2 Burst results for "Margaret Anderson Kelleher"

"margaret anderson kelliher" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

11:59 min | 1 year ago

"margaret anderson kelliher" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"Talking about roads traffic and how to make them better. And. What the next transportation Commissioner zoo? And joining us now is the next transportation. Commissioner Margaret Anderson Kelliher, thanks for joining us. Well, good morning, boys. Good morning. Dear listeners. Good morning. You know, I think as I thought about this that everybody has an opinion about roads, traffic, transit, etc. You've been around government and public service for a long time. Why did you wanna be transportation Commissioner? Well, it's such a great question. And I really appreciate it. You know, the the thing that has inspired me to step back into public service. I've been running the Minnesota high tech association, which is a business association of science and technology companies is really this vision of one Minnesota that governor elect walls and Lieutenant governor elect Flanagan have put out and campaign, Don in talking to Minnesotans about and also the commitment that they have to make sure that our roads bridges and transit systems are really taking care of into the future both today and tomorrow and the need for sustainable, reliable long-term funding for those activities be other part of it for me coming from the. Technology side of it is being able to work with people in Minnesota to make sure our future, I guess platform or canvas is ready for how we might be moving people and goods in into the future. So you bring up a good point because I've known you for a long time people have senior service, but one of the other things that I think is is interesting is because I travel as you know, across the state, and wherever you go transportation, roads bridges maintenance is an issue, but you're from greater Minnesota originally. And this is one of the issues that there seems to be a fair amount of tension between greater Minnesota in the metro area. But resources for roads, how we're taking care of them where we're spending as you think about quote, one Minnesota, how do you start to kind of put the puzzle pieces together to make sure that I'll just give you the ultimate goal that everyone's happy. Yeah. Well, I think. Ultimate happiness for everyone. On roads. Bridges and transit is a really beautiful goal. I I'm not sure that we get all the way there. But what we can get to is having, you know, a better grade in terms of there's been some independent work done in the state on looking at the condition of our roads and bridges again. And at you know, really, it looks like we're kind of hovering around that seamark by the society of civil engineers have done a look at it. And that's just not good enough for people all around the state. I mean, I'm I'm just gonna say, you know, part of this is about for me about prosperity of Minnesotans and the ability of communities to be able to connect across the state. I grew up down on a farm near Mankato, most of my family still lives down there. And I really think that when you are thinking about, you know, the farmer trying to get their crops out of the field. Either to their own, you know, storage on the farm or get it to the grain elevator to get it on a train, and the trains are running across the state. You have to think about that is a whole a whole system of supporting people. And so I, you know, I'm thinking about this voice that I think about that the way we get there is we do need this reliable dedicated funding going forward because if we don't the actually the permanent transportation faces kind of a fiscal cliff in a few years of of about six to eight billion dollars and nobody's going to be happy. Then. So there is tension. And I agree with you. There's tension around these issues right now, we have had a higher priority for the maintenance of our roads and bridges and that is an important goal. You gotta take care of what you have. But we also do need to be making. Sure, we're we're actually able to. You know, provide those critical connections where needed we have spent more than we have in previous years, and it's been bipartisan the last few years. But one of the things that callers and listeners aren't clear on is the way in which the gas tax is dedicated now, can you just set it straight here at least for now? And then we can move on to how it is. Now, not how it's going to be in the future. So the gas tax is an important tool in the toolbox. I wanna say there's a number of transportation funding tools in that toolbox. But the gas tax is our largest right now and probably will be into the foreseeable future. Probably the next eight to ten years, at least by prediction, and that is dedicated to our roads and bridges that money does not go to transit. There are other funding sources that go to transit in the metropolitan area. There's an additional sales tax min dot does have a responsibility for greater Minnesota transit. But those funds are also coming from other places, and that gas tax is one of those clear dedicated user fees that when you pay it, you know, that it's going to go to improve your roads and bridges got it. I just want to clarify that. Yup. Absolutely. So. Transportation is one of those things that's always changing their studies people are researching it it's about moving people you