35 Burst results for "Margaret"

John Zmirak and Eric Discuss E. Michael Jones' Antisemitism

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:06 min | 12 hrs ago

John Zmirak and Eric Discuss E. Michael Jones' Antisemitism

"Years ago, I read some of E Michael Jones's books. And again, this is what Nick Fuentes is kind of following, right? I read some of his books and he wrote one called degenerate moderns. It was brilliant. He wrote another one about architecture and another one, I forget. But brilliant stuff, right? And so I visited him in his home and I didn't see the anti semitic side of him until right around that time, a friend of mine, doctor Jeffrey sat in over, wrote a brilliant book, he is a genius psychiatrist, he has a degree in quantum physics. One of the smartest people I know, not a Christian, but he wrote an amazing book from the point of view of a psychiatrist who had dealt with people struggling with same sex attraction. And it really an amazing, amazing book, sat in over his last name. And so I interviewed him and reviewed it ostensibly for E Michael Jones magazine. He hardly printed anything of what I wrote. He cut almost everything. And then he wrote a review that was effectively anti semitic. And I will never, ever, ever forget it. I read it and I thought, this, this can be, this is the whole, the whole review of this great book, which was homosexuality and the politics of truth by Jeff sat in over hinged on really an anti semitic idea. And that's when I realized 27 years ago, uh oh, I don't know that I can spend any more time. You're telling me Nick Fuentes who just had dinner with the president is following you, Michael. Right. That's right. And I'll just explain briefly to your readers. Michael Jones is a theological Jew hater. He doesn't hate them racially. He doesn't believe in Nazi crackpot racialism. He believes that any one of the Jewish people who does not accept Jesus is the moral equivalent of the sadducees and that he takes literally the statement, let their blood be upon us and upon our children. He channels the old old anti semitism of some of the church fathers and some people in the Middle Ages. He takes all that, not as a historical tragedy and abuse, but as an authoritative part of the Christian tradition. And he describes the Jews who did not follow Jesus as the synagogue of Satan and the mystical body of Antichrist. That has existed ever since the death of our lord. And as a sort of satanic counter church. And so he blames Jews for pornography, even though the Marquis de Sade was not Jewish. He blames them for abortion. Margaret Sanger was not Jewish. He manages to act as if the Jewish people by not accepting Jesus became Antichrist. And

Nick Fuentes Michael Jones Jeffrey Jeff Michael Marquis De Sade Margaret Sanger
A Recipe for a Hollywood Fight

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:19 min | 4 d ago

A Recipe for a Hollywood Fight

"Michael viner was the owner of dove publishing. He had a number of decent books that came out in the 90s, the most famous one was you'll never make love in this town again. And when I was dating Jermaine Jackson's ex-wife, Margaret Maldonado. She was working for him at the time, but for Michael viner. And one day she sneaked me in early copy of this salacious book, and no one had seen it yet, Margaret got the proofs and begged me not to show or tell anyone about it. I said, no, no, I won't. I'm not going to write about it. I just want to read it myself, okay? So I go back to the hotel or wherever I was and start reading this book and the proofs and maybe two years ago, I read a couple of the more filthy chapters on this show. The book contains a bunch of stories written by three prostitutes and one actress about this sexual encounters with a bunch of different Hollywood celebrities. There was a Robin and Liza grier, Linda Hammond, and Alexandra daddy. And inside are all these lurid tales of what these girls discovered while having sex with the likes of Nicholson Warren Beatty, Don Henley, Bruce Willis, Robert Evans, John Claude Van Damme, Mickey Rourke, on and on. And a very, very detailed stories. Whether they're all true or not, I don't know. It's just the horrors point of view. So my jaw was on the floor when I started reading this. A couple of days later, I'm at Evans house for one of his great get togethers. Robert Shapiro, Geraldo Rivera, Jacqueline bessette, Beverly Johnson, Neil sedaka, a lot of luminaries in addition to the dynamic to all of Jack Nicholson and Warren Beatty, who are always at Evans house back in the 90s, and now I have all this information inside me bursting out and I don't know that Jack Warren and bob know about this. And then my eyes couldn't believe what I was seeing. The publisher Michael Weiner walks into the party. And he lived a few doors down from heaven, so it kind of made sense, but I know all this information from the book he published and I grabbed Margaret and I go, what the fuck is he doing here? She's like, what's the big deal? I go, he's publishing a book about what a few hookers have to say about a few of the men at this party. But balls on this guy,

Michael Viner Margaret Maldonado Evans House Jermaine Jackson Liza Grier Linda Hammond Alexandra Daddy Nicholson Warren Beatty John Claude Van Damme Margaret Jacqueline Bessette Robert Evans Don Henley Mickey Rourke Bruce Willis Robert Shapiro Robin Beverly Johnson Geraldo Rivera Jack Warren
Bill Federer Digs Into the History and Biblical Roots of Thanksgiving

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:48 min | 5 d ago

Bill Federer Digs Into the History and Biblical Roots of Thanksgiving

"Continuing what you were saying and tell us about squanto. Yeah, so the pilgrims switched from company to covenant. The company bylaws that says, okay, here's this system. We're going to take it away from you, and we're going to distribute it to, look, you get your own plot of land. You become prosperous and then you follow on carefully take care of your neighbor because you're doing it as unto God. And so you have the pilgrim pastor was John Robinson. He says, we are knit together as a body in covenant of the lord. We so hold ourselves tied to all to care for each other's good. Margaret Thatcher, she writes, your founding fathers look after one another, not only as a matter of necessity, but as a matter of duty to their God. And then the founder of the puritan Massachusetts John winthrop gives his famous speech in 1630. This love among Christians is a real thing, not imaginary. As absolutely necessary to the being of the body of Christ, we are accompanied professing ourselves fellow members of Christ. We ought to account ourselves nit together by this bond of love. We must make one another's condition our own. Rejoice together, mourn together labor and suffer together. We shall find that the God of Israel is among us. You know, people say, well, wasn't the early church socialists. You know, the early church was the early church, socialism is counterfeit early church, and the differences between the word voluntary and involuntary. Right? So you're blessed with goods, and then you voluntarily take care of your neighbor because you're doing is unto God. Socialism, there is no God. You get the good from the state and you don't own anything. So if you don't own anything, how could you be charitable? How can you give away what you don't have? No, God, and trust you with stuff and it gives you opportunities to give them away.

