26 Burst results for "Marco Werman"

All Eyes Are on Teenage Track Star, Athing Mu, at Tokyo Olympics

The World: Latest Edition

01:29 min | 6 months ago

All Eyes Are on Teenage Track Star, Athing Mu, at Tokyo Olympics

"Meters the first time the us has claimed top spot and this event since nineteen sixty eight games in mexico city. As if that wasn't enough mo- also snagged new american record. Back home in a large room in trenton new jersey. A pandemic era olympic scene were quickly becoming familiar with jubilation from viewing party. Back home. you can hear al jennings who has coach mos since she was nine. Mo- was born to south sudanese. Parents moved to the us just before she was born in new jersey before the games her brother told the new york times quote when you are from an immigrant family that comes in with its back against the wall. You know what the bottom is. He continued it gives us a focus on pursuing things. That would help us improve our lives for a thing mo that focus was running before heading off to tokyo. She shared her hopes on her youtube channel. I want to be an olympic gold medalist completely honest so i was looking forward to that. And hopefully that comes god willing. That hard work paid off today at just nineteen years. Young one footnote the podium featured none of the medallists from two thousand sixteen summer games in rio because women with naturally high testosterone are now banned from the eight hundred meters if they don't take medication to lower their levels. That rule disqualified all three of the reigning medalists more stories from the olympic games. Coming up including france's love affair with judo plus super fans team israel. That's later this hour. You're listening to the world. i'm marco werman.

Al Jennings New Jersey Mexico City Trenton MO Olympic United States The New York Times Olympic Gold Tokyo Youtube RIO Olympic Games Judo France Israel Marco Werman
Moscow's jails overwhelmed with detained Navalny protesters

PRI's The World

01:32 min | 1 year ago

Moscow's jails overwhelmed with detained Navalny protesters

"Foreign ministry says is expelling diplomats from germany poland and sweden for allegedly attending recent protests. Protesters have been out showing support for the jailed. Russian opposition politician alexei navalny so far more than ten thousand russians have been arrested during these demonstrations leaked photos. Show some pretty grim conditions. In detention cells. Sergei diabetes is a moscow based human rights advocate who works with prisoners and he spoke with my colleague. Marco werman sergei. How would you assess the current conditions in some of these holding cells and jails around moscow and across russia. Can you just describe what you've seen. Extra is conditions are very bad because never could so many people detained and more school schimmel tenuously and neva police stations or special detention centers on For so many people there is no room there and a lot of people had to be kept in a cold but at least wins for muslin one day reports about forty hours in these police. People didn't have possibility to sleep to eat or go to many police. Stations and police ransomware. They head to spend a lot of times now. You detention facilities opened was detained people but everything is slow in this process and the people spend a lot of time raging for possibility to be a place to this new

Foreign Ministry Alexei Navalny Sergei Diabetes Marco Werman Sergei Moscow Neva Police Poland Sweden Germany Schimmel Russia
"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:36 min | 1 year ago

"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Weedy I'm Marco Werman you're listening to the world lots of calls to defund or abolish police departments recently across the U. S. other countries have attempted big changes to their police forces so how does that work for example in Northern Ireland after the end of the troubles the decades long violent clashes between Catholics and Protestants Northern Ireland dismantled its mostly Protestant police force it designed a new one one that would include Catholics that was in two thousand one to hear how that worked for joined by Duncan Morrow he's a politics professor at Ulster university in Belfast welcome to you Duncan thanks for being with us great to be here so obviously what happened in Northern Ireland as a troubles are ending is very different from the conversations were having about systemic racism here in the US today but do you see similarities in these conversations about how to kind of reinvent policing all of course and we see similarities in so many different levels one level as we did have a real problem inside the police of what was called institution sectarianism and it was the institutional aspect that was most complicated there wasn't so much the attitudes of officers that was the way in which over years contacts just didn't join the place so by the end of our troubles with it it was a ninety two percent Protestant organization and that was extremely problematic in a society which is more equal why were Catholics not joining the police department well actually from the very beginning of Northern Ireland they never identified with the northern island state and so they basically regarded the police as the front face of that state I'm so being and the police in some ways for Catholics was always seen as some high suspicious and then on the other side the culture then developed inside the place obviously we'll dominated by if you like the people from the other side of the community in the province and the community so policing became area a Protestant profession so what would you say Duncan were the three most important reforms that kind of really changed the policing in Northern Ireland when picking three it's difficult but let me give you three the first one I think was they ensured that the governance of policing in other words the oversight on the way places organized really was accountable to the whole community and they did that by creating what was called the policing board which brought people in from all political parties but also independents who have the technical ability I'm the chief of police is responsible for giving a kind to them of what he has done the second element I suppose was recruitment in order to insure here that it was really a representative police force they recruited people from the whole community very deliberately in the first eleven years through a process which was called the fifty fifty process I'm not meant that fifty percent of the new recruits for eleven years came from a Catholic background to recruitment was very important and then the third element was probably accountability we have a system of complaints where any complaints about the place goes to an independent body called the police ombudsman's office that complaint in intervention investigators and they also investigate as a matter of course anytime when there is a death involving a police officer and as a matter of course anytime when a firearm is used so all of those complaints from through an independent office and that was to give confidence to people that it wasn't being investigated from the side of the place but really was being investigated in a fair and open process so Duncan did these changes these reforms that they worked and they stick well of course I got nothing are they work and I think anybody in Northern Ireland would say they worked absolutely fantastically in some ways in the sense that there's been very few police staff since there have been very few instances where the police have actually been involved in use of force and in some circumstances particularly where there is still a real deep controversy in the society around the old issues and those tend to be for us around some incorporates where they become very controversial at certain times the police here have developed actually very interesting ways of trying to manage those which involve liaising with the community but also trying to minimize the escalate the violence so I would say that overall his been a huge success at the same time there are still issues relationships with please do continue to be complicated over certain issues particularly over legacy issues from the past or where there's a particularly controversial decision and then some communities there are it's it's been more difficult than others to build relationships so all of that is still true but if you were to compare where the police service is twenty years later where they were twenty years ago it is almost night and day Duncan you gave a Ted talk where you asked how do you build a future after all the trauma that's an important question for us in the US right now so let's ask it how do you build a future after all the drama well there are so many complexities that but let me say two things or maybe three there needs to be a commitment from the leadership that that's where we're going so that is no longer about defeating the other identified actually agreeing to trade as these different ideas of how the future will be shared in the future the second thing I suppose is that there are a number of things which we know we're going to have to deal with and I suppose for us those are around on some of the complicated issues of equality which have to be feast and simply address and a lot of those are amenable to mathematics those are complex to trade into work but they're still important to deal with and those include justice questions and questions around policing and then I suppose the third element is that some of this is open and that's fine all of it is open and then we're going to a place we don't quite know so there is a requirement to bell's real dialogue across the community a capacity for people to contribute and what I call the not Ted talk a learning society we are trying to get somewhere we haven't been before so some thing which allows participation more widely than just through politics it's also important Duncan Morrow is a professor at Oster university in Belfast thank you very much for discussing all this with us I think there's some lessons here you're very welcome.

