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17 Burst results for "Margie Kerr"

"margie kerr" Discussed on How To! With Charles Duhigg

How To! With Charles Duhigg

02:58 min | 9 months ago

"margie kerr" Discussed on How To! With Charles Duhigg

"Tell me a little bit like what's the scariest thing that ever happened to you. Well that'll be a conversation for my therapist so you know I mean our fears are there deep their personal things which for me is just more evidence of why we should find opportunities to kind of from they want to know how to fix and today's episode be afraid be very afraid a problem tell tell me a little bit about it I am very scared of the stupidest things to be scared of so I have such a strong physical reaction if I'm spooked or being chased or anything like that a immediately down and start crying and just can't help it oh my gosh that sounds unpleasant coming up especially when you're are you a scaredy cat in general or is this kind of unusual no no it is it's super unusual so I am not a meek person I don't think anyone would ever grab me that way physically I'm six foot tall so I'm a I'm a big fairly dominant physical person I am bold and strong willed and all of those things and I don't know why this gets me here's the thing all of us get scared sometimes right this is totally natural in fact just a couple of weeks ago I was staying in a cabin in the woods for the weekend and I put my kids to bed and before I went to bed I looked in the bathroom and a humidifier just how to handle that my name is Margie Kerr I may sociologist and author and I study fear after the short break we'll see if margie can help becker I understand her fear and fear and your fear and how to live with that fear and maybe even laugh at it at least long enough to enjoy Halloween.

Margie Kerr becker six foot
"margie kerr" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"margie kerr" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"W. W w j news time is now eleven forty a trial set to begin in Denver is the first time. A jury will consider whether property values are diminished because of the smell from marijuana. We get that story now from WWE's Charlie Langton a couple in Denver bought a home on a rule piece of property. Overlooking pikes peak in Colorado, however, the couple now claims that the pungent and fall older from a nearby marijuana. Grow company has hurt their property value. And what's more interesting is that they're using the federal Rico law to get a judge to close down the marijuana business. Private citizens can use Rico to protect their property from illegal criminal operations and under federal law. Marijuana is illegal the property owners claiming one million dollar loss in the property value. Charlie Langton WJ NewsRadio nine fifty after winning the World Series. Boston will honor the Red Sox. But the celebration will be limited to just a parade. Here's mayor Marty Walsh. There will be no rallied city hall plaza. This is just the parade that will. We're going to be doing on Wednesday. I'm excited as mayor to host, Mike, I Red Sox parade. Getting used to the patriots parades. And now we have a Red Sox parade. So I'm happy about that. Boston won the World Series in five games. Why do we like scary movies so much while this year sequel to the original Halloween had a monster opening scaring up a staggering seven seventy seven point five million dollars. It's the latest industry of horror movies that have been killing it at the box office, no pun intended. There. Margie Kerr is a sociologist who studies what happens to our brains when we get scared. She told CBS spine tingling feeling we get is actually kind of a high our heart rate increases for breeding faster. We've got the traveling or not really thinking about our bills or the future or you're just in that moment in that moment, we've been employing people to help us be scared for for centuries because we wanted we wanted be scared. We'd like to pay people to to do it for last year. Stephen king's it earned more than seven hundred billion dollars worldwide. Experts say it was the most profitable year in the John or at least a quarter of a century. W w j news time is now eleven forty three..

