MIX Programming

01:50 min | 3 years ago

EU commissioner on $5 billion antitrust fine: Google has to 'stop this behavior'

"They have denied European. Consumers the, benefit of effective competition in the very, important, more was fair so Taylor that. Of course was EU competition Commissioner Marguerite the sti- or speaking. Last month if you remember Google received an almost five billion dollar fine it was a record from the EU and was ordered, to change the way it put search and web browser apps on Android mobile devices, penalty is far higher than anyone that's. Been dished out by the US the Chinese or any other anti-trust authority it's really. Interesting that they're trying to sort of make a crackdown on these companies is there sort of feeling like they're falling behind intact and want to be able to better compete with the US and China and Europe hasn't had, that breakout. Tech star that really needs to put itself on the map but Jeremy Mikan found that there are some hopeful startups around the continent Europe historically has suffered from a number of things traditionally there was there is a lack of, entrepreneurial spirit Becoming an auditor wasn't. Something that a lot of European young people wanted, to do there are a lot of very large. Corporations that have been, around for decades kind of in. The environment they're also as a lack of venture capital funding lack. Of people to offer that venture capital funding and to some extent there was a lack of skills I think all, those things are no longer the case in Europe and now you find there are a ton of. Young people who want to be entrepreneurs and start their own businesses a very popular career choice for people coming out of universities just to go work for a startup so that. Problems kind of solve the venture capital funding has increasingly comeback Europe last year had a, record level of venture capital. Funding at at nineteen billion US dollars and law that's still a lot less than the US which had. About sixty. Seven billion or China which had about forty billion it? Is a record for Europe and it's four times as much as what's available. Just five

Europe Silicon Valley United States Google EU Nokia Jeremy Taylor Jeremy Mikan China SAP Bloomberg Priceline Commissioner Jeremy I Auditor
"marguerite" Discussed on Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"marguerite" Discussed on Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

"Jimmy buffett was not too excited about that oh that's so so jimmy buffett sort of you know rip me new asshole he wow i like it why you can't yell at me i mean marguerite ville this is not your persona right yeah twelve right right i'm twelve similar story about jimmy from my childhood dad's a healthcare lawyer hugh meet a lot a lot of people did you grow up i grew up in manhattan beach near the strand brawl volleyball i'm no because my parents didn't want me to get skin cancer you grew up on manhattan the beach but they were like cuts i you'll get melanoma because we're oscar ozzy oliver love inland v said you're the ultimate dilfer and my free pass who is your celebrity free pass me yeah oh my god i don't even know i've always loved eva mendez are right yeah how was patti lupone on crazy ex girlfriend insane fantastic so so chill and grounded and down to earth down to improvise down to play hung out with everyone blast you know shoe but who's your free pass a mo also my free pass because this is that that's more exciting like if you had if you had banned one guy could who would it be probably hand sorry i'm sure he's great i mean i mean we've talked about it's you know it's weird as you will you get it is you start to actually meet favors passing i think i if i'd like i said to my husband like i'm at a party with colin i.

Jimmy buffett marguerite ville manhattan beach melanoma eva mendez patti lupone colin hugh manhattan
"marguerite" Discussed on The Popcast With Knox and Jamie

The Popcast With Knox and Jamie

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"marguerite" Discussed on The Popcast With Knox and Jamie

"That's the one and marguerite like she this this may be follows to asan's with a sinister mission a fatally ill teacher an enigmatic janitor and a waitress with a double life no no i'm out like here's the thing if we're trying to figure out should i see this watch the trailer and i got bored thirty percent through the trailer and there's red someone i think it might have been bloomberg actually he was talking about editing just in general for writing audio pay attention to your boredom so anybody creative if the thing you've made if you're working on it and it bores you then it sucks so don't do that cut it out and this trailer i found myself repeatedly board and the trailers supposed to be awesome the trailers thing obviously every trailer for movie most mccarthy's made has been credible but that doesn't mean the movie's good so you have made a good trailer that's a bad sign now to speak to what you said von stein is the director and at first i was like i looked at von stein and then i was like oh my gosh he has been on world war z and sherlock holmes like oh my gosh no clarify he was the second unit director and he was miscellaneous crew on truck and i know you gotta start somewhere but this is your first movie out now i'm out the dome you have to trust you as not cool vaughn vio in its v a u g h n so that's suspect i don't know if thing about that are solicit go to june jamie solicited movies i because there's a lot of them we've got which i'm so excited for the movie.