Marco Werman
"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:24 min | 1 year ago

"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hi Marco Werman this is the world it's a Juneteenth today and we sort of show in Galveston Texas good morning and and heavy duty today June nineteenth is the date in eighteen sixty five when the news that slavery had ended reach the state of Texas two years after the Emancipation Proclamation was issued a letter to second as a son of a lawmaker who got Texas to make it a state holiday thirty years ago it is freedom day for African Americans in the United States it is our day white black Asian Mexican American it is a United States holiday as in the legislature thank you Juneteenth is getting extra attention this year as protest for racial equality in systemic change continue around the country in the wake of George Floyd's killing Mona Boyd has been celebrating Juneteenth and across Ghana she moved there from the U. S. in the nineteen nineties I'm not drinking but I've never celebrated in the United States when I came to Ghana I found a community of African Americans already celebrating this holiday so I joined them to celebrate it and since that time many people have joined us many Canadians in celebrating the holiday so I would say there's a good knowledge of it is not a holiday that people celebrate when you call up country but it down here in a crime which has people from everywhere is celebrated I know from your own story Mona that you left the U. S. because you did not think it was a good place to raise your son how does that affect how you think about Juneteenth it's a holiday that much more connected to then July fourth July fourth was always just a holiday for U. K. but you have a lot of significance because it actually means something to me it was the day that my ancestors learned back they will are no longer slaves that they were now free this year of course Juneteenth comes in the midst of some major introspection and anger about the deaths of black people at the hands of police in this country what is it like to observe from Ghana the protests and the focus on police violence against African Americans right now what kind of a mixed feeling because we have been there before I'm not sure that much will change when it's all over you know I grew up in the rural south under Jim crow so you know I know racism I lived in an all black will be cost a lace isn't until I went to college so I have really mixed feelings about what it will all come to I think that we need to have some new strategy like what what would you add if you look at American society of the country everything is based on economics and in the kind of capitalistic system that we hope someone has got to be from my perspective someone has got to be at the bottom yes it may not look as well and I think that what we need to do as black people is trying to develop an economic strategy that will lift off from that bottom which will then give us more power and more control over our lives and over you know how we are treated in the society you know I'm not a big fan of integration to be honest with you I grew up in an all black town and fifty percent of the people were self employed my father's father bought his phone he had been out of slavery maybe twenty twenty five years and then him and his son kept adding on to the landfill it got up to around I think my brothers now farming about five hundred acres so we were quite independent we weren't marginalized and we didn't really have to worry about people respecting I understand your your emphasis on creating wealth but isn't integration key though to eliminating otherness like to get people comfortable with the fact that we are all humans you know we don't know that so what do we have to tell you that I didn't feel this way until I left America okay because I had a chance to live in a place where race was not a issue so for almost thirty years I'm really in my personal life have to deal with the race so I was able to step back some things are about race some things are not about right and I think it was like people don't do everything through the lens of race then I think it would be much easier for us to deal with some of the social inequities in our society you know every white person in America from my perspective is part of the problem bases in a systemic in every arena of America and the benefits from it you know I'm not sure people are really willing to give it up so this is why I think black people need to start thinking about it differently I mean we shouldn't have to tell people our lives matter because so many people out a lot No matter to them do you know what I'm saying and I think that we should decide our lives matter and this is what we're going to do to protect our lives on a daily basis but I think one of the strategies that we have not gone near is looking at what we can do economically because we have a lot of money we have a lot of money and we really need to look at how that money is employed in America you read something a moment ago that I want to ask you about the idea that capitalism need somebody on the bottom how do you change that in a world that is driven by profit I'm not sure that you change it I think that you concentrate on how you lessen its impact on you yeah I don't see America changing its economic system at all but you know other countries have dealt with this issue Scandinavian countries tax there people at a forty five percent rate so that everybody can have health care education and the food a place to stay it's just the American value system which is something built on capitalism and nothing else matters and it's just not black people that are marginalized by this capitalism there are so many white people that are marginalized as well so getting into the heart and mind especially the heart of people of white people they're going to have to get into their own heart because what people are never going to be able to turn that around it's been going on since like people have been in America so it's up to white people to get into their own heart and do the right thing you said earlier Mona how much margin teens means to them July fourth there is a movement undertaken by a Republican lawmaker from Texas to make it a federal holiday what do you think about that I mean it's symbolic is it important to have that you know we have been celebrating Juneteenth probably since lately on out on without it being a holiday they can make it a holiday personally it doesn't matter to me because I'm interested in a much bigger picture than a holiday in terms of changing America I mean it's the law the provincial coal get rid of the law we're cops will have a unity no matter what they do and how they do it those are the things that matter to me the window dressing peace don't matter to me I can continue to celebrate Juneteenth as I have been you know since I started we cannot think that these little gestures actually I'm going to give us the results that we need to have happen.