marijuana Red Sox patriots Denver Charlie Langton WJ Charlie Langton Boston pikes peak WWE Margie Kerr Rico Stephen king Marty Walsh Sox Colorado Mike
"margie kerr" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"margie kerr" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"Female. Newsradio nine fifty. Good morning. Thank you for joining us. I'm Roberta just seen it on Tom, Jordan. These are the top stories have six twenty investigation is underway in Indonesia this morning after all lion. Air passenger flight with one hundred eighty nine people board crashed into the Java sea just minutes after takeoff. The plane was traveling from the capital Jakarta to a popular domestic tourist hub off Samara. Here's BBC, correspondent charisma Swannee. The search and rescue operation currently is focused on an area on the beach and the coastline off a KC long. Which is where officials say they have found pieces of the plane, debris of the aircraft that they believe to be a from this crashed aircraft experts say at this point. They don't expect to find any survivors. And an investigation survivors are recounting the terror during the massacre that killed eleven Eddie, Pittsburgh. Synagogue suspect Robert Bowers is expected to appear in federal court today. One survivor says members of the synagogues new light congregation were in the basement Tim beginning to pray when they heard crashing come from a stairs. They looked out saw body in the staircase. He says he called nine one one, but was afraid to say anything for fear of making noise as gunshots. Echoed upstairs. Why do we like scary movies so much this year sequel to the original Halloween had a monster opening and it was number one over the weekend? Margie Kerr is a sociologist who studies what happens to our brains when we get scared. She tells CBS that feeling we get is actually kind of a high heart rate increases for breeding faster. We've got the adrenaline or not really thinking about our bills or the future or you're just in that moment in that moment, we've been employing people to help us be scared for centuries because we wanted we wanted to be scared. And we'd like to pay people to to.

Margie Kerr Tim Indonesia Jakarta charisma Swannee Robert Bowers KC Roberta Samara Pittsburgh Eddie BBC Tom CBS
"margie kerr" Discussed on The Pulse

The Pulse

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"margie kerr" Discussed on The Pulse

"High of sorts the chemicals that are released during fighter flight when are sympathetic nervous system is activated. They're the same that are released when we're excited or surprised or happy. That's Margie Kerr associates who studies fear, and she says our enjoyment of this emotion has a lot to do with context. It's all about how we interpret the rush of endorphins, you can even see it. When somebody's watching scary move. You're going through one hundred house they scream, but then within milliseconds there, smiling laughing, and it's you can see how they've you know, kind of remembered I'm gonna save place. I'm not really endanger and all of that energy all of that excitement that went into the. Cream is now going into the laughing. But sometimes fund scary turns into actually scary as in legitimately terrified. So I ask people on Facebook. What movie put you over the edge, the horror film that has left the most lasting impact on me his nightmare on elm street? The exorcist is the scariest movie I've ever seen. All eight away the entire terrified. My sister actually took our ouija board and throw it in the dumpster across the street from our house. I think I still may need some therapy to this day. I can't say freddy's full name. I can't look at pictures of him. I can't think about the movie in any detail for two months after I had to move a light into the corner that I could see for my bed or I wouldn't be able to sleep on frigging myself out right now who is going to be scarred by which movie depends on the person. But sociologists Margie curses kids are especially vulnerable for really young kids kids who haven't reached the stage of development where the understand what is fake, and what is real. So you know, they may see a person in a a witch costume and believe that they're really going to hurt them. So that's you know, two young at At the. that age too. We are remembering things that are scary. Really? Well, and that becomes the thing of huger nightmares. That kind of thing happened to listener Alex Schmidt. She had a really scary experience in a haunted. Maze. When she was a kid. She had a panic attack employees had to pull her out through an emergency exit. But as an adult she was able to get over that I decided to face my fears a couple years ago at an event called the great horror campout in Los Angeles where you camp out in tents overnight and monsters kind of common drag you out of your tent and do all these really scary things to you and believe it or not it actually worked after several hours of being in this situation. The monsters got kind of old, and I got used to them, and I had seen all of them multiple times. And I was like, I know you're deal. You're not scaring me anymore, and it actually kind of cured me. And now. I sort of like haunted houses, and I sort of like scary movies. So trying your fears. It actually might cure you probably to Alex. But I have to say when I was done going through that haunted house visited I could not wait to leave a never come back. Best noise ever. That's our show for this week the post production of WHYY in Philadelphia, you can find us on itunes, or whatever you get your podcast. Julian Harris is our intern our health and science reporters LSU list, hung and jets Lehman Charlie is our engineer. Lindsey Lazar ski producer, Alex turn the associate producer tiny English is our editorial director. I might can Scott. Thank you for the snake. Behavioral

