17 Burst results for "Margrethe"

"margrethe" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

07:29 min | 3 months ago

"margrethe" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"My time. Yeah, I can't believe it. Okay, that picture you guys posted on your own stuff. We're 19 years in the business over Margrethe. I couldn't even I wrote, I just wrote hashtag icons because you guys, I mean, and if anyone follows them on anything What When are you going to like You guys look exactly the same, but like everybody, he says. I mean, I know I said that to my wife last night and my no, I think it's my mom. That said it. I was like, Hey, yes, She's like, How's Laurie and Julia Show? That was your last day with them, right? And I'm like, Well, kind of, but I'm like it was their 19th anniversary was a big deal. She's like 19 years. When did they start when they were 12? So good job, ladies. You're doing some right. Well, thank you. Thank you, Doctor Crutchfield it out to you. Yeah, no, I It's It's wild, but because there's a lot of photos, you know, if you guys with, you know the bigwigs around various studios and yeah, I would say on it, okay. I'm not trying to shade past either of you, but I'd say the big thing is you guys got better at Epic. Close an epic hairdos. Yes, like that's why I'm like, raw and rough at the beginning, and you know there is a there is something to that. That is also quite beautiful, but, yeah. Oh, God. Okay, well, speaking of beautiful, so I can't remember if this was on G m A or the today show And it was, uh His graduations and prom's are happening. You know they're happening in person and people are like so happy. And so this is the North Carolina Principal who breaks into song to sing to his graduates. Here we go. North Carolina Principal had a special Mex special message for his graduating class. Listen to Marcus. Gad. Send them off with a little Whitney Houston. Oh, Oh! Oh! Oh, well. He's got his hands stretched out in the graduates and feel. I mean, isn't that incredible? Could you imagine? That going down at your school at your high school graduation. I thought when I saw the Whitney Houston headline it was going to be. I believe the Children all our future because when I graduated in 1990, that was that was the song that was even better, You know, just starting right? There are capella then. Bam, boom. I mean, I'd be high fiving strangers in that audience. So, so unbelievable. So Anyway. Yeah, that was it was CBS this morning and, um, yeah, that was that was really great. And then also, um, the Pulitzer prizes were Uh, handed out today or people were recognized newspapers and, um, so it's the most prestigious award in journalism. Yeah. And, um, Star Tribune. Yeah, won a Pulitzer pretty amazing for breaking news reporting. So the two The two high ones are public service and then and investigative reporting and then breaking news. So the Stars room got breaking news. Obviously all the George Floyd The coverage was amazing. And the reporting was continual and constant. I would even say even all the News stations here in the twin cities. I mean, we're really incredible with their reporting. Yes, absolutely. And then public service. The New York Times one appeal Pulitzer for their coronavirus and Pandemic reporting. Yeah, Iraq Remember, we had the author on a couple weeks ago. Who What she does for the New York Times is puts the graphs together over, right? Yeah, yeah, that The New York Times had every day and almost every paper in the country pick that up and carried it because it was kind of a horse. Snapshot of the U. S. And then investigative reporting was for specific reporters for from the Boston Globe, and then especially citation was given. For, Um Darnell A. Fraser, Who's the young woman who filmed The entirety of George Floyd's murder, and it's just a special citation recognizing her for, um, courageously recording the video. And it spurred protests around the world and highlighted the crucial role of citizens citizens. In journalists it like citizen journalism. If you will, it is so when you think about How much that Video had an impact to the extent it's like That's a that's a great award and absolutely deserved. Yeah, just amazing. She didn't turn it off or turn away or anything. You know that having all of that, Because I mean without that would have been convicted. You know who knows that anyway? So Star Tribune. That's really so cool. I mean, it feels Yeah, well deserved. Yeah. Yeah, And what else do we all And then we have posted in homage. You guys like Christopher walking? Yeah. Kind of get a kick, How they have? Yeah, There's just something there's something about finally cool cat. It just feels like he'd be the type that like What you'd be at a party and he would just walk by and say something that would like stick with you for the rest of your life if I was ever. I mean, I would have to know what went down the night of Natalie Wood and you know, because he was on the boat. Yeah. Yeah. Robert Wagner and Natalie Wood. You know that. You would. You would. That would be your How would you start out that conversation? I'm Christopher walking. Hey, look, um, did you remember anything that happened that night? You got it for you for you That way said that you can't remember was no foreplay in that. I know. I don't know. That's what I Want to know. But apparently, somebody at the Huffington Post was like how many movies as Christopher Walken danced in. Uh huh. And they did a nice montage and Holly posted a Of all the dancing that he has done in 50 movies, and it kind of works as a little movie within a movie about Christopher Walken dancing in all the movies, you 50 you, said 50, that's wild or appearances on TV or whatever. Yeah, he's a dancer and he dances, apparently in a lot of movies because 50 is alive. He's a lot I first met. You said 15, and I sat here going that's 50 is insane. Yeah, so very go take a look at that. That's your Friday. Uh, You know, dance inspirational. What was the music video? That was probably his most infamous one that he did the whole music video going in and on the elevators. Do you remember that? Rocco? Um, I won't even the eye. What the song was? Yeah, it was like, Oh, yeah. Was that like Fatboy Slammers? Yes. Thank you. Okay. Don't leave. Never good. Okay, listen when we come back Well, it's our stories. We can't get enough of get your laughs after lunch.