Marco Werman Galveston Texas
"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hi Marco Werman this is the world where co production of the BBC world service WGBH and PRX in India population one point three billion cases of the corona virus are spiking Mumbai the financial hub now has fifty one thousand recorded cases that's more than will haunt China at its peak earlier this year and yet restaurants stores and places of worship are re opening across India he Melanie calling at the left off you don't get what I'm worth it's been two and a half months this entrepreneur in Delhi told the BBC people need to go outside and go back to work tomorrow Mukherjee is a professor at the university of Michigan she's been modeling the outbreak of corona virus in India since March it is actually a steady growth and I do not see the glove turning the corner according to our models by July one there would be around six hundred thousand two two point one million pieces potentially that's the upper bound of the confidence interval so things are not looking to come down very soon in India two point one million potential cases that stunning I'm so when do you expect to peak the models show that the peak so not until late July and August but I would really caution you that as the models project out into the long term future there's tremendous uncertainty associated with this projections because we really do not know what people are going to do on the ground as the country opens is there going to be a cautious return already very vigorous re done that people have a fed up with the lockdown so just to be clear if you would still consider that peak the first wave right yes India it's definitely not the second wave but if you look at India I think it's very important to recognize the steep wide heterogeneity so some of the states have actually expediency up or speak anything look at their biased because it looks like other places in Europe where the love done came within three weeks soon saw a slowdown of the he says and the color of went down but that has not been shoot in most of India's states for example Maharashtra Delhi now time is not rude I just fine good job and with the British yes given the variety it must be really difficult to create a model or different models even for a country of one point three billion people so how do you go about that yes that's a that's a great question because I think I missed this point initially when we started to model the national data and we dug tracking this hatred you need across the state so now in our app we do have state specific models because there's tremendous heterogeneity in the states and even within states India really needs to track the data at a very granular level so do you think professor the statistics you're relying on to build these models are they reliable because we've heard so much about the inaccuracy of various models because for example testing is so variable from country to country of course we are working with very imperfect enough and then perfect reality so the question is that we could give up and see that no we are going to do not do any projection models because we do not believe the case counts we do not believe they gave Declan but to me what the modern diss instead of the absolute numbers that decoded messages and the lessons from intervention perspective is still meaningful because it helps me to study the problem into himself really thinking about deploying resources for example just looking at our or doubling time does not give me any idea about how many pieces do I expect in Mumbai how should I plan my healthcare capacity so for that I do need the projection models and even if they are projecting high number say at least know the worst case scenario and prepare that where do I need the beds and the ventilators and the icy use and the PPVs so I think the models have some utility in terms of planning and policy professor you were born in India I know you have aging parents there and deep bonds of the subcontinent how much is the overall future health of India in all respects in the forefront of your mind as you do this work so what can India has meant more to me than just doing the designs and modeling my entire family is in India and they're in Calcutta which was hit by a category four cyclone in addition to the corona virus so how do you do social distancing in a natural disaster all of these hard questions that you have to ask and that is why we are very worried about corona virus in India because India has about point seven beds four thousand people very few ICU beds and number of ventilators are also limited so I think India has a red giant healthcare system from R. Mukherjee is a professor at the university of Michigan has been modeling the outbreak of coronavirus in India professor thank you very much thank you very much thank you for having me our other top story today takes us to Spain where memorials for George Floyd have been held across the country Floyd's death has sparked a national conversation in Spain about the oppression people of color faced over the years they're being targeted by police and made invisible in Spanish society Jennifer money has our story from a dread the memorial for George Floyd in the trade was originally planned for two hundred.

Marco Werman WGBH India BBC
"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Serving and teaching those with special needs that's Wednesday on the PBS newshour stay with us for the PBS newshour comes on after the world this afternoon at three o'clock here on KQED public radio I'm Marco Werman this is the world many cities states and countries around the globe were having the debate of how long lockdown should continue and when stay at home order should be lifted but what if your home is an oil tanker or a cargo carrier you can't get off there's nowhere to go three quarters of a million crewmembers aboard these vessels are finding they can't go home let me repeat that number seven hundred fifty thousand crew members out at sea right now Nick Chubb is a former ship's navigator he's currently director for the maritime technology intelligence platform Phidias and joins us from London so what's going on here Nick why can't crew members get off the ships all of the world's one point five million seafarers around Hoffer at sea at any one time cost for it at home waiting to to to join inter ship amount when you join you ship you stay for anywhere between three and nine months after most ocean going ships each month around a hundred thousand seafarers I think get off the ship or or join the ship and it's it's actually quite a big logistics operation and it sells moving all of these people around the world obviously since the lockdown began we've had a whole legacy ferries to at reaching the end of that contract unfortunately having to stay on board the vessel because they just simply that relief cockpit to the ship and potentially in some cases even why should they manage to get off the ship but that stock I'm in a foreign pulled out because there are no flights hard so it's quite a scary situation earlier this month a spokesperson for the international chamber of shipping said that there could be terrible accidents at sea of shipping crew changes continue to be blocked so aside from things like oil spills what accidents could he be referring to drive you shape or navigating your ship is it's a bit like flying a plane it's quite a complex job and there's a lot to it and it takes a lot of team work and a lot of communication not just on board you're right vessel but also with other vessels in the area and and if you've been on board a ship for any particular length of time you'll find that fatigue starts to set in you'll be working a lot she crashes often im that that might be for I was almost six hours on admin and HR six hours off and over time that builds up and his people extend beyond that normal contract length it's a bit like a pilot being off the fly planes longer than they should be can these vessels dock anywhere right now or are they literally floating around with nowhere to go it completely depends on the situation just to be clear most ships are docking which is why we're all still able to get through to I'm close and and the kids that we need it's just that the crews can't get off when they talk or if I can get also get stuck in the city so I she incredibly that the hundreds of thousands of seafarers out that working incredibly hard to keeping our supply chains moving world dependent upon them but when it actually comes rushing up sort of pay them back by setting them apart we cultivates and I'm not the real problem so that so the ships are moving around the world and and trade is flourishing and the people who make it happen all suffering as a result so in your prior job neck you worked on one of these vessels and oil tankers specifically in your at sea for long stretches of time what's that like and I'm wanting if you could kind of extrapolate the kind of pressure the seafarers are not under right now with a corona virus there's a kind of running joke in the industry that that being at sea it's about being in prison except there's no TV it's quite a good analogy you can't get TV or radio signals I'm does not return at on the on the vast majority of the ships and the conditions on board can vary from being very comfortable to being a pretty cramped and I'm not great food and a just completed varies from from shipping companies are shipping companies are certainly being away from home for an extended period of time I was once away said it for months and I found out my contract was being extended by another three weeks I'm I'm just gonna psychological and emotional level I found that incredibly difficult to deal with so I I'm I'm just but no idea how these people who have been away for nine months already and being told that that there's no end in sight for them how that must feel Nick Chubb in London he's a director for the maritime technology intelligence platform fetus thanks for being with us neck thanks bye okay.