Alex Schmidt Margie Kerr freddy sympathetic nervous system Facebook ouija Los Angeles WHYY Lindsey Lazar Julian Harris Scott Lehman Charlie editorial director Philadelphia producer engineer two months
"margie kerr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"margie kerr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Fame our movie producer in the nineteen forties and that was his first film and it's whenever a cat jumps out of a closet or a friend pops up behind someone and it's not actually the real killer she's sorry and became known as the luton bus still to this day as that's but there weren't too many jump scares in early cinema there a handful one of the most famous a psycho soon as the startle or the jump scare hits we've got a whole host of chemicals that are activated and start coursing through the body my name's margie kerr i'ma sociologist and i study fear and how the brain and body respond in times of high stress and thrilling situation we do see the release of our endogenous endo cannabinoid so we've got our our own version of thc that is released along with the the endorphins and that's likely a adaptation evolutionary early because in these times of stress it probably meant that we also might be hurt so our body learned over time it was a good idea to prepare for any pain and not let interfere with our survival but when we know that there's not actually a ghost too that's going to jump through our screen and and get us the endorphins that dopamine oxytocin serotonin connection lend to feeling even a little bit euphoric in feeling excited and that's where you see the the screams turning to laughter it's just a a reframing of these physiological experiences but once you start making everything jump scare you someone's behind you or your friends just scares you i mean that's a cheap jump scare because it's not earned i'm so sorry i'm crazy after all if you just do it for no reason it's it gives you a shock and then joins kind of goes back to normal but the most effective ones the ones that we've seen the ones we always think about are ones that that that were built up to people think of jump scares that one second of a crash but really it's about how you get to that crash in how you earned the crash it's almost like a little film in itself so start start with some kind of questions from character leading somewhere there's a long moment in the middle of where you're not sure what's going to happen and during that time of anticipation when we look at what.

producer margie kerr dopamine oxytocin one second
"margie kerr" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"margie kerr" Discussed on KGO 810

"The science of fear that's the book that we're talking about this evening margie kerr my guest as we continue discussing this talk to me about some of the actual science of fear how our some of these tests done and what is it really told us so there's really two two parts of fear that we often kind of combine into one thing but when it comes to measuring it can get very complicated because a lot of different disciplines define it in different ways but when we look at fear as the threat response we're talking about what's happening in the body when we go into a state of stress so whether we're startled or you know you might even be thinking about something that that really scares us and we have a response that involves a bunch of different chemicals so there's adrenaline that's getting our body going into go mode so our metabolism kicks into high gear so we're trying to burn convert is much a sugar as possible into energy and get that outdoor muscles and our heart rate is increasing we're trying to get oxygen also out to our body there's also nra transmitters in our brain that are released like serotonin dopamine and they are kind of greasing the wheels helping us respond to what is most important and endorphins of course are released and they're going to block us from feeling any pain should be get hurt and all of these things are happening to make sure that we can survive whether that means running or fighting or freezing it's it's really helping us to to focus attention on on survival that means a lot of the abstract thoughts or thinking about the groceries or.

dopamine nra
"margie kerr" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"margie kerr" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"In the science of fear that's the book that we're talking about this evening margie kerr my guest as we continue discussing this talk to me about some of the actual science of fear how how are some of these tests done and what is it really told us so there's really two two parts of fear that we have to kind of combine into one thing but when it comes to measuring it can get very complicated because a lot of different disciplines define it in different ways but we look at fear as the threat response we're talking about what's happening in the body when we go into a state of stress so whether we're startled or you know we might even be thinking about something that's that really scares us and we have a response that involves a bunch of different chemicals so there's adrenaline that's getting our body going into go mode so metabolism kicks into high gear so we're trying to burn convert is much a sugar as possible into energy and get that outdoor muscles and our heart rate is increasing we're trying to get oxygen also out to our body there's also nurture transmitters in our brain that are released like serotonin dopamine and they are kind of greasing the wheels helping us respond to what is most important and endorphins of course are released and they're going to block us from feeling any pain should be get hurt and all of these things are happening to make sure that we can survive whether that means running or fighting or freezing it's it's you know really helping us to to focus attention on on survival that means a lot of.