John Robinson John Winthrop Margaret Thatcher Massachusetts Israel
"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

05:14 min | Last week

"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"Many fragrances the plant world can offer, which is our topic today, hi Ken, I'm ready for some nice fragrances. I'm glad Margaret because I know that you have a what is it lower bad sent I do. I have a very perceptive little nose. And so since if I like them, it's fine, but boy. Yeah, but it's funny because, you know, you can come inside and, you know, it's dry and it's hot, you know, it's the heating season suddenly, we didn't have that until this past week where I am, and because it was unseasonably warm, but now it's kind of like, well, except when you're cooking, there's no real fragrance. Do you know what I mean? You're cooking. Here there is because I've got a couple of bowls filled with some unusual fruits. And they smell. Yeah, well, because you're so clever, you always remember to have those sort of almost like potpourri, right? The old days of potpourri. Oh, well. So these are really natural. Yeah, yeah. Yeah. We grow a tree called pseudocydonia, which is Chinese quince. And it has beautiful bark. It's sort of patchy like camouflage. And very late, it still has fall color. It still has almost all its leaves. And it has kind of not that pretty fruit, but the fragrance in the bowl, just you can smell it for about 30 feet away and thankfully it's very nice. But it's very complex. It's like hair with Apple and guava and citrus and violet all mixed up and it hits you like cilantro. You can almost feel it as you smell it. It's not one of my favorite fragrances. Yes. And we could talk about why that is because it's a whole big genetic thing. Yeah. But I just mean that in the way that cilantro, you can almost feel it. So this is a fragrance you can almost feel. And something else that we've been talking about that's so beautiful. I always get them for Ebola on the table in the fall, and then when they start to kind of go, and they last a long time, I moved them to where I got them so that they will be where they might grow, even though they're from the Midwest, and they grow here. Because the osage orange. Oh. It's also called head chapel. It was very popular as defense post material because the wood lasts a very long time. It's very hard wood and they used to make furniture out of it outdoor furniture even. But the fragrance of these bunny gnarly, they're almost like brains and they're gorgeous chartreuse color. Yeah, chartreuse brings the size of softballs. Almost a pound a piece. And they smell kind

Margaret Ebola Apple Midwest
The Pursuit of Conservitism

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:43 min | 3 weeks ago

The Pursuit of Conservitism

"One of the most, I think one of the most brilliant points that I've heard I read it actually so I should say that I've read in the past year, I think I've mentioned this before. It's from John O'sullivan, who is a British speech writer for Margaret Thatcher. He had this excellent point, it's true of public schools. It's true of higher Ed schools. It's even true of something of the LA times, which a hundred years ago was one of the most conservative right-wing papers in the country and now it is just saying to say his left wing is an egregious understatement. But John who's Sullivan had this brilliant brilliant theory that any individual group or society institution, really anything that is not actively practicing conservatism, like every single day, vigorously pursuing a conservative way of a life. Will naturally drift to the left, because that's just, in most societies, the natural drift of things is leftward. Certainly in this society because our media and our schools and everything. All the influences around us are left. Wouldn't you love I wonder if you ever fantasize this. That you got an hour to speak to all of the students at Harvard. Well, that's how we started the conversation about the bullhorn. I just wanted to trust me. I would love that. I would get booed off the stage. You know, you know what? You might want to write. You should write if I could go back to school. Well, that was my senior speech. That's true. My senior speech that I gave was, which is on YouTube for those who haven't seen it. Yes, he did.

John O'sullivan Margaret Thatcher La Times Sullivan John Harvard Youtube
"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

05:41 min | 3 weeks ago

"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"Ginger is a little bit complicated, while Ginger has a long history of use as an edible plant, but it also is part of a plant family that has some potentially toxic elements. To it. And it's one of these plants sort of like sassafras that people go back and forth on because there's sometimes saying one thing and then there's just a lot of things that we don't know. So where I've landed on wild Ginger, but I think that everybody should do their own research is that the potentially toxic elements or in this case potentially carcinogenic elements do not seem to be water soluble plant chemicals. So I will use while Ginger and a tea and it has the most amazing aroma. I mean, even if you go out and you have large Ginger in your garden and you just go and kind of scratch and break a root a little bit while the rhizome, really. It's so spicy. It's so good. It's one of my favorite wild aromas out there. But right now, I'm not chopping it into my stir fry. No, no, no, no, no, no, no. So I get well. Right. Right, right. So sometimes, you know, one of the things that people think about when I think about wild edible just toxicity there is this plant going to kill me or whatever. And I really like that because I think that makes you a really good bottom. Because if you're looking at something, you're like, this could be a really bad decision. I better check my ID again. That's what gets people really looking at the leaves and smelling the foliage and touching the little fine hairs on the top and so on. But the other thing is oftentimes toxicity as a matter of preparation or use. So if I hand you a raw potato Margaret, I'm like, you know, millions of people, billions of people all over the world eat these, and you chomp into it, you're going to look at me with pure hate in your eyes. Yes. Because yes, yes. Raw potato is not French fries, but we know how to make French fries in your so good. And that's so often the case with these wild edibles too is that they have a cultural tradition of preparation around them that makes them not only safe to eat, but also delicious. And we have to, you know, in some cases innovate or relearn those things about all these species. And that's also part of the excitement. Right. So two of the things I think about when you're talking about that are two that are edible quote, unquote, but not at the wrong time and not in the wrong condition or whatever.

Ginger Margaret
The Lesson Joe Biden Should Learn From Liz Truss

The Trish Regan Show

01:11 min | Last month

The Lesson Joe Biden Should Learn From Liz Truss

"Liked the sort of Margaret Thatcher enthusiasm of Liz truss, but let's be realistic what she wanted to do was completely out of line with what the Federal Reserve or their equivalent of the Federal Reserve that would be the Bank of England was trying to do. And as such, she didn't have the ability or the political capital to go forward with those massive tax cuts at a time when they were doing everything they could to reign in inflation and therefore drag all the money out of the system rather than put more in. It's a good thing for Joe Biden to notice. Only in that, what he's trying to do right now, and by the way, it's getting held up for legal reasons with the student loan program, is very similar to what she was trying to do with tax cuts. In other words, it's free money giveaways. All while, our Federal Reserve is doing everything it can. Well, not everything. I think it could. And should be doing a whole lot more. But doing what it can to restrict that money supply. And rain and inflation. And so you have the left hand and the right hand, basically not talking to each other at all. And working against each other, that's what was happening in the UK. It's people. And in fact, that's exactly what's happening here.

Liz Truss Federal Reserve Margaret Thatcher Bank Of England Joe Biden UK
James Carafano and Sebastian Discuss the Wisdom of Margaret Thatcher

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:33 min | Last month

James Carafano and Sebastian Discuss the Wisdom of Margaret Thatcher

"We were the first country. To attempt and to succeed in rolling back the frontiers of socialism, which is the first cousin to come in. No one else tried it. We were the first to do it. I remember some politicians saying, well, what's your very careful misses Thatcher? To see if you're succeed, we did. I just played that because my guests looked at that clip. We had in the show them and just said, can we have some more of that DNA? The iron lady. The woman who took the UK from literal piles of trash, you know, winter of discontent with the refuge piled up with the coal miners on strike. The defeating, the Argentinian junta in the Falklands, and along with Ronald Reagan and bless his St. John, Paul the second defeating the communist threat in Eastern Europe. And I think it's appetite to play it because I do believe, is there not a Thatcher center at the heritage foundation. No, it's not 8th acid center. It's the only Thatcher center that she would allow. To be named after her so it's the Margaret Thatcher center for freedom. That's the only one in the world. And she actually provided the initial endowment. But being a conservative, she said, I will give you X amount if you raise ten X

Thatcher Center Thatcher Falklands Ronald Reagan St. John Eastern Europe UK Margaret Thatcher Center For F Heritage Foundation Paul
Sebastian and Mike Graham Discuss Liz Truss' Resignation