Marco Werman KQED
"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hi Marco Werman you're with the world it was a big weekend for the kids in Spain after six weeks stuck inside twenty four hours a day they finally got some sunshine Spain has the second most reported code nineteen cases in the world and it imposes some of the strictest protective measures anywhere on children certainly the most strict in Europe but is Jennifer on Monday reports from Madrid some experts are concerned about the impacts the lock down has had on those kids mental health threatening yes but in the US the pharmacist on a ten thousand gotta say a Jose Valdez is holding his three year old twins hands as they walk slowly down the street in central Madrid that faces covered by masks it's a plain surgical model for him and dinosaurs and poppy prints for the girls is the first time in a month and a half that these children along with six million others have set a foot outside the front door the severity of the corona virus outbreak in Spain has kept all children under fourteen cooped up day and night in high rise cities like Madrid there has been no relief what does it all work out a yes listen in a meeting these weeks have been really to be chaotic I don't know good at entertaining themselves and I have had to look myself in the bedroom to work with the baby as well it's quite hard to organize ourselves the B. looking out the window a lot we have been trying not to change their routines and to do activities with them from nine AM to nine PM kids can now walk cycle or ride their scooters for the maximum of an hour always accompanied by a responsible adult they gone yeah a teacher whose first out the door when the restrictions were lifted accompanied by four year old Pablo two year old son Thiago and baby Lucas I don't think I'm gonna call her like I will be going out every day they can blow off steam ride their bikes they need to run around if they're unable to do that they're climbing the walls it's difficult to get young kids to understand why they shouldn't touch anything outside and why they constantly have to wash their hands thoroughly I selected there are cases filed in court has refused the last meal can we put that dog and I'll have to say now honey not right now all the kids are also missing their friends from school which went online only in mid March because we have me on that but I'm glad he received Julia Pena is ten years old and use the zoom and what's up like a pro these days to talk with our friends and see how that passing the time at home you know that I mean case studies he at the end I remember runs out hi brother Rafael is that team said his leg started hurting after just twenty minutes of walking on his first day outside in a month and a half he was used to playing soccer.

Marco Werman
"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hi Marco Werman this is the world it is good to be with you this Friday we begin with news that feels like it's all around us all the time now the corona virus here's a random question are you touching your face right now well stop it health officials have been telling us that for weeks but as the world's rupa Shenoy reports stopping is easier said than done the person you're most likely to get coronavirus from is yourself more specifically your hands think of them as sponges soaking up the world and putting it in your eyes and mouth when you touch your face because you probably touch it all the time turns out there's a likely reason why social anxiety psychologist Kevin Chapman director of the Kentucky center for anxiety and related disorders says face touching is often a way to comfort ourselves but it's not actually good for us although all feel better it alternately reinforces strong emotional state so yes it can be self tuning but also can backfire make strong emotion worse long term like any good bad habit it's hard to stop and Chapman says all the talk about not touching faces will just make us all want to touch our face having a more flexible thought related to face touching such as waking up and saying something along the lines of I will be more aware of touching my face today is a much more flexible way less punitive way to extinguish that behavior some people have been able to do it I haven't touched my face in the wings weeks I miss others struggle even Singapore's minister of health gone Kim young even at a meeting that we have on this the ministry task force while I was speaking it was touching my face until minister Lawrence Wong knocks me with his elbow as you stop touching your face it's possible people in some cultures might have an easier time stopping than others Vladimir alone so is a global health researcher with the university of sao Paulo was contrasted face touching habits in Brazil and the U. S. and he says he hasn't observed a big difference everyone seems to do it almost constantly but he says some cultures are more touch oriented in general than others may be making the face touching in those places more dangerous you can read and people would be like to greet each other early Walkley so I think that's going to we have a crises they're going on people keep doing that you know so you know once you see that how do you not know if that Italy's special commissioner for corona viruses suggested Italians need to tone down their warm culture France's minister went further advising people to stop greeting each other with kisses when German chancellor Angela Merkel swept into a meeting and offered her hand for a shake to the German interior.

Walkley chancellor university of sao Paulo Kim young Kevin Chapman Angela Merkel France commissioner Italy Marco Werman Brazil researcher Vladimir Lawrence Wong Singapore Kentucky center director rupa Shenoy
"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hi Marco Werman you're with the world earlier today on the show we heard from an American passenger who chose to stay in quarantine on board the diamond princess cruise ship near Japan hundreds of passengers on the ship have tested positive for the new disease known as covert nineteen it is a remarkable situation but Dr Isaac ball gosh an infectious disease specialist at the university of Toronto says outbreaks on ships are not so unusual there have been very well documented cases of gastrointestinal infections and breaks of these infections on cruise ships primarily with norovirus which is a pretty contagious infection that has you know a short but you know unfortunately rather severe gastrointestinal illness associated with that but I think a lot of people are forgetting that there have been some pretty high profile respiratory virus outbreaks on cruise ships as well for example influenza epidemics for outbreaks on cruise ships when we have many many many individuals often in the thousands of individuals in close quarters on a cruise ship that certainly can promoted even enhance the transmission of these infections there are some Japanese disease specialists who are now telling reporters that the the quarantining of the diamond princess was a bad idea and then there are others have been quoted saying that given what everyone knew at the time it was the best decision to balance the health of the greater good with the interests of individuals so what do you think the ultimate goal was laudable the ultimate goal was care for people that are infected prevent other people on the boat from getting infected we have to also factor in some logistics here I mean there's thirty seven hundred people I think would be extremely challenging to rapidly find appropriate accommodations at the snap of a finger for thirty seven hundred people on the mainland but then when we step back and look at the thirty thousand foot view it does not appear that this was successful and we know day by day by day there were more and more people who were found to be positive for this infection it does not appear that this quarantine measure on this particular ship work well it seems the removal of passengers from the ship and where they're going to a hospital in Japan or to quarantine the United States it feels a little Pell mell is there an international protocol for how quarantine supposed to unfold no I think yeah I really this will be under the guidance of the local public health team so in this case the ship is in Japanese waters and the protocols will be under the Japanese public health teams coordination you know this may have looked completely different if this was in another country but in general quarantines have been used in the past and you know there's obviously very historic use of quarantine before you know preventing for example yellow fever importation from various countries to new regions of what people are kept on the boat for you know several days up to one month at a time before they're allowed to dock but you know in the in the modern era this would certainly be it the more extreme end of the spectrum for a public health response to contain an epidemic Dr Isaac ball gosh an infectious disease specialist at the university of Toronto thanks very much for being with us thanks for having me on it is high time the word Amazon gets re appropriated and the women in the quartet lays Amazon that deaf freak are the ideal wants to do it these is on that freak is a super group made up of women with connections from across the African continent and across generations recently I met two of the ensemble in New York NY added you only goes by that one name she has roots in getting father Rufino is from Benin also in West Africa when we met it was like he you much because we we we are on the same page a ball on this whole violence against women thing and everything is going perfectly seems as musicians things are going well but the content of their music what they sing about may reveal why.

