36 Burst results for "Margaret"

Fresh "Margaret" from WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:33 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh "Margaret" from WTOP 24 Hour News

"Org It's one 28 Traffic and weather every ten minutes on the 8th to rich hunter in the WTO P traffic center By traveling into district a new issue over in southeast is going to be Alabama avenue closed between 25th street and nailer road southeast that due to a police investigation again watch for their direction they were diverting folks away from their investigation areas would be aware At last report suitland road remained closed between Alabama avenue and southern avenue that as a result of clean up an investigation of an earlier structure fire fire has been extinguished for some time Now traveling in Maryland 70 westbound approaching interchange for a ridge road exit 68 the extra mount airy single file left get your bods work headed toward the eastern shore 50 eastbound as you head east of saint Margaret's road down to a single left lane in network zone then on the bay bridge the east pounce pans block for the overnight construction westbound carries two way traffic warning for each direction as of late no report of delay up in Laurel westbound one 98 between russet green west and whisky bottom road single left linkage bothered works and southern Maryland root for on the governor Thomas Johnson bridge the alternate traffic one direction at times he could work and watch out for delays there as a result Now if you're traveling on 95 in Virginia north down north route three Fredericksburg works in blocks the right lane is where you get by without delay 66 eastbound issued east of 28 toward the fairfax county Parkway two ride lanes passed the work zone then approaching roof 50 fairfax to work some blocks of single right lane and finally just before you get to the bellway on eastbound 66 two left lane sketch by the work just a brief delay rich hundred WTF traffic And the four day forecast from storm team four chief meteorologist Doug camera We saw a cooler day on our Tuesday and we've got a few more out there on our Wednesday and Thursday both days temperatures in the.

Alabama Saint Margaret WTO Maryland Thomas Johnson Fairfax County Parkway Fredericksburg Virginia Fairfax Doug Camera
Miranda Devine Exposes the Kind of Father Joe Biden Actually Is

The Dan Bongino Show

01:55 min | 5 d ago

Miranda Devine Exposes the Kind of Father Joe Biden Actually Is

"I thought it was the most important book of the year and I was not being hyperbolic about that So a couple things about the book and the Biden family and just the disturbing revelations in there You know Miranda my takeaway from the book is about Joe Biden himself who puts a guy like this Hunter Biden his son who he knows well it's his son obviously What kind of guy puts a kid like this Hunter Biden in this central position in these mega business deals with corporations and businesses all over the world knowing he's got this troubled history It's just it speaks to Joe Biden as much as it does to hunter's character You've absolutely nailed it Dan that's the overriding impression that I had was what kind of a father puts the sun with these addiction problems in front of gushing torrents of unaccountable cash And that's what he did at Hunter Biden is even admitted that in his memoir earlier this year beautiful things in which he talks about that money that came from burisma was like play money He said it was $83,333 a month And he didn't have to do anything for it and he said that really that was what led to him falling off the wagon and really indulging in his crack addiction And I think when tens of millions of dollars of ill gotten gains are coming into your bank accounts And you have an addiction problem What are you going to do And I mean it destroyed his marriage He had a really lovely wife and three quarters girls And he's like just unraveled from there on So and the other thing about burisma was that as soon as his father stepped down from being vice president was Margaret out obviously Hunter Biden's 83,000 plus salary from burisma went down to half that much It was cut in half Just crazy

Hunter Biden Joe Biden Burisma Biden Miranda Hunter DAN Margaret
Sen. Rand Paul and Sen. Ted Cruz Are Right to Check Dr. Anthony Fauci

Mark Levin

01:42 min | Last week

Sen. Rand Paul and Sen. Ted Cruz Are Right to Check Dr. Anthony Fauci

"Is Senator Cruz told the attorney general you should be prosecuted Yeah I have to laugh at that I should be prosecuted What happened on January 6th senator Do you think this song right there for a second Thank you rich First of all let's break that down His creepy laugh like a Batman villain aside First of all what the question of course is here you have a United States senator who is bringing up the fact that Anthony Fauci a member of the executive branch might have lied before Congress might have perjured himself before Congress Might have in fact totally American people Why So here's the legislative branch doing its constitutional job of being a check on the executive branch of government And instead of her following up and go well senator that's you know we're not talking about January 6th here We're talking about you and possibly now the accusation is that you lie to Congress about gain of function research You lied about the lab leak You lied about these things That's what they're arguing How do you want to respond to that No don't give me a giggle I'm gonna be a giggle like you've just tied up Robin and you're waiting for Batman to rescue him Answer the question This is their job Their job is to check the executive branch of government So what do you have to say to that Doctor Fauci But again Margaret brand is on his side He's the victim here right He's the victim And even though it's very very likely that Fauci did lie to Congress on multiple occasions about gain of function research which led to the virus in China being in that lab and maybe we could have very early on intervened in this whole thing She's willing to let that go because Fauci's a hero of the left And she is CBS So obviously you got to give the guy a pass

Senator Cruz Congress Anthony Fauci Doctor Fauci Margaret Brand United States Batman Fauci Robin China CBS
"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

01:51 min | Last week

"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"Wow. Being having been reported from New York City since the late 1960s. And since then, a few additional species have been reported. I think we're looking at about a 120 species within the 5 boroughs at this point. Wow. And you told me before that even once you had to go do a walk or something on it at the big the big landfill, the big caps landfill, it's at an island fresh kills and you were like, there's not going to be anything here. And what did you find? I mean, so even in preposterous places, they are there, yeah? Yeah, absolutely. That was a really that was actually a really fun event. That was one of the Macaulay honors college bio blitzes. So I was out there with my colleague Natalie Howe and a number of undergraduate honors students. And yes, exactly, I said, oh my gosh, what are we going to find here? And then we actually found quite a few species including one that was growing on a brick discarded brick, there were a number of species that we actually hadn't seen in any other parts of the city. So there are surprises to be found everywhere. I think that we are still just getting a sense of what is possible. What can possibly live even in these really dense urban areas? Yeah. Well, doctor Jessica Allen, thank you so much and thank you for urban lichens, a field guide for northeastern North America. And just for being patiently telling us more about these incredible creatures. So everybody should go out and do a like and walk and take that hand lens as she was explaining. And we're going to have the giveaway as I said with the transcription. I hope I'll talk to you again soon. Great. Thank you so much, Margaret. There was a pleasure to be on the show. Thank you..

Natalie Howe New York City Jessica Allen North America Margaret
"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

05:32 min | 2 weeks ago

"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"Eventually she finds this garden. She's also right. She discovers that plants come back to life. And that to me is the most moving part of the book. It's like, oh, that time in the winter when everything seems dead. I love in the book where you ask the reader, you mark to ask the reader, whether they've had their own secret garden moment, and you write where you stepped into the garden and felt a shiver of something, recognition, awe, you know, kind of what was it? And I think we've all had that. And I think that's why even though children's story, it's sort of metaphorical for so many of us, this discovery and this magical place that then can transform us, yes? Yes. And so I think especially, especially in our current times, right? A lot of people have come to gardening or come back to gardening because it is a relief. It's like you can get to a different place in your head. If that makes sense, sometimes just by observing things coming back in the garden. Yeah. Now each of the women, each of the authors that you've written about, and I think all of your subjects have been women. Yes, they've all been women in their gardens. They have a particular plant palette, you know, sort of a signature of plants, and I mean, I think as when we talked a while back, Emily about Emily Dickinson, she loved her flower garden her lilies, her roses. I don't remember Laura ingall, wilder's favorites on the Prairie, and so forth. But let's talk a little bit about the palette that delighted Francis. You know, if delphiniums, for instance, oh, my goodness. Oh my goodness, so delphiniums, her son later wrote the delphiniums were her greatest triumph and her greatest tragedy. And I don't know if this has ever happened to you Margaret, but, you know, once in a while, you'll grow a plant and it will do so well that you just, you know, I think, oh, I'm a genius. Well, for a Burnett, it was delphiniums. Now, delphiniums, I've tried to grow them in my New Jersey garden. You know, honestly, it's like, you know, we don't like New Jersey. We want to be in Portland. But, you know, Burnett had this garden on Long Island and she grew so many delphiniums. She called it my land of the blue flowers. That was the only he or she had that. I have a kind of grainy washed out picture of me. It looks like hundreds of delphinium. After that, right? Of course she has planted a monoculture, so it's been like this, you know, kind of neon sign for all the pests and diseases. She can never do it again. And just the best she can do is hide a few in her mixed borders. Yeah. She called them larkspurs made big and grand, I think. That's a great expression. That is, it is great and she loved roses and I love the anecdote that if you want help with.