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:04 min | Last month

Sebastian and Mike Graham Discuss Liz Truss' Resignation

"Given the situation, I can not deliver the mandate on which I was elected by the Conservative Party. I have therefore spoken to his majesty the king to notify him that I am resigning as leader of the Conservative Party. No U turns this lady's not for turning, I remember that catch phrase from Margaret Thatcher when I lived in the UK well, this one didn't just do U turn. She got off the highway, a record 44 days in office, shortest serving prime minister ever, gone, goodbye, Liz truss. What does it all mean? How did it happen? We stay on top of international news as much as anything else. I'm your host Sebastian gorka, and you're listening to America first on the Salem news channel. Who do we rely upon? Our good friend across the Atlantic, the man who speaks truth and common sense on the fastest growing channel there. It is talk TV. It's our good friend. Mike Graham, welcome back to America first. Sebastian, thank you very much. Indeed, well, it's been quite a day. It's been quite a week. It's been quite a 44 days. You might say, as you said, the shortest period ever, some think this has been a remainder plot. There are those in this country who still can't take the fact that Brexit was a success and that we left the European Union. You know, we now have Jeremy hunt, who's had Chancellor, who voted to remain in the EU. Let's trust was a remainer who changed into a brexiter and is now out. Boris Johnson, however, is the big name on everybody's lips tonight because but hang on, hang on, hang on, didn't you just get rid of him, Mike? Yeah. We might be getting him back. It could be the greatest political comeback of all time. You know how he's very much like Donald Trump. They're trying to get him every single step of the way. They are terrified of Boris Johnson coming back because he is the one man who can unite the Tory party who can win an election against the Labor Party and who could actually restore everything for them. Nobody's quite sure if he's going to run, but he's already in the lead in the polls and he's already in the league in the House of Commons as far as MPs is supported.

Conservative Party Liz Truss Sebastian Gorka Mike Graham Margaret Thatcher Brexit America European Union Boris Johnson Jeremy Hunt Sebastian Atlantic UK Tory Party Donald Trump Mike Labor Party House Of Commons
Daily Signal: Conservatives Accuse DOJ of Targeting Pro-Life Activists

Mark Levin

01:45 min | Last month

Daily Signal: Conservatives Accuse DOJ of Targeting Pro-Life Activists

"The daily signal Mary Margaret holahan that's heritage foundation amid accusations that it's targeting pro lifers to silence and intimidate The Justice Department has charged 11 more pro life activists but violations of the freedom of access to clinic entrances act are the face act for blocking the interests of an abortion clinic in 2021 All right you can see that this is a concerted effort of the federal bureau of instigation and the department of injustice That means they're literally having meetings every morning on who to take down and who to take out They must have a white board or something Where they decide okay today is Trump day All right tomorrow is pro lifers day All right the next day January 6th day What about the communist spies that hey we don't have time for that Besides the big guy mister 10% he's in their back pocket What do you want us to do The 11 activists who were charged with face act violation stomach from their 2021 quote unquote blockade when abortion clinic and mount Juliet Tennessee this blockade was peaceful pro life activist AJ Hurley told the daily signal last night Several of the activists were arrested on the day of the blockade after reportedly successfully preventing abortions from taking place at the clinic for most of the day but police reportedly released the activists later in the day after they posted bail for misdemeanor charges The pro life news outlet live action reporter while now They're facing the feds And federal felony charges Oh yeah

Mary Margaret Holahan Federal Bureau Of Instigation Justice Department Aj Hurley Mount Juliet Tennessee
John Amanchukwu Has a Powerful and Cleverly-Titled New Book: 'Eraced'

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:54 min | Last month

John Amanchukwu Has a Powerful and Cleverly-Titled New Book: 'Eraced'

"I'm talking to my new friend, John Manchukuo, and the book is erased. Very clever title to spell it that way. So, John, what you're basically saying is that the forces of atheist Marxism that have infiltrated the Democratic Party, the forces of critical race theory, ultimately are themselves racist and ultimately are seeking to erase black Americans, principally through abortion and they have been successful largely in this over the decades and it's time for people to wake up. That's perfect. That's correct. That's exactly what I'm saying. And through this erased book, I deal with several chapters displaying the heinous crimes and the evil venom of Planned Parenthood and Margaret Sanger and evil woman who said that she wanted to exterminate the black population. And Planned Parenthood recently removed her name from her prestigious clinic in New York during the summer of 2020, but at the end of the day, they're still propagating her mission. She was clear. She wanted to eliminate every black person off the face of the planet because she felt that blacks were not willing to live and or exist. She wanted to eliminate and kill everyone who was deformed and even Jews. She was an evil woman, but today many black support a political party that seeks to propagate the ideologies of Margaret Sanger. Margaret Sanger also said that she wanted to use the black preacher to deal with rebellious negroes if they refused to support the abortion industry.

John Manchukuo Margaret Sanger Democratic Party John New York
Planned Parenthood Barely Disavowed Margaret Sanger in 2020

Mark Levin

01:24 min | 2 months ago

Planned Parenthood Barely Disavowed Margaret Sanger in 2020

"2020 Planned Parenthood finally disavowed Margaret Sanger over eugenics New York Times put it this way Planned Parenthood in New York disavows Margaret Sanger over eugenics This Sanger a feminist icon and reproductive rights pioneer Supported a discredited belief in improving the human race through selective breeding That's on the key to Stewart wrote it She said her legacy also includes supporting eugenics a discredited belief and improving the human race through selective breeding often targeting poor people those with disability immigrants and people of color She was particularly targeting black people or to quote her negroes The removal of Sanger's name from our building is both a necessary and overdue step to reckon with our legacy And acknowledged Planned Parenthood's contributions to historical reproductive harm within communities of color said Karen seltzer the chair of the New York affiliates board said in a statement So there you have Margaret Sanger and Planned Parenthood Woodrow Wilson And so much more

Margaret Sanger Eugenics New York Times Sanger Stewart New York Karen Seltzer New York Affiliates Board Woodrow Wilson
Planned Parenthood Is Margaret Sanger's Legacy

Mark Levin

01:50 min | 2 months ago

Planned Parenthood Is Margaret Sanger's Legacy

"Planned Parenthood and other such organizations have been handing out Margaret Sanger awards the equivalent now for decades They've pulled back Hillary Clinton got one watch They pulled back Because as the rewritten history gets straightened out It's important to understand who Margaret Sanger was And the Democrats celebrated her up just a few years ago And so it is Margaret Sanger said some horrific things and pushed for horrific things It's what she did And the planned parent or organization is her legacy And you and I had been funding that organization for decades In any effort to try and defund that organization has been blocked by the Democrats This issue of abortion has evolved into an issue of women's rights in a woman's body That's not what it was originally Not even close It was an effort by a racist Who even created what she called the Negro project To try and enlist black ministers Into promoting quote unquote birth control In which she included not just included but pushed abortion For black women

Margaret Sanger Hillary Clinton
As the Queen Is Laid to Rest, Leftists Prove They Have No Shame