Marco Werman
"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:26 min | 2 years ago

"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Marco Werman you're with the world secretary of state Mike Pompeii always on his first trip to sub Saharan Africa this week it includes stops in Senegal Angola and Ethiopia one of my past top priorities is to focus on anti corruption efforts as well as the fight against money laundering and financing terrorism they are mainly follows closely he's a director of investigations at the sentry and nonprofit that reports on corruption and human rights in Africa everything from maritime piracy to drug trafficking to terrorism all these problems are fundamentally worse if government officials that are responsible for addressing these challenges can be paid to look the other way what we've seen over the past few years in sub Saharan Africa is that there are a number of transnational challenges that have been worse and as a result of corruption in several those challenges are really important to the US the fight against corruption and money laundering really is crucial for safeguarding the integrity of the U. S. financial system the vast majority of international business transactions in sub Saharan Africa take place in US dollars in transactions that take place in US dollars they passed through the U. S. financial system even if it's only for a split second and that poses a money laundering rest these puzzle pieces how do they actually fit together I mean do you actually see a chain reaction from state captured national funds and let's say Angola where Mike Pompeii was today to the money laundering and then to terrorism the same pathways that are used by corrupt government officials or criminal organizations can also be used by terrorists to move money throughout the world for example there are terror financiers from has blocked that have use companies and banks in Congo and Angola to launder money in US dollars so we have seen these pathways work both for corrupt government officials and for terrorist organizations so let's zoom in on how this looks in one a specific country Angola as I said Pompeii met today with angle of presidential while around so Lorenzo has committed to tackling corruption and repatriating stolen funds do you see the tides turning in Angola I think there have been important steps in the right direction going after some large scale major deals involving heavy hitters is no small task and it's really a challenge for a new president to make as much headway as he has in such a short time however in order to determine that this is fundamental systemic change and not just targeted investigations going after would be political rivals what we need to see is really greater transparency in a number of areas particularly as to concerns that national oil company sun angle and then finally I'd say that an important sign would be for actual allies of Lorenzo to become subject to corruption inquiries it's easy for anti corruption investigations to go after the political rivals president but when they start going at the people who actually have power currently that's an order of magnitude more challenging obviously you're referring there to the opposition to the former president does Santos and we have also learned from financial X. that his daughter is about the sent us about her dealings with the money and money laundering and that it goes beyond Angola what steps would you want to see the U. S. specifically take to tackle illicit money flows in Africa there has been greater creativity over the past few years in using what we call the tools of financial pressures the sanctions and anti money laundering mechanisms particularly those possessed by the US department of treasury to start to impose consequences for corrupt government officials are criminals that are stealing state assets as well as the financial institutions that are moving those funds so first and foremost I think putting corruption from center and thinking about which tools can be used creatively to address corruption should be priority number one J. R. Maley the director of investigations of the sentry thank you for being with us thank you we're going inside a high security prison in Indonesia now to witness a remarkable meeting between a young woman and the two convicted terrorists who planted the bomb that killed her mother the bombing happened in two thousand for the prison visit is part of a government de radicalization programs aimed at changing hearts and minds to stop future attacks the BBC's Rebecca hence he has a story getting a security check.

Marco Werman Mike Pompeii
"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hi Marco Werman this is the world the twenty twenty presidential election is still about ten months away but we've already been talking an awful lot about healthcare Democrats have put number put forward a number of proposals to lower healthcare costs unlike a lot of places around the world in the U. S. when you get sick it can cost you a fortune but actually it's not just when you get sick here's the world's Amanda down having kids is super expensive you got food clothes soccer camp let's not even get into paying for college but it turns out the cost of having children start even before all that giving birth in America is expensive new research out of the university of Michigan finds the average cost for having a baby is around forty five hundred dollars out of pocket costs for child birth in the United States are orders of magnitude higher than in other countries that's the shaman these she is a practicing OBGYN and the report's lead author we're talking about out of pocket costs that are in the thousands and these are for women with health insurance coverage that's right forty five hundred dollars with health insurance money says high deductible insurance plans are to blame and there's another problem she says hi costs can deter pregnant women from getting the care that they need I regrettably sometimes see and deciding not take at a lab or an imaging study or other health care services that we recommend for them because of their concern about costs what's more is that in the U. S. giving birth is not only expensive the outcomes are bad the number of women who die during childbirth in the US is high compared to other wealthy nations this is called the maternal mortality rate I asked monies which country she thought had better systems and she named one right away Finland Finland has one of the lowest maternal mortality rates in the world and giving birth there is cheap professor maker Yesler is at the National Institute for health and welfare in Helsinki he says the current policy goes back to the nineteen thirties and forties eighteen years ago we were very poor and people are living in the countryside without meat wives giving birth hold without help and then the government realized that this is not good then then decided to do something drastic provide free access to prenatal care they also rolled out something called the.