Laura ingall Emily Dickinson Burnett wilder Emily New Jersey Francis Margaret Long Island Portland
"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

05:27 min | 2 weeks ago

"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"How are you? Hi Margaret. I'm well thanks. Cleaning up the garden, are we? I am indeed. I just cutting down some Clemens line. Oh, boy. Windstorm, the other night tower, a tour that I have of one old calamitous transition tipped over. So I think it might have cut itself down. There you go. Well, this one is one of those old, you know, September, blooming, white ones. I have one, my father propagated, so it's got a little special spot. Oh, so I'll confess and before we start I should probably say we're going to have a giveaway of your new book. Unearthing The Secret Garden with the transcript of the show over on a way to garden dot com. But I have to confess this sounds probably terrible, but I don't frankly know if I was read The Secret Garden as a kid. I don't have a strong memory of it, having just read your book. It was first published, I think, is a serialized magazine, article series or something and like 1910, tell us about the book and really why it called to you to make it your latest project. So it's never been out of print. I received a copy when I was probably 9 or ten, which was just the right age because that's the age of the protagonist, Mary Lennox. So, you know, it's always nice when you can see yourself in a book. Mary Lennox was also really spoiled, which I think I was too early. But we didn't get many books in my household. We were a go to the library every week family, so this really, you know, it was sort of a notable event and I loved the book and I read it so often that you know like the lining was all cracked. It was the addition by Tasha tutor, you know, you know, pretty well known illustrator, but it's also been illustrated by lots of people. You know, frankly, I didn't know anything about Burnett when I started on the quest for this particular book. Well, and that's what's so astonishing because, you know, there I am reading your book and it's like, oh my goodness, she's the author of little lord font Leroy who people may have heard, they have made it for 50 novels and a dozen plays and oh my goodness. Yeah, so here is like an absolute powerhouse author who just has fallen off the radar except for just like definitely The Secret Garden and maybe people remember a little princess. I wouldn't have passed a quiz on little lord fauntleroy before I started down this particular oh, okay..

Hi Margaret Mary Lennox Secret Garden Clemens Tasha font Leroy Burnett
"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

05:09 min | 3 weeks ago

"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"And especially to remind himself and me and all of us, not to get lulled into procrastination, even if it has been in the 60s some days here the last week, hi Ken, how are you today? Margaret, you're reading my mind again. Yeah, I know it's kooky, right? Maybe you're reading every gardener's mind. Yeah, the weather certainly does not give us the usual signals that I used to expect by this far into November. That's for sure. Well, usually by this far into November, we're wreaking out completely because we haven't done anything. But at least we are in Indian summer here because we had killing for us and then we have the warm temperatures above 60. Yeah. I'm going to go up into the meadow, little meadow above my house today and collect some more seeds from some of those goldenrods and asters and things that are up there that their seeds haven't dispersed, but they're looking good and maybe I'm a little late, but it's not too late and put on people's bags. It's not too late. That's interesting that you should put it in paper bags because I was going to say don't do it in the field. Especially because we're going to have wind. Little twigs with the flower heads on them and put them in bags right there, label them. I guess you're going to have separate bags. But when you get home, indoors out of the wind, breads and newspapers or some white paper and get the seeds out there. Because when you do it in the field can you talking to over there? Ever try to get the milk eat? Oh my goodness. Yeah. So you're saying because I usually take either some cups, Tupperware kind of things, whatever, or I take the paper bags up, depending on if stuff is wet, and it depends. I like it to be on a dry day if I can. And just kind of, if I have the paper bag, I've already written on it, what it is. And I just kind of cut it and let it fall upside down into the bag. Yeah, yeah. Yeah. There's a guy in Texas who invented something with a dust buster and a tube and stuff. I mean, here's collecting a lot of seed from his own Prairie and he suck them into the despot. I don't think I need any more gadgets, I think I just need to make sure and go and get some because I want to repeat them in certain spots like some interesting things that have started to sew in and so forth. I want to be a little more deliberate. What they are, but in your name one. Well I have 6 kinds of goldenrod, don't ask me which ones. And, you know, and I sort of think of them as the early one. The tall one. Right. I have to always look it up. Yeah, yeah, yeah. But yeah, some of the asters that do better in not in the meadow, but nearby and sort of a shady area like the big leaf faster and the whitewood Astor and so forth. And you know, I just want to be as I said a little more deliberate. Winter sow them and actually I did an interview with Heather mccargo of wild seed project up in Maine, maybe a month ago, and we can put a link to that, the how two steps how to propagate them in the transcript of this show..

Margaret Ken Texas Heather mccargo Maine
Dean Stockwell, ‘Quantum Leap’ Star, Dies at 85

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | Last month

Dean Stockwell, ‘Quantum Leap’ Star, Dies at 85

"Actor dean Stockwell has died of natural causes at the age of eighty five according to his agent I marches are a letter with a look at his life Stockwell said in nineteen eighty nine he would not have gotten the role in the TV show quantum leap if he had not done the film married to the mob because nobody knew he could do comedy Stockwell's resume includes the films blue velvet airforce one in Paris Texas as well as the TV show Battlestar Galactica he was a child actor appearing with Frank Sinatra in anchors Aweigh and Margaret o'brien in the secret garden well I dream really young named his after the gold rush album after stock was never produced screenplay of the same name Stockwell designed the cover for young's album American stars and bars and he made sculptures out of

Stockwell Dean Stockwell Aweigh Margaret O'brien Battlestar Galactica Frank Sinatra Paris Texas Young
"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

04:09 min | Last month

"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"Flexible non static art form. Right. And I want to talk about collecting. And you kind of hinted at this, you know, about the idea of getting into a genus of plants or whatever, and making that one of the sort of layers that helps things hang together. One of the elements of repetition. In Europe, shall we say passionate collector, you have collections of narcissus and hellebores and snowdrops and galatas and lots of collections. But you didn't collect them to then like line them out like in a firm kind of setting to be some steady collection or reference thing, right? You're incorporating them. So give us the pitch for why we want to collect something as gardeners. Something that the topic that is very near and dear to me. I am a plantsman. And guilty as charged, I have a lot of collections. It's like, you know, I like Margaret roach. So I like all of her family. If I like a galactus, I tend to like all of it and try to explore them. But I don't want my garden and I hope it does it. I don't want it to read like a plant zoo. You know, it's not about right. Overall garden comes first. So I chose to house my collections in a particular style. I would guess you would describe my style as a cottage garden. Yeah. With a naturalistic planning. But I wanted to look more like a plant community that relate to one another. Not like a botanical garden per se, nothing's really labeled in the garden, except don't answer this collection. I want to take as the larger view of the garden to make it look the picture of what I'm trying to achieve. And then I house my collections within that. I work the collections in where they fit in this space and where they fit in the garden due to environmental conditions like the drier collections going one area, the weather collection is going another. I constantly amazed by what plants do and how they relate to the one another. Take the genus gerani AC geraniums. If you see lots of geraniums in your garden, that is a form of repetition as well. Now there's a fine line between being boring and repetition. You don't want to be boring. You want to repeat that in a kind of a clever way by putting one of another plant, putting it with another texture. There's so much you can do with it. I'm not afraid and I'm collecting. It's just how you put them together. I want people to consider. Right, so not not as you say making a zoo where they're in their individual displays. But segregated so to speak. But integrating them, and you even use them in pots and so on and so forth. We have about maybe three minutes left and I just wanted to dig a little bit more into that. You said, you know, when we did the time story said, if there's something you love, do a little exploration of that genus, and then extend the bloom time of that favorite plant..

Margaret roach Europe
"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

02:31 min | Last month

"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"Me when we worked on a for people who don't know we worked on maybe a month or so ago. New York Times garden column together about layering the layers of the garden and so forth. And about your work and afterward, I was thinking, you shared with me in that debt, you have a lot of vertical linear shapes in your garden and I'll ask you to explain that in a second. And I was thinking, well, what's my signature shape in my garden? And I confess to you that it's amoeba. Margaret's amoeba garden. But by that, I mean and again, a reflection after talking to you about signature shape, it sounds silly like I'm making fun of myself. But I'm on an undulating very hilly sensual sensuously curved sight, right? So if I tried to make Versailles here 30 years ago, you know, with rigid linear geometry, it wouldn't have worked. So everything I'm attracted to is kind of, you know, lumpy shaped plants and beds with irregular, curving edges. Do you know what it kind of fits? So that's one of my layers. Well, that's exactly what I want people to do is first of all, you kind of like assess the site. Right. Are your strength, move forward from your strengths, something that you like and shape is very, very important. As a plantsman, you know, my tendency is to plants, but we need to find things to give our gardens and their right. You probably heard it a thousand times to give our garden unity. That with color by repetition of color, you can do that by repetition of shape. Or by repetition of a certain genera that helps bring your garden together and give it a theme. It was often overlooked due to the garden riders about colors..