The Trish Regan Show

02:20 min | 2 months ago

As the Queen Is Laid to Rest, Leftists Prove They Have No Shame

"Going to get to this horrible stuff. Queen England just died. She was an elderly woman. I'll tell you I got chills when I saw the photo of her with the new prime minister who, by the way, I think it's going to be fantastic, fantastic for the UK. A lot of really strong economic chops and believes in low taxes and has almost a kind of libertarian conservative view of things. Plus, she's not fully liberty, 'cause I think she's more hawkish than that. So I think she could be the next Margaret Thatcher, which is exactly what the country needs, but the queen, who was just days away from her death, God herself, up out of bed, got the makeup on the whole outfit, and did what she needed to do. For the sake of her country. I mean, talking about patriotism. For the sake of her country, perhaps in the sake of her family, and the monarchy, so she was committed, of course, everyone likes to pile on and hate the queen, hate England, and hate America. And that's just the world in which we live, but disturbing and upsetting when you see so many people that have benefited from the economic opportunities that they've gotten here in America out there slamming, slamming the culture that has afforded them this. Now, I want to be careful here. I'm in no way condoning what England did do. And a lot of people see England is responsible for the slave trade. I would point out that the slave trade was actually happening. Thousands of years before, and that really almost since the beginning of civilization. Unfortunately. And I'm talking civilization. I mean, not during the gathering and hunting days. But once we had civilization, that was an unfortunate reality, and it did exist in Africa and a pretty sophisticated way long before England ever showed up, which was, I believe, in the 1600s. Maybe it was a little bit earlier than that. Let me check my notes because I've got a little research on this for you that I would like to share. I believe it was sometime around 1663. You see, I was close. I was 1600. Anyway, it was done with royal approval, of course, so The Crown was behind this, and they engaged in it for about a 150 years, and you had a slave trade that was born. So I'm not saying that any of that is not absolutely horrible, but I do think it's important to look at things through today's lens.

Queen England England Margaret Thatcher America UK Africa
Nigel Farage on the Election of a New Prime Minister in the UK

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:49 min | 2 months ago

Nigel Farage on the Election of a New Prime Minister in the UK

"One of the great patriots of the west is with us right now, Nigel Farage to discuss the new prime minister of the United Kingdom, of which I know nothing about so he'll educate all of us. Nigel, welcome back to the program. Johnny, very good to see you. And by the way, if you don't know anything about this, trust, you're not on your own. The British public until a few weeks ago, you very little about to arrive. She's been a cabinet minister for 8 years. How would a range of quite important jobs, but she's literally appeared out of left field, this is now the fourth conservative prime minister in 6 years, which tells you two things. Number one, the party is a complete shambles. Number two, the British system needs modernizing and updating. And let's see today was her real debut in the House of Commons, the famous prime minister's questions, which people all over the world watch. It's a gladiatorial sporting contest. I have to say, if I'm being honest, I was pleasantly surprised. She defended the concept of low taxes of hard work being rewarded. She said we can't tax our way to growth. And there was an echo in my mind from what I was in my mid 20s. The last conservative leader that spoke like that was Margaret Thatcher. It could be. Despite 12 years of so called conservative rule in Britain, truth is we've had 12 years of social democracy in Britain, maybe inexperienced though she is, maybe we finally actually got a conservative that believes in free markets, believes in the profit motive. It was, I think, to be fair, a good start.

Nigel Farage Patriots Nigel United Kingdom Johnny Cabinet House Of Commons Margaret Thatcher Britain
Even the Greats Were Once Despised, Considered 'Controversial'

Mark Levin

01:54 min | 2 months ago

Even the Greats Were Once Despised, Considered 'Controversial'

"Who are the great people But they just embraced and accepted Churchill Churchill was despised He was considered extremely controversial Now we all know what a tremendous leader Churchill was George S. Patton He didn't conduct himself like other general He wasn't a Millie A Mattis a Kelly one of our greatest generals ever More recently England England was dying in the 1970s The government owned almost all the industries the labor movement had been taken over by the marxists It looked like there was no end That what was going to take place They elected the iron lady Margaret Thatcher A few years later in our own country after Jimmy Carter and the Democrats the country was sinking We elected Ronald Reagan Ronald Reagan was not supported by his party the Republican establishment In Israel Benjamin Netanyahu is considered controversial He's not controversial Again one of the great leaders of all times And if the Israelis are smart they'll bring them back especially now since they're on the brink Many of you may not know this but Abraham Lincoln was considered very controversial

Churchill Churchill George S. Patton Mattis England Millie Churchill Ronald Reagan Kelly Margaret Thatcher Jimmy Carter Benjamin Netanyahu Israel Abraham Lincoln
Joe Biden Mentioned 'MAGA Republicans' More Than Crime or Inflation

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:43 min | 3 months ago

Joe Biden Mentioned 'MAGA Republicans' More Than Crime or Inflation

"They do not care about democracy. They care about Democrats staying in power. With the red lights coming up, Joe Biden decides to go on this speech. That was supposed to be uplifting and about representative government. And Joe Biden's speech, China was mentioned zero times. Crime was mentioned zero times. Inflation was mentioned. Zero times. Fentanyl was mentioned. Zero times. The southern border was mentioned. Zero times. Charlottesville got a singular mention. January 6th got two mentions. Insurrection got three mentions. Donald Trump got three mentions. Extremism got 7 mentions, violence got ten mentions mega 13 mentions. And Republicans, 16 mentions. Joe Biden play cut 85 last evening. Donald Trump in the maga Republicans represented extremism. Magar Republicans do not respect the constitution. Margaret Republicans. By Donald Trump on the maga Republicans. Who reject the extreme mag ideology. Mag Republicans have made their choice. I agree Republicans. Magic republic is magical Republicans believe Trump and extreme mega Republicans. Maga forces are determined to take this country backwards. It's very clear what happened. Some consultant, some messaging consultant, has some sort of polling data that the term maga turns off independence and motivates the Democrat base. They

Joe Biden Donald Trump Magar Margaret Republicans Charlottesville China
Ali Velshi Is Worried About America's Decline in Democracy and Rights

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

02:12 min | 3 months ago

Ali Velshi Is Worried About America's Decline in Democracy and Rights

"So I have to say, first of all, a lot of people talking already about the fact that the three major networks did not carry this amazing Biden speech. You've been in the media landscape for so long. What is your take on that? I'm deeply disappointed because I have, I'm generally speaking an optimist about society and politics. And I am so worried about this particular issue. This decline in democracy globally. I was overseas for a while during the Ukraine war. I was in Ukraine. And here in the United States, I'm worried that people don't register it, right? Democracy is really an abstraction to most people until, of course, they start taking away your rights and we start to feel like we're in handmaid's tale and voting changes and we don't trust our ballots. It's happening, but it's kind of like a slow flood, right? This democracy is getting flooded out and we're not seeing it. And I think when the president of the United States talks about actual threats to democracy that to journalists and to the public have been demonstrated by January 6th and so many other things, including a recent exploration of Mar-a-Lago where the president did untold things. And thank you for bringing a handmaid's tale, even though you do not have a vagina. I appreciate that. I spoke a few months ago before the ro leak with Margaret Atwood, and she said, you know, in 1985, when she wrote this thing, she said, people told her, this is just unrealistic. And she says, no it's not unrealistic. Women's rights are going to be taken away. It's going to happen in America and it's going to be on the basis of a theocracy and everybody said, there's no theocracy in America, abortion rights are entrenched. It's not going to happen. And yet when you read it, it's amazing that it's all happening. It's happening in ways that are so draconian. So when you ask people, you like abortion you don't like abortion. Some people like abortion, they don't like abortion. We're asking the wrong questions. Do you think women and their doctors should be criminalized for it? This is just an aspect of the way in which rights are being taken. Do we think the government should the government make that decision? Do you think the president was affected was a bunch of historians that were just warning him about this that we are literally losing democracy in the future? And so when the president wants to talk about that issue, then I think we should be listening to that issue.

