13 Burst results for "Marcus Reed"

"marcus reed" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"marcus reed" Discussed on KCRW

"Activists found hard to stomach. Daniel Cameron is no different than the sellout Negroes so that people on Friday activist Tamika Mallory spoke in downtown Louisville with Briana Taylor's mother standing the cider that is who you want, Daniel Cameron. You are a coward. You are a sellout, and you were used by the system. Bahanga own mama. Mama Way had no respect for you belong black people at all. It's a sentiment many black people in movies have expressed in recent days. Marcus Reed runs a restaurant near where Briana Taylor was killed. I don't know what if they hit Phantasm or whatever, but he's not. For us, You know, his skin is black. Not the way he thinks. You know, He don't really care about us, he said his friends and family all agree, but it's a charge that Cameron, a 34, year old Republican and the first African American elected Kentucky attorney general rejects his office declined an interview request, but here's what he said at last month's Republican National Convention. In a speech criticizing Democrats in the quote anarchist, he said, were tearing up American cities and attacking police. They believe your skin color. Must dictate your politics. If you fail to conform while exercising your God given right to speak and think freely. They will cut you down, but black activists have scorned him. Also, they say, because he's closely aligned himself with police unions. He sued Democratic governor Andy Bashir over his executive orders aimed at containing the Corona virus, which is disproportionately affected Black people. University of Louisville political scientists doing Clayton says the Briana Taylor decision was a tipping point. People are saying something's got to happen here on public policy has got to change. So I think you're getting the bowling over of a lot of frustration. But he said he wouldn't go as far as questioning Cameron's blackness. I don't think it's a fair charge to call him a race traitor or simply because he didn't seem to bring any homicide charges, which everyone knows is very difficult anyway. Because of Kentucky law that gives police officers leeway in performing their duties. But he said the case has nonetheless been an important test for the attorney general. And he said Cameron has not looked good, refusing to answer basic questions like whether his office recommended additional charges to the grand jury. That's led people to demand. Cameron release transcripts of the grand jury proceedings, Professor Clayton said. If he does, it could help Cameron regain credibility among the broader black community. Adrian for EDO. NPR NEWS, Louisville.

Daniel Cameron Briana Taylor Louisville Marcus Reed Mama Way Professor Clayton Kentucky University of Louisville Tamika Mallory attorney NPR Andy Bashir Adrian executive
"marcus reed" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:56 min | 1 year ago

"marcus reed" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"On Friday activist Tamika Mallory spoke in downtown Louisville with Briana Taylor's mother standing the cider that is who you want, Daniel Cameron, You are a coward. You are a sellout on you were used by the assistant Bahanga own Mama. Mama Way had no respect for you do not belong to black people at all. It's a sentiment many black people in Movil have expressed in recent days. Marcus Reed runs a restaurant near where Briana Taylor was killed. I don't know what if they hit him, Tasman, whatever, but he's not. For us, You know, his skin is black. Not the way he thinks. You know, He don't really care about us, he said his friends and family all agree, But it's a charge that Cameron, a 34, year old Republican and the first African American elected Kentucky attorney general rejects his office declined an interview request. But here's what he said at last month's Republican National Convention in a speech criticizing Democrats in the quote anarchist, he said, were tearing up American cities. And attacking police. They believe your skin color. Must dictate your politics. If you fail to conform while exercising your God given right to speak and think freely. They will cut you down, but black activists have scorned him. Also, they say, because he's closely aligned himself with police unions. He sued Democratic governor Andy Bashir over his executive orders aimed at containing the Corona virus, which is disproportionately affected Black people. University of Louisville political scientists doing Clayton says the Briana Taylor decision was a tipping point. People are saying something's got to happen here on public policy has got to change. So I think you're getting the bowling over of a lot of frustration. But he said he wouldn't go as far as questioning Cameron's blackness. I don't think it's a fair charge to call him a race traitor or simply because he didn't seem to bring any homicide charges, which everyone knows is very difficult anyway. Because of Kentucky law that gives police officers leeway in performing their duties. But he said the case has nonetheless been an important test for the attorney general. And he said Cameron has not looked good, refusing to answer basic questions. Whether his office recommended additional charges to the grand jury that's led people to demand. Cameron released transcripts of the grand jury proceedings, Professor Clayton said. If he does, it could help Cameron regain credibility among the broader black community. A dream for Edo. NPR NEWS, Louisville This is NPR news. This is morning edition on W. N. Y C in New York. I'm Carrie Nolan Later on morning edition Black residents of Philadelphia. We're having trouble getting tested for covert 19. So one black doctor began testing people herself. When they asked how I was going to pay for the uninsured people. I said, you're gonna build me. And I'm going to figure out how to pay for it later. More on that story coming up later this hour, then on the BBC news hour at nine heavy fighting continues in disputed territory between Armenia and Azerbaijan. And more on the criticism of President Trump following the release of information on his taxes by The New York Times That's on the BBC News Hour Coming up a 9 93.9 FM w N Y C. W. N. Y. C is supported by Facebook to prepare for the U. S elections. Facebook has tripled its safety and security teams implemented five step and verification and launched a new voting information Center. More at FB dot com slash about slash elections In the 19 eighties, 19% of Major League Baseball players were black. Today that number has dropped to 8%. Now the MLB and the players union are pledging money to increase black participation at all levels of the sport. We're going to talk about it, plus the latest on the fight over the open spot on the Supreme Court. I'm tan Xena Vega, and that's next time on the takeaway weekday afternoons at three on 93.9 FM. It's 69 degrees and skies are clearing over. New York City will see partly sunny skies this afternoon with highs in the upper seventies. The clouds come in again tonight with overnight lows in the upper sixties, and they stick around for tomorrow with a chance of showers and highs near 80 once again, 69. And mostly cloudy in New York City. Support for NPR comes.