New York Times Margaret
"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

04:54 min | Last month

"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"Ken Druze is an old friend and a garden writer with 20 books to his credit, and most recently, one about fragrance called the sensual garden, and another called the new shade garden. He made a visit the other day to wave hill the renowned public garden in New York City, where they have a whole monocot border that was in its glory and hence our topic today, plants that are monocots and Y to care. Hello Ken with the crazy ideas for segments. Margaret, if that may talk about rabbit hole, I said monocot and now I know a whole lot about little more about monocots than I would like to have known, except the monocot border wave hill is spectacular. And I'm sure that most people who see this arrangement of plants, which will try to describe. Don't realize that they have something in common. And that they're all monocots, but most people don't even know not that I'm putting people down. It's just that, you know, who teaches biology now anymore. But well, so I start talking about this. Yeah, yeah, but first I have a question about what's going on in the garden just to know 'cause I haven't talked to you in a bit. Are you still warm and no frost and no nothing down there in New Jersey? And the color has begun. And it's funny because indigenous peoples day this year is early. Because usually indigenous peoples day is our.

Ken Druze New York City Margaret Ken New Jersey
"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

05:07 min | 2 months ago

"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"Mark Wolfe is director of mountaintop arboretum in the catskills of New York, a 178 acre public garden that's open every day of the year, and we're managing native plant communities as the focus. Mark has a particular appreciation for small native trees that we too often overlook. And we'll talk about some of his favorites and also a palliative native shrubs to delight you and these and the birds. Hi Mark, I'm so glad to talk on this fall day. Hi, Margaret. Thanks so much for having me. Yeah, it's such a great it's like earth is celebrating fall. I mean, it's cold and clear and beautiful up here. And the leaves are already changing color up here. So you say up there, you're at 2400 foot elevation, is that correct? Yeah, 2400 feet in ten orville, New York, which is near hunter mountain if people, if that's helpful to people. Yeah, for their GPS. Right. So I want to ask you before we get started talking trees and traps, I want to ask you for a quick introduction to mountaintop arboretum, but also to say that you have this not so long ago built education center and built from many species of tree wood from many trees from around the property and nearby. And you did a book about it called 21 trees. And about those 21 trees. And we're going to have a giveaway with the transcript of the show over on a way to garden of a copy of that beautiful book. Photos by rob cardello. So tell us what is mountain top briefly. Mountaintop our burrito is a 178 acre public garden. And it started in 1977 with the 6 and a half acres. And over time, it's grown. We've become more native plant focused over the life of the arboretum. And especially as you're talking about the new education center is really a celebration of native plants because we went through our forest and some generous neighbors who donated some trees too. And we have 21 different species of native trees that are represented in this beautiful timber frame structure and the floors are also from trees from our forest. And that sort of bleeds out..

Mark Wolfe mountaintop arboretum Mark New York hunter mountain orville rob cardello Margaret
The Founder of Planned Parenthood Was a Eugenicist

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:00 min | 2 months ago

The Founder of Planned Parenthood Was a Eugenicist

"Have you asked yourself. Why is it that planned. Parenthood clinics are disproportionately located in high density minority areas. Why could it be pachon. Because the founder of planned parenthood margaret sanger in whose name awards are given out each year one of which was received by hillary clinton yes. She's a proud margaret sanger award recipient. Could it have anything to do with the fact that she was a eugenicist. Don't take my word for it. Look at what she said about the enfeebled of mind and those not fit to live or to breed especially the poll black community. She was such use geneticists. Such a hateful murderous bigot. That hitler himself. This scene is one of the most chilling scenes in our friend. My colleague nesta sousa's death of a nation where he reenacted and read had reenacts actors read the latter. Adolf hitler wrote to the leadership of the national socialist. German workers party that is the full name of the nazi party. Let me just one more time. National socialist workers party of germany that he wrote them a letter. Instructing of the leadership of the nazi party to congratulate margaret. Sanger on her clear thinking and eugenicist starts.

Margaret Sanger Pachon Nesta Sousa Hillary Clinton German Workers Party Adolf Hitler National Socialist Workers Par Nazi Party Germany Sanger Margaret
Influential Educators: Nursery School Pioneer Margaret McMillan

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:01 min | 3 months ago

Influential Educators: Nursery School Pioneer Margaret McMillan

"Margaret and rachel contributed to the christian socialist magazine and margaret began giving free lessons to working class girls in london. These the beginning years of their lives in service. At the poor and disenfranchised for the next few years the sisters helped workers and strikes and traveled to different industrial regions of england giving talks and visiting the poor to better understand the needs of communities their engagement also led to involvement in several socialist societies and groups in nineteen. Oh two when margaret was forty two years old. The sisters joined the recently formed labor party. The labor party remains the major political parties in england to this day at that time working class children were expected to work long hours in terrible conditions as their parents did. Factory owners cared more about profit than safety and children often got injured. And we're not paid well. This exploitation deeply concerned the sisters and they became champions for the wellbeing of all children. They canvassed for a bill that established a nurse all primary schools. They established community health and dental clinics in a needy area of london. They used their connections to establish night clinics in deptford where children could get a nutritious hot meal a bath and clean clothes and bedding and they became involved in a campaign to provide meals in schools. Arguing that hungry children could not learn and contributing to legislation. That made it law in. Nineteen eleven margaret wrote the child and the state in it. She criticized the tendency of some schools to focus solely on preparing children for unskilled on monotonous labor. She believed schools should offer a humane and interesting education that spurred the growth of the next

Margaret Christian Socialist Magazine Labor Party England Rachel London Deptford
Republican Governors Infuriated by Biden's Vaccine Mandates

Axios Today

01:57 min | 3 months ago

Republican Governors Infuriated by Biden's Vaccine Mandates

"The new vaccine mandates that president biden announced last week will affect about one hundred million americans all told and while it seems that many americans agree with the president. There's also been a significant backlash with some gop. Governors vowing legal action and other top republicans calling for a public uprising. Margaret talev is managing editor for politics. At axios hi margaret hi. How striking is this reaction. We've seen especially over the past few days from republicans. The republican governors in states like florida and states like texas. They're responding to the gop base that is strikingly on the side of the the freedom not to be vaccinated the freedom to work in a place where your boss can't tell you what to do and it is that question. Mark about the most vulnerable districts for democrats that is really driving this push by republican politicians to jump all over joe biden for these mandates. The argument is that it is an issue of personal freedom or of medical choice. Of course americans who aren't comfortable with taking a shot have the right to speak out against it and have the right to resist. The question is what's the breaking point between free speech. You know civil disobedience and a threat to the nation a threat to national security violation of the law right and former president bush compared those threats to national security that you're talking about with the terrorism that took place on nine eleven at an anniversary ceremony and shanksville pennsylvania on saturday little culture overlap between violent extremists abroad and violent extremists at home. But then there's disdainful pours in their disregard for human life and their determination to defile national symbols. They are children of the same foul spirit and it is our continuing duty to confront them.

President Biden Margaret Talev GOP Joe Biden Florida Texas Shanksville Mark President Bush Pennsylvania
"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

04:24 min | 3 months ago

"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"I'm so glad to talk again margaret's could talk to you again to. Yeah before we get started. I wanted to stay with the transcript of this show over on a way to garden dot com. We'll have a giveaway of your book So i'm excited to share that with one with a winner like you. Yeah and i was so glad that we got to do earlier this year. The new york times garden come together in spring. When i was taking my houseplants out for the season so as i get ready to bring them in is really doesn't dez so i'm like sort of right now reciting to myself as i need to bring them in some of your wisdoms in philosophy that you shared especially one thing which you said to me. Plants will grow in the shape of your light the way a plant looks is not just because of your good care but the environment you have. So it's all about the light yeah. I always consider plans. I when i look at them. I use my engineering mind. And i look at it like it's a little a little solar-powered sugar factory. You know i mean at the at the heart of photosynthesis that's really all it is right. Yes yes and so the same plant the same variety even a division of the same literal plant grown in your house in my house or in the commercial greenhouse where maybe it originated years ago. It's gonna look different. Absolutely yes And you know the the really insight. Like i guess a surprising thing i would say is that the actual amount of light that is collected in various places between different peoples homes is actually so varied and you know i think a lot of times i mean we know for a fact that does more likely the greenhouse we know for a fact if you have huge south facing windows in northern hemisphere You know you're going to get more light but we don't often or rarely we ever actually collect all that.