von stein director jamie marguerite bloomberg mccarthy sherlock holmes thirty percent
China's March trade weakens, surplus with US at $15.4B

Morning Edition

02:18 min | 3 years ago

China's March trade weakens, surplus with US at $15.4B

"In new york i'm tracey samuelson in for david brancaccio the world trade organization has a pretty positive outlook on global commerce in two thousand eighteen unless you know what in a new report this morning the agency warned countries not to risk trade growth by resorting to restrictive policies like tariffs the bbc's economics correspondent andrew walker has more world trade last year grew at his fastest rate since twenty eleven the wto says it's likely to continue close to that pace this year and the organization says preliminary data suggest 2018 has got off to a strong start but there's a stark warning the upbeat prediction depends on governments refraining from a cycle of retaliatory trade measures against the background of increasing trade tensions especially between the united states and china the wto's director general rebecca as vida said such a cycle was the last thing the world economy needs he urged governments to show restraint and settle their differences through dialogue and serious engagement global trade growth in the aftermath of the financial crisis has been relatively sluggish by power standards though it did pick up pace somewhat in twenty seventeen the bbc's andrew walker and about those trade tensions between the us and china chinese officials said yesterday it's not currently conducting any trade negotiations with the us it also said recent announcements that china would allow for foreign firms greater access to its financial and manufacturing industries that should not be taken as concessions to the us that those measures have actually been in the works for a while now and now let's do the numbers the footsie in london is just about flat dow and nasdaq futures are up in the six tenths percent range with the dow futures up one hundred and fifty two points p futures are up about a half a percent one key theme of mark zuckerberg's testimony in front of congress this week how facebook should be regulated going forward in light of revelations that user information was harvested without permission by data firm cambridge analytica given facebook's global reach this isn't just an american issue foreign firms are also grappling with how to limit these kinds of privacy breaches one of those one of those leaders is marguerite vest ear she's europe the european union's commissioner for competition and she spoke with marketplace's david brancaccio you are further along.

Congress Europe Cambridge Analytica London Director General Andrew Walker New York Commissioner European Union Facebook Tracey Samuelson Mark Zuckerberg China Vida Rebecca United States WTO
"marguerite" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

The Daily Zeitgeist

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"marguerite" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

"Just post in pointed out says people who like jamie loftus his feet also like jennifer gardner cook hilary duff marguerite moreau in arianna guerande company yeah i i am intellectuals throw in my engine does have a page oh yeah no anyways surf surf away something this is how we're going to do an attorney tino movie this all my god it's the easiest feat yeah bait them bain dot gopher the anti foot tarantino sub stop highly beautiful feet women yeah startling some really real feet gnarled up stinky feet please thank you what's something you think is overrated overrated unfortunately also because the last time i was here i talked about how much i love a series of unfortunate events have since seen the new season of the show not good i don't think that there is like a more poorly casted television show currently running it is crazy how like all the casting on that show is straight up bad and i'm also salty because allison williams guy cast in in a my dream part for when i was a tiny little child she's just getting all the parts she computer pain dan you know like get out oh you're someone's daughter alfitre everyone is someone's daughter if she's really good at playing somebody who is really hate able or if she's really hateful i i wonder what she's actually like yes maybe she is just like capitalizing on being a hard to be around and jamie and this is going to be hard for audience.

jamie loftus marguerite moreau allison williams jennifer gardner attorney tino tarantino
Bill Cosby trial judge delivers defense 2 big victories