Daniel Cameron Briana Taylor New York City Mama Way Louisville Professor Clayton Kentucky attorney NPR Marcus Reed Tamika Mallory Bahanga Movil Facebook University of Louisville BBC Andy Bashir Baseball MLB
"marcus reed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"marcus reed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Friday, activist Tamika Mallory spoke in downtown Louisville with Briana Taylor's mother standing the cider that is who you want. Daniel? Karen, You are a coward. You are a sellout on you were used by assistant Han. Go, Mama! Go back, Mom. Wei had no respect. You belong black people at all. It's a sentiment many black people in movies have expressed in recent days. Marcus Reed runs a restaurant near where Briana Taylor was killed. I don't know what if they hit Phantasm or whatever, but he's not. For us, You know, his skin is black. Not the way he thinks. You know, He don't really care about us, he said his friends and family all agree, but it's a charge that Cameron, a 34, year old Republican and the first African American elected Kentucky attorney general rejects his office declined an interview request, but here's what he said at last month's Republican National Convention. The speech criticizing Democrats in the quote Anarchist, he said, were tearing up American cities and attacking police. They believe your skin color Must dictate your politics. And if you fail to conform while exercising your God given right to speak and think freely, they will cut you down. But black activists have scorned him. Also, they say, because he's closely aligned himself with police unions. He sued Democratic governor Andy this year over his executive orders aimed at containing the Corona virus. Which is disproportionately affected Black people. University of Louisville political scientists doing Clayton says the Briana Taylor decision was the tipping point. People are saying something's got to happen here on public policy has got to change. So I think you're getting the bowling over of a lot of frustration. But he said he wouldn't go as far as questioning Cameron's blackness. I don't think it's a fair charge to call him a race traitor. Simply because he didn't seem to bring any homicide charges, which everyone knows is very difficult anyway because of Kentucky law that gives police officers leeway in performing their duties. He said the case has nonetheless been an important test for the attorney general. And he said Cameron has not looked good. Refusing to answer basic questions like whether his office recommended additional charges to the grand jury that's led people to demand. Cameron released transcripts of the grand jury proceedings, Professor Clayton said. If he does, it could help Cameron regain credibility among the broader black community. Adrian for NPR News. Louisville. Ah. This is NPR news and you're hearing morning edition here on members supported Kiwi de public radio. Good morning. I'm Dave Freeman. Thank you for tuning in. And by the way, thank you for supporting us during our fundraising drive at 5 19. Let's find out about traffic conditions out there in the Bay Area reported this morning by Lorry Sanders. Good morning Glory. Good morning, Dave. It's already a grind on the ultimate. It's heavy from Lammers out to North Flynn. That's a 42 minute ride. It's slow getting to signal from Livermore West Bond 84 is heavy down pigeon pants up to 6 80. And it looks like we still have this disabled big rig in Hercules. It's westbound 80 the four transition ramp. Watch out for a big rig there. I'm Laurie Sanders for cake, sweetie. All right, Laurie. Traffic support on this Monday comes from Lucky and Lucky California. Weather wise today. Of course, red flag warnings remain in effect in the north and East Bay Hills, Sonoma County, Napa County due to dusty offshore winds and very low humidity. Another heat advisory remains in effect until about 7 P.m. this evening for the interior portions of the Bay Area, as well as the San Francisco Bay Shoreline. Kiki BD news is following the North Bay fires right now in Napa and Saddam County will be having a report a live report. With Daniel Benton coming up in just about 10 minutes on the next California report, We go to the kitchen. California has a law that makes.

Cameron Briana Taylor Marcus Reed Bay Area Laurie Sanders Louisville Daniel Benton NPR News Professor Clayton Kentucky Dave Freeman California attorney University of Louisville Tamika Mallory Karen San Francisco Bay Shoreline East Bay Hills Wei North Bay
"marcus reed" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"marcus reed" Discussed on KCRW

"Back, Mama Way had no respect for you do not belong to black people. At all. It's a sentiment many black people in movies have expressed in recent days. Marcus Reed runs a restaurant near where Briana Taylor was killed. I don't know what if they hit Phantasm or whatever, but he's not. For us, You know, his skin is black. Not the way he thinks. You know, He don't really care about us, he said his friends and family all agree, But it's a charge that Cameron, a 34, year old Republican and the first African American elected Kentucky attorney general rejects his office declined an interview request. But here's what he said at last month's Republican National Convention in a speech criticizing Democrats and the quote anarchist, he said, were tearing up American cities. And attacking police. They believe your skin color must dictate your politics. And if you fail to conform while exercising your God given right to speak, and think freely. They will cut you down, but black activists have scorned him. Also, they say, because he's closely aligned himself with police unions. He sued Democratic governor Andy Bashir over his executive orders aimed at containing the Corona virus, which is disproportionately affected Black people. University of Louisville political scientists Dewey Clayton says the Briana Taylor decision was a tipping point. People are saying something's got to happen here on public policy has got to change. So I think you're getting the bowling over of a lot of frustration. But he said he wouldn't go as far as questioning Cameron's blackness. I don't think it's a fair charge to call him a race traitor or simply because he didn't seem to bring any homicide charges, which everyone knows is very difficult anyway. Because of Kentucky law that gives police officers leeway in performing their duties. But he said the case has nonetheless been an important test for the attorney general. And he said Cameron has not looked good, refusing to answer basic questions like whether his office recommended additional charges to the grand jury That's led people to demand. Cameron release transcripts of the grand jury proceedings, Professor Clayton said. If he does, it could help Cameron regain credibility among the broader black community. Adrian 40, though. NPR NEWS, Louisville This is NPR news on this Monday. You are listening to K C. R W It's Josh Barrow, host of left right and center. This one's for the teenagers out there. If you're 16 or 17 years old right now, did you know you can pre registered to vote in California? Just go to register to vote dot dot gov fill out the pre registration form and on your 18th birthday, you will be a registered voter and a legal adult. Congratulations until then stay informed and stay tuned to K C. A federal judge has handed Tic Tac a legal victory by granting.