dez margaret The new york times
The Catholic Church: Scandal in the Shadows With Margaret Mary OConnor

Beyond Picket Fences

01:44 min | 3 months ago

The Catholic Church: Scandal in the Shadows With Margaret Mary OConnor

"We are excited to have margaret. Mary o'connor with us today. How are you armed doing real good ladies having a year. Yes for so thrilled. Where would you like your story to begin. Well i guess it begins back in the nineteen fifties. When i was a young girl and i was raised in an irish catholic family and there was one incident in particular that regard a birthday gift that my brother paul received that actually brought out the inequality of woman in the catholic church and my mom had bought my brother Replica was a rural cardboard replica of church altar. So i remember bob were so excited. He immediately went behind the altar and assume the row of playing the part of a priest and he told myself and my twin sister pat Bring some chairs in here so we both got a share for ourselves and put him down right in front of the altar in we were like playing the role of parishoners. Well everything was fine until a certain point one. I remember. I stood up. And i told paul basically I wanted to play. The ro as appraised. And i'll never forget what he said he said can't be appraised. Your girl only girl only men. Can you know play their part saw. I basically learned a young age very quickly. That there definitely was a difference As far as you know assuming such a position in our

Mary O'connor Pat Bring Margaret Paul Catholic Church BOB
The Inspiring Story of Margaret E. Knight

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

02:40 min | 3 months ago

The Inspiring Story of Margaret E. Knight

"So margaret louise night. She was a prolific american inventor of machines and mechanisms for a variety of industrial everyday purposes. Margaret was nicknamed maddie mit. She lived with her widowed mother and older brothers. Charlie and jim in a little house in york maine. she was born in eighteen. Thirty eight by the way so after her father passed away mattie had inherited his toolbox and she liked to think of things that could be made with these tools and she drew them in a little notebook that she labeled my inventions. Mattie demonstrated knack for tools and mentioned from an early age making toys kites sleds and household items in as little girl. She preferred to play with woodworking tools. Instead of dolls saying that quote the only thing she wanted whereas a jack knife gimblett and pieces of wood. She knew she wanted good for her so when she was eleven. Maddie's finley moved to manchester new hampshire to work in the textile mills there and so matty was going to continue going to school only going so far as a complete her elementary school education and she got to know the head engineer there while wandering around the grounds after school waiting for her family to be done with their like fourteen to eighteen hour shifts. Sure textile mills. Yeah including like her twelve year old brother and fourteen so at age twelve. She started working the mill herself and aloom ow function and injured a worker So it turns out that one of the leading causes of serious injuries at the mill that she had observed was the propensity of the steel-tipped flying shuttles so those were manipulated by workers to unite the left in the warp threads in their weaves. I'm so these shuttles would come free of their looms and they would like shoot off the machines high-velocity even at like the slightest employee error. So like there were people dying from this. There are people like you know basically like you're getting almost shot. Yeah basically tipped metal thing like flying off a machine you know so it was really dangerous and so matty what she did. She created a guard. That would stop the shuttle from coming off of the machine if it malfunctioned. So like the exact details of this device have kind of been lost to history but mentions of it came out throughout published stories of her work and her Mentions articles that will get into so again because this was the mid nineteenth century. And why would anybody document what they actually did anyway. So workman who installed these types of guards all the looms and all the males in manchester. So this sounds like a big deal. She clearly didn't make any money for sure. You know maybe save some lives so after she turned eighteen. Mattie left manchester for better opportunities She worked in several different factories on new england along with other short-term technical jobs too so that she could keep

Margaret Louise Maddie Mit York Maine Gimblett Matty Mattie Margaret Finley Maddie Charlie Manchester JIM New Hampshire Workman New England
"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

06:41 min | 3 months ago

"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"Seventeen thousand questions arrived by phone email or in person at the plant clinic at the morton. Arboretum questions representing consumers from forty eight states. Julie jonoski a former landscape designer who has managed the arboretums free plant clinic for three years after volunteering there for five years before. That is here today to answer some of mine. Hi julie. how are you. i'm margaret. how are you good to speak to you again. I really enjoyed getting to know you. And the morton arboretum a little better as part of a recent new york times column. We did together so the The arboretum stated mission is to act as a champion of trees right and tell us a little bit about it just briefly So our mission is to try and study and promote the care and appreciation of trees. And we do that. In a lot of ways we have A number of of scientists on staff were studying trees and climate change and how that affects them. We have The seventeen hundred acres set you mentioned And we also provide a lot of education for homeowners agreed professionals in the best practices tree care based on that scientific background. Right always science-based. Yes i i mean i. I hope that when the times count came out that the raiders didn't overwhelm you with more questions than you already get By the way we should say that they can be emailed in with the transcript of the show or phone calls and so forth with the transcript of the show will give the how to contact you how to contact the plant clinic information So people will be able to do that. What's your email for for the plant clinic. Our email address is plant clinic. All one word at morton arb- dot org okay so So the clinic team is you. And i think another fulltime staff colleague and then who else so. We also have between forty five and sixty volunteers depending on the here. Who are well trained. They're either master gardeners or have horticulture degrees Or have been avid gardeners and have gone through a lot of the arena of training And they come in and help us answer questions via email or phone We put them through in addition to whatever their background is. We put them through about thirty hours of training ourselves before they even pick up a phone for us. So these are extremely well trained. Volunteers And they are really the core of our team. They they spent thousands of hours volunteering here. So you know. I've been writing about gardening for a long time in kind of like the doctor at the cocktail party. Who gets asked medical questions. You know like a lot of plant questions forever. I am and i suspect you do to kind of greatest hits. You know some like for me. For instance one. That always comes up over and again year after year is when do i prove my. And it's usually fill in the blank but often it's hydrangea or lilacs. Those two really popular ones and kind of related is. Why didn't my fill in the blank plant. Usually shrub bloom You know and that's often lilacs. It could be hydrangea as you know. So and pest and disease questions in season come up your after year Kind of what are the ones that you're getting what we certainly get. All of those as well But a key thing that we do here is plant. Identification for people can send us or bring us samples of plants that they have in their yard or that they found And we can help them identify them. A lot of people aren't aware of all the different types plants. We have in the area or even how to figure out what they are. So we do a lot of that We also help. People select plants for specific areas in their yard so We get a lot of questions about high. I've got this circle in the middle of my driveway and the tree they're died. And what should i put back in there and we spent time with them trying to figure out what the conditions are in that area. How big a plant. They can put their what they're looking for and then we can make recommendations to help them figure out what to put in a space like that. Okay this year. We've been very dry in the upper midwest and so we have spent an enormous amount of time talking about how to water properly And the fact that even big trees needs to be watered when you have a twelve week drought because it's just so important for the longevity of the tree to get some sort of regular moisture. Yes and go ahead. And we talked about that in the new york times story Was one of the points that you made was that people will go in water their vegetables or water there pots daniels. But what about the trees and it may not be showing the signs right away. Some big ultra specially but it is suffering like you said in a prolonged dry spell. So i believe you told me if more than like ten days to two weeks of dry or something. Is there like a protocol that you recommend people. Yeah that's usually exactly the timeframe that we recommend if it hasn't rained at ten days two weeks you should water your trees and trump's Not just your pod senior annuals Trees and shrubs lose those fine feeder routes when the soil dries out completely and it takes them a long time to build that back. So if you have a prolonged period of dry weather these plants will lose a lot of their root system and that has very long term implications especially for big old trees. Right i for the first time. Now we're gonna get into some creepy crawly things for the first time. This year i saw magnolia scale on a magnolia in my yard very small number of the while they're scale insects so they're like little dots underneath the leaves And i had never seen before. And i have read about it and so forth. Is that something you're hearing about. Is that a trending Past magnolia scale has been a big pest here for the last five or six years And you can identify magnolia scale by white fuzzy spots on the stems and branches of your magnolia trees. They only feed on magnolias. So if you find something like that on a different plant it's not magnolia scale But yeah we spend a lot of time trying to help people identify.