Natalie Wood Robert Wagner 1990 Margrethe Darnell A. Fraser Marcus Christopher Walken 19 years 12 Whitney Houston George Floyd Holly CBS today two Christopher 19th anniversary Rocco last night twin cities
"margrethe" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"margrethe" Discussed on Recode Decode

"And We would want a development of our capital market to be the same that you go in the market pace yourself five ten percent of your business. You get onboard someone who will allow you to get the drive really to scale it, and this will have in the process of making over the last five years than we're starting to see it taking off. Are there other Governors that keep it back because it really is Donna Shing, display of not enough innovation that some people in the US say to matriculation there's too much risk. The risk tolerance is too low. That there's not have mentality, of entrepreneurship. Disagree. With this. Well, we. Are Indeed different. But I like privacy too much. But I don't think it's not. You Know Europe. Is An amazing place. We have made it so far since since the second world. War, when things were you know your was destroyed physically but also spiritually. With? Transatlantic. Friendship with real rebuild it and it if we lack something I think it's confidence. Because, it is if we're sitting on all these sort of tacit knowledge about what we have achieved, not realizing that when we have made it so far of course, we can make it even further and now having a much better capital market real diesel, single market, and having an ecosystem. Of innovators that has tranged changed dramatically over the last ten years. So you see a big company coming out of because, you can see them coming out of China one. After the next you see India is investing. There's a lot of really interesting invasion of France. There's some stuff going on. In France but. Do you think the biggest company will come out I mean I was thinking of a debate did at the Oxford Union, they had US people and British people talking about the next grade company will come out of blank us or Britain, and so there was our side that argue that it'd be us and why and the British side and because it was game the British side one But the fact of the matter is what came out of the US was uber those those Oxford people was Uber Pinterest what's about to go you know lift all these companies are about to go public AIRBNB and not European company. What will it take to get a great? Importance company out of Europe. A big one I mean a large one. Leaving spotify aside and smothers. Leaving, SAP's this one. would be the to May and those are the two males. Well, of course. It will take all the office that you have a brilliant product. because. I don't think that should be underestimated that one of the reasons why a number of these companies has been doing very well in Europe is because they have great products they have disrupted marcus that needed to be disrupted. They have created innovations that we really need it. So obviously, you need first of all a great product, but you also need fair competition which means that access to data that no one is gaming. The marketplace and that of course is why we need strong law enforcement..

Europe US France Donna Shing Oxford Union spotify China SAP India AIRBNB Britain
"margrethe" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