Marco Werman America United States Finland Yesler Helsinki university of Michigan professor National Institute for health
"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Marco Werman on the world we get an outside perspective because getting outside yourself can be a good thing somebody says to me Kwame I can't imagine what you go through as a black person and I'll see try it is the world when the world is on KQED this afternoon beginning at two one a spent a year going across America look along the river I didn't know I was black until I came to America they can anybody can come China does not have our farmers best interest at heart that's the problem what we learned from our travels and what more can we look forward to in the new year highlights from across America next time on one that when a program is here on KQED tonight beginning at eleven it's morning edition from NPR news I'm no well king and I'm Steve Inskeep almost any great writer needs a great editor a champion who understands their work and makes it better the editor of many a great writer has died Sonny matter was seventy seven the editor in chief of the publishing house all for a cut off where his authors included Toni Morrison Gabrielle Garcia Marcus and John look correct and peers rose Friedman has this appreciation something that I didn't like to talk about himself in fact in NPR's archived along this clip I could find of him was one in which he quoted to other people on the definition of a classic I think it was Mark Twain who described it as a book which people praise and on trade but the one I feel closest to is Clifton five amends and they said that when you read a classic you do not see more in the book than you did before you see more in you than there was before he was on occasion and brilliantly articulate but he largely left the articulation to his office is James Ellroy was one of those authors he says ministering was that he didn't just a choir books he reveled in hammering out the details with authors Sonny got him there with me for years all right the most complex crime books ever written and he could talk plot points with me chapter and verse on and on and on we met a published all rights novel white jazz the author says they discussed the syncopated style down to each sentence I could walk quite channels off my shelf right now so Sonny me Sonny me so that I was born in New Delhi in nineteen forty two he was the son of a diplomat and moved around the world frequently his career in publishing began in London but it was in New York that he became something of a legend he published six Nobel Prize winners celebrities pope John Paul the second thrillers by John le Carre and such literary authors as jumble Heery Joan Didion and Patti Smith metal live through huge changes in publishing the rise of E. books at Amazon but author Robert Caro historian whose books about power and the ways it's wielded take famously long to write says metal always gave him the room he needed nine one three one I would deliver the manuscript when I would be finished you really understood what I was trying to achieve with my books and you get a rate the thing I needed most farm card to achieve the best back court so he made a never stopped working and James Ellroy says he never stop looking for the next great book he had a troubled sniffing bloodhounds in the state for books at all points in the development of a manuscript his bloodhounds out was right down there on the page so I need to love the cigarette and a Scotch on the opera and a good book best of all rose Friedman NPR news New York as the.

Marco Werman
"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hi Marco Werman this is the world it took some time but the deal got done nafta two point oh also known as the US MCA officials from the US Canada and Mexico met to finalize a deal in Mexico City where US trade representative Robert light Heiser described it this way the result I think is the best trade agreement in history an end to gather all of our teams did this and it's something that's gonna break North America richer it's going to make America rich was gonna make Canada richer and it's gonna make Mexico which the deal still has to be passed by legislatures in all three countries but what does the U. S. M. C. a change from the old nafta will have use from all three partners to the deal starting here in the US Lori Wallach is with public citizen a consumer advocacy group in Washington she gave me her take on who wins and who loses with nafta to point out the winners are ostensibly the working people in North America yeah it works after twenty six years of now that we see wages in Mexico lower than before now stand forty percent lower than manufacturing wages in China this has drawn a billion US government certified million to outsource U. S. jobs so the goal was to try and stop some of that damage so in your opinion is the the US MCA better for US workers and consumers the nafta it's better than the original nafta in fact the outrageous investor state dispute settlement system where multinational corporations can shoot against domestic environmental and health laws you get unlimited compensation from taxpayers that outrageous regime is largely removed from nafta the big open question is are the environmental and labor standards and there and force strong enough to stop nafta is original sin of job outsourcing the main sticking points for house Democrats were environmental concerns are also labor rights in Costa pharmaceuticals what specifically were they worried about well the problem with nafta during a little secret is not mainly about trade sat stop all kinds of rights and privileges for corporations and so the Democrats were trying to get the bad things out of now then tap formative labor and environmental standards that basically set a floor of conduct but again this is an agreement about fixing an existing battered remains and tried to ameliorate its ongoing damage this is not the template for a good modern agreement it's better to have a better agreement than the agreement you know is dreadful but it's not standing question about whether or the new agreement is going to make enough of a difference and if not I think there's gonna be a clamoring it two or three years renegotiated agak Lori Wallach of public citizen with the consumer advocacy take on the US MCA north of the border the Canadian government is taking a victory lap here's deputy prime minister Christopher inland all of us together have finally accomplished what.

Marco Werman
"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:33 min | 2 years ago

"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hi Marco Werman this is the world what's in a name legally a lot champagne has to come from the champagne region of France Scott can only come from Scotland but balsamic vinegar does it need to come from Modena Italy the European Court of justice weighed in this week next different don't you are I did some nifty field office the court said no balsamic is a general term despite the fame around the city of Modena for making it balsamic vinegar comes from the juice of crushed grapes along with all the skins seeds and stems Modenas vinegar makers were arguing for exclusive rights over the label boss sonic and they wanted it codified into European law this idea was hats when a German vinegar makers started labeling it's vinegar balsamic Italy's makers worried that would dilute their product yes on intended but with this week's bitter ruling better from the Italian perspective at least balsamic vinegar here after is any bitter sweet tasting vinegar regardless of where it's made foreign aid workers coming go in Afghanistan but Japanese humanitarian Tetsu it not come more it was different he was a doctor and stayed in Afghanistan for decades until this Wednesday when knocking more was driving to work in the Afghan city of Jalalabad and gunmen opened fire on his car nothing more in five of his Afghan colleagues were shot dead what full enough to fees audit is head of tolo news in Kabul he's followed not camara's work he was an extraordinary individual he came to Afghanistan and he went to a rural area to help people gain access to water and he turned a desert into a green area so he changed lives he was not one of those aid workers to being in Kabul or somebody other big cities inside the heavily guarded compounds he was in Afghanistan for many many years and recently he was granted honorary Afghan citizenship so I gather that he entered Afghanistan as an MD a clinician in the eighties but saw a more effective focus on agriculture and realize that drought was actually killing more people than his clinics could save right and he was living and working like a local everybody into all of that left him he was not a foreigner at all one can argue he was speaking the local language and he was living that lie can ask those irrigation techniques that he brought from Japan to Afghanistan I mean those are hundreds of years old I know Afghans are excellent engineers how's it that this canal building technique was not well known in Afghanistan his techniques and I think we're quite unique in the sense that he managed to get it done and he was very persistent he was very dedicated to what and they gave us a lot of time and that's not something that you you see so much here you start something and they don't finish it you too you too not a very good job I'm just not sustainable you put them and his entire life and he was basically living and that was the reason that this was such a successful project but I will not the only thing he was doing right he also oversaw the construction of mosques let's listen to what doctor not more actually said about that is certain will to available in most of the most who attest to keep doctor knocking Morris saying there they were please when the water came of course but hearing about the mosque made them even happier until that time doctor Knockmore continues it was as if being a Muslim was considered something bad and there's even a photo that moment I saw the locals literally picked up doctor not camara and held aloft like a hero it reminds me though that a lot of foreign aid workers who come to Afghanistan they promised to respect the culture and in the long run they don't really how was doctor not come or a different that way he loved the country at a not very true sense and he connected with local people he had a nickname and people love him and he was not seen as a farmer what was his nickname Kokomo rod John come around that's what some people you know called Marat these in our C. M. destiny unlock how and that suited his character the student is that commitment he was well known in particular part of Afghanistan but after his death in the whole country is morning and I haven't seen such a reaction for any of the Afghan loss this week since the who is likely responsible for this attack we kill doctor not camara and his colleagues it's very difficult to say that a lot of people running around the country with **** anyone can do that but to whoever did it I think they just don't want to see Afghanistan will forward kind of some pro grass I've got a son build friendships where there other people in the world so any me off not just Afghanistan but I think humanity all of us including myself and Afghans you know where we do we right there's an outpouring of respect on line for uncle more odd there's one Afghan who posted this video online where another person's expressing enormous respect for not camara at the inauguration of what else a water canal the good the good I'm loving it this man is saying you took the construction very seriously no one has ever been so conscientious before we are very grateful we pray for your health and success it is a very different approach to humanitarian aid that was in a course you know the waited to you you dedicate all he had and his time and resources and passion I was quite unique this is a story of friendship by someone who wanted to make a difference and one of the most difficult places in the world for some of the most deprived people yeah I mean attacks like this seem to be escalating in Afghanistan just about a week ago an American working for the United Nations was killed in an explosion and COBOL in places like Afghanistan humanitarian work is dangerous work and yet Afghans need humanitarian workers and will continue to need them how do you get aid workers to think more like doctor not to more of being really with the people and not here today gone tomorrow it's very difficult and I think it is getting more and more difficult a lot of foreigners and Afghans are being filled in and what we see a trend gunmen on a motorcycle or driving by and started shooting at them this is very very alarming I think this makes it difficult for other people aid workers and countries than older I commit to Afghanistan I think Afghanistan loss to not just an aid worker acting up gonna some loss of someone who is not just dedicated his life to make a difference but leading mate you know huge deal of difference I think the whole nation is in debt to his commitment and hard work for all these years look for a not if he's not a heads tolo news in Kabul he's been telling us about the life and work of Japanese humanitarian Dr Tatsunoko mora who shot and killed this week in Jalalabad Afghanistan level of thank you very much for helping us remember the doctor sure thank you thank you a.