Cameron Marcus Reed Professor Clayton Briana Taylor Kentucky attorney NPR Josh Barrow University of Louisville Andy Bashir Louisville California Adrian executive
"marcus reed" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:35 min | 1 year ago

"marcus reed" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"On Friday, activist Tamika Mallory spoke in downtown Louisville. Briana Taylor's mother standing the cider that is who you want. Daniel? Karen, You are a coward. You are a sellout, and you were used by the assistant Bahanga own mama back, Mama Way had no respect for you belong to black people. At all. It's a sentiment many black people in Louisville have expressed in recent days. Marcus Reed runs a restaurant near where Briana Taylor was killed. I don't know what if they hit Phantasm or whatever, but he's not. For us, You know, his skin is black. Not the way he thinks. You know, He don't really care about us, he said his friends and family all agree, But it's a charge that Cameron, a 34, year old Republican and the first African American elected Kentucky attorney general rejects his office declined an interview request. But here's what he said at last month's Republican National Convention in a speech criticizing Democrats in the quote anarchist, he said, were tearing up American cities. And attacking police. They believe your skin color. Must dictate your politics. And if you fail to conform while exercising your God given right to speak, and think freely. They will cut you down, but black activists have scorned him. Also, they say, because he's closely aligned himself with police unions. He sued Democratic governor Andy Bashir over his executive orders aimed at containing the Corona virus, which is disproportionately affected Black people. University of Louisville political scientists doing Clayton says the Briana Taylor decision was a tipping point. People are saying something's got to happen here on public policy has got to change. So I think you're getting the bowling over of a lot of frustration. But he said he wouldn't go as far as questioning Cameron's blackness. I don't think it's a fair charge to call him a race traitor or simply because he didn't seem to bring any homicide charges, which everyone knows is very difficult anyway. Because of Kentucky law that gives police officers leeway in performing their duties. But he said the case has nonetheless been an important test for the attorney general. And he said Cameron has not looked good, refusing to answer basic questions. Whether his office recommended additional charges to the grand jury that's led people to demand. Cameron released transcripts of the grand jury proceedings, Professor Clayton said. If he does, it could help Cameron regain credibility among the broader black community. A dream for Edo. NPR NEWS, Louisville We appreciate you listening this morning on your public radio station, you can find all of us who host this programme on Twitter. I'm at NPR. Green. Noel is at Noel King Rachel Martin is that Rachel NPR? Steve Inskeep is at NPR Inskeep. But we're just the host. There's entire team of colleagues who do the real work here getting this show on the air and you can find all of them. If you go to NPR dot or go over to the morning edition page, click on staff and meet all of our colleagues. You can follow a lot of them on Twitter there tweeting things that are a lot more fun. Interesting tonight. This is NPR news. And this is morning edition on W. N. Y. C. 19 minutes past six o'clock a little later on morning edition Black residents of Philadelphia. We're having trouble getting tested for covert 19. So one black doctor began testing people herself. When they asked how I was going to pay for the uninsured people. I said, you're going to build me and I'm going to figure out how to pay for it later. More on that story coming up later this hour. Stay with us. WNYC supporters.

Cameron Briana Taylor Louisville NPR Marcus Reed Professor Clayton Kentucky Twitter Tamika Mallory attorney University of Louisville Steve Inskeep Bahanga Karen Noel King Rachel Martin Daniel Rachel NPR Andy Bashir
"marcus reed" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:41 min | 1 year ago

"marcus reed" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Dot org It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm no well King For the second time this week, protesters in Louisville who are demanding justice for Briana Taylor defied and 9 P.m. curfew. Police moved in last night. Kentucky State representative Attica Scott was arrested along with other protesters. Wf pl reporter Ryan van Veles air recorded the arrest. Ah, police Union spokesperson says Scott is charged with unlawful assembly and first degree rioting. That's a Class D felony. Now that is the same level felony as wanton endangerment. The on ly charge brought against one of the three officers. Involved in Taylor's death. This for the record is why so many people are so angry. Marcus Reed runs a barbecue joint near where Briana Taylor was killed. If it was me, I'd probably get 20 years. But you know this is police and he's not my skin color. Just a slap on the wrist. Amina Elahi of member station W F P L in Louisville is with me now. Good morning. I'm gonna good morning. Let's talk about the questions that everybody in Louisville seems to be asking. So the first one is theater Knee general is pursuing these charges wanton endangerment against a detective that shot into Briana Taylor's neighbor's homes. But no one has been charged with endangering her. Why not? That is the same question. Family attorney law Anita Baker hasn't you can understand why Taylor was unarmed, and she was killed. So Baker wants to know why she wasn't endangered by a former detective, Hankerson or other officer's actions. So, the attorney general said the charges were based on the bullets. He blindly shot through a covered window, passing through the wall of table Taylor's apartment into her neighbors, and he also said the other two officers weren't charged because they were found to be justified in shooting back in response to an alleged warning shot from Taylor's boyfriend. Okay. They were justified in shooting back because they had been shot at first. Another question. Everyone really seems to want. The answer to is. If no one was charged for Taylor's killing, Why did the city of Louisville agreed to pay her family $12 million in a settlement? Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer said it was important for the city to begin the healing process, and he said he thought it was the right decision at that time. But let's note that the city did not admit wrongdoing is part of that settlement. Which is often what happens in these cases. Ah grand jury reviewed evidence from the attorney general's investigation this week. What was the evidence they were looking at? Well, we don't know who and we don't know if the attorney general of release that to the public, although Kentucky's governor and Louisville's mayor have called on him to do so, But Attorney general down you. Cameron also didn't say whether he presented the grand jury with evidence or charge is specific to the other two officers. Who shot Taylor, who notably were not charged with, the attorney general said was that it was his job to present the facts to the grand jury. Unfortunately, we still don't know what those facts were. Okay worth noting. I talked to Louisville State representative Charles Booker yesterday and he asked for the same thing more transparency listless into that throughout this process. Transparency was never there. The community was left in the dark leadership. Even elected leaders like myself. We were left in the dark. And that seems to be why there is so much outrage. People feel like things are being covered up. So what happened to the two other officers who were who fired into Briana Taylor's apartment? They're still on administrative leave. They're still on the payroll, and now they're under in another internal investigation to see if they violated any department policies. Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer said. If the investigation fire finds that they've committed fireable offenses who'll fire them, but that remains to be seen. Domina Lahey of member station. W F P L in Louisville. Thank you. You're welcome. The pandemic has caused many kinds of work disruptions. Some people have lost work. Others have more work than they can handle. And we're sorry to say that people with extra work include coroners. Colorado Public Radio's Kevin Beatty brings us this perspective from Denver. Ryan, You got all the top you need. I'm sure right? This is Dr Jim Caruso. I'm the chief medical examiner and corner for the city and county of Denver on DH. At this present time I am performing a post mortem examination every day..