08:53 min | 1 year ago

"margrethe" Discussed on Recode Decode

"What was secret was the tax rulings and apple numbers? Because back then there was very little transparency as to how the company was organized, what they generated of prophets and how they were booked and tax. So I don't think it was possible to do the case before the the US Senate hearings started because that sort of gave the concerns that my predecessor then acted upon to open the case, open the case and you've been carrying them out, which is really interesting. So the US Treasury also opposed what you're doing largely because they want the money, the money repatriated to the United States, how do you look at that their objections? Well, we two different Texas not available in any detail no the US taxes than, but you have a more of a global approach. Where in Europe, we would think that prophets are to be taxed where profits on generated right in Europe, and here you talk about profits being generated in Europe and booked apple themselves in Europe. Which is why we think they should also be taxed in Europe. Then very often you would have tax treaties to make sure that you do not have double taxation. That, you get a tax credit when you pay taxes in in other countries that then again, it is important to make sure that those. Tax Treaties do not then enable double non taxation because they actually have the opposite aim So where does it go next from here with apple? Are you in negotiate with them? The US Treasury Department? No. The next thing to happen is for for Ireland to themselves to calculates the unpaid taxes. For, the unpaid taxes to be recovered, put an escape account close to count and then the Irish have said that they will appeal the case, and then of course, the court its proceedings, and whereas apple in this, what do they need to do? Well, they Japan's very much on themselves but for us since what we do in this third to of of competition enforcement, we deal with the government it's it's the government is the state to. Whom we direct the decision what did you when you were doing this? Obviously, this is the most famous company in the world one of them. One of the most famous companies in the world, some people call you a superhero in for doing it not so much sort of the opposite would kind of political pressure you under when you pull out the big names like this where you go after these companies well, the thing is we try to. Stay sort of clear of the politics because we cannot allow that to interfere with the casework. You didn't pick just any company apple you must be aware but the thing is that also we have taken decisions on on yet the European car company and starbucks and the built in scheme where a number of European multinationals were involved and to me the important thing is that. Citizens. Fine that someone is looking after that. Not only most companies but all companies do pay taxes you you met with Apple. After the decision up to the decision? No. That was an excerpt from September, two thousand sixteen interview with Margaret Investiture we're gonNA take a quick break now back after this to play some of the follow up interview, I did with her in November, two, thousand seventeen recorded live at the web summit in Lisbon Portugal. World champion soccer player and trail-blazing activism. Megan repeal know is coming to HBO Sports. In seeing America with Meghan rip you know the Iconic Star athlete host of fearless conversation with representative Alexandra of the. Cortes. Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Nicole Hannah Jones and acclaimed television host Hossan men Hodge. Watch these change makers come together to talk about the challenges we face as a nation known for both our talent on the field and her dedication to activism repeal has become one of the United States most recognizable and admired advocates for change seeing America with Meghan Piano Premiere Saturday August first at ten pm on Hbo Stream It on HBO. Max. VPN's are great because they keep you private and hidden online, which is why it's such a shame that some VPN's log your data, which sort of defeats the purpose HMO VPN doesn't do that though we're just private and fast and generally awesome to have around get HMA VPN now for seventy five percent off and see what we're talking about go to HMA VPN. Dot Com slash deal. All right let's get started because we have very short time Marie how fucked is Silicon Valley I I don't like to generalize. because. Everyone should have a fair chance of making it right also in Silicon Valley. Okay. But at least series enough so that we found out a fine of two point four, billion euros was defining the Google case that we just decided So talk about where it is now because you've been out in the forefront of talking to these companies about their power about their influence and right now in the. United States finally in Congress, which is acted not at all in our government has not acted very much against these companies they're under a lot of their under siege they're under pressure especially about rush investigations. Can you talk a little bit about why you I went for them? Because I think they don't have a sense of their power and now people are recognizing the potential impact of what they've done. Well all values a very simple if you if you're successful in the market, it should be because you have the best proud. That you customers and like you not because you cut corners or you get a tax break. Or you don't inform authorities about how things actually are. And this is this is the case of the apple of unpaid taxes and the Google case of misusing dominant position or the facebook fine of not giving sufficient information to authorities when assessing a case. And on top of my day job as A. Commission of competition. I have these worry about what happens with our democracy what happens with our way of being together social. And I think maybe sometimes. The platform businesses they underestimate. The powers that they hold. All right. Let's talk about that because right now these investigations are pretty clear. These platforms were used and abused by others in this case. Russia and a lot of the indications point that it had an impact on the election and of course, it's not just a US issue it's a global issue that these platforms have enormous influence over politics society culture. All kinds of things including the coarsening of society. One of the things I've always talked about the fact that they're not benign platforms and they see themselves that way they often do can you talk about the challenge of dealing with these big companies largely, they've been protected by the government in this in the US well, for us, the challenge is to is to develop the right tools. Because I find that sort of the founders of the European Union. They sell rightly that we need fair competition to have a fair market right and I think the motives of breaching competition. No they are as old as Adam and Eve is about greed and fear. And when you combine that with power, you have a very poisoned cocktail. So The motives, well, they go way back but our challenge is to stay fast enough and to have the right tools because this is fast moving areas in our economy, and we really need to make sure that all the businesses, all the coming Alps or the enterpreneurs have the fat chance of making it in this market to serve citizens in the role of customers. Do you imagine though that the damage is done because? So many of these companies right now there's consolidation in the United States. There's these companies are getting more powerful. One of the things that you've been accused of by these companies, you're trying to stifle innovation when in fact, they're getting more powerful than ever. So can you talk about that accusation that that you're trying to do protectionist stifle innovation not let them do what they do best. But on the contrary because I think everyone here would like to be the next Google who doesn't want to build a success but I don't but go ahead while you are successful radio. So no need. No but the thing is that one thing is when you grow, you shouldn't deny. The chance to challenge you. And you should never yourself say, no one will challenge.

United States apple US Treasury Department Google Europe Texas Senate HBO Silicon Valley Pulitzer Prize soccer Japan HMA starbucks European Union Ireland Margaret Investiture A. Commission of competition Cortes
"margrethe" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