take into account pollution. There's so many factors that go into it. But you know, we started to see him show up in the suburbs awhile ago. And now they're showing up in greater Minnesota. And that's roundabouts. Now, again, these are new for people to experience drive through. It's a little different than Europe or Washington DC where I learned how to drive on them a few years ago. But is are those the kind of things that do you think either it's done now or you as Commissioner will look at kind of some cost benefit of some of the ways in which we're designing these roads because I think some people feel like we're spending more to build different systems when the when the old system was just fine. We just need to not spend as much on the new system. So first of all, I you know, you know, this, and I'm just gonna remind everyone I'm not even day one rhino yet. So I don't know everything I'm foreshadowing. About about the the research that is going on at men dot and as well over at the university of Minnesota, I want to say we have a nationally renowned center for transportation studies right here at the u of m there's also work going on in Duluth at the university of Minnesota. And so I think being able to look at all of those factors now, you know, my understanding I I'm a driver too. I every day I'm out there driving. And I, you know, sometimes do use transit Iran road, the green line over to the announcement the other day, but most of the time I'm also in my car, and I understand the challenges with getting used to some new things often this is about safety and making sure that our our folks are safer in Minnesota as they're driving in the second piece of that. I would say is things like roundabouts actually do help with keeping people in goods. Moving you know, where you don't have to necessarily come to that full stop figure out who's moving around the four way and and getting it going, and I know that a lot of communities have implemented them and then dots been using them. So it's something to look at your right on them that well, and I and I call it out because it was interesting is that I've had opinions for a while on them. And then again when I was in greater Minnesota over the last few months roundabout started to come up and again, men dot using them. And again, everybody's got an opinion. And I know you're not on the job yet. This is only been two days. So we're trying to foreshadow. So that you're not caught by surprise on January. Seventh of what many regular Minnesotans are thinking about. And I so appreciate that. I'm getting a lot of contact from folks, you know, whether it has been in emailing me, or you know, seeking me out through social media already to share with me ideas, and. And I really do appreciate that. Because you know, it's one of the things that I think coming from the world of public service. I had a head of this in the legislature that contact with constituents in that listening in that back and forth is really important. So I mentioned this to you before you were on the show. But I was in Wilmer a couple of weeks ago and talking to some farmers, which I know you can really to. Yup. And they had an opinion about a new initiative, and I don't expect you to have a position on this. But and it's called J turns and Ajay turn is. So, you know, those uncontrolled intersections in greater Minnesota where some of them are mostly gravel or dirt where you're crossing a divided highway from one county road, you're crossing the divided highway, and then you're turning left. Or and that, you know in a in an effort for safety, and or moving traffic, so that that person cutting across is a little safer that they're installing J turns. And so think about it looks like kind of a candy cane. So you're you're entering I feel like they have these Florida and down south. They actually have installed them a lot on one sixty nine as you go south now with rebuild a one sixty nine a road. I travel a fair amount going down to man Kato, and they they Saint Peter's the place. I think about the where they have installed a pretty significant J term J turn coming. I was getting my college days, and my transportation upright there folks sentence all in one sentence. And so it's it's directly north of Saint Peter where one of those have been put in so one of the challenges that farmers talked about is if they're driving their truck or. They're semi the way they traditionally have and that it's nearly impossible to make a u-turn at one of those when it used to be more possible because they could spread wide knowing. The way it was. So there's there's a little alert for you. That's coming your way. I think very good. I think the corn growers and soybean growers are going to have an opinion about that. Just so, you know, and anyone who has driven a large scale vehicle will totally understand what you are talking about because you know, the turning radius is different. It is so different than our our normal car. And so I can I can understand the challenge of that. There you go. Margaret Anderson Kelleher is our guest. She's getting to be the next transportation Commissioner of Minnesota. And when we come back, we're going to talk just about kind of this balance of in the metro area bikes trains and cars, how do you make them all work well together play salsa nine to noon on news talk. Eight three zero w c c o. Feeling live tomorrow at seven twenty nine news talk eight three w c c.