dopamine
"margie kerr" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"margie kerr" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"In the science of fear that's the book that we're talking about the evening margie kerr my guest as we continue discussing this talk to me about some of the actual science of fear how our some of these tests done and what is it really told us so there's really two two parts of fear that we have to kind of combine into one thing but when it comes to measuring it can get very complicated because a lot of different disciplines to find it in different ways but when we look at fear as the threat response we're talking about what's happening in the body when we go into a state of stress so whether we're startled or you know you might even be thinking about something that that really scares us and we have a response that involves a bunch of of different chemicals so there's adrenaline that's getting our body going into go mode so our metabolism kicks into high gear so we're trying to burn convert is much a sugar as possible into energy and get that outdoor muscles and our heart rate is increasing we're trying to get oxygen also out to our body there's also neuro transmitters in our brain that are released like serotonin dopamine and they are kind of greasing the wheels helping us you respond to what is most important and endorphins of course are released and they're going to block us from feeling any pain should be get hurt and all of these things are happening to make sure that we can survive whether that means running or fighting or freezing it's it's really helping us to to focus attention on on survival that means a lot of the abstract thoughts or thinking about.

dopamine
"margie kerr" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"margie kerr" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"Good evening welcome to coast to coast am your host for the evening dave schrader and tonight it's a night of fear fear it's it's a universal human experience but do we really understand it if if we're so terrified of monsters and serial killers why do we flock to theaters to see them why do people avoid thinking about death but jump out of planes and swim with sharks well our guest is here to enlighten us and give us some insights to the science of fear margie kerr is associated who moonlights at one of america's scariest haunted houses and she has seen grown men cry and pushed their loved ones aside as they run in terror and she's kept careful notes on what triggers these responses she's here with us this evening to discuss fears universal human experience and margie thank you so much for being here grabby here thank you for having me man we do love fear don't we from the highest roller coasters to horror movies or door or movies as they've turned into over the last decade here why are we so fascinated with putting ourselves in situations that we are terrified or fearful of war there's a lot of reasons and it's something that we have done as a species really for most of our our history if you look back through time you can find lots of different examples of people choosing to scare themselves either through telling stories around the campfire or doing things like sliding down hills that are covered in ice but we have always kind of a way to push ourselves in ways they're scary but also ended up being enjoyable or serving some function.

dave schrader margie kerr america
"margie kerr" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"margie kerr" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"The science of fear that's the book that we're talking about this evening margie kerr my guest as we continue discussing this talk to me about some of the actual science of fear how are some of these tests done and what does it really told us so there's really two two parts of fear that we have to kind of combine into one thing but when it comes to measuring it can get very complicated because a lot of different disciplines to find it in different ways but when we look at fear as the threat response we're talking about what's happening in the body when we go into a state of stress so whether we're startled or you know we might even be thinking about something that that really scares us and we have a response that involves a bunch of different chemicals so there's adrenaline that's getting our body going into to go mode so our metabolism kicks into high gear so we're trying to burn convert is much a sugar as possible into energy and get that out to our muscles and our heart rate is increasing we're trying to get oxygen also out to our body there's also neuro transmitters in our brain that are released like serotonin dopamine and they are kind of greasing the wheels helping us respond to what is most important endorphins of course are released and they're going to block us from feeling any pain should be get hurt and all of these things are happening to make sure that we can survive whether that means running or fighting or freezing it's it's really helping us to to focus attention on on survival that means a lot of the abstract thoughts or thinking about the groceries or.

dopamine
"margie kerr" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"margie kerr" Discussed on 710 WOR