06:06 min | 1 year ago

"margrethe" Discussed on Recode Decode

"You're here in Washington correcting what are you doing here now and I want to get into your background because I think people don't know everyone is still values aware of you. Basically. I come to Washington. A couple of times a year sort of a strictly business basis talk to my counterparts of the Federal Trade Commission or the DOJ given occasional talk very often in the lawyer or academic environment and when I'm here, of course, take the opportunity to talk to people right big regulators other regulars like that's the other recognizes that would be media that would be people like you because I think that. Any thought of a finding out new things and try to breach differences is, of course we talk right how do you find? Washington Oh, I'm loving it. Do you why no one says that? Well, because I have a trail that I jog while I'm here and dot the perfecting pond and the Washington memorial and the Lincoln. Memorial. Is Some of the most beautiful very moving man made places surprising. Doesn't it? Isn't it surprise you how much moves you when you see them and the thing is I think it was not last time but the previous time I was here it has been snowing. Running in the morning there was no one there and it was just this news snow that had fallen. He was still dark. and. The Lincoln Memorial just you know it took me you know so gruesome. And I felt you know this very strong pressings of US history on American culture. Yeah absolutely. Well, that's very nice. It's interesting listening to say that I have a lot when I told people I was interviewing you that they had a lot of questions sounded great interested in what you do think of American American American companies. But let's talk about your background I think people don't realize you enter politics very young at A. Very Young Age at twenty nine is that correct? Well, actually even even before that but I was very young I took no interest in party politics my sort of line of interest was, how can you be part of an influence the society that you Livin? Right? You're an economics major, correct yes. I was, and then I got sort of drawn into sort of more conventional politics in the Social Liberal Party in Denmark. But but my background, my both my father and my mother being ministers in the Danish People's Church. Sort of you gave this very fundamental value that you should take part in your community right? Right and I did you always want to do that? Did you want to be no? No no, it's just too much of me not being able to say, no, tell us. So what did that give you your parents both being Lutheran ministers? Correct. What did that instill in you in terms of just being part of a larger community or doing you know Denmark very different countries from the US and there's great social contract going on there with people yes and it's society with a very short distance between people in power and the electorate So you feel very strongly that you represents something who have a real interesting in what you're doing and. where I grew up it was a very open home. You would find anyone who would come there. People who need it marriage counseling who wanted to get married If that's been a sudden death people who were very poor people were very well off, they would all come and be part of a very sort of lively our home where you find a lot of discussions but also a lot of engagement Murray and then you. Moved quickly after college into a university mum into the party that you were part of and you did a variety of jobs when you were there, correct? Yes. He did. I was into that a little bit. Well, I was both the sort of the organizational heads of of the Party did a number of different things in that do that and then I became in ninety eight, the Minister of Education and Ecclesiastical Affairs. then. We lost the election in two thousand and one and became part of the opposition. Then two, thousand seven I. became also the political heads of powerful. Well, it very much dependent Danish politics very different from Janas politics trying to watch Morgan last night was. Partially, based on you a little bit. Yes, and the thing is that actually it's quite a nice and accurate portrait of of the needs politics and I think also sort of the Scandinavian atmosphere when it comes to politics. And I know that a lot of people appreciated because it it's another look upon politics than what you get from house of cards, right? Yeah. Well, that's how politics works. We always murdering people right and left that must be a horrible show to see from somewhere else imagining it watching it. It was too dark for me and yeah. Yeah. Yeah. You haven't pushed in front of a train. Okay So when you were in government, you did a lot of economic policy and one of them was. At one point you were cutting benefits that one point which was quite controversial in Denmark can you talk a little bit about that because people sort of see it until valiantly see you is not that like the idea of you know you're more tough than most Danish politicians. Well, what was important for us was to make sure that the Chinese economy was sustainable that we could sort of stay in charge of our our spending an hour debts in order not to run into a situation where you know the people would would want to take over share. So we did away on a very, very long transition period with sort of. A PRE retirement scheme, not for people who were. Run, down by the judge they were doing but people who could work but who able to retire quite earn it around the age of I think sixty or something like that. So gradually, we did away with that, and now we have one of the lowest unemployment rates among senior. Members of the working community. I think the most controversial thing was that we shortened the period where you can get unemployment benefit. From for Yes to to to in order to..

Denmark Washington Danish People's Church US Washington memorial Lincoln Memorial Federal Trade Commission Minister of Education and Eccl Social Liberal Party DOJ Lincoln Janas Murray Morgan
"margrethe" Discussed on Boss Files with Poppy Harlow