Julie jonoski morton arb morton arboretum new york times margaret julie raiders midwest daniels
Man Finds Bill Gates's Ancestors Buried on His Property

The Ordinary, Extraordinary Cemetery

02:11 min | 3 months ago

Man Finds Bill Gates's Ancestors Buried on His Property

"Island is home to thousands of historic cemeteries. Many of which haven't seen the light of day in years. That includes an overgrown cemetery on brian pages property in west greenwich page. Who'd recently purchased the land discovered the cemetery after following an gated path. Deep into the woods we had no idea it was there. He said it was a shock. A cemetery on our land. It's kind of weird. I don't know about you. But i would be so high. We and my older for senate on a i would be thrilled. Margaret malcolm share. The rhode island historical cemetery commission tells twelve news. There are more than thirty. Two hundred historical cemeteries across the state ranging from small family burial grounds to fully landscape gardens. One of those cemeteries is the one page uncovered historical cemetery. Ninety six appears to have been forgotten about for more than a century when he founded it page said several of the gravestones were toppled over and the cemetery itself was overgrown with weeds and brush once he realized the importance. A site page recruited family and friends to help revitalize the cemetery the crew spent hours clearing overgrown brush trees branches and rocks from sacred place. It is a nice little site we have out here and we just want to take care of it. Page said my mom wants to start giving flowers to keep it up. We're trying to do some work to fix this place up but the story doesn't end there while cleaning out. The cemetery page noticed a familiar last name on several of the gravestones. The markers belonged to israel seth and zachariah gates at first page that he didn't think anything of it it wasn't until he reached out to malcolm that he realized the significance. She left a comment in an email that she heard they may be related to the bill gates from microsoft page said The names on the headstones prompted page to launch his own investigation after researching the names on ancestry dot com page. Said he was able to link them all to the

Margaret Malcolm Rhode Island Historical Cemete West Greenwich Brian Senate Zachariah Gates Seth Page Malcolm Israel Bill Gates Microsoft
Census Data Could Make Voting Rights Legislation Even More Important to Democrats

Here and Now

02:15 min | 4 months ago

Census Data Could Make Voting Rights Legislation Even More Important to Democrats

"Move over to the question of the census Now and my I want to ask you About the numbers that came out yesterday. We saw that the U. S population the last decade has become less white has become more diverse, notably and politically important places. Florida, Texas, Nevada, Georgia. Are we seeing up? Purple ink of these places. I don't know what purple and blue makes. But is that happening here? Well, I think it's a purple ng. If you can immediately assume that these populations this growing number of racial minorities are going to vote Democratic, then I suppose that it is Sort of a purple ink. And you also see which is another good sign for Democrats. This rapid growth in big cities over the last 10 years, which have always been democratic domains that Republicans are looking also to cut into. But I think your point is right, especially in the Sun Belt states in these battleground states that Democrats absolutely need if they want to hold the house and expand their majority in the Senate. Thinking about Georgia, North Carolina, Texas, Arizona, which isn't quite the sun Belt, but still kind of in that in that range of states that Democrats will I live in Arizona. It's the Sun Belt. I'll say that Yeah, and and, you know, thinking a lot about the deep south as well where Democrats are hoping to make inroads. Of course, there are two big roadblocks to this one. The fact that the GOP controls redistricting in a majority of these battleground states and will be The party that writes these these district lines in the next couple of months here that were most likely to be favorable to them, and also in the sun Belt states. They're starting to pass, especially in Republican controlled state legislatures loss that would limit turnout among a lot of the groups that were saying or that we're seeing. Have grown substantially in population over the last 10 years. Black voters, Latino voters, Asian Americans. These are all demographics that Democrats absolutely need to win in 2022, but the Republicans are certainly they have in their toolbox just a lot more at their disposal To really Make these make this still, um something that would be advantageous to them. Mhm. Margaret. We have

Georgia Texas U. Arizona Nevada Florida North Carolina Senate GOP Margaret
Schumer's Trillions by Tarzana Joe

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:27 min | 4 months ago

Schumer's Trillions by Tarzana Joe

"The senate's spending trillions but the house would like some more they want it to be five but they could compromise it for soon. They'll reach agreement but joe's signature won't end it or once. They've gone past it. It will be a job to spend it or if you stack them one by one dollars so finish forget it. It's a job that you would never ever finish. I've done the mathematics for my number challenged peers. Assuming they spend evenly across the next four years. Let's say it's just four trillion. Then they'll have to find a way to pay out two point seven billion each and every day in the dc universe who needs a superpower the drop one hundred million dollars each and every hour to act with such a dasan. I give them my respects but no one has the stamina to write out all those checks and like the seeds from cottonwoods. When summer windsor blowing no one has the auditors to track. Where it's all going margaret thatcher said it and i used to think it's funny the government could reach the end of other people's money budgets kept increasing and the government survived but the day that she envisioned. I think sadly has arrived so welcome to the green new deal inflation. That's unending all brought to you in the disguise of infrastructure spending. That's brewster's millions. I'm sorry schumer's trillions by tarzana. Joe

Senate JOE House Margaret Thatcher Government Brewster Schumer Tarzana
Planned Parenthood Is the Definition of White Supremacy

Mark Levin

01:27 min | 4 months ago

Planned Parenthood Is the Definition of White Supremacy

"You know, we hear a lot of people these days expressed concerns about something called White supremacist. Um Well, let me tell you something about that. As far as I'm concerned, Planned Parenthood is white supremacist. Um, if we want to read American society The vestiges of racism against people of color in this country, the best thing that can happen in this country. As for the United States Supreme Court to overturn Roe versus Wade, For states to outlaw abortion. And for Planned Parenthood to be put out of business. None other than Dr Martin Luther King's own niece, Dr Alveda King. Has stated the Planned Parenthood has achieved what the KKK the Klan never could have dreamed of the deliberate killing of millions of black babies. I mean, I don't know if you ever noticed, but Planned Parenthood offices tend to be in minority neighborhoods. Don't know if you are aware of this, but Margaret Singer who started Planned Parenthood 100 years ago. Was a racist. And recently just in the last few months. The current head of Planned Parenthood said. Look, we're done trying to Um Remember the exact words but done trying to deal with the racist past of our founder. Anyway. This needs to stop

Dr Martin Luther King Dr Alveda King ROE Wade Supreme Court Margaret Singer United States Planned Parenthood
"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

04:43 min | 4 months ago

"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"That's geared to what they're facing and the conditions and all that kind of good stuff That's yup that's exactly what we do work with Everybody we work with. We work with them on can an integrated pest management approach. Yes though kind of taken. All of the available tools together and see What made the most effective you know from grade. The mechanical control it moee to herbicides. You know putting all those tools together and coming up Yet least toxic and Just had least non-target impacts as well organisms. That people wanna have out there so for those people who haven't seen it. You and i and jane collaborate on a recent story on the subject of herbicides and especially horticultural vinegar for my new york times garden column. And i'm eager to share kind of what we talked about. And it's funny. Because when we first when i first approached two guys you know i had the one question and then it just turned into like we were kind of collaboratively exploring this subject because You know i. I we i i was like. Why is there this stuff on the shelf in my garden center. That's not labeled an herbicide. But it's among all the other herbicides and it's this vinegar in it's like twenty or thirty percent acetic acid and and then you guys said you saw that there in your store to and you know we got into this whole conversation about labels and wherever but before we get to that. I suspect you hear a lot about people's home remedies. Like i do as a garden writer and and and those are those are pesticides to if they use the mono- passed like a weed. Right there in urbicide right margaret. I think that's a great point If people you know they hear the word pesticide. And it's you know such a bad rap but really pesticides just any substance that were applying to pest. Were trying to control rate so to me. Something that someone's mixing up from there Cabinet made up of us household vinegar. Some salt and sibusiso is a pesticide..

jane margaret Cabinet sibusiso
"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

03:50 min | 4 months ago

"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"I'm doing great sephardi. How're you doing okay. You know in the weeks. Since i met you virtually met you and your colleague jane mangold. I find myself checking the montana weather to see how you're fairing because boy. You must be some intrepid gardner and have some very tough plants out there. You know margaret. I am trump gardner and by plants are really tough I do let a native plant or In my own you know personal gardening life and they're doing great even though it's been ninety degrees yes the summer so yes and you're a little your little short on rain too. I think out there. Oh indeed a. It's a really horrible drought in montana this year yet. Well i admire your your your courage. We're spoiled here. I guess still in You know it's havoc now and again but it's not like that so so in your professional life tell us just a little bit kind of what you do and again with your colleague. Jane mangold their montana state. And sort of also what we'd the word we'd means in your world. Great question margaret So my job in the sputter. Diagnostic lab is So the the scudder lab is a service offered through montana. State university extension And plant clinic. That helps people figure out Either what it organism is. They've question about or what's wrong with their plants. And i work with the whole team of people from no plan disease experts to inspect arthur products. Birds But my particular expertise and now lab is We'd science so i work with people and plant identification and also had a manage unwanted plants and that's people. Most of our clients are our local extension agents in the commisson reservations across montana and i also work directly with rowers and homeowners and has decide applicators and all kinds of people like at So yeah a lot of what they do is work with people about plants. They don't want and to me margaret. That's what we'd is right any any plant that somebody doesn't want for any reason could be considered a weed and you you work a lot You and jane work a lot with large landholders to i mean So ranchers and Other groups and groups over that may have large tracts of land and they may be dealing with very serious invasive plants where you can't hand weeded out right absolutely yes. Jane and i both work with clients like that. That's in montana. That's awada ranchers are working with. Bid lands eclipse You know a public land agencies Yeah people like at our working large landscapes and when they're working with Invasive species or noxious weeds in our regulated plants in montana that have impacts biodiversity and You know why sock forage had wildlife words and things like that Those plants are bit control. And also there on those large lance apes where han weeding is not gonna cut it right right so you you try to help them come up with the least toxic and most effective solution..