"The science of fear that's the book that we're talking about this evening margie kerr my guest as we continue discussing this talk to me about some of the actual science of fear how our some of these tests done and what does it really told us so there's really two two parts of fear that we have to kind of combine into one thing but when it comes to measuring it can get very complicated because a lot of different disciplines to find it in different ways but when we look at fear as the threat response we're talking about what's happening in the body when we go into a state of stress so whether we're startled or you know we might even be thinking about something that that really scares us and we have a response that involves a bunch of different chemicals so there's adrenaline that's getting our body going into to go mode so our metabolism kicks into high gear so we're trying to burn convert is much sugar as possible into energy and get that out to our muscles and our heart rate is increasing we're trying to get oxygen also out to our body there's also neuro transmitters in our brain that are released like serotonin dopamine and they are kind of greasing the wheels helping us respond to what is most important and endorphins of course are released and they're going to block us from feeling any pain should be get hurt and all of these things are happening to make sure that we can survive whether that means running or fighting or freezing it's it's really helping us to to focus attention on on survival that means a lot of.

dopamine
"margie kerr" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"margie kerr" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"In the science of fear that's the book that we're talking about the evening margie kerr my guest as we continue discussing this talk to me about some of the actual science of fear how our some of these tests done and what does it really told us so there's really two two parts of fear that we have to kind of combine into one thing but when it comes to measuring it can get very complicated because a lot of different disciplines define it in different ways but we look at fear as the threat response we're talking about what's happening in the body when we go into a state of stress so whether we're startled or you know we might even be thinking about something that that really scares us and we have a response that involves a bunch of of different chemicals so there's adrenaline that's getting our body going into to go mode so our metabolism kicks into high gear so we're trying to burn convert is much a sugar as possible into energy and get that out to our muscles and our heart rate is increasing we're trying to get oxygen also out to our body there's also never transmitters in our brain that are released like serotonin dopamine and they are kind of greasing the wheels helping us respond to what is most important and endorphins of course are released and they're going to block us from feeling any pain should be get hurt and all of these things are happening to make sure that we can survive whether that means running or fighting or freezing it's it's really helping us to to focus attention on on survival that means a lot of the abstract thoughts or thinking about the groceries or.

dopamine
"margie kerr" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"margie kerr" Discussed on WLAC

"The science of fear that's the book that we're talking about this evening margie kerr my guest as we continue discussing this talk to me about some of the actual science of fear how how are some of these tests done and what does it really told us so there's really two two parts of fear that we have to kind of combine into one thing but when it comes to measuring it can get very complicated because a lot of different disciplines define it in different ways but when we look at fear as the threat response we're talking about what's happening in the body when we go into a state of stress so whether we're startled or you know we might even be thinking about something that's that really scares us and we have a response that involves a bunch of of different chemicals so there's adrenaline that's getting our body going into go mode so our metabolism kicks into high gear so we're trying to burn convert is much a sugar as possible into energy and get that out to our muscles and our heart rate is increasing we're trying to get oxygen also out to our body there's also never transmitters in our brain that are released like serotonin dopamine and they are kind of greasing the wheels helping us respond to what is most important and endorphins of course are released and they're going to block us from feeling pain should be get hurt and all of these things are happening to make sure that we can survive whether that means running or fighting or freezing it's it's really helping us to to focus attention on on survival that means a lot of the abstract thoughts or thinking about the groceries or.

dopamine
"margie kerr" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"margie kerr" Discussed on WRVA

"Of fear that's the book that were up this evening margie kerr my guest as we continue discussing this talk to me about some of the actual science of fear how our some of these tests done and what is it really told us so there's really two two parts of fear that we have to kind of combine into one thing but when it comes to measuring it can get very complicated because a lot of different disciplines to find it in different ways but when we look at fear as the threat response we're talking about what's happening in the body when we go into a state so whether we're startled or you know we might even be thinking about something that's that really scares us and we have a response that involves a bunch of different chemicals so there's adrenaline that's getting our body going into go mode so our metabolism kicks into high gear that we're trying to burn convert is much a sugar as possible into energy and get that out to our muscles and our heart rate is increasing we're trying to get oxygen also out to our body there's also neuro transmitters in our brain that are released like serotonin dopamine and they are kind of greasing the wheels helping us you respond to what is most important and endorphins of course are released and they're going to block us from feeling any pain should be get hurt and all of these things are happening to make sure that we can survive whether that means running or fighting or freezing it's it's really helping us to to focus attention on on survival that means a lot of.