Boss Files with Poppy Harlow

11:56 min | 2 years ago

"margrethe" Discussed on Boss Files with Poppy Harlow

"We really appreciate you listening to this. Podcast want to learn more about you. Please take a minute to visit pod thoughts dot com and tell us about yourself. Pods dot com is a short survey that lets us know what you like about podcasts where you listen and what you want more of so visit pod thoughts dot com and help us learn more about you. Thanks for the first episode of engineering big ideas. Yes we visit nikola motor company to learn how they discovered and developed an idea with the power to change transportation as we know it visit mazar dot com slash empowering cowering innovation to watch the episode now in this episode of boss files a c._n._n. Special documentary report we take you inside. The rise is of amazon understand the mission and the man behind it. All where is jeff bezos taking amazon next in this special boss files episode assode. I speak with margaret vest ear the e._u.'s commissioner for competition on the heels of the antitrust pro. She's just launched what we are looking into. Oh you know really hard is to fully understand the role of data on the road of accumulating a lot of data because one of the things that we look into in the amazon case. It's not sort of the individual data coming from the individual retailer on the amazon platform. It is what you can learn when you get the enormous amounts of data from all the retailers coming in and what kind of paxon that will <hes> give amazon compared to what the individual joel selleck and see if that leads to some kind of cherry picking. You can say you can find our c._n._n. Documentary the age of amazon on c._n._n. Go now. Here's my conversation with the european commission's top antitrust official marguerite best year commissioner arrested are thank you so much for joining joining me to be with you. Thank you very much for having me so the washington post calls you. The world's toughest big tech regulator and silicon valley's top nemesis across the pond. Is that about right well. I know what you're right. They right but you know this is what comes to my job <hes> because we're here to make sure that the mock it serves the consumer and the other ray round looking at big tech in the united states all of these huge companies apple amazon google facebook there air in the midst of this top to bottom you know sweeping antitrust probe led by congress the d._o._j. The f._t._c. what level of scrutiny take these companies be prepared for well. The thing is that we really like success. <hes> one of the reasons why these companies <hes> doing good business in europe is because because they're very successful europeans really love them. They love the services they'd have the way they do business but they also rely on the businesses to do that. By the book gino competes on the marriage empowering ovation <hes> do what we need in order to have a vibrant marketplace and i think in when you get the doubts and you get the complaints and you get the second sought then we are obliged as law enforcers to have investigations and to make them you know thoroughly as we should. What do you think the number one question is. That lawmakers in the u._s. should be asking these companies right now well now. I don't know because my colleagues they do that. Y'all in their way and as you can see here in europe. I'm busy enough doing my own day job. Instead instead of getting it giving advice to other people but what we are looking into you know really hard is to fully understand the role of data and the road accumulating a lot of data because one of the things that we look into the amazon case. It's not sort of the individual data coming from the individual retailer taylor on the amazon platform. It is what you can learn when you get the enormous amounts of data from all the retailers coming in and what kind of batson and that will give amazon compared to what the individual seldom see if that leads to some kind of cherry picking you can say so it is is the data side of of our economy that everyone around the globe is trying to understand right now. Congressman david cicilline who's leading the houses probe of these companies on on the antitrust front had said to essentially america's dropped the ball on this that we've been way behind europe on this charge. Would you agree at least to an extent while you know so so far. We've got one two three google cases. <hes> we've had two first amazon case in that we settled it was an on e books to allow for more innovation for competition so in that respect yes we have been doing quite a number of cases and we have learned a lot from those cases and of course was the necessary waivers. We more than happy to work with our u._s. Colleagues the d._o._j. And the f._t._c. because two very lost degree. We have value base. That's a similar even though to some degree. We have different regulation. You have just announced a formal antitrust probe probe of amazon why well for two reasons one thing is we want to look into the contractual agreements <hes> and second we want to look into into the buy books <hes> because basically amazon is the only one who knows how and who gets into the bible and that we want to investigate further and we have a lot of data on board already. We've been asking <hes> fifteen hundred retailers. We've been asking in the marketplace. How do you you see this what is going on here and in in the analysis of those data that we get sufficient doubts to start asking also four for many questions as to how amazon is doing business in those two respects of their contracts and the bible's amazon's part. Let me just read what they have said. In response bonds we will cooperate fully with european commissioning continue to work hard to support businesses of all sizes and to help them grow. I i'm interested in what it is his most specifically that concerns you about amazon or commissioner. If there was one action or one complaint perhaps that sparked this probe initially for you well we looked into ecommerce a couple of years ago and that produced a number of cases with with a number of companies knees and one of the things that kept coming back to us was people's they were concerned about the dual role where on the one hand side you hosts retailers us and you give them a chance of doing e commerce even though they may primarily be a sort of big and mortar kind of business while at the same time are you're a competitor to those businesses and that has caused some concern into fully understanding well. Is this for real you that you hostess or we hosted by you because you want to cherry pick when you get all the data from how we do our business and not not concern has been there for quite some time and then we started our initial pro and from that initial propane all the data that we have gotten on board we found well there is there's there are no sufficient grounds for us also formerly to open a case of course we do that without prejudice and we're very happy with how amazon purchase and and then of course we'll see what comes of the case jeff wilkie the ceo of consumer for amazon when i asked him directly you know does amazon give priority to private label search for example over other smaller competitors the little guys is you call them. He said to me we prioritize things that customers want and then this week on capitol hill a member of congress asked asked another amazon executive about that and the data that they get from the little is from the other retailers that sell on the amazon marketplace and he said we do not use individual data when we are making decisions to launch private brands but you still have questions about this why you know. I think it's kind of worked for people in my position that we don't take what you say for granted. We really want to see the evidence that it is. She told me and that kind of evidence of of course comes from investigating it comes from analyzing the data because it's not necessarily sort of data from from one spore oh retailer from one little guy it may be the inside you get from all the data have all the small guys because amazon would be the only one who has access to that sort of full data sets and that of course is the one that we would like to look into and second of course well. Lots of people would want to sell what people wants only allison so of course we would like to see well. How does this jewish relationship work that you both a host and a competitor bitter and that is the key question here. Has the commission received any formal complaints about amazon. We've had quite a number of concerned certain people coming to us. We have no formal complaint. Okay so let let's talk about size and bigness first off. Simply put is amazon and monopoly in your view well in in some european markets in what they do. They may be as we call it. In europe be dominant and that for for us is the key to how we deal with antitrust because you're more than welcome to be successful and become a dominant and company but if you are a dominant company you get special responsibility <hes> to make sure that you still sort of exercise your size and you muscle in a way that is compatible with competition. <hes> be successful. That's not what we question but we question chian how you may use your success if you still make room for the little guy for the smaller ones who compete on the merits and also tried to do their best to meet customers sneeze i kept hearing commissioner over and over again from amazon executive after amazon executive every amazon executive i i talked to said to me. We are one percent of global retail sales. We are a small fraction of global retail sales that may be the case but in the united states there are fifty percent of e commerce retail sales. What is your response when you hear that well retail as such. It's not just one big thing. Retail retail is a lot of different things. An ecommerce in particular is a specific thing because the business model is different <hes> the delivery and and how things are bundled together <hes> in how you can look for an offer how you can buy it and how he can have it delivered so you cannot just compare retail as such and e commerce and the different ways of doing e commerce and of course we will be very regular because we will have to prove that amazon is dominant in the markets that we're looking at because otherwise we don't have a case more from our c._n._n. Special documentary report on amazon after the break and it's one thing to have a big idea but how do you bring it to life simple you engineer it. Join me grant imahara for engineering big ideas in this four part series bull journey through the innovation process from discovery to design to manufacture in our first. I episode we're talking to transportation game changer nikola motor company about their big idea to create the first electric hydrogen-powered semi-truck visit mouse dot dot com slash empowering innovation watched this episode and more finding.