Minnesota Commissioner Commissioner Margaret Anderson university of Minnesota Saint Peter Mankato Europe Margaret Anderson Kelleher society of civil Washington Iran Duluth Flanagan Wilmer Don
"margaret anderson kelliher" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

13:06 min | 1 year ago

"margaret anderson kelliher" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"Eight three WC CO. It's time once again for playing politics collaboration between the Star Tribune editorial board and w c c writing. John rash? Laurie stirred event or here when it's all about Lori in a little bit, and what's going on with the lorries life and some changes coming up to the biggest national story of the day. And also, what is taking place. With the incoming walls administration. John rash? The president. As he often. Does makes news who Twitter rather significant news this morning when he said the United States is defeated ISIS in Syria. My only reason for being there on the Trump presidency, and they are planning to pull all US troops out of Syria, a defense official confirmed. Now, you're seeing conflicting comments about this. We've witnessed many times where a commander in chief. And the Pentagon don't always see eye to eye was probably happens every single presidency. You also have some Republicans who fan prominent supporters of the presence Saint hold on what exactly stick in place. Marco Rubio, Lindsey Graham in particular. This is an entanglement that the president has not wanted to be part of he's spoken about this before he's threaten to pull troops out of Syria. There was nothing telegraphed in the last couple of weeks about this. But what is your reaction about the news of the day, it it isn't news that should be broken on Twitter? First of all to be done in close consultation. Not only with administration officials, particularly at the Pentagon. But also congressional consultation as well. And I think that it's Representative of how President Trump often makes decisions how we telegraphs them to the world, and it has really significant foreign policy ramifications and most Americans clearly don't want to have our men and women in harm's way over in Syria. Let alone broader Middle East, but it has served some strategic interests, including close alliance with our Kurdish allies are there who many of them who may feel abandoned, and it may leave. Them quite vulnerable. Not just to ISIS fighters are still are remnant of some of them. They're not just to the forces of Bashir Assad and his homicide aubergine in Syria. But to our NATO ally Turkey who has telegraphed that they will perhaps moving to try to attack the Kurds there because they believe that they're affiliated with some separatist Kurds in Turkey who the Turkish government considers terrorists. So this is a really significant move. And as you mentioned the fact that many of President Trump's congressional allies, not only disagree with it. But reportedly found out about it the same way you Laurie, and I did which was via Twitter or new services as opposed you in this kind of consultation suggests that there might be some bumpy times ahead for the Republicans in congress as well as President Trump, China, look at this get Lori on the walls of mystery may look at this Washington Post analysis, and I see winners people who will look at this decision behalf. Happy. As you just said, Iran, Russia Islamic state. Those are not groups that we wanna make happy at this point. Do we as the United States of America, not at all? And then of course, you know, on two different Cajun's. There have been US air strikes against the Assad regime and with a direct message to Vladimir Putin's Russia as well. And this will likely cement the victory that President Assad has been able to pull off through the most brutal deaf tactics that clearly rise to the level of war crimes in most experts opinions and with Russia right behind them in an incredibly amoral. Backing of the homicide Assad regime. So this does not send a good signal to the rest of the world on perhaps makes Vladimir Putin. Even more adventurous, which could lead to more military miscalculations. And you know, that's something clearly that not just the United States, but our western NATO allies really want to avoid laureate. We're getting close to the transition here where Mark Dayton will leave. Tim walls will step in he selects five. Commissioners still what eighteen more to go. What's what's your overall assessment of yesterday's announcement? Well, there was one for me one. Maybe two really good pieces of news yesterday. The most important one was that Myron France Mark Dayton's really right hand man, really been functioning in Botswana's deputy governor both as revenue Commissioner and as budget Commissioner mine and fans are staying on. That's a blessing for this administration. He's respected on both sides of the aisle. He's a steady and very capable hand. There. That's a real plus for this administration as it prepares its first budget. The other good news. I thought was the return of Margaret Anderson Kelliher to public life. This is a lot of talent that's been so them on the shelf. She tried to get back in to the congressional race in the primary voters in the fifth district thought otherwise this year, but that's a person of enormous talent as well. She was the loser to Mark Dayton in twenty ten gubernatorial primary. DFL gubernatorial primary, it's great to see someone who has her ability in her connections. As a former speaker of the house is the former head of the Minnesota high tech association. She's going to be well positioned to help lead a major priority for the walls administration, the transportation issue and the gas tax the the the congressman then running for. Governor talked about one Minnesota. I'm going to bring all people are you expecting? We're gonna see in a couple of these positions. Republicans name to these spots or he's just gonna be open more open minded, potentially working with Republicans when he finally becomes governor. Well, I thought about that yesterday. And we did have a signal that he was at least considering the mayor of Woodbury Giuliani Stevens as a Commissioner for the met council position. It was significant that went to a suburban merit and have been more notable into a Republican suburban. But there was a lot of talk about a lot of strong DFL from the city of Minneapolis or Saint Paul who would be really fine metropolitan council chairs, but this governor chose to go with a suburban mayor. I think to send a signal to that part of the metro area that has not been happy. Always particularly with metro transit's decisions that this is a try to address those with a mayor from the east side where there have been chronic complaints. About not enough attention from the met council and from the metro transit area. I want to do one of the