Briana Taylor Louisville Attorney Ryan van Veles endangerment Greg Fischer Anita Baker NPR News Marcus Reed Steve Inskeep Louisville State Kentucky State representative Attica Scott police Union reporter Amina Elahi Denver Charles Booker Dr Jim Caruso
"marcus reed" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"marcus reed" Discussed on KCRW

"Six minutes after the hour, this's all things considered from NPR News. I'm Sasha Pfeiffer in Cambridge, Massachusetts. And I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington. The city of Louisville is bracing for another night of protests after Kentucky's attorney general said he would not charge three officers in the death. Briana Taylor. She is the black woman shot and killed by police in her apartment in March. The decision not to charge the officers involved drove demonstrators into the streets around the country. But it's Louisville. That is the center of this story. And that is where NPR's Adrian Florido is now. Hey there, Adrian. Hi, Mary Louise Hay describe to us what you are seeing. What you're hearing is you're out and about reporting on the streets there in Louisville. So, so far today, things have been calm. That was not the case Last night, however, the streets of downtown Louisville were really tense as police worked to enforce and nine PM curfew and Disperse crowds were furious Attorney General Daniel Cameron's announcement just before curfew, two officers were shot. Their injuries were non life threatening and the suspect was arrested. But this morning, Mayor Greg Fischer pleaded for peace. We never had control over what Attorney General or the grand jury would do. We do have control over what happens next in our city, So I'm asking everyone to reject violence and join me and committing Ourselves to the work of reform for justice and for equity and do that now. And Adrian. How our people out on the streets protesting. How are they hearing that? How are they responding to that plea? I think that there is a lot of skepticism that meaningful change that the mayor is calling for, if they participate will actually happen, You know, people here in Louisville have protested for 120 days, demanding that the three police officers who participated in the raid on Brianna Taylor's apartment be charged with her murder. Instead. What they got was a grand jury and the state attorney general deciding Charge just one of those office. There's not for Taylor's death, but because the bullets that this officer fired into her apartment, entered the apartment next door and endangered the lives of Taylor's neighbors. This morning, I spoke to a man named Marcus Reed. He runs a barbecue joint near where Taylor was killed wasn't what he said. If it was made, probably 20 years, But you know, this is police and he's not my skin color. They just a slap on the wrist. You know, that's why they keep doing it. He told me that his friends and family are deeply resentful of the decision not to charge and that he would not be surprised if tensions on the streets actually actually grow worse after this, Yeah, well, I was going to ask where where my things go because people out protesting many of them had some pretty specific goals in mind. They weren't just angry. They wanted all of the involved officers to be fired and charged with murder. Which, as of yesterday seems to be off the table. So so where do things go now? Rights of the local investigation into Taylor's killing is complete. There will be no more charges Theater New general has said that but the police Department is continuing an internal investigation on whether the officers followed department protocols on the night of the raid. There's also an ongoing federal investigation. The FBI is looking into whether police violated Briana Taylor's civil rights, and they're looking at how they obtained that warrant to raid Taylor's apartment to look for drugs drugs that they did not find. And aside from that Kentucky's governor, and this year he is calling on the attorney general to release the evidence from his investigation against the officers. Here's what the governor said just a little while ago. I know the attorney general talks about the truth, and I talk about the truth. I think we ought to let the people of Kentucky see all of that evaluate and come to the truth. I believe that it is fully appropriate to do at this point in time, Put it all on line. The attorney general has said that he won't do that for now because of the charges brought yesterday against the one former officer on also that pending FBI investigation so briefly, Adrian, you're watching for more protests there in Louisville tonight. There will be more protests. You know, The police say that they're going to continue to enforce the curfew, which is still in effect. Police say that they will do the same thing they did yesterday. They have today arrested more than 100 protesters yesterday. I should. Also saying, really is that we're expecting to hear from you. Briana Taylor's family tomorrow. Alright. NPR's Adrian Florido reporting from Louisville tonight. Thanks, Adrien. Thank you. Five of the six largest wildfires in California's recorded history ignited in the last six weeks. In that same time, an epic heat wave suffocated the state, making it the hottest August on record. And in the last decade, California wilted in a years long drought. Maybe. Nowhere are the climate effects predicted in a warmer world more visible that in California, the state has already committed to get 100% of its electricity from solar and wind and other zero carbon energy sources by the year 2045. And yesterday, Governor Gavin Newsom announced another plank of his emissions reduction strategy by 2035. In the next 15 years we will eliminate in the state of California the sales of internal combustion engines. Governor Newsome, a Democrat, is here with me to talk about this. Welcome back to all things considered. It's great to be with you. Thanks for having me. And governor to clarify first, this order would affect only new vehicle sales. So no more sales of gas powered or diesel powered cars or trucks after 2035 but would not prevent Californians from owning cars with internal combustion engines past 2030 35 or selling them on the used vehicle market. Is that right? Yeah, that's exactly right. And so that's mean and it's important point because people obviously a right to say, Well, you're taking something away when in fact, we're not taking anything away..