The Savage Nation

01:32 min | 3 years ago

Bill Cosby trial judge delivers defense 2 big victories

"From the judge hearing the bill cosby sexual assault retrial no words from cosby as he walked into the montgomery county courthouse today but his lawyer tom izzo must've been feeling good after the judge issued two rulings favorable to the defense testimony will be allowed from a woman who claims that alleged victim andrea constand was out to get money from the comedian the judge said who ruled during the trial on what she can and cannot speak about though johnston said marguerite jackson is lying the judge also ruled that the jury can be told how much the former temple university employees received from cosby in her civil case steve kastenbaum in norristown pennsylvania neighbors of a smith smithfield pork plant in north carolina or suing over the smell they say smithfield's forcing local farmers to spread hog waste over crop lands instead of using a more expensive less smelly process it uses elsewhere smithfield says there was never a problem until out of state lawyer showed up i'm rich johnson steve moskowitz sponsored by page publishing an accident southbound two eighty just north of page mill road silver honda fit and a white chevy silverado are blocking the left lane a tow truck is on the way should be pulling up shortly northbound eight eighty just south of eighty four there's a bumper between the three and four lanes disabled vehicle northbound two eighty just south of eleventh street a grain nissan altima is in the gore point possibly out of gas chp is going to have to rent a traffic break to clear that vehicle out of the gore point eastbound eighty just east of thirtyseven that dump truck lost a load of.

Smithfield Gore Honda Smith Smithfield Pennsylvania Temple University Nissan Altima Silverado Steve Moskowitz Bill Cosby North Carolina Steve Kastenbaum Marguerite Jackson Johnston Andrea Constand Tom Izzo Montgomery County Courthouse Assault Mill
White House lays out DACA deal asks

Arizona's Morning News

01:12 min | 3 years ago

White House lays out DACA deal asks

"Triage it comes as agents get ready to deal with summertime emergency calls in the coming months the training said to be helpful because of the limited law enforcement presence in the rural border areas jeremy foster ktar news the white house putting together an immigration package the package focuses on deterring further illegal immigration and it does not appear to include a solution for dauga however phoenix immigration attorney marguerite de silva says for now people are still being allowed to renew nobody knew is allowed to apply and they've been clear with that since late last year that's thanks to federal judge ordering the trump administration to continue accepting renewal applications while legal challenges continue were operating as usual meaning we're sending in the applicator were expecting to get to your approval back in the mail silva says she's hopeful congress will ultimately pass a permanent solution for dhaka result the psotino ktar news if one group has its way public utilities in arizona would have to get at least half their power from renewable energy sources by twenty thirty a new asu report claims that proposal from clean energy for a healthy arizona could hurt our state economically matthew benson arizonans for affordable electricity doesn't like.

Dauga Marguerite De Silva Congress Arizona Jeremy Foster Attorney Dhaka ASU
"marguerite" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"marguerite" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

"It is national marguerite at a very important role that his fifth goal johnny's on his way on i think what girl kathleen already started celebrating last night o'reilly jazz say an margarita day in the yep how do you like yours i like frozen frozen yes all no salts you you were you straightening boga rosen i love it blended and another traditional marguerite a guy like like those strawberry levin gummy one i love a mango all my frog you're not a big drinker but if you had to drink a margarita how would you like it prepared are definitely frozen yeah you guys like you're frozen margaritas scarier frozen nosalt you i'm a traditional on the rocks with salt guy i like a half rim you know you can have what are you live in it so i've heard use harsh that's not night i like it when they they sold half the rim of the glass you can ask them to do that and i can put i like when they put sugar 'cause i sometimes will say can you put sugar instead he could do then i let go of the sugar off it's so good in i like i like it when they can do a within johore with a different type of spirit what has that will smoky flavor to intern i dunno i like i love martyers but love them on the raw loves all kinds of polls online of how you like your margarita and so far thirty eight percent safe frozen is the way to go well gap not it's not traditional but you can have that if rights not bowling ninety percent said traditional really all right so far so far as long as you can get it in the hid it in your mind read a whole el there's not in any way i can get it m category.

johnny kathleen intern thirty eight percent ninety percent
"marguerite" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:54 min | 4 years ago

"marguerite" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Marguerite also actively mediated between the roman catholic church in france protestants really advocating for tolerance between the two of them she never publicly converted or left the roman catholic church likely because to her her religious beliefs for private even as they were mirrored in her own ratings but she's so publicly supported reformers and shelter people accused of heresy that she's both credited for nurturing protestantism in france in criticized for weakening the catholic church there unfortunately that atmosphere of tolerance that mercury had tried to nurture did not last long beyond her death in fifteen forty nine which is something we're going to talk about after another quake sponsor break did are'making super villain almost destroy san diego i like to picture him as malevolence area yaluk him kind of like is whether these super villain gyn of with the hacker soviet bone recordings square's in the colleges in the margins in the sensors tommy's the khamis did i'd miss the khamis okay yes he can't you never me never see them cummings the business did a miracle really wage war on chinese restaurants okay so you you that i felt like there was a silver lining coming near ben in just a geo i don't see a vase with your say leg better because it got worse you know why do british lawyer still where those amazing powdered works sherry wig sounds frivolous it sounds through there's too much whims unit very lucky hi i'm fit and unknowns and we delve into the youngest people pleases beams across the story of civilization our show ridiculous history can find new episodes every week where ever you catch your favorite podcast and please be sure to subscribe on apple podcast never miss a new episode.