topic here that want to talk about what what is taking place here would lorries life. John I'll start with you. This is from Angie crack now, Angie, Craig is congresswoman elect she's not even a congresswoman yet. But she sent a fundraiser. To her supporters just recently as we look forward to twenty twenty the Republican House campaign. Arm has already named our district is when they will be watching and targeting to take it back, and we just saw the first twenty twenty house rankings that showed us as lean them. This is a strong warning sign that we can expect a serious challenge in twenty twenty. So it's crucial that we began preparing right now. I'm sure that if I looked the other. Soon to be congressmen and congresswomen that they would have new information out. It is just a reminder that literally this fundraising never ends. She hasn't served a day yet. We're already talking about fundraising for the next election. Something is not right. Representative Craig's analysis is accurate and yet the system is fundamentally flawed, and I completely concur with you. I think that people from both parties get caught in this syndrome where they have to continuously take time from what they have told voters. They will prioritize when they go to Washington and to try to raise money. This is a bipartisan problem and more profoundly an American problem that few other western democracies experience. And it's why they continue to be calls despite the rollback of recent years for some kind of campaign finance reform, and it's not something that's widely thought as to win elections. But it is something that voters do deeply care about when they're asked about. And so you're very, right Chad. I think that there are other people who have just been elected in these narrow margin district's Republican and. Democrat who feel that they already have to gear up. Not celona. No, you could have found the same thing. I think from any number of other members of congress for sure party. So we don't want to single out Angie, Craig writing, particularly in a bad place here. But we have a system now that really emphasizes politics over governance that's becoming worse and worse as time goes on our country is the poorer for it. And I echo everything. John just said about the need for some kind of campaign finance reform Bill Frenzel, an old Minnesota Republican name that I'll mention had always always for some kind of a mechanism of public financing of campaigns. We had something like that still have something like that at the state level. Minnesota though, it's being swamped out by independent expenditure money some look at that option. Again, I think is in order tell people what is going on with your life professionally. Well, thank you for asking. I will be leaving the Star Tribune editorial board retiring this at the first of the year with my last sort of regular working day this Friday. So you only started doing playing politics with me in the last year, or so is there a correlation to these occasional interviews in the fact you finally have decided to leave the Star Trek not good adventure into a radio career. She added. But it's been fun to do this. And I thank you for the opportunity. Okay. What gimme gimme your top highlights of of what you've done. I know John wants to. Thanks to South Dakota by by birth. We couldn't chose Minnesota at a young age. And boy am I glad I did. I have been able to cover the best state to live in the country with one of the most interesting governments I've been able to have an upfront and close personal seat with all kinds of politicians. I've even gotten to know, the great said Hartman who as long as as long as it is still at the Star Tribune, I can go out as one of the kids. Do I'm going to be able to do that. Because he's still there at age ninety eight Laurie. Of course, you have this tremendous experience on the editorial board for the last several decades in the newsroom before so you have always been involved in covering politics and governance, and I know that you know, you have had a very unique purview of many of the key leaders of Minnesota throughout that time and bipartisan basis, it seems that you really have gotten to know and admire summer or look at them have been particularly impactful Lubeck in your career bidding and tell us about a few of those lead. And why they particularly stand out to you. Why was chosen to go to the capital back and a full-time basis back in about forty years ago, December of nineteen seventy eight was when they sent me there was because I had been the reporter attached to congressman Al que- when he was running after twenty years running for governor. And I think they stuck the the girl kid girl reporter who is twenty five years old with that assessment. Because they thought he might not win and the other players could cover the the candidates that they thought had a better chance, but Queen of course, did win and that gave me entree to the governor's office right from the get-go what a tremendous man, Al quiz snout still today at that age ninety five what a great friendship that has been through the years. But there have been so many, really, fine dedicated Minnesotans. We are so blessed in the state with the caliber of the people who are willing to enter public service people. Sometimes we'll ask me today because they're unhappy with the way our government is going are we just sending the wrong people to Saint Paul or to Washington? Let me let me ask in this way. Because a lot of people will romanticize different aspects of their life, including politician, they'll say twenty years ago, forty years ago, sixty years ago, whatever it might be we were sending better people are the Saint Paul or to DC. Do you buy that at all? Well, and I'll confess that. There may be have been a few bad days when I've muttered something about like that. But but on the truth is I think we continue to elect really good people in Minnesota and the parties are finding good candidates. We are sending people into a system that needs reform. And that work is something that I still care about 'em hope to continue to write about I should mention I will continue to do occasional columns for the Star Tribune were thinking about once a month give or take us to start with and see how it goes. So by my by my words, won't disappear completely from our pages. And when you write those words, Laurie as you look toward the future. What is particularly unique about Minnesota that you think needs preserving and protecting and what would you advise? Those who you have covered and will still continue to follow that they do to steward the status..

Minnesota Star Tribune John rash Laurie Twitter president President Assad Syria United States editorial board President Trump Mark Dayton Craig writing Pentagon NATO Commissioner congress Lori congressman Al que Vladimir Putin