Louisville Brianna Taylor attorney officer Adrian Florido Kentucky California NPR NPR News Briana Taylor Mary Louise Kelly FBI Governor Gavin Newsom murder police Department Mary Louise Hay Governor Newsome Sasha Pfeiffer Washington Greg Fischer
"marcus reed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"marcus reed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of Louisville is bracing for another night of protests after Kentucky's attorney general said he would not charge three officers in the death of Briana Taylor. She is the black woman shot and killed by police in her apartment in March. The decision not to charge the officers involved drove demonstrators into the streets around the country. But it's Louisville. That is the center of this story. And that is where NPR's Adrian Florido is now. Hey there, Adrian. I'm a really describe to us what you are seeing. What you're hearing is you're out and about reporting on the streets there in Louisville. So, so far today, things have been calm. That was not the case. Last night, however, the streets of downtown Louisville were really tense as police worked to enforce and nine PM curfew and disperse crowds or furious Attorney General Daniel Cameron's announcement just before curfew, two officers were shot. Their injuries were non my threatening and the suspect was arrested. But this morning, Mayor Greg Fischer pleaded for peace. We never had control over what attorney General of the grand jury would do. We do have control over what happens next in our city, So I'm asking everyone to reject violence and join me and committing Ourselves to the work of reform for justice and for equity and do that now. And Adrian. How our people out on the streets protesting. How are they hearing that? How are they responding to that? I think that there is a lot of skepticism that meaningful change that the mayor is calling for if they participate will actually happen, You know, people here in Louisville protested for 120 days. Demanding that the three police officers who participated in the raid on Briana Taylor's apartment be charged with her murder. Instead. What they got was a grand jury and the state attorney general deciding to charge just one of those officers not for Taylor's death, but because the bullets that this officer fired into her apartment, entered the apartment next door and endangered the lives of Taylor's neighbors. This morning, I spoke to a man named Marcus Reed. He runs a barbecue joint near where Taylor was killed wasn't what he said. If it was may 20 years, But you know, this is police and he's not my skin color. They Just a slap on the wrist. They keep doing it. He told me that his friends and family are deeply resentful of the decision not to charge and that he would not be surprised if tensions on the streets actually actually grow worse after this, Yeah, well, I was going to ask where where my things go because people out protesting many of them had some pretty specific goals in mind. They weren't just angry. They wanted all of the involved officers to be fired and charged with murder. Which, as of yesterday seems to be off the table. So so where do things go now? Rights of the local investigation into Taylor's killing is complete. There will be no more charges Theater New general has said that but the police Department is continuing an internal investigation on whether the officers followed department protocols on the night of the raid. There's also an ongoing federal investigation. The FBI is looking into whether police violated Briana Taylor's civil rights and they're looking at How they obtained that warrant raid Taylor's apartment to look for drugs drugs that they did not find, And aside from that Kentucky's governor Andy this year, he is calling on the attorney general to release the evidence from his investigation against the officers. Here's what the governor said just a little while ago. I know the attorney general talks about the truth, and I talk about the truth. I think we ought to let the people of Kentucky see all of that evaluate and come to the truth. I believe that it is fully appropriate to do at this point in time, Put it all on line. The attorney general has said that he won't do that for now, because of the charges brought yesterday against the one former officer Onda also that pending FBI investigation so briefly, Adrian, you're watching for more protests there in Louisville tonight. There will be more protests. You know, The police say that they're going to continue to enforce the curfew, which is still in effect. Police say that they will do the same thing they did yesterday. They have today arrested more than 100 protesters yesterday. I should also say Marie Louise that we're expecting to hear from Briana Taylor's family tomorrow. NPR's Adrian Florido reporting from Louisville tonight. Thanks, Adrien.

Briana Taylor Louisville attorney officer Marcus Reed police Department NPR Mary Louise Kelly Kentucky murder Sasha Pfeiffer Adrian Florido Greg Fischer Cambridge Daniel Cameron Washington Massachusetts FBI
"marcus reed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"marcus reed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Sasha Pfeiffer in Cambridge, Massachusetts. And I'm Mary Louise Kelly In Washington. The city of Louisville is bracing for another night of protests after Kentucky's attorney general said he would not charge three officers in the death of Briana Taylor. She is the black woman shot and killed by police in her apartment in March. The decision not to charge the officers involved drove demonstrators into the streets around the country. But it's Louisville. That is the center of this story. And that is where NPR's Adrian Florido is now. Hey there, Adrian. I'm a really describe to us what you are seeing. What you're hearing is you're out and about reporting on the streets there in Louisville. So, so far today, things have been calm. That was not the case. Last night, however, the streets of downtown Louisville were really tense as police worked to enforce and nine PM curfew and disperse crowds or furious Attorney General Daniel Cameron's announcement just before curfew, two officers were shot. Their injuries were non my threatening and the suspect was arrested. But this morning, Mayor Greg Fischer pleaded for peace. We never had control over what attorney General of the grand jury would do. We do have control over what happens next in our city, So I'm asking everyone to reject violence and join me and committing Ourselves to the work of reform for justice and for equity and do that now. And Adrian. How our people out on the streets protesting. How are they hearing that? How are they responding to that? I think that there is a lot of skepticism that meaningful change that the mayor is calling for if they participate will actually happen, You know, people here in Louisville protested for 120 days. Demanding that the three police officers who participated in the raid on Briana Taylor's apartment be charged with her murder. Instead. What they got was a grand jury and the state attorney general deciding to charge just one of those officers not for Taylor's death, but because the bullets that this officer fired into her apartment, entered the apartment next door and endangered the lives of Taylor's neighbors. This morning, I spoke to a man named Marcus Reed. He runs a barbecue joint near where Taylor was killed wasn't what he said. If it was may 20 years, But you know, this is police and he's not my skin color. They Just a slap on the wrist. They keep doing it. He told me that his friends and family are deeply resentful of the decision not to charge and that he would not be surprised if tensions on the streets actually actually grow worse after this, Yeah, well, I was going to ask where where my things go because people out protesting many of them had some pretty specific goals in mind. They weren't just angry. They wanted all of the involved officers to be fired and charged with murder. Which, as of yesterday seems to be off the table. So so where do things go now? Rights of the local investigation into Taylor's killing is complete. There will be no more charges Theater New general has said that but the police Department is continuing an internal investigation on whether the officers followed department protocols on the night of the raid. There's also an ongoing federal investigation. The FBI is looking into whether police violated Briana Taylor's civil rights and they're looking at How they obtained that warrant raid Taylor's apartment to look for drugs drugs that they did not find, And aside from that Kentucky's governor Andy this year, he is calling on the attorney general to release the evidence from his investigation against the officers. Here's what the governor said just a little while ago. I know the attorney general talks about the truth, and I talk about the truth. I think we ought to let the.