Marguerite roman catholic church france tommy apple
"marguerite" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:54 min | 4 years ago

"marguerite" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Later on that year marguerite got married again this time to you already the second dow brain the king of navarre on november 16th fifteen twenty eight they had a daughter zhen who will talk more about in a bit after remarrying and having a daughter marguerite became a lot less involved in her brother's court politics focusing more on her own riding in her own personal religious studies she did continue to shelter protestant refugees and navarre though in addition to her translations of others work marguerite was also a writer herself her only work published during her lifetime was marguerite dilemma karite discipline says which was published in fifteen forty seven she died two years later on december 21st her most notable work have tamarin was published posthumously by claude cliche in fifteen fifty nine at the request of marguerite starter written in the style of a car cheers to kamran it's sat arises among other things religious hypocrisy she wrote volumes of work beyond these two works though much of it existed really just as her own personal manuscripts until the 19th century and a lot of it was explicitly religious and infused with reformation ideas they're really also were not very many women who had published work during their lifetimes at this point in history in europe aside from her writing marguerite support for the reformation really helped it to survive in france in the early to mid 16th century as we noted earlier punishments for spreading material that was deemed to be blasphemous are her were or heretical were really severe and they included execution so without having sets consistent and vocal support from the french court as well as the act of sheltering of reformation leaders the reformation really might not have established much of a foothold in france.

marguerite navarre zhen writer claude cliche france french court remarrying kamran europe two years
"marguerite" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:39 min | 4 years ago

"marguerite" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"She also sought out and obtain the translations of these tax to be brought to her in france so that she could stay up to date about was going on under marguerite influence king francois the first court also provided protection and shelter to a number of reformers whose work was considered heretical and blasphemous marguerite herself might have face the same fate had she not been sister to the king even in spite of her advocacy though several of the reformers and scholars marguerite associated with were eventually executed for heresy as all of this was going on on february 24th fifteen twenty five the forces of francis or france while the first of france fought those of hapsburg emperor charles the fifth at the battle of perugia which was part of the italian wars this is a whole series of conflicts in which a number of nations primarily france and spain tried to take control of italy this battle was a decisive victory for charles the fifth and france's wound up being taken prisoner mercury husband charles sort of took the fall for this whole thing he died not long after marguerite was actively involved in the negotiations for the release of her brother including personally meeting with charles the fifth she returned to france only when her brother began to suspect that charles was dragging out the negotiations on purpose in the hopes of taking her captive as well her brother was only able to return home after signing the treaty of madrid in fifteen twenty six which surrendered all french claims to italian territory.

france perugia charles marguerite spain italy
"marguerite" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"marguerite" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"So when marguerite duncan lerma was born on april eleven fourteen ninety two martin luther was still 25 years away from posting his 95 theses but criticisms of the roman catholic church many of which were incorporated into those theses were well underway marguerite was the daughter of sheryl's davao wa orly arm and louise of several a and she had a younger brother francois who was born on september twelve fourteen 94 although it seemed pretty likely that the french monarchs king louis the twelfth in queen anne would have an air of their own friend flow is that the line of succession for the throne so he received the sort of education that would prepare him for the possibility of becoming the king than louise made sure that marguerite got the same education as well in fifteen own nine mercury marriage charles the duke of alan song and took an active role in trying to improve the lives of the people of alan song she raised money for hospitals in alms houses and prompted her brother to establish an orphanage in paris she insisted that poor women be given shelter and food during the last days of their pregnancies and after the birth to try to combat ongoing problems it bit of infanticide and child abandonment she also remedied the alan zones cancels lack of a library and she began inviting scholars and poets to stay with them to enrich the spiritual and emotional atmosphere at court get her husband did not have a reputation for being a particularly scholarly man.

marguerite duncan lerma martin luther roman catholic church sheryl francois anne louise paris davao alan 25 years