montana jane mangold gardner margaret Jane mangold scudder lab State university extension And arthur jane Jane
Baby Mama: A Trophy Wifes Headache

Joseyphina's World

02:00 min | 4 months ago

Baby Mama: A Trophy Wifes Headache

"Was feeling over the moon toward her upcoming nuptials. She was on the verge of giving up and calling it quits. When elvis proposed she was surprised at the out of the blue popping the question she was suspecting him of seeing another lady and she wasn't going to allow herself to be dumped so an elvis invited her to dinner at a restaurant. She knew the day of reckoning head. Come she prepared herself mentally and emotionally for the moment. She watched him warily as they ate. What was he waiting for for her to finish her dinner before he said so she would puke them out or would he say that she was chewing so it would choke her. No she would say it first. Margaret will you elvis. I know what. You're going to say. Mary me maggie eyes bulged. Was she dreaming. Are you asking me to. Elvis smiled and got down on one knee and ask the unbelievable yet overdue question again she said yes breathlessly. Still in shock over the turn of events so he chose her. Whoever he was seeing must not have had enough to keep her efforts. She feared she was going to lose him on the basis of her decision to abstain since he was sexually active when they met but it looked like the good girl won the battle over the bad boy but her tail wasn't going to have the usual happy ending about four days to the wedding. Margaret found out. Elvis had a baby on the way so he found himself someone to sort him out after their brief. Make out sessions no wonder. He didn't protest much about the abstinence. Pledge she had made years ago was she disappointed yes. She was heartbroken that although she was the one he had chosen to marry. A part of him would always be out there a part of him. That didn't include her. She wanted to call off the wedding but she couldn't. How could she when all the invitation cards had been sent and the event planner caterer and make up artist of all been pay. How was she going to explain to her family. Friends colleagues at work her facebook and instagram friends and followers that she was going to remain single a little while longer.

Elvis Margaret Maggie Mary Facebook
Mint Relatives With Ken Druse

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

01:46 min | 4 months ago

Mint Relatives With Ken Druse

"You all know kendrew regular visitor to the show and author of twenty garden books and longtime friend. When he's not managing the antics of two troublemaking but gorgeous canines. He manages his extensive garden in new jersey. Hi ken i changed. Your intro. gorgeous canines oak the their handsome. It's true managing left that part out. So i sh- since we're talking men's today which are often aromatic. Let's have a giveaway of your latest book. The central garden about sent and fragrance and so forth with the transcript of the show of runaway to garden dot com. Okay that's lovely okay. Good good So you know when you said it. As i said in the npr's like what. What are we gonna talk about. And then i really it was kind of. And then you and i both got to sort of digging around reading about mints the mid family and so for so tell us a little bit about the breadth of it. Well i could stand in one place. Just turn and look and see. There's oh there's bee bomb and there's a lemon balm and there's some you know there's so many family relatives and you can often recognize them. Not only because many are fragrant when you rub the leaves but also because many have square stems but there are over two hundred and thirty genera- and over seven thousand species of mint relatives plants in the lenny. Ac family

Kendrew KEN New Jersey NPR
"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

05:18 min | 5 months ago

"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"Temperatures are not getting for that so he warns the good amount of water. And and if you want to it as a house plant and allocation actually makes a pretty decent house plant it's a it has a thicker sturdier. Sam sturdier leaf Much more structure. So it it. It's it's for playing around with you play around with what's working your are you using that. You're you're letting that go dormant that you ever use it as a house plant. I try a and what happens is at a certain point in the winter it decides it wants to go to sleep and i think it's you know i mean there's multiple factors obviously with with overwintering something in an awakened state You know you're you're you're you're Temperature humidity and then you're watering how much you watering and so forth. And so. Apparently i displeased it on one or several of those factors at some point and some years it just decide to go to sleep and and and But i do try to grow it as a house plant. I think i don't have the ideal situation. I have cold sort of mud room. Bright light cold but they're cold. They're not happy place for that. And then i have places that are lower light am and and maybe a little warmer but dry you know you know what. I mean like typical house. I mean a lot of people have that situation. He and none of us have have perfect situation. Dewey for overwintering plants and I for the longest time. I was in a much smaller house. Much smaller garden than i am now And i had to put these in a lot of these in the corner of my dirt. Basement passed all of the mass and the crumbling walls and there's never an ideal space and i really didn't have a lot of indoor space to give to anything other than a plant. That was looking really good. I didn't have a lot of places to put the pity puppies. You know the the ones that the high maintenance partners pd peppy is not a chapter in the book but i love that but you call them the high maintenance partners. Those are the plans that that that they really challenge ush as to learn a little bit more about perhaps a specific genus or or Just something that we maybe have a sentimental attachment to but it's tough to get through the winter. And i look at those as i really do. Look at those a challenge. But i try not to take on too many of them at one time because we you you just don't wanna have window sills completely overflowing or at least you do it first and then you don't. That's interesting that you say that because you have been gardening. A long time and i started with house. Plants probably forty something years ago. And and and i've noticed in the last few years i've gotten tired of looking at the sort of sorry you know certain types of of house plants even just some of the fancy leaf begonias. Don't love it..

Sam sturdier Dewey
PharmaLedger the Pharmaceutical Blockchain ConsortiumThe Pharmaceutical Blockchain Consortium

Insureblocks

02:21 min | 5 months ago

PharmaLedger the Pharmaceutical Blockchain ConsortiumThe Pharmaceutical Blockchain Consortium

"Our listeners. Who haven't yet you or heard you on insure blocks. Could you please give democratic deduction on yourselves perhaps Donna i thanks. Thanks for having us back for another edition. This is great My name's stanford same the domain architect for supply chain at novartis Looking at technology Evaluation and selection also on emerging technologies. That's where it goes to the block chain. And and i have another role. Which is the industry project leader of the farmer. Ledger project which focused on blockchain adoption in the healthcare industry. Excellent marco. yeah hi. This is margaret cuomo. I'm working to same group as dan but the with a little bit different focus. I'm part of what we call the plight. Technology innovation this team trying to bring in new technology into the into novartis in this case. I am focused on blockchain's responsible blockchain in new artists. And my second or other role in familiarize is be co lead architect for the blocker in cloud. Thank you both in his great. Avi bosa back on the show. So as he recalled the first question we all ask. Our guest is to define what is blockchain. But here's i'm curious to know how your definition may or may not have changed since our first podcast back in august two thousand nineteen. Dan do you wanna have a go at it. Yeah actually a. I've i've refined my blockchain definition a little bit and and and what i usually know or how i introduced. Blockchain is with the five days and mark just loves this definition but the five as stand for asset. We're talking about not. Just cryptocurrencies is assets but also add data or or or medicine products. Which can be exchanged on you. Know district distributed ledger technology. So blockchain's good for asset. It's good for audit. This is the immutability aspect that we can't change anything after it's been written to the blockchain very relevant for for our industry Automation so use of smart contracts to eliminate non value adding steps

Novartis Ledger Project Blockchain Margaret Cuomo Avi Bosa Donna Stanford Marco DAN
The Fox Sisters: A Mysterious Haunting

Supernatural with Ashley Flowers

02:14 min | 5 months ago

The Fox Sisters: A Mysterious Haunting

"Today story begins in december of eighteen. Forty seven when the fox family moves to the rural community of hides new york the plan to build their own home in the new town but the winter is pretty brutal so the construction comes to a stop in the meantime. John and margaret fox rent a modest house near the town centre and move in with their two young daughters. Fourteen year old maggie and eleven year old kate. This rental house is small like the four of them have to share a single bedroom. The parents asleep in one bed in maggie in kate and another and while it's kind of tight the fox's are relatively happy. John is a reformed alcoholic with a new outlook on life. Margaret is a super sweet mother who lives for her children as for maggie and kate. They're pretty much glued at the hip so they're never bored. Most nights in the new house are pretty unremarkable. After doing some chores and blowing out the candle they slip into their beds and fall asleep to the peaceful sounds of the river nearby. Of course there are other sounds too you know. The standard creepy sounds that come with living in a tiny shack in the middle of the woods. The wind howling the creaking of old trees. The pitter-patter of creatures scuttling through the night but on a cold march night. The fox's wake up to something different something other worldly. There's a sudden wrapping on the walls thumping on the ceilings and vibrations all around them naturally. Everyone's a little alarmed so they re light the candle and investigate this sound has to have a source an open window rattling an animal trapped inside a woodpecker on the roof. It could be any number of things but after checking every corner of the room and popping their heads outside. They don't find anything out of the ordinary. Which is a little weird sure. But it's the middle of the night in everyone's tired. So john margaret maggie and kate all go back to bed hoping that the sounds will just go away on their own. But that's wishful thinking.