dopamine
"margie kerr" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"margie kerr" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"The science of fear that's the book that we're talking about the evening margie kerr my guest as we continue discussing this talk to me about some of the actual science of fear how how are some of these tests done and what is it really told us so there's really two two parts of fear that we have to kind of combine into one thing but when it comes to measuring it can get very complicated because a lot of different disciplines to find it in different ways but when we look at fear as the threat response we're talking about what's happening in the body when we go into a state of stress so whether we're startled or you know you might even be thinking about something that really scares us and we have a response that involves a bunch of of different chemicals so there's adrenaline that's getting our body going into go mode so our metabolism kicks into high gear so we're trying to burn convert is much a sugar as possible into energy and get that outdoor muscles and our heart rate is increasing we're trying to get oxygen also out to our body there's also never transmitters in our brain that are released like serotonin dopamine and they are kind of greasing the wheels helping us respond to what is most important endorphins of course are released and they're going to block us from feeling any pain should be get hurt and all of these things are happening to make sure that we can survive whether that means running or fighting or freezing it's it's really helping us to to focus attention on on survival that means a lot of the abstract thoughts or thinking about the groceries are.

dopamine
"margie kerr" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"margie kerr" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"A universal human experience but to really understand it if if we're so terrified of monsters and serial killers why did we flock to theaters to see them why do people avoid thinking about death but jump out of planes and swim with sharks well our guest is here to enlighten us and give us some insights to the science of fear margie kerr is associated who moonlights at one of america's scariest haunted houses and she has seen grown men cry and pushed their loved ones aside as they run in terror and she's kept careful notes on what triggers these responses she's here with us this evening to discuss spheres universal human experience and margie thank you so much for being here raby here thank you for having me man we do love fear don't we from the highest roller coasters to horror movies or door movies is they've turned into over the last decade here why are we so fascinated with putting ourselves in situations that we are terrified or fearful of where there's a lot of reasons and it's something that we have done as a species really for most of our our history if you look back through time you can find lots of different examples of people choosing to scare themselves either through telling stories around the campfire or doing things like sliding down hills that are covered in ice but we have always kind of found a way to push ourselves in ways they're scary but also ended up being enjoyable or serving some function.

margie kerr america raby
"margie kerr" Discussed on The Pulse

The Pulse

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"margie kerr" Discussed on The Pulse

"Stephen thinks that could explain why individuals feel asked them are in the first place their minds may be more open to those unusual brain tinkle's the scientists also found people who experience asked him are are prone to neuroticism and more likely to have anxiety or depression there are a lot more ups and downs for people with laos us omar and they have to find some way to deal with it and that might be why are so many people use a s mars away to relax because they're trying to find some way to cope with the ups and downs of their experiencing meanwhile could someone like me someone who hasn't experienced nami response ever have this feeling i gave it one last shot and got my boyfriend to play me one of his favourite videos i put headphones on i close my eyes the guy has a bar of soap with some plastic packaging out of and he's moving it in front of around a special microphones i don't think this can do anything to me yup nothing for the pulse i'm molly segal a new so the research on a as a maher and why some people enjoy these videos is still very new but there is a lot of science on fear and why people sometimes enjoy the feeling of being scared it can give people a natural high of sorts the chemicals that are released during a fighter flight when are sympathetic nervous system is activated uh they're the same that are released when were excited or surprised are happy let's margie kerr a sociologist who studies fear and she says our enjoyment of this emotion has a lot to do with context it's all about how we interpret the rush of endorphins you can even see it when uh is watching a scary movie you're going through one hundred house they scream i'll but then within milliseconds they're smiling and laughing in its you can see how they've um you know kind of remembered i i'm going to safe place i'm not really endanger i and all of that energy all of that excitement that went into the scream is now going into the laughing but sometimes funds scary turns into actually scary as in legitimately terrified so i ask people on facebook what movie put you over the edge.

Stephen sympathetic nervous system margie kerr facebook omar molly segal maher