Marco Werman Scott France
France Announces New Measures to Tackle Domestic Violence

The World

01:23 min | 2 years ago

France Announces New Measures to Tackle Domestic Violence

"I'm Marco Werman and you're with the world there were dozens of marches across France this weekend demanding government action against domestic violence today France's prime minister Edward Philippe unveiled some new measures including dedicated prosecutors to address abuse better police training and a plan to seize guns from violent abusers France has one of the highest rates of femicide in western Europe is defined there as women killed by their partners or ex partners according to one count at least one hundred sixteen women have been killed so far this year though the number is believed to be much higher what gets less attention is this fact about one third of those women were over the age of sixty Rebecca Rosman recently spoke with the daughter of a woman who was one of those statistics there's so many things not in new Bach or want to tell me about our moms on Thomas Hey she was a very confident woman for sure I could listen to her talking over and over she always taught me something new she says her mom was smart loved animals she even rescue two donkeys my sister and I were like what are you doing this month and she would say I just love donkeys now he lives in Michigan so she's playing a video for me over the phone that's from may

Marco Werman France Edward Philippe Europe Rebecca Rosman Bach Michigan Prime Minister Thomas
Hong Kong is in recession after almost 5 months of protests

PRI's The World

08:01 min | 2 years ago

Hong Kong is in recession after almost 5 months of protests

"I'm Marco Werman this is the world Hong Kong is in recession and after nearly five months of street protests the economy in one of China's most important business hubs is slowing down retail sales are plunging also tourism is off fifty percent in October compared with last year and the U. S. China trade war is taking a financial toll the demonstrations in Hong Kong have been led mostly by young people protesting the way China governs a territory. It's easy to make a historical comparison to nineteen eighty nine when young people in Beijing's Tiananmen Square also protested in Beijing so two years ago we were begging for something called freedom that we member taste them by ones were you were smashed and we just gave up that's Han Dongfang. He was a protest leader in Gentleman Square after the bloody crackdown he spent a couple of years in prison and he later fled to Hong Kong now he's a labor organizer base there and he's watching and supporting this young generation protesters Han told me the movement in Hong Kong DOC is different from gentlemen in one crucial way today Hong Kong young people what they are doing is not begging in an Oscar for freedom is they have been living and freedom now someone attempting to take away so that is the fundamental for instance that is what I believe these people will never gave up how much have you been speaking with protesters in Hong Kong in recent weeks and what have you been hearing I am not really speaking to them I am participating in every major protest I am industries I observe them and I learned from on them because if I well remember in nine in two thousand fourteen I saw these young people into the highway and I run into them I said look you've got to get out from the highway you are giving them excuses the two shoe and I came from a nineteen eighty nine Tiananmen Square as what happens at the time they get shoes and these are shooting people and people don't want to listen to me an ICU kind of sad. about saw you know they are really not taking their life Catholic and they are really taking great risk but on fung aren't the protesters today also giving the the authorities plenty of reasons to kind of mistake reprisals I mean subway stations have been a set a a light they've occupied the airport I mean they're giving it seems the police a lot of reasons to to crack down on them yes you can say today even more than two thousand fourteen even more than thirty years ago in Tiananmen Square was they'll protesters are doing but the fundamental differences the protesters the mentality and courage so two years ago we we're fighting for something in or dreams we never know whenever taste it if we don't get it and we don't really lose anything but nowadays these people what from my observation in the street every major protest I can see a determination from their phase their body language and especially this is joined by men women young men and women and women are not following a man and men are on their own so all over in st they in their say's in their body language you can read they are ready to burn together it if it burns so dunk fung what is your advice to the Hong Kong protesters at this moment and where should they steer that courage I'm afraid I don't have a any strategic suggestions because I don't have it I am is a learning from them about the decorative ity of organizing difference activism protests every day during the week and evening date so this is a very new to mate so US Vice President Mike Pence says a America stands with Hong Kong and he criticised China for curtailing the rights is in liberties of Hong Kongers does that help the protesters or does it just add to the Chinese government's claim that this whole protest movement is a Western inspired separatist movement oh it's definitely help the movement the protests in Hong Kong and to make the Chinese government to think twice what to do but I have a very serious question here as Mista pants our Mr trump they taking this decision as a strategic move to make themselves in better position during the trade deal trade talk as a chip or as they are taking it as principal that no matter what even there there's no trade war they will take this human rights and democracy matter seriously what about if the U. S. China trade deal goes well while they oh back there will be no pressure there's no concern at what the Hong Kong people will do with that so help us with this one final question Dongfang despite some of the police crackdown on protesters disrupting business and mass transit in Hong Kong it seems many Hong Kongers have not abandoned or given up on the protesters and their actions why do you think that is what does it tell us you know Hong Kong people have enjoyed the freedom or snow much democracy Z. in a pause up to this point but enjoy the freedom freedom means you don't have to realize that every day morning would you tab use as I'm in freedom no freedom the beauty of freedom you don't realize that every day you don't have to pay attention but once somewhat attempt to AAC it whether your business person big business small business big like Miss the League coaching as more like other corners streets let you open a small restaurant leak catching as a big tycoon in Hong Kong right yeah big tie tongue one of the I didn't know riches Jason and Asia and the world maybe these people they all suddenly few their freedom as maybe a facing to a risk and this is a what make people bring people together you lose the same things that you enjoy didn't really have to feel it every day now you feel the same danger but the same even people were walking in the street protests the same things are fearful of losing freedom and they're not not necessarily show last or right middle or what but they are gathered together on this one same interests and fear which is fearful of losing freedom so that's my explanation about why Hong Kong people even the businesspeople they lose some business they're not but they're still tolerate this because they know that I had them. There will be bigger things to Luke's Han Dongfang a protest leader at Gentlemen Square nineteen eighty nine and currently a Labor activist thank you very much for your perspective I really appreciate it thank you thank you. Ns talking to you