Maggie Margaret Fox FOX Kate John Margaret New York John Margaret Maggie
"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

02:26 min | 5 months ago

"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"Patrick mcmillan came to herons would last fall from clemson university in south carolina where he ran the south carolina botanical garden and was a professor in the college of agriculture forestry in life sciences he also hosted a pbs series called expeditions with patrick mcmillan and led the development of the botanical gardens natural heritage garden. Which will hear more about so. Hi patrick. I'm so glad to make contact and get to know you a little bit. I margaret. it's it's wonderful to speak with you in wonderful be your. Yeah so i feel like it must have been a bit of like dorothy. Were not in kansas anymore. When you found yourself in the pacific northwest compared to south carolina. it really was. It really still is I've been a little shocked. How quickly of this area has started to just feel like home One of the. I mean herons would as one of the world's great gardens of with some of the best garden people in the world and into the area itself also to me just has this wonderful kind of maternal nece to it Seems to just envelope you and and convince you pretty quick that this is one of the best places on planet earth. Yeah so. I mean it's a distinctively different natural community or habitat from where you were and so besides being shift in zone and so forth. It's a distinguished place in many ways no thousands of different types of plants and so forth but also being i think one of the largest public gardens in the us that's wholly owned by native american tribes does. Did that influence your decision to come there and tell me a little bit about that absolutely You know when i when i was sort of looking around to to sort of slowdown and change and i know you know what that's like to to want to Get away for maybe six job. Titles down to one. When i was looking around of hans would was very first place that came up and It it's the kind of place where When when my wife looked on the ap job board and said oh. There's only one director ship right now. Open in the united states. I said where is it. And she said herons would the kind of came to a screeching halt were driving between her house and south carolina and our home up in the mountains of north carolina and i had about three hours to put an application.

Patrick mcmillan south carolina botanical garde college of agriculture forestr patrick mcmillan botanical gardens natural heri south carolina clemson university pacific northwest dorothy margaret patrick kansas united states hans ap north carolina
Natural Communities With Patrick McMillan

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

01:55 min | 5 months ago

Natural Communities With Patrick McMillan

"Patrick mcmillan came to herons would last fall from clemson university in south carolina where he ran the south carolina botanical garden and was a professor in the college of agriculture forestry in life sciences he also hosted a pbs series called expeditions with patrick mcmillan and led the development of the botanical gardens natural heritage garden. Which will hear more about so. Hi patrick. I'm so glad to make contact and get to know you a little bit. I margaret. it's it's wonderful to speak with you in wonderful be your. Yeah so i feel like it must have been a bit of like dorothy. Were not in kansas anymore. When you found yourself in the pacific northwest compared to south carolina. it really was. It really still is I've been a little shocked. How quickly of this area has started to just feel like home One of the. I mean herons would as one of the world's great gardens of with some of the best garden people in the world and into the area itself also to me just has this wonderful kind of maternal nece to it Seems to just envelope you and and convince you pretty quick that this is one of the best places on planet earth. Yeah so. I mean it's a distinctively different natural community or habitat from where you were and so besides being shift in zone and so forth. It's a distinguished place in many ways no thousands of different types of plants and so forth but also being i think one of the largest public gardens in the us that's wholly owned by native american tribes does. Did that influence your decision to come there and tell me a little bit about that absolutely You know when i when i was sort of looking around to to sort of slowdown and change and i know you know what that's like to to want to Get away for maybe six job. Titles down to one.

Patrick Mcmillan South Carolina Botanical Garde College Of Agriculture Forestr Botanical Gardens Natural Heri South Carolina Clemson University Pacific Northwest Dorothy Margaret Patrick Kansas United States
Scotland's Long Road to Independence

Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

02:10 min | 6 months ago

Scotland's Long Road to Independence

"My name's george. Miller and my guest this month is rory scoth on an edinburgh based writer who has an article this month. Addition of the paper entitled is scotland closer to independence. Rory is also co author of the book. Rock wins a treacherous guide to the state of scotland published. Twenty sixteen. And when. I spoke to him recently. I was kid to get his update. On the current state of scotland. The two thousand sixteen brexit referendum in which scotland voted strongly to remain in the eu. And boris johnson's twenty nine thousand nine hundred. Uk general election confirmed growing divide between how scotland and england see their respective futures. The scottish national party secured a fourth successive electoral victory in last month's scottish parliamentary elections but the path to independence is still far from straightforward. So where does the snp go from here in pursuit of that objective. We'll come onto that. But rory's piece begins with a comment margaret thatcher made in the nineteen eighties whereas she offered a vision of modernisation. She asserted her. Opponents wanted to turn the uk inter museum society. Rory rights thatcher underestimated the appeal of museum society labor overestimated last him. To tell me more was one of the key things to understand about. Thatcherism is that this was not a return to the nineteenth century. This walson the state stripping away all the gains of one thousand nine hundred eighty five. There was an element of -absolutely. But really it was something new the power of neoliberalism as i think a lot of people and left know very well. The power of neoliberalism was at a offered. Something new offered a form of progress that a lot of people on the left had thought until then the right could not offer. It offered a vision of the future. That kind of took the left by surprise. I think

Scotland Rory Scoth Rory Boris Johnson Scottish National Party Edinburgh Miller George UK EU Margaret Thatcher England Thatcher
"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

". You know that I used to love for its variegated sort of silvery and green leaves. . kind of almost looks like an IV ish Gr-. . vining but low prostrate thing <hes> lamb the astrum galley. . Dolan Yellow Archangel which you know thirty or more years ago when I planted it, it , was like a coveted thing. . And now it's on the invasive list in the North West and it's invading into woodland's as the climate warms. . In. . The Northeast and you're starting to see it on the invasive list in in new areas and so forth and I, , have suddenly forty miles of it in my garden because it no longer stays. . You know within a reasonable range. . So I mean maybe we should I say what's the ground cover and what do we want to use anyway, , right Okay The me okay. . I. . Think a ground cover is a plant that increases in numbers over time but does not run away or spread too fast <hes> it's usually we'd suppressing that's what we hope and we have a couple of those. . And you think of ground cover is something you can walk on, , but there's not a whole lot of plants that will tolerate. . Being walked on besides grass lawn but a ground cover is anything that could do what I suggested I. . You know spread a bit and suppress weeds and it could be seven feet tall. . It can be a big SHRUB and I've seen that. . But. . I. . Guess. . What do you think is that just about it? ? Yeah, and , and like what you said you know we think when we hear if you hear the phrase ground cover, , you would think, , oh, , turf can walk on it but there really ain't no such things I mean there are so few things that can tolerate that I mean maybe creeping timing lawn, , you could technically walk on but you know really almost none of them so <hes>. . So yeah. . So it can be any hide I completely agree it's it's it's maybe a living mulch is. . Is the. . <hes> cloudy a west of <hes> landscape designer of fido studios. . She says, , plants are the MULCH. . You know that's one of her key phrases that we need to remember and I think in a way. . Like I have a lot of masses of ground cover. . Like Geranium Macrocosm, , the big route Geranium. . Yeah and doesn't seed around doesn't it is rise Amadeus, , but the rise zones don't spread sideways underground. . It's of like it sounds big route on the surface. . So, , I find that he's unit, , you can just edit it. . You can pull out a bunch and throw it away and so forth <hes> but it gives you weed suppression that you were talking about right it's it's it's a living mulch <hes>. . It shades the ground under the trees and shrubs. . Moishe helps keeps moisture and etcetera etcetera, , but it's not so rambunctious that it's troublemaker <hes>. . It won't jump out of where it was where you intended to be. . Does that make sense? ? Yes. . There was one plant here. . Twenty six years ago that some. . People before I bought this place planted and I'm still. . I'm still a ratting in this year. . It was it was a ground cover this year. . I think it almost eight the house. . And the it's. . Tonia. . Oh Yeah Tuna however that Chameleon plant that's a nightmare. . That's actually one of the most popular stories on my website ever is one of us visited from Google searches is about can I get? ? How can I get rid of? ? You know how can I kill this plant still full fill fold on Mare plant? ? Yeah. We've . mentioned it before it is nightmare plant but <hes>, , but the draining macaroni him by comparison, , it only exists in the places I, , put it in though I started with a few plants I now have large expanses of it. . It means that I don't have to weed. . Those beds as often nearly evergreen even here in zone five B and you know it just does a really good <hes>. . We'd suppressing kind of a job. . But then there's like the Lambda Strom. . which wants to take over the earth and. . So. . Forth. . So then you're you participated in its takeover. . Bid And so. . There's lots of things and we should say, , of course, , the disclaimer as ever. . What is invasive in one place or becoming invasive is again, the , temperature shift the the weather the climate shifts <hes> is. . Is Not, , the same as in another place something may self. . So in Georgia that doesn't self so in Michigan and In the neighborhood yeah. . Depending on soil types and exactly. . There's so many things that you can grow like your angelic. . I cannot grow that right for you that. . COMES UP YEAH so. . So I mean, , the classic things that