amazon europe commissioner united states nikola motor company congress jeff bezos washington post executive google Congressman david cicilline gino european commission margaret joel selleck batson e._u. marguerite
"margrethe" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"margrethe" Discussed on Recode Decode

"On access today on the role the platforms in terms of innovation to prepare for that push during the next mandate. And then, of course, never to forget all the amazing sort of traditional industries where we also need to be aware of concentration, and then of course, to work with other portfolios because when we look outside of Europe, so the global marketplace, we need a very strong push for competition, and he tools from from trade from single-market tools, like public acumen a lot needs to be done. So just the suggestion that the work is definitely not over on the country win the middle of something when you think about what is unfair in other areas. There wasn't industry that you're both concentrated on right now. Media or no, what was see is that in the global marketplace. Also, for instance, state-owned Chinese companies will be there reactive in Europe. You can you can of course, be a Saint owned company. That's the state will have to act as a market participant. Because otherwise it will be not fair because the private company do not have all the tax payers to potentially pick up the bills. So you quite strict on this you have to act as a private shareholder would act. It's not a given that a Chinese state owned company will operate on the same terms. So of course, we're very interested to see how can we promote this? How can the fact that Europe is open for business be mirrored in other jurisdictions also being opened for business, for instance, when it comes to public procurement, building bridges roads, rails, whatever in Europe. Everyone is welcome. We want the same welcome. When we make our offers in other countries, these all outsides of of my portfolio, but I think we need com. Common push to have a much more global marketplace. Are you worried about the impact of China the active? I mean, they talk about a lot..

Europe China
"margrethe" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"margrethe" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Company with your privacy? If they've decided they decided to say now, we really value privacy a company those over and over again, but violet no change. Come with saying it, right? It's like never eat these chocolates again. Right. Okay. Only when I've kept that promise for weeks and weeks and weeks is anything that is you think it's sincere shift in attitude towards this is important. Or is it just a business? You care. You don't care which way it is. Well, I care when I take notes of this promise say, well, we take note, but when you put it into real life, then of course, it's something because then uses will have different not only experience, but I also have a different product that respect their privacy. When you're speaking of competition, one of the areas, they're moving into is there's several different services lightened this nap chat in this country. At least it is in Europe. Also, they're moving directly into someone else's business rive arrivals business. How do you protect the competition? If that's the case, it's Microsoft moved into ails business. If you remember they decided to get into the with with product that failed because it was terrible product, but they tried to move in and use their advantages to top skip and jump into it. The the first case is a good example of because here you have someone trying to put themselves into the chef in comparison business, right? The first Google product appeal. This was his appeal just a mechanisms the first coop products in shopping comparison. It didn't work, right. So they cold in frugal. That was. Yes. Yes. So they cold in sort of the big guns that search and then and they recreated their product, and then they promote product..

Europe Google Microsoft
"margrethe" Discussed on Jalen and Jacoby

Jalen and Jacoby

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"margrethe" Discussed on Jalen and Jacoby

"It's the same thing with me like been there done that that less money let let somebody else wait lima go to the party and you know do all of that stuff shake hands kiss babies try to find things for the ig like i'm i'm good good i'm not going to any parties matter of fact follow me on hygiene chairman versus everybody out out jaylen v as everybody have you pose they think i look at your pay if you post anything yet now gotta get more followers first is not just that is not gonna take let me take it posted and only guy gary every behind the curtain on this jaylen is not active on i ig because he needs to take a class you told me you're like i need i need i was like john will do right now we show yesterday i say i'll do right now show you how to use edgy look too lazy right now but you're scared of accidentally liking so thing or follow the wrong person or not hitting what's what's what's public it was private you're scared of igf 1 activity advice let me give you a perfect example jerry margrethe here's the thing everyone knows i'm in a public committee relationship soul like isaiah thomas when he likes to video of me and paul pierce talking all nba countdown is no different from me making a mistake in liking somebody's pitcher or anything else askar rambus he knows about that life i ain't not.

lima chairman gary john jerry margrethe isaiah thomas paul pierce nba
"margrethe" Discussed on The Weekly Planet