Ukraine America Biden Margaret Atwood
Jared Kushner Joins Hugh for an In-Depth Interview About His Memoir of the 2016 Campaign and President Trumps White House - Burst 06

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:46 min | 3 months ago

Jared Kushner Joins Hugh for an In-Depth Interview About His Memoir of the 2016 Campaign and President Trumps White House - Burst 06

"Let's talk, extend the football analogy. Sometimes you have turnover artists. Sometimes you have bad coaches that don't relate signal. I noticed the reference to Margaret Peter Lennon here, and that's two inside baseball for the radio. But I do want to talk about Navarro and Bannon. I've known Peter naru for 30 years. When he ran for mayor as a no growth mayor in San Diego, when he ran unsuccessfully for Congress with Hillary Clinton at his side when he ran for supervisor. Peter is charismatic and fun to be around. I went to a Crosby still national young concert with him once. But he is completely mercurial and off the reservation often. Why in the world did you recruit him? It's a funny story. So one of the things I did on the campaign was Trump called me and says, I want you to write a speech for me for apac. And I go through this in the book. And I wrote a big policy speech for him. It was a policy I understood. And I convinced him to use a teleprompter for the first time, which he was resisted to. We called the story in the book. It's really funny. But you said, look, I used to make fun of the politicians who used teleprompters. And I just do this. If you don't like it, you'll never have to see one again. And he goes and he used it and the speech was incredible at AIPAC. He says to me after I want you to build a speech writing team. So Stephen Miller was on the campaign as I called Steve and I said, look, can we start developing a policy and a speech writing team? And he says, Jared, this is like the first thing I've heard on this campaign that makes any sense. Like that should have been done 6 months ago. But let's do it. So we started putting it together. And I was looking for people who can give me more nuance on Trump's what he was saying about China. So I found Peter's book death by China, which seemed like a title that was in line with what Trump was saying. So I researched him. I was a little nervous because I think he was a Democrat. If you would call me and we got on the phone, I said, hi, I work with president with candidate Trump. And I said, what are your thoughts on him? Because I didn't want to open it up to myself. I love what he's talking about. He's the first politician saying it. And I said, do you want to be on our economic advisory council? And he says, well, who else is on it? And I said, well, I really can't disclose names. Trump's a little controversial now. I don't want to be out there. There's going to be a secret advisory pal. Spears is absolutely all right stuff for you. I'll give you advice. I'll send you stuff. He was the only person on it. I was on it at the time. And so Peter started advising the campaign sent us some very good advice. And then when it came into time and The White House, we ended up putting him in a trade position. And again, he was a very useful voice throughout the time. He definitely played hard. I think he was a little bit paranoid that when Trump wasn't deciding his way that there was some grand conspiracy or people were stewing it up. But I felt like we had a policy on trade that was very revolutionary from a Republican orthodoxy,

Margaret Peter Lennon Peter Naru Donald Trump Bannon Navarro Peter Apac Hillary Clinton Stephen Miller Crosby Baseball Aipac San Diego Football Congress China Jared Steve Spears
Why Anna Paulina Luna Subjects Herself to the Dirty World of Politics

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:21 min | 3 months ago

Why Anna Paulina Luna Subjects Herself to the Dirty World of Politics

"Talk Florida and I guess the country in general where we look at these midterm elections because you've been a great political strategist as well. We had congressmen that Gates on the top of the show. We did have congresswoman Margaret Taylor Greene. She talked about being assaulted, but swatted. Last night, this attack where they were pretty wanted her to be assaulted or possibly worse. When you know that things like that are potentially in the cards, why is this that you want something that you want to get into? Why do you want to get into this when you know those threats and the pain box are something that they can put you in with the smears the attacks and everything else? Why do all this? Because we live in the greatest country in the world and there's only one like it. If the United States is to exist, that's it for us. We are the Beacon of hope and freedom. I've been to Jack, I've been over 25 countries around the world. And I can tell you that the United States, everyone, wishes that they had the opportunity and freedoms that we have here. Unfortunately, there are people in D.C. that don't like this country. There are people that are in D.C. that are foreign actors. They are involved with foreign governments, and they want our country to crumble. And because of the fact that I think you and I both understand from a military perspective that sometimes maybe it's not the easiest thing to do, but it's the right thing to do. And if we as good people don't stand up, then it's going to be, you know, the sociopath weirdos that just want power and control to get into office. And we have to fight back. So that's why I'm doing what I'm doing.

Margaret Taylor Greene Gates Florida United States D.C. Jack
"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

05:23 min | 3 months ago

"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"So let's digress for a minute into a bowl because there was one on the list in your book for this particular area of your garden that you then have like a plant profile of elsewhere in the book, which are the surprise lilies. Yes. And I have to say when I got my garden when I moved to my place, maybe 35, 37, something like that years ago. The first fall, up came these strange looking pink things, but there were no leaves. It was like these spikes, these stems came up and boom, these little pink lily shaped flowers were suspended quite a bit above the ground. And I was like, what are these? So I think is that what I think that's what one type was at squamigera or something like that. Some of these names. It's just no way to pronounce them. And you British types pronounce them differently. You know, that's true. That's true. We divided by the con language, as they say, yes, so oh my goodness. Well, there was your surprise, Margaret, that was your surprise. So they are a surprise. And even when you have planted them, sometimes you're like, what the heck is that? Oh wait, surprise. Another name for them is naked ladies, which obviously is non PC, but the life cycle of some of these bulbs is that their foliage comes up in spring, and it can look pretty ugly to be honest, because it's large and lanky and basically you want it somewhere that's not at the front of the border, because otherwise that will be dominating early scene. So that is when they do their photosynthesis when there's plenty of moisture in the soil usually in spring and they put out these long leaves and

Margaret
"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

04:54 min | 4 months ago

"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"I've actually had two plants go down. You know, in as much as we've talked about these diseases, I've out of my maybe 25 plants in strawberries. I've removed half a dozen. So there are still plenty that are doing really well. So I'm now starting to think about did the roots of the plants go through the straw bales into the soil and could have picked up some disease that was harbored in the lawn from meat gardening the last two years. This is where you have to put on your Sherlock Holmes cap. And I do think about some of these diseases are absorbed into the seed coat. And even though you do fermentation, you dry your seeds nicely, you could have spores of things like fusarium or early blight and septoria sitting in the seed coats. And so they get into the plant and once the conditions become right, which is heat humidity, it can trigger them. So I've got a lot. When I say I've got a lot of things to figure out, and you know me well enough, Margaret I've been doing this 40 years and every year I still feel like, my gosh, I don't know anything about this. I have so much more I need to learn. And then I like to share it with everyone because it's no good knowledge unless you share it with your Friends and other gardeners so we can all succeed together. Yeah, well that was what you and Joe have been doing on the epic tomatoes course that you had people that people subscribe to that started at the beginning of the season and so forth. Well, you know, you bring up Joe and he and I have a combined 80 years of gardening experience and Joe kill me if I say that, but it's true because he's only 39. How can that be? Yeah, exactly. But I was just at his garden, we did a blind tomato tasting, man.