Margaret I Dolan North West
"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"I called you the other day and I'm like Oh, , it's a mess everything. . So overgrown and I'm telling you about my call is that's taken the. . Anna's hip in the Salvia swamped by the whatever and you're laughing at me and so. . What's the time for can? ? Besides facelifts. . But just just because you aren't having guests visit doesn't mean you let the whole thing go to pot. . Or you're thoughts go to pot. . He's GonNa Discipline Me I publicly out loud on the radio. . You said, you're , pinching things so they get kind of thicker but. . You May. . It may be time to cut stuff back I. . Guess I'm I'm using <hes> a modest sounding verb but yeah, , you're right some cutbacks will you I have these big balls you've been here and you know people who visited if seen them through like big low terra cotta bowls on the patio and other places they're kind of you know and I group smaller pots around them but they're they're sort of the big statement centerpiece things for my annuals usually and and you know. . Not. . Everything grows at the same rate and put it all in when it's small, , you know little things from the garden center but then something's grow more lushly than others and so like the Coleus, , for instance. . 'cause you know. . Yeah. . When you're cutting those Coleus bag you you mentioned that you could route them in water. . You can also in some situations, , just stick them back in the same container if you've got space and then that'll get even more lush and full without hanging over and losing its Bottomley's and stuff. . Because, , when you when you pinch or break off that parent plant branch and you'll get more leaves on that one, , and then you have these pieces that you can either sticking or route in water or I like to use per light. . Okay. . So containers with like a pot of per light. . SMALLPO- of per light and. . Moist in the per light Tampa down really hard that really seems to help, , and then I drill a hole in the per like with a pencil and sticking my cutting and firm the per light back around the cut and again, , and you want to remove a couple of bottom leaves of the cutting the cuttings about. . Four to six nodes long. . So it's depending on the type of plant. . Three to five inches long and some some plant. . Coleus. . Might route and two to four weeks. . Then you have a new plant with roots and you carefully pry it out of the per light or in the case of water, , you want to move it when the roots are less than an inch and a half long <hes> and sometimes roots made him water have a little trouble adjusting to a lower oxygen or higher oxygen medium. . But anyway, , you can stick them back in the same container that you took them from or just what you need Margaret. . Another container of Coleus definitely need that. . That's absolutely what I need. . 'cause I'm doing such a good job managing the ones that I have this year. . But seriously it has been kind of an epicure in the sense of <hes>. . We all are realities are changed <hes>. . Completely you know our patterns of life are changed. . I mean, , I'm stating the obvious and and on top of that in our region and many other regions, , there's been severe weather so we have had. . I've had almost no rain until a hurricane in fact, , I should ask you how did you do during the hurricane that was just a couple of days ago I had a couple of inches of rain. . Outages Day or two but not. . Terrible terrible like many areas nearby had much. . No, , you were praying for rain. . Also, , a lot of areas they're still places New Jersey that don't have electricity. . We lost power for almost twenty four hours. . But we had five and a half inches of rain, , and then that's stopped and then the wind came in the wind was really a lot of wind but. . Knock would not trees and I've got tree did trees here. . So I thought Oh that's GonNa be something there was there was one stick about four and a half feet long from the ash tree that was stuck into the lawn straight up. . It's always funny when that happens in a big storm when it's also like spear gets thrown and it yeah, , it really lands like right as if someone. . INSERTED. . It with with force while someone did. . Yeah. . Now, , I had a couple of inches of rain and ninety. . I keep saying to myself is this whole year? ? The theme weatherwise has been it never rains, , but it pours it won't rain for a month practically and then we get the torrential gully washers. . It's almost no rain. . Yeah. . Half. . An hour of tons of you know you think finally and then it turns out it's dry under the trees sometimes. . And you got to listen to half an inch but I was thinking about what we were talking about just before if you make a new plant and you potter it up of Coleus or a sweet potato vine or Begonia. . You can carry. . You can try to carry that over in a very sunny window inside and by March that's probably not going to be a very pretty plant, , but you can cut that back and it'll make new growth and then make cuttings of the new growth and you can save a lot of money because you can use that to fill your those cuttings to fill your containers.

Bottomley Anna Margaret Tampa
"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

04:22 min | 3 years ago

"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"Well, you're welcome. Glad talk with you. Yeah. Over the years on the show you and I have talked about Tim matoco hygiene, as you taught me to think of it and spinach growing and curb it and all kinds of things things that have proven to be really popular how To's that people are using again, and again each year and searching people finding them by search on the web. So I'm excited to get your advice on this most important topic of filling the salad bowl. So. Yeah. So things have really I feel like I've been gardening. I don't know a hundred years or so thirty something I don't know. How long have I'm guarding thirty five years something like that? And I feel like things have changed. You know, I used to get a couple of varieties of lettuce black seated Simpson and one of the Oakley couple things, and I saw a block every week or. To you know, I used to do blocks in the in the days and do cut and come again. But now, it's like, wow, there's so many strategies, and so many possibilities and to really do a better job so much choice. And I wonder if he's kind of like characterize what's gone on. Because you've been there at the pulse of it. Yeah. Well, I think a lot of it has to do with them versatility of this crop. That is everybody when you think about it in the kitchen as concerned everybody knows what to do with lettuce. Don't do much with mix it into a fall. You put some dressing on it, and maybe some cucumbers, cherry, tomatoes, or whatever on it. It's totally unintimidated. Yeah. And it's something that people eat as regular part of a meal as opposed to say something like a fancied type of winter squash. Or something. Like that valid is is you big goodness and versatile. And so that the everybody was involved in the marketing of produce has known and has stretched the use of salad, and what counts as salad into a lot of different ways. And then that's translated onto the farm. And and growers. I think the big advantage for both of gardeners and farmers in growing lettuce and other types of greens is that they are really quick on. All you need to do is to make a leaf you don't need to make stock flower fruit. None of that stuff. So right. It's really really versatile in that way too. And of course, there are really interesting trends and things folk about versity out there really different than it was even ten years ago in certainly twenty or thirty and yeah, I mean, I used to you know, if I were writing a story about lettuce as a. Raider in the newspaper years ago, or whatever magazine, you know, I would say, okay, there's four basic types of lettuce. There's you know, the loose leaf, and there's the crisp peds, and there's the butter heads, and there's the costs or romaine. However, you say CO s and you know, and I go no now, we have like the Celtics or whatever the stem lettuce. But anyway, you know, now, it's like the category say in a catalog like high mowing, you know, there's a lot of different categories that didn't even exist having to do with the utility. And what you get. So like, everyone loves baby sized leaves and the old style way of Margaret's old style way of growing that again was that sort of cut and come again, you know, so it broadcasted in thickest way and cut though baby leaves a few times. And so again, so another block. But now, it's different. So what about that that sort of baby leaf passion that people have? Sure. Well, I mean, this is something that I don't honestly know where started. And how much of this is is coming from any European influence not, but I certainly know some early growers who twenty plus years ago on the west coast started, you know, selling very, very thickly and basically mowing their crop. Little single leaves. And not quote unquote, wasting time growing full plan. Just you know, using this this crop as as Bruce baby leaf, and maybe they'd get a second or third cut..

Simpson Tim Celtics Bruce Margaret thirty five years hundred years ten years