The Weekly Planet

01:34 min | 4 years ago

"margrethe" Discussed on The Weekly Planet

"Oh he'd directing episode of davinci damon zoo sends real good man for we got here i don't recognise aci yet the last when he did was the born but he is he's got a hand in all edna bunch of is gonna has italy's dirty little thing as in all sorts of pies if you look at his for margrethe's got like he's got a hand in batman begins at the dock not but also jumper yeah isis man of steel the forest grain latin that's coming up and i really hope that that's how they say in the movie the morris it was an associate producer on kickboxer tiller oh nice diana he mahbubul at delegitimize him but anyway others are bring them up is is because he's going to be directing masters of the universe it's finally happening they're not paint a cat grain terrific like get out of her is going wait a little pink scholtz did little schultz a shot back nice and we suspected as modulated way but be talking about this for them i think as long as the show he's been going yeah and this babe talk of this movie the even before lattes i think at justin lin was going to shoot at one point fast and furious guy in those voice view a sequel to the original which became all that money went to universal soldier of something all guy or the sets count remillard exxon high that all the doll longer and suddenly went of the universe has salted activity if a wasn't universal soldiers it was one of those movies i remember adult longer vehicle adolf one group ruin vehicle thoughts meyssan knock it out let's say how we can do it who's hey whose hey man.

aci margrethe producer schultz justin lin italy
"margrethe" Discussed on The WIRED Podcast

The WIRED Podcast

01:48 min | 4 years ago

"margrethe" Discussed on The WIRED Podcast

"And i think that's a very good sort of sign of yes we ado competition on these are very important very tricky very specific legal discussions but we also have a side said that what we want to help syrian refugees uh to get something to do an and if things are getting more difficult and one is losing the foothold then the important thing is up to talk about the to realize that other people feel the same way and we can do something about it so i follow christian there will be i guess it's appropriate to end on a hopeful note what is your your hope for the resolution of this this current tech no political conflict that we seem to be arrested we we need a bigger ecosystem we need many more businesses in the tech welt because our societies i digitalising in every aspect aquiculture uh health transportation learning everything is to to to lie saying so we need an ecosystem that is much more diverse much more many fold we need more women in tech we need several generations in tech uh we need to make make the ecosystem bigger also to make sure that it's not the us and europe it is you as on europe and african countries on an asian countries we need to make the ecosystem bigger in order from many more people to thrive in tech and to give us many more and much better solutions also also but mcgrath thank you ice always it's great to see it was a pleasure to be here and the next time down the mike will work right exactly excellent.

us mcgrath europe
"margrethe" Discussed on The WIRED Podcast

The WIRED Podcast

01:42 min | 4 years ago

"margrethe" Discussed on The WIRED Podcast

"No i i have too little time to explore but but i i tried to keep up mostly search engines uh different services i find that actually the european tech scene is becoming more and more and more interesting where does this all and this this conflict between tech can and politics and tech and regulators what is the good place the we get too but but to some degree there is not a conflict because well in other areas we worked beautifully together like i have colleagues of mine who worked with the against a hate speech uh recruiting in to terror or a or the best things in order to to have a virtual world that is as safe as our analog world because what is not accepted here among all cells of course should not be accepted in the digital world either and there we have a very strong cooperation with the very same companies where i have to take decisions with colleagues to send them a fine so it's it's all about behavior and what rule will you play in also scientists specially when you have this prevalent privilege as a company to be part of forming also societies like they say in denmark that youth crime is falling it is as low as ever basically it's my general russian where the criminals but um is as low as ever and they say that one of reasons are that one of the reasons are that uh they're all on their small muttenz.

search engines virtual world denmark
"margrethe" Discussed on The WIRED Podcast

The WIRED Podcast

02:13 min | 4 years ago

"margrethe" Discussed on The WIRED Podcast

"Fair enough there are people in sorting sochaux who oddest you're not there we're in of see where we have uk i'm i know you are really shocked about brexit how you doing by now well when it happened it was kind of a british joan situation well you know in your bad eating ice cream out of the box okay i was i was wondering which aspect of british joyce i i'm with you but then you know saddam literally having slept on it everything looks different the next morning and now you know we have prepared for the negotiation we have a very very skilled competence negotiator michel bon yet it seems as everything he has done in his life has just let's to this point where he's the chief brexit negotiator renowned side so so you know things this as come down and it's much more sort of pragmatic this is something that we have to solve i wanted did you see the the oba decision in in london no i don't think that uh there was a there was a case of uber being tonight being denied its licence with really because of allegations that it was an uncertain proper company i guess the big question and this must have cost your mind given everything that swells around silicon valley firms do you think that they have an ethics problem but i don't think that you can say that in general because again the potential of having a much better use of resources of having a true sharing economy where you contribute also into this economy with paying taxes insuring your customers uh enabling workers employees to have decent working conditions what is a great opportunity uh i think on average a car is is in use like five percent of of its life.

michel bon uk joan saddam oba london five percent
"margrethe" Discussed on The WIRED Podcast

The WIRED Podcast

01:43 min | 4 years ago

"margrethe" Discussed on The WIRED Podcast

"So that no one can fact check and no one can counter argue because it's just you and you and you and you get a private messaging instead of having a debate and public space that i find to be a challenge for all of us how to renew our democracy so it remains a thing that takes place in public because that's actually when you think about it a real challenge the internet as it currently exists because basically the internet is a proper space where on facebook 'brava company google private company twitter other things owned by facebook what does this other public internet even look like well i i don't know because if if i knew i would make it is one part of it that they're all private companies bought they've been broken up and they much smaller well i don't i don't think it's the size that's the problem in itself it is how sizes being is being used and for instance for me the google case is also about who is to make the choice because if you see this combination of promoting yourself and demoting others so if you want to compare prices well what you find is google shopping comparison who can shopping you have to go to page four on average in your search results if you want to find another price comparison service have any of you ever been to pay foreign you such results yes i would like to meet you.