Sherlock Holmes Margaret Joe
"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

04:00 min | 5 months ago

"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"50 different possibilities. So my oh my, how your backyard has grown. So just before we get started, tell us briefly how this all happened. Yeah, as we like to say, it started off more as a curiosity and then we went down a rabbit hole and it's become dangerous. I think for most gardeners, once they start learning about different plants, it really opens up a whole world. So even with a focus on native plants, then you have native ornamentals, native edibles, and I think early on for us, we realize there was so many wonderful plants that we wanted to try growing. And then as soon as we had put many of those in the ground, our interests became even more peaked about like, what else is out there? What else can we try growing? And yeah, before you knew it, we had really just planted out our three acres and in 2009, we were fortunate enough to get land across the road, which was about 8 acres, and that was a full southern site, so we put in a nut grow, and we put in European plums, and we put in a lot of magnolias and viburnum collections. And actually recently we were able to just purchase ten acres of land that's adjacent to our field garden. So we now have 21 acres. Oh my goodness. Yeah, it's pretty crazy, Margaret, but yeah, now it's a whole nother opportunity for planting when we get there. But we love all plants, but you know, there has been all this interest in native plantings and in our book. I'd say of a roughly about 20 are native trees, many that people don't even realize are native. Yeah, 20 of the 50 yeah, it's pretty, it's great..

Margaret
"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

05:49 min | 5 months ago

"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"So who were they? Well, maybe one was a rat snake. I know I sent you a picture and submit a video. And the other one I think was just a garter snake, which people missed call garden snakes, but their garter snakes. Right. But the successes actually outweigh the losses. And a snake is neither here nor there, as far as I mean, it's always a surprise. And what am I going to do? Get the dog inside, dogs. But for the most part, snakes are good unless they're like the ones you have sometimes. Oh, well, yeah, the eastern timber rattlers, but they're just hunting, you know, they're not doing anything. And you don't see them that often and they're in my region, they're around here. So you do come upon them from time to time. But, you know, around here, other people in slightly different environments have copperheads and those are a little more where you don't notice them. I mean, a rattlesnake is a big thing. But yeah, but the great thing about snakes is that, as I said, they're hunting, is that they're like the best pest control, you know, partners. I mean, you know, they're doing, I mean, do you want to get rid of slugs? You know, your garter snakes and so forth. They're doing a nice job of some of these things of eating up some of these things, which is great. I'm not so crazy when they grab a frog. That's disgusting, but it's nature, so it's okay. So something positive, let's say something, but what's something that? Oh, well, the peonies were incredible and there's one that I hadn't seen bloom before called canary brilliance. And when it opens up, it's a remarkable color. It's sort of the color of pantyhose. Canary. But it then turns yellow. So that's why I guess it's called that. And years ago, there was a peony I always wanted when I was a kid. Misses Franklin D. Roosevelt and she bloomed fantastically this year. So the peonies were great. And something I was going to say, you know what surprising is if you know Margaret, can you read my mind yet? Yes, I can. I have a couple of honeysuckles and I'm a little, you know, I'm always wary of honeysuckles because of halls and which is such a thug. Right, some of the aliens are. It smells so great and we used to eat the nectar. But there are plenty of honeysuckles that are not monsters. And a couple of blooming right now, one is Mandarin, which is kind of orange and gold gorgeous flowers. And this is a vine. Vine on a trellis. And another one is called sensations. Like scent, say something that I'd ever heard that word. And I've had it for three years, and the first year I thought this didn't smell. And the second year I had a few more flowers, and I couldn't hardly detect any fragrance at all. And this year with easily a hundred more than a hundred flowers. And this incredible year, I was probably 30 feet away and I thought, well, what is it?.

Franklin D. Roosevelt Margaret
"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

03:13 min | 7 months ago

"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"As mount Cuba centers director of collections and conservation lead, Amy highland, a graduate of Purdue's public horticulture program, has traveled throughout the temperate forests of North America to find rare plants in need of conservation. She's here today to talk trilliums and also how we as gardeners can be more involved in conservation of native plants overall, hi Amy, how are you? Hello, Margaret, thank you so much for having me. Yes, happy spring. I bet it's beautiful down there. At mount Cuba right now. It is things are popping every day. I bet. I bet. So in the report that I've read and all of this information about trilliums that we're going to get into, I was not surprised to see mount Cuba as one of the three conservation organizations behind this report on the endangered status of trillium. But one of the others, the New Mexico bio park society Albuquerque bio park, it did surprise me because I don't think there are any native trillium in New Mexico are there. So tell us about them and about the third partner nature serve and how you all did this. That's true. There are not any trillion species native to New Mexico. And that was not lost on the researchers from the biopark either. And it is one of the reasons why we held our workshop time here at mount Cuba center where we could see some of these specimens as opposed to there in Albuquerque. But the New Mexico bio park has a commitment to these assessments of how plants are doing in the wild. And they work regularly with the international union for the conservation of nature on medicinal plant species. And a little known fact is that trillium is actually a medicinal plant species. So they were asked to pursue trillion as one of the early assessments that they did. They reached out to us at mount Cuba because of our national collection of trillium, and we were able to pull together our third partner, nature serve, because they also have an assessment process that they use. And worked with every trillion expert that we could find in North America. Nature serve also has the nature cervix explorer, the search tool. I mean, I just am a lay person, but that I use if I want to find out kind of the range of a plant where it's wild ranges or whatever, where you can type in a genus and species and it kind of populates a map in real time of where that plant is occurring and so forth. Is that yes, yeah. Nature service a fantastic resource. They not only create maps, but they regularly work with botanists, boots on the ground, looking at these plants in the wild to say, how are they doing? Is this population under threat? Does this population need some external conservation or that kind of thing? Do we need to put a land easement together for this population? So nature serve actually consists of.

mount Cuba New Mexico Amy highland bio park society Albuquerque b mount Cuba center bio park Purdue North America international union for the co Margaret Amy Cuba Albuquerque
"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

02:20 min | 9 months ago

"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"So tell us how you got to be a kohlrabi fan and give us extol the virtues of kohlrabi so that maybe some of us order some seed. Oh, Ravi, it really is the greatest. I would probably say being CSA members back when we lived in the city is where we first learned of it. So again, this is where I swear the sage is Succession planters are our farmers because they must Succession plant to provide food every week for their customers because that's their livelihood. So they are the best. We could all learn more from them. Yes. And so that's where I learned about kohlrabi. And then we grew it. We've been growing it for over ten years now and the kids loved growing it when they were little. And I played with open pollinated varieties and hybrid varieties here, some 5, 6 years ago and realized the open pollinated varieties put on a lot of leaves and those leaves were sticking out everywhere from the bulb and the bulb was like half the size of the softball and I thought, this is the virtue of plant breeding. And you know, I am a fan of open pollinated, but there's a place for hybrid figures. And I really think brassicas is a huge place for me where I lean more heavily towards hybrids. They grow faster. They're more uniform, of course, the uniformity is for the farmers, and that's why hybrids, I think, do exist, and I digress. But you can eat the leaves. If you don't have any other greens in your garden and you just grow a kohlrabi and spray, you have a mock kale salad with the leaves and you have a vegetable that you can eat raw that you can shred that you can roast that you can cook. I mean, it's delicious, it's crunchy. What else can you get that's crunchy like that and has the brassica flavor so quickly. Yeah, no, it made me smile to see you praise it because it's not one that we hear a lot about. Well, I'm so glad to speak to you and the book is plant grow harvest repeat by May cowden and yeah, I will have the book giveaway, as I said with the transcript. And I hope we'll speak again soon. Thanks so much for making time today, Meg. That would be lovely. Thanks so much, Margaret. Okay. Underwriting support from timber press the leading publisher and books that share wonders with the natural world, including a way to garden by Margaret Roche, a stunning guide in parts decades of plant wisdom and challenges readers think beyond their garden borders, and to consider the.