Briana Taylor Louisville attorney officer Marcus Reed police Department NPR Mary Louise Kelly Kentucky murder Sasha Pfeiffer Adrian Florido Greg Fischer Cambridge Daniel Cameron Washington Massachusetts FBI
Louisville preparing for another night of protests after Breonna Taylor decision

All Things Considered

04:22 min | 1 year ago

Louisville preparing for another night of protests after Breonna Taylor decision

"Of Louisville is bracing for another night of protests after Kentucky's attorney general said he would not charge three officers in the death of Briana Taylor. She is the black woman shot and killed by police in her apartment in March. The decision not to charge the officers involved drove demonstrators into the streets around the country. But it's Louisville. That is the center of this story. And that is where NPR's Adrian Florido is now. Hey there, Adrian. I'm a really describe to us what you are seeing. What you're hearing is you're out and about reporting on the streets there in Louisville. So, so far today, things have been calm. That was not the case. Last night, however, the streets of downtown Louisville were really tense as police worked to enforce and nine PM curfew and disperse crowds or furious Attorney General Daniel Cameron's announcement just before curfew, two officers were shot. Their injuries were non my threatening and the suspect was arrested. But this morning, Mayor Greg Fischer pleaded for peace. We never had control over what attorney General of the grand jury would do. We do have control over what happens next in our city, So I'm asking everyone to reject violence and join me and committing Ourselves to the work of reform for justice and for equity and do that now. And Adrian. How our people out on the streets protesting. How are they hearing that? How are they responding to that? I think that there is a lot of skepticism that meaningful change that the mayor is calling for if they participate will actually happen, You know, people here in Louisville protested for 120 days. Demanding that the three police officers who participated in the raid on Briana Taylor's apartment be charged with her murder. Instead. What they got was a grand jury and the state attorney general deciding to charge just one of those officers not for Taylor's death, but because the bullets that this officer fired into her apartment, entered the apartment next door and endangered the lives of Taylor's neighbors. This morning, I spoke to a man named Marcus Reed. He runs a barbecue joint near where Taylor was killed wasn't what he said. If it was may 20 years, But you know, this is police and he's not my skin color. They Just a slap on the wrist. They keep doing it. He told me that his friends and family are deeply resentful of the decision not to charge and that he would not be surprised if tensions on the streets actually actually grow worse after this, Yeah, well, I was going to ask where where my things go because people out protesting many of them had some pretty specific goals in mind. They weren't just angry. They wanted all of the involved officers to be fired and charged with murder. Which, as of yesterday seems to be off the table. So so where do things go now? Rights of the local investigation into Taylor's killing is complete. There will be no more charges Theater New general has said that but the police Department is continuing an internal investigation on whether the officers followed department protocols on the night of the raid. There's also an ongoing federal investigation. The FBI is looking into whether police violated Briana Taylor's civil rights and they're looking at How they obtained that warrant raid Taylor's apartment to look for drugs drugs that they did not find, And aside from that Kentucky's governor Andy this year, he is calling on the attorney general to release the evidence from his investigation against the officers. Here's what the governor said just a little while ago. I know the attorney general talks about the truth, and I talk about the truth. I think we ought to let the people of Kentucky see all of that evaluate and come to the truth. I believe that it is fully appropriate to do at this point in time, Put it all on line. The attorney general has said that he won't do that for now, because of the charges brought yesterday against the one former officer Onda also that pending FBI investigation so briefly, Adrian, you're watching for more protests there in Louisville tonight. There will be more protests. You know, The police say that they're going to continue to enforce the curfew, which is still in effect. Police say that they will do the same thing they did yesterday. They have today arrested more than 100 protesters yesterday. I should also say Marie Louise that we're expecting to hear from Briana Taylor's family tomorrow. NPR's Adrian Florido reporting from Louisville tonight. Thanks, Adrien.

Briana Taylor Louisville Attorney Officer Adrian Florido Marcus Reed Kentucky Police Department NPR Murder Greg Fischer Daniel Cameron FBI Marie Louise Adrien Onda Andy
"marcus reed" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:07 min | 1 year ago