facebook google twitter
"margrethe" Discussed on The WIRED Podcast

The WIRED Podcast

01:41 min | 4 years ago

"margrethe" Discussed on The WIRED Podcast

"An in does chp asking for the money back i know you will tell them to hurry up recently at what's going on that well this thing is that we've not an issue with starbucks in the netherlands and with fiat's in now in luxembourg and with 35 multinationals in belgium in a full scheme and in belgium in luxembourg in the netherlands uh that's been recovery companies have paid their taxes uh as they shoot and then of course when when some countries do it well then everyone will have to do it so we we cannot just sits in weight we'll have to do something of course i i respect that it is slightly more complicated to recover thirteen billion uh than than two hundred million no way po or or twenty million something i got out but still in order to restore a level playing field at recovery has to take place to when will the recovery take place by well hopefully sooner rather than later because the iraqis are setting up a a methodology to figure out will how to how to keep 13 billion while the court case uh goes on now let's talk about dougal because it's the case of a really different kind because this is about antitrust that that case was about just shopping one particular dayton but in your view merited a another really pick a big fine in this case two point four billion euros in why was while he's not so big.

starbucks netherlands fiat luxembourg belgium dougal dayton chp
"margrethe" Discussed on The WIRED Podcast

The WIRED Podcast

02:16 min | 4 years ago

"margrethe" Discussed on The WIRED Podcast

"Well we have the rule that we can only go back ten years and say well within this timeframe you'll have to to pay back taxes if someone has been giving you a selective advantage then this government will have to claim it back to tax payers in the country and we can go back tenuous tim cook up show you know goal that judgement total political crap what did you think when he hooked up while the thing is i don't think much about politics as such because it has no room in in our working processes we have the chief economist team were independent advice us and we have our legal service atwood who advises us as well because eventually all cases will have to stand up in court and and coach will hear nothing about politics they want the facts of the case the evidence the jurisprudence this is what they want to here uh and we would completely de legitimize what we're doing and what predescessors has been doing and what successors we'll be doing if we allowed politics to interfere with our work the amas in case of the reason i was in case business and waste very similar and in that case it was a deal with luxembourg that was an issue rather than a deal with it when you look at these cases all you really aiming them at the country or at the company well the these cases when it comes to to selective advantages they are aimed at countries because these are rules to say that in europe we don't only take a offends when one company is tweeting another company in a way that's illegal we also look into if governments a sort of joining up with companies which makes it more difficult for other companies and this is sort of the european specificity that we also see that sometimes government actions can make it very very difficult for businesses to compete on the merits and this is why we take issues with the with countries when it comes to state aid apple hasn't paid.

europe apple chief economist ten years
"margrethe" Discussed on The WIRED Podcast

The WIRED Podcast

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"margrethe" Discussed on The WIRED Podcast

"We need a change in behavior when we find that something is illegal than we need a change in behaviour and and the point is that you shouldn't fear a law enforcer you shoots you should be afraid not to do the right thing which is of course to play by the rule book that's what you should be afraid of because it's in yourself you find the strength and their capabilities and the willingness to do something else to you've done an awful lot over the last eighteen months for say does that mean that in silicon valley there isn't enough fair about not doing the right thing well probably over said of our history when when our societies were changing uh you would find the different dole not only send to man's and opinions and facts of the case because society is changing and uh probably you'd also this sort of in between when when we had the first dusty machines when we had the first a other kinds of technology not changed elsa scientists so in that respect i think that this is nothing new but it's just a very very fast and big as well i think this is a really important point so let's talk about apple that was a big fine or no saw not a big fight apic wrecked attacks reclamation yes unpaid taxes to be paid yes unfortunately some of us know it but just not 13 billion why why was that so bake well it's it's of course if reflection of the fact that this is a very big company and if it's a very big company and you pay very very little in texas then the unpaid taxes of course amount to something and also i guess because it goes back a long way.

dole apple texas eighteen months
"margrethe" Discussed on TEDTalks Business

TEDTalks Business

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"margrethe" Discussed on TEDTalks Business

"It's quite a lot so so we had to set up new systems we had to to figure out how to do this because you cannot work the way you debts just few years ago so we definitely sharpening up our working methods the other thing is that we tried to distinguish between different kinds of data because some data is extremely valuable and they will form like a barrier to entry in a markets other things you can just it loses a value tomorrow so we try to make sure that we never ever underestimate the fact that data works as a currency in the market and as an assets that can be a real barrier for competition google you find to them to wounded billion euros a few months ago now that was dollar it's not so strongly status world depends on the google appealed decrees the case is going to court released earlier last year you asked apple to pay thirteen billion me back taxes and you have also receive your other companies including european russia companies local limited income is by far yet the divisionals against the american companies was elected most of the frenchwoman the also tractor song accusations had been accused for centrally of professional his of gels your using lives little tweet back at the american companies with of concord european markets the columnist just this week on the front page writes the style versus the violent how to react to that first of all i i take a very serious because bias.

google apple russia