Ravi CSA softball Meg Margaret Roche Margaret
"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

04:47 min | 9 months ago

"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"The next level of organization would be me actually writing notes about quantities and if that square footage was enough, and for example, carrots, you know, I do not like buying carrots in May at the store, but it does come to that at some point in the spring for us. So trying to increase how many square feet do I need to increase my care garden so that I don't have to buy carrots in May and then I could have some from last year. Anyway, so but yes, I say this to be humble Margaret because you know as a gardener, our work is never done and that is the joy of the journey knowing that we could continually improve. And so my record keeping is pretty good. It falls off the rails by about August 20th when I'm trying to like can my tomatoes and transplant my false stuff and direct seed my watermelon radish and get the kids ready for school and day and day, you know, so at that point I like lose track like just recently I was like, I wonder how many of our feet I sort of we have so many daikon and watermelon radish because the garden was larger last year and I was able to plant a whole bunch of rows and in October I thought I was crazy but in March right now we are still enjoying oh it's totally nice to have it is their root crops. But I didn't write down how many row feet I had so can I can I backtrack by my aerial photos maybe. I don't know. I haven't figured so anyway. Keeping, yeah. Yes, I highly encourage at any size. And the notes during the season is important. You know, I'll find I'll go back to my spreadsheets and be like, oh, I said start this two weeks later. Oh, good job, Meg 2020. Okay, so when something hasn't been quite right and you have an insight on the spot, you try to footnote it..

Margaret Meg
"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

04:09 min | 10 months ago

"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"Isn't going to be protected. Do you know what I mean? Do you have to really keep up with this? This is a commitment, right? Like you were talking about vigilance before. That's correct. And also bear in mind that flower buds and things like 8 lily's scapes and rosebuds don't have the tissue to systemically take up systemic repellents. So those will be vulnerable in things like this. Right. So I could if you'd like Margaret, I could give you kind of my seasonal strategy for protecting plants. Sure. I mean, that's fine. I mean, I think whatever you think are the I mean, I'm a barrier. I'm an exclusion person. I'm a believer in keeping him out of here. But you know that's my thing. And I'd love to know about some of the alternatives to the 8 fence, you know, like prison wall kind of thing. Right. Right. Yeah, a typically in early spring to protect your daffodils and early spring ephemerals coming up and things like this. I'm a big believer in malaga night, a fertilizer, activated sewage sludge, which actually has its label now for food and crops there. I spread malaria night as a topical fertilizer at half strength, recommended for turf in as soon as these bulbs start emerging, that will protect them in their about a month after that. I spread the second half if you will, and that will get me through bloom period and into early spring, importantly, if you're using Maori knight as a deer repellent, I've seen lots of problems where they're over using it. Yes. Don't fertilize those beds again. They've got it for the year. Right. In there. Some people also make up little sachets of malaria night. And hang them on that works as well in there. But once we have full leaf expansion, I go to my spray on repellents in their typically alternating between odor and taste based ones. There's a plethora of them out on the market. I've evaluated them all some are a little bit better than others, but the important thing is none of the.

Margaret malaria malaga
"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

03:54 min | 10 months ago

"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"And laciniatum has the tall as the deeply cut huge leaves in my garden 30 inches long. And some are ten to 8 to ten feet tall. They always fall over eventually. And these are Prairie natives as well from our American prairies. They are. One plant that looks very well with them is not a Prairie native at all. It's an inula angular racism in spear. Which was, I think, introduced by Wolfgang Herman of amber and van Sweden associated. Yes. Yes. I read something about him, I know he was a sort of wild and crazy plantsman. And I read something about his using this plant, and I found it in a little nursery and British Columbia. I think it was called blue stem. Oh yeah. I ordered a couple one year just as an experiment. And lo and behold a seed like crazy. Which might frighten many gardeners? But I've discovered if you pay attention, you can keep the plant from escaping, and I think they seed like that for a reason because they tend to be sort of short lived plants. Grow up to be, you know, some, I think, are 12 and 14 feet tall, but that's the extreme. But they get very large. And then each year they get smaller. I think they have short lives. But the plant is beautiful. It's a beautiful winter plant. It has a fabulous structure. It's very sculptural in the winter. They sort of turn this skeletal black. Very, very atmospheric. It's one of my favorite plants. Well, we're almost out of time and I just wanted to not fall victim to the thing that Monty Don forgot to ask you about apparently at your interview, which is that you said you hate gardening, is that a true thing? I don't like the labor of gardening. I grew up in the south. So I should be used to heat, but I like gardening from a distance and having someone to do what I want done. Yeah, I'm getting to the help I like having helped to I still like rooting around and I still like, I love weeding, but I think that's not your thing. I sort of enjoy pulling Japanese still grass. Oh boy, yes, let's do that. Wicked devil, yes, yes, yes. Yeah. Yeah, it's interesting. Well, the book is lovely. Did you take the pictures? Well, I took all of the pictures except for the cover, which was done by Claire de kosh. Ah yes, but it's beautiful. And I say that it's at the beginning. It just making me think about exerting less control and letting the place speak to us and I think very, very, very it's full of very good philosophical advice as well as practical advice and plant inspiration. So thank you. And thanks for making time, James this morning to talk. I appreciate it. Thank you, Margaret. I enjoyed it very much. Okay. Talk to you soon again, I hope. Bye bye. Underwriting support from timber price, the leading publisher in books that share wonders with the natural world, including a way to garden by Margaret Roche, a stunning guide in parts decades of plant wisdom and challenges readers think beyond their garden borders and to consider.

Wolfgang Herman van Sweden associated Monty Don Columbia Claire de kosh Margaret Margaret Roche James
"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

05:54 min | 10 months ago

"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"Sam is the manager of horticultural research at mount Cuba center, a long time native plant, garden and research site where he trialed 29 species in cultivars. Before joining my Cuba, he was lead horticulturist for longwood gardens, hillside garden, and he received his degree in sustainable horticulture from university of Vermont, hi, Sam, how are you? Hi, Margaret. I'm great. Thanks so much for having me. How's the winter been down there.

mount Cuba center hillside garden Sam longwood gardens Cuba university of Vermont Margaret
"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