"marcus reed" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Sasha Pfeiffer in Cambridge, Massachusetts. And I'm Mary Louise Kelly In Washington. The city of Louisville is bracing for another night of protests after Kentucky's attorney general said he would not charge three officers in the death of Briana Taylor. She is the black woman shot and killed by police in her apartment in March. A decision not to charge the officers involved drove demonstrators into the streets around the country. But it's Louisville. That is the center of this story. And that is where NPR's Adrian Florido is now. Hey there, Adrian. Hi, Mary Louise Hay describe to us what you are seeing. What you're hearing is you're out and about reporting on the streets there in Louisville. So, so far today, things have been calm. That was not the case Last night, however, the streets of downtown Louisville were really tense as police worked to enforce and nine PM curfew and Disperse. Crowds are furious Attorney General Daniel Cameron's announcement just before curfew, two officers were shot. Their injuries were non life threatening and the suspect was arrested. But this morning, Mayor Greg Fischer pleaded for peace. We never had control over what attorney General of the grand jury would do. We do have control over what happens next in our city, So I'm asking everyone to reject violence and join me and committing Ourselves to the work of reform for justice and for equity and do that now. And Adrian. How our people out on the streets protesting. How are they hearing that? How are they responding to that plea? I think that there is a lot of skepticism that meaningful change that the mayor is calling for if they participate will actually happen. You know, people here in Louisville have protested for 120 days. Demanding that the three police officers who participated in the raid on Briana Taylor's apartment be charged with her murder. Instead. What they got was a grand jury and the state attorney general deciding to charge just one of those office. There's not for Taylor's death, but because the bullets that this officer fired into her apartment entered the apartment next door. And endangered the lives of Taylor's neighbors. This morning, I spoke to a man named Marcus Reed. He runs a barbecue joint near where Taylor was killed wasn't what he said. If it was made, probably 20 years, But you know, this is police and he's not my skin color. They just a slap on the wrist. You know, that's why they keep doing it. He told me that his friends and family are deeply resentful of of the decision not to charge and that he would not be surprised if tensions on the streets actually actually grow worse after this, Yeah, well, I was going to ask where where my things go because people out protesting many of them had some pretty specific goals in mind. They weren't just angry. They wanted all of the involved officers to be fired and charged with murder. Which, as of yesterday seems to be off the table. So so where do things go now? Rights of the local investigation into Taylor's killing is complete. There will be no more charges Theater New general has said that but the police Department is continuing an internal investigation on whether the officers followed department protocols on the night of the raid. There's also an ongoing federal investigation. The FBI is looking into whether police violated Briana Taylor's civil rights, and they're looking at how they obtained that warrant to raid Taylor's apartment to look for drugs drugs that they did not find. And aside from that Kentucky's governor, and this year he is calling on the attorney general to release the evidence from his investigation against the officers. Here's what the governor said just a little while ago. I know the attorney general talks about the truth, and I talk about the truth. I think we ought to let the people of Kentucky see all of that evaluate and come to the truth. I believe that it is fully appropriate to do at this point in time, Put it all on line. The attorney general has said that he won't do that for now, because of the charges brought yesterday against the one former officer Onda also that pending FBI investigation so briefly, Adrian, you're watching for more protests there in Louisville tonight. There will be more protests. You know, The police say that they're going to continue to enforce the curfew, which is still in effect. Police say that they will do the same thing they did yesterday if they have today, arrested more than 100 protesters yesterday. I should also say, Marie Louise that we're expecting to hear from you. Briana Taylor's family tomorrow. Alright. NPR's Adrian Florido reporting from Louisville tonight. Thanks, Adrien. Q Five of the six largest wildfires in California's recorded history ignited in the last six weeks. In that same time, an epic heat wave suffocated the state, making it the hottest August on record. And in the last decade, California wilted in a years long drought, maybe know where are the climate effects predicted in a warmer world more visible than in California. The state has already committed to get 100% of its electricity from solar and wind and other zero carbon energy sources by the year 2045. And yesterday, Governor Gavin Newsom announced another plank of his emissions reduction strategy by 2035. In the next 15 years we will eliminate in the state of California the sales of internal combustion engines. Governor Newsome, a Democrat, is here with me to talk about this. Welcome back to all things considered. It's great to be with you. Thanks for having me. And governor to clarify first, this order would affect only new vehicle sales. So no more sales of gas powered or diesel powered cars or trucks after 2035 but would not prevent Californians from owning cars with internal combustion engines past 2030 35 or selling them on the used vehicle market. Is that right? Yeah, that's exactly right. And so that's mean and it's important point because people obviously a right to say, Well, you're taking something away when in fact We're not taking anything away. We're just establishing a frame of consideration that is self evident. Anyone that's watching the trend lines that this is where the automobile manufacturers air going. This is where the proverbial puck is. And we want to skate towards it. And we want accelerate a trend You're seeing all around the rest of the world, At least now. 15 countries have put out Similar signals of their intention to do something along the lines of what California is doing. To make this happen. California would have to add huge numbers of electric charging stations. You need to upgrade your electrical grid, which is already aging, already forced to do rolling blackouts during heat waves. How realistic is this In terms of California's infrastructure? We could do it. I mean, the reality is we're already doing it. 34% of our electricity comes from renewable places We have over 50% of all the electricity produced Procured in California from non carbon sources. We have a plan. We have a strategy. We went through an historic heatwave that was really a heat dome on the entire West Coast, the United States. We are reliant on imports from other Western states, and that's what impacted us for those two days where we had rolling blackouts, but we believe Our strategy's movie. Ford will mitigate that, and that primarily will be advanced to battery storage technology, which is really taking shape which for us is going to be the game changer and we think for this nation as it relates to.

Briana Taylor attorney Louisville officer California Adrian Florido Kentucky Mary Louise Kelly NPR FBI Mary Louise Hay murder Governor Gavin Newsom police Department Sasha Pfeiffer Cambridge Greg Fischer Governor Newsome Daniel Cameron Washington
"marcus reed" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"marcus reed" Discussed on KCRW