03:37 min | 11 months ago

"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"Gather as much light as possible before the trees leak out. And bulbs like depths. They need sun. Re bloom. But there are some summer flowering bulbs, gosh, we grow so many you and I grow you comas. Those are bulbs. Yes. The pineapple Elise, right. Right, and you grow the voodoo and dragon lily types. Yes, this sorrow made him in the amorphophallus. Now those I grow for their foliage. So those I put in pots and they're in the shade and that's fine. I usually put in sunnier spots. I don't know about you. Well, I don't have fun here as much. Oh, so you're saying in part trade they're doing fine. Yeah. Yeah, yeah, yeah, no. They get big I probably, I don't know, three and a half to four hours. Okay. But then they're in bright light or shade for the rest of the time. I think I have at least 12 different ones. So they bloom. They're getting fine. Yeah, and Dave kopp, who's written a number of books we've known him for a long time, both of us. The brandywine cottage books. He has a whole collection from fall until well into spring, including a lot of winter bloomers of the snowdrops of the glands. You know, I mean, you can really study a genus and see which ones do the best. What about culture come is that a word I'm trying to say, what are the ones that have the pretty leaves? You think they're pretty. They have leaves. They have they bloom in the fall, most of them. And then in the spring they have very big leaves that they are nice, but you have to really think about where you're going to put them. Okay. Because they'll shade out even the plants around them. And those big leaves last for a while. But if you do think about that, it's okay, and I think that in now in January, I think that I've seen some of them just beginning to show. And they're very, very early that they come up. Well, lots of possibilities we just touched on a few. I've got the Anthos blooming now, actually. Oh, you do? Oh, cool. Cool. I'll have to go march around and see if I do up here. So thank you, Ken. It's always good to talk. And as I said, we're going to have a book giveaway of the new shade garden. But it's going to be a delayed receipt of the book because we're a little out of stock, but that's okay. Thanks again for the class the other night, and I'll talk to you soon. Oh, that's great. Thanks, Margaret. Underwriting support from timber press, the leading publisher and books that share wonders with the natural world, including the way to garden by Margaret Roche, a stunning guide in parts decades of plant wisdom and challenges readers think beyond their garden borders, and to consider the ways gardening can enrich the world, available everywhere books are sold, and at timber press dot com. They invite you to come grow with them. And I'll talk to all the rest of you soon again, too. I hope now don't miss an episode. You can subscribe free to the podcast version of the show on Apple podcasts or stitcher or Spotify, and you can find me anytime at a way to garden dot com, and on Facebook and on Instagram as at a way to garden and happy gardening meantime. A way to garden with Margaret roach is a joint production of a way to garden dot com and the smallest NPR station in the nation. Robin Hood.

Dave kopp Margaret Roche timber press Ken Margaret Margaret roach Apple Facebook NPR Robin Hood
"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

03:55 min | 11 months ago

"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"But because they're from the up on the bank, they can also tolerate long dry periods. That's unusual, I would think for a bulb, a geophyte, as we would call a bulb, right? Like this underground storage organ thing. That it can tolerate wet like that. I don't think of bulbs as liking the wet. No, a lot of bulbs don't. And the typical spring bulbs, especially that we grow commonly in gardens. Most of those bulbs are Mediterranean, so they really don't like the wet. But these are more bog plants. In fact, there are even aquatic crimes. There's one that's very popular in the aquarium trade. Oh. But yes. It's not particularly pretty. So it's not one that I grew up, but I have because I have this sort of desire to grow and try them all. Yeah. When do they blow or do they have a long boom time and what's the color range of the flowers and things like that? So when I tell people how to pick a cry in them, I start with when it's flowers are going to come on. Because the flowers come at different seasons depending on the cultivar or like the species. Right. And in our climate, we're in zone 8. So we have craniums that start in March and they look great through May, but then they are totally ending and you don't have anything but foliage on that plant for the rest of the summer. But then other crimes come on. So on our farm, the peak time is early June, where the farm is just a sea of pink flowers. Okay. And then there are a few that come on later, especially after like fall rain storms will get a few. But for the most part, there's summer and the colder you go, the more compressed that is, of course. So in like St. Louis, you would have almost all your crimes come on June and July. You ask about color of flowers too. The color goes from pure white to rich burgundy reds and pretty much everything in between, including some fuchsia pinks and lots of soft pinks as well as stripes of all different and different patterns. So some that are white pedaled with a pink stripe down the middle and some that are white pedal with a deep burgundy kind of blood red stripe. Interesting. Now you in your subtitle of your new book, you say you call it the world's biggest bulb. Is it the biggest fault? I mean, some of the pictures in the book are hilarious, jenks with you holding an unearthed bulb. And I mean, the thing is a monster. Okay. Margaret, the book, the title is meant to be a little bit provocative. You know. You have to do a little bit of marketing. Yeah. So if you were to search the web for what's the biggest bulb in the world, then another bulb pops up. And you'll see things that say, this bulb gets up to 12 inches. Well, I'm ready for the competition. I have a picture I took two days ago that a crime involved has a tape measure after it and it's 26 inches around. Oh my goodness. That's like a pineapple. That's like.

Mediterranean St. Louis jenks Margaret
"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"Recent years he's created something else. The Joe Gardner online gardening academy, a curriculum, a virtual courses on topics from seeds to tomatoes, pests, and weeds, to soil science and lots more. Hi Joe, how are you? Hi, Margaret. I'm doing great. How are you? You're just down there like kicking back, relaxing,.

Joe Gardner online gardening a Joe Margaret
"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"Ken Druze is an old friend and a garden writer with 20 books to his credit, and most recently, one about fragrance called the sensual garden, and another called the new shade garden. He made a visit the other day to wave hill the renowned public garden in New York City, where they have a whole monocot border that was in its glory and hence our topic today, plants that are monocots and Y to care. Hello Ken with the crazy ideas for segments. Margaret, if that may talk about rabbit hole, I said monocot and now I know a whole lot about little more about monocots than I would like to have known, except the monocot border wave hill is spectacular. And I'm sure that most people who see this arrangement of plants, which will try to describe. Don't realize that they have something in common. And that they're all monocots, but most people don't even know not that I'm putting people down. It's just that, you know, who teaches biology now anymore. But well, so I start talking about this. Yeah, yeah, but first I have a question about what's going on in the garden just to know 'cause I haven't talked to you in a bit. Are you still warm and no frost and no nothing down there in New Jersey? And the color has begun. And it's funny because indigenous peoples day this year is early. Because usually indigenous peoples day is our.

Ken Druze New York City Margaret Ken New Jersey
"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

05:07 min | 1 year ago

"margaret" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"Mark Wolfe is director of mountaintop arboretum in the catskills of New York, a 178 acre public garden that's open every day of the year, and we're managing native plant communities as the focus. Mark has a particular appreciation for small native trees that we too often overlook. And we'll talk about some of his favorites and also a palliative native shrubs to delight you and these and the birds. Hi Mark, I'm so glad to talk on this fall day. Hi, Margaret. Thanks so much for having me. Yeah, it's such a great it's like earth is celebrating fall. I mean, it's cold and clear and beautiful up here. And the leaves are already changing color up here. So you say up there, you're at 2400 foot elevation, is that correct? Yeah, 2400 feet in ten orville, New York, which is near hunter mountain if people, if that's helpful to people. Yeah, for their GPS. Right. So I want to ask you before we get started talking trees and traps, I want to ask you for a quick introduction to mountaintop arboretum, but also to say that you have this not so long ago built education center and built from many species of tree wood from many trees from around the property and nearby. And you did a book about it called 21 trees. And about those 21 trees. And we're going to have a giveaway with the transcript of the show over on a way to garden of a copy of that beautiful book. Photos by rob cardello. So tell us what is mountain top briefly. Mountaintop our burrito is a 178 acre public garden. And it started in 1977 with the 6 and a half acres. And over time, it's grown. We've become more native plant focused over the life of the arboretum. And especially as you're talking about the new education center is really a celebration of native plants because we went through our forest and some generous neighbors who donated some trees too. And we have 21 different species of native trees that are represented in this beautiful timber frame structure and the floors are also from trees from our forest. And that sort of bleeds out..

Mark Wolfe mountaintop arboretum Mark New York hunter mountain orville rob cardello Margaret