"This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Sasha Pfeiffer in Cambridge, Massachusetts. And I'm Mary Louise Kelly In Washington. The city of Louisville is bracing for another night of protests after Kentucky's attorney general said he would not charge three officers in the death of Briana Taylor. She is the black woman shot and killed by police in her apartment in March. A decision not to charge the officers involved drove demonstrators into the streets around the country. But it's Louisville. That is the center of this story. And that is where NPR's Adrian Florido is now. Hey there, Adrian. Hi, Mary Louise Hay describe to us what you are seeing. What you're hearing is you're out and about reporting on the streets there in Louisville. So, so far today, things have been calm. That was not the case Last night, however, the streets of downtown Louisville were really tense as police worked to enforce and nine PM curfew and Disperse crowds were furious Attorney General Daniel Cameron's announcement just before curfew, two officers were shot. Their injuries were non life threatening and the suspect was arrested. But this morning, Mayor Greg Fischer pleaded for peace. We never had control over what Attorney General or the grand jury would do. We do have control over what happens next in our city, So I'm asking everyone to reject violence and join me and committing Ourselves to the work of reform for justice and for equity and do that now. And Adrian. How our people out on the streets protesting. How are they hearing that? How are they responding to that plea? I think that there is a lot of skepticism that meaningful change that the mayor is calling for if they participate will actually happen. You know, people here in Louisville have protested for 120 days. Demanding that the three police officers who participated in the raid on Briana Taylor's apartment be charged with her murder. Instead. What they got was a grand jury and the state attorney general deciding to charge just one of those officers, not for Taylor's death, but because the bullets that this officer fired into her apartment entered the apartment next door. And endangered the lives of Taylor's neighbors. This morning, I spoke to a man named Marcus Reed He runs a barbecue joint near where Taylor was killed was not what he said. If it was made, probably 20 years, But you know, this is police and he's not my skin color. They just a slap on the wrist. You know, that's why they keep doing it. He told me that his friends and family are deeply resentful of of the decision not to charge and that he would not be surprised if tensions on the streets actually actually grow worse after this, Yeah, well, I was going to ask where where my things go because people out protesting many of them had some pretty specific goals in mind. They weren't just angry. They wanted all of the involved officers to be fired and charged with murder. Which, as of yesterday seems to be off the table. So so where do things go now? Rights of the local investigation into Taylor's killing is complete. There will be no more charges Theater New general has said that but the police Department is continuing an internal investigation on whether the officers followed department protocols on the night of the raid. There's also an ongoing federal investigation. The FBI is looking into whether police violated Briana Taylor's civil rights, and they're looking at how they obtained that warrant to raid Taylor's apartment to look for drugs drugs that they did not find. And aside from that Kentucky's governor, and this year he is calling on the attorney general to release the evidence from his investigation against the officers. Here's what the governor said just a little while ago. I know the attorney general talks about the truth, and I talk about the truth. I think we ought to let the people of Kentucky see all of that evaluate and come to the truth. I believe that it is fully appropriate to do at this point in time, Put it all on line. The attorney general has said that he won't do that for now because of the charges brought yesterday against the one former officer on also that pending FBI investigation so briefly, Adrian, you're watching for more protests there in Louisville tonight. There will be more protests. You know, The police say that they're going to continue to enforce the curfew, which is still in effect. Police say that they will do the same thing they did yesterday. They have today arrested more than 100 protesters yesterday. I should also say, Marie Louise that we're expecting to hear from you. Briana Taylor's family tomorrow. Alright. NPR's Adrian Florido reporting from Louisville tonight. Thanks, Adrien. Thank you. Five of the six largest wildfires in California's recorded history ignited in the last six weeks. In that same time, an epic heat waves suffocated the state, making it the hottest August on record. And in the last decade, California wilted in a years long drought. Maybe. Nowhere are the climate effects predicted in a warmer world more visible that in California, the state has already committed to get 100% of its electricity from solar and wind and other zero carbon energy sources by the year 2045. And yesterday, Governor Gavin Newsom announced another plank of his emissions reduction strategy by 2035. In the next 15 years we will eliminate in the state of California the sails Of internal combustion engines. Governor Newsome, a Democrat, is here with me to talk about this. Welcome back to all things considered. It's great to be with you. Thanks for having me and governor to clarify First, this order would affect only new vehicle sales. So no more sales of gas powered or diesel powered cars or trucks after 2035 but wouldn't 2035 but would not prevent Californians from owning cars with internal combustion engines past 2030 35 or selling them on the used vehicle market. Is that right? Yeah, that's exactly right. And so that's it..

Briana Taylor Louisville attorney officer Adrian Florido Kentucky California NPR Mary Louise Kelly Mary Louise Hay Governor Gavin Newsom FBI police Department murder Governor Newsome Sasha Pfeiffer Greg Fischer Cambridge Washington
"marcus reed" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"marcus reed" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Three degrees right now high school graduation ceremonies planted center center in may and June will have to be moved to reschedule Javor university announcing that their arena on campus is going to remain closed through July thirty first universities is working with all the local school districts who had booked the sin toss for graduation ceremonies to reschedule challenging the order that a shutdown nonessential businesses in Ohio lawsuits been filed against Dr Amy acted by the bridal shop owner in Columbus who says she's being unfairly singled out he says the state health department director arbitrarily allowed some businesses to be open while others have to close she believes business owners should have a right to argue their case all were seeking relief for a hearing process for these you know by definition arbitrary decisions of any action to close all the a arbitrary because she does unilaterally decide so we're gonna have a judicial review of that decision making process that's attorney Chris Finney a hearing in federal court on the challenges planned for Monday morning Cincinnati police have made an arrest in connection with yesterday's murder in an apartment building off Westwood northern Boulevard twenty eight year old Marcus reed is behind bars for shooting to death twenty four year old Patricia woods in the village of role hill it was the second straight day that someone was shot to death at the Renato apartments no injuries in a fire happened advantage sales car restoration company in Roselawn firefighters reported heavy damage to the company on reading road no word yet on how the fire started Kentucky's governor Andy Beshear now the starting the daily briefing today to update us on covert nineteen cases let's join him in progress in fact surfaces cleaned multiple times a day and as we talk about re opening oh boy this is going to be incredibly incredibly important if we as a people can't practice good hygiene at a time when will gradually start loosening things with the coronavirus still out there and still be in deadly that'll keep us from doing what what we need and and and wanted to do so we always talk about the ten steps plus one fill out your census again this is so important on federal dollars that regularly flow to Kentucky it doesn't take long if you're watching and you haven't done it please do it tonight it only takes a couple of minutes if you're watching you a few of you you have bought and you were doing your duty you are part of team Kentucky it's a very small thing they were asking as a part of team Kentucky that will help us help our fellow human beings just like we're doing by following the various rules that we have we also ask you every day to do the right thing and to show other people that you're doing the right thing to fill up social media with your positive work and positive examples so let's see a little bit of what we have on your team Kentucky together K. Y. patriot and healthy at home Kentucky governor now showing some of the slides some shots of different to people around the state protecting themselves from the finance team testing remember we talk about our health care workers being heroes.