Hong Kong China Han Dongfang Beijing Tiananmen Square Marco Werman Gentlemen Square Gentleman Square Luke Two Years Fifty Percent Thirty Years Five Months
"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:34 min | 2 years ago

"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Marco Werman you're with the world an explosion in Iraq this week is raising some big questions it was from a drone attack firing on a cache of weapons that belong to an Iraqi malicious supported by Iran several parties are involved here news reports say the drone was piloted by Israel it's apparently not the first such airstrike so we're basically looking at a serious escalation happening in Iraq since July nineteenth that we see in four explosions joys Karan has been covering the story for the national news agency which is based in the United Arab Emirates so mark on Tuesday eight PM mob of that time another report an explosion and a rock hitting an ammunition warehouse that belongs to a role Iran militia since then we've seen all fingers pointing on Israel as being responsible for the act act Israeli prime minister Bibi Netanyahu speaking from Ukraine did not deny responsibility but he also did not confirm it either so a pro Iran Alicia inside Iraq uses these Iranian weapons in this cache what what are they for well these militias have sprouted after the US invasion of Iraq and they have why you're sophisticated weaponry from Iran and the US and Israel monitor these weaponry transfers they initially used some and the fight against ISIS but they mainly use them as non state actors then they are a major threat inside Iraq and region the answer is wrong so BB Netanyahu has not denied or confirm that this happened but does it follow the pattern of Israel just being concerned about Iran where ever run is in the Mideast precisely and that's what he said Iran will have no immunity anywhere in the Middle East and the attack it sells the rights they fit a pattern that Israel has been following and hitting Iranian proxies whether in Syria or Iraq now what this brings to the conversation as there are US troops in Iraq these militias have threatened not to retaliate against Israel but to retaliate against US interests and basis and Iraqi territory you remind us what the US interests are in Iraq right now the US has several thousand troops in Iraq there are joint bases with the Iraqi government and several areas in Iraq some are very close to where these explosions happened the same militias have said openly that they want the US to leave Iraq but the US is there mainly for the fight against terrorism the the fight against ISIS I'll guide now also to secure its regional interests I mean there's another question to why did the Iraqi military not handle this it's incapable the Iraqi military though the functions of the Iraqi state after the war has been weakened the state itself is fragmented if there's concern in Israel about Iran why was this a military strike was diplomacy not an option because there is no diplomatic ties between Israel and Iran there is no diplomacy happening in Iraq or Syria or Yemen or live yeah I mean you name it there is very little conflict resolution and diplomatic efforts going a selectively into several Middle East arenas today so you said there's been a seer as of the strikes what are you gonna be looking for next in assessing where this goes the latest we've heard from Iraq is one of these malicious has stripped and then you ask if one more strike ochre so we were all watching to see if another explosion mysterious explosion happens in Iraq and who will bear the consequences of that will it be US assets and Iraq would be U. S. allies assets in Iraq we don't know yet so that's what we're watching ends up you know keep an eye on them at least you don't know what's wrong is gone just explode at that that's what time George Karem with the national thanks very much for your time thanks mark of there's a small town in Belgium called off AT H. and today the du casa dot festival kicks off it's a tradition that goes back hundreds of years it was even put on the intangible cultural heritage lists by UNESCO the U. N.'s cultural agency the festival includes a parade with twenty two characters riding on floats each one representing some type of historical or religious figure enter the controversy one of these characters is called the savage and there's a campaign to have them removed the world's are burned down has more that looks like a ship makes three and a white guy in black and full body black make that change the Dow this is the seventh in the make up it's only the half of it he has a ring through his nose a feather headdress a ruling class and shackles he strains against the chains and cries out the crowd the pre goes back to medieval.

Marco Werman Iraq
"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hi Marco Werman and you're with the world good to have you here today large protests in Moscow over the weekend got ugly police arrested more than thirteen hundred people that is unprecedented in recent Russian history the demonstrations were about the Moscow city council elections coming up in September and the fact that the Moscow Election Commission bart opposition candidates from running Alexina volley is probably the most well known opposition leader in Russia he was not among those arrested on Saturday that's because not only was already in prison he was detained last week and yesterday not only was reportedly taken from jail to a hospital with some kind of severe allergic reaction that's led to speculation and fears that he was poisoned so what is going on here Daniel suddenly covers covering all of this for TV rain independent television channel in Russia he joins us now from Moscow describe dental what it's been like for protesters in the streets of Moscow over the past couple of days so it was not my first protests but this one the police tried to intimidate they'd started that they need random people on the streets the police goal was to keep the streets empty but they didn't succeed the crowds begin to grow and the police were trying to divide the crowds there were no internet connection no cell phone connection and at this point nobody knew what's going on that's when the police started so that the people and to act more aggressively I've never seen something like that before they have huge crowd was walking on the streets of Moscow yelling some slowdowns and nobody was controlling them down what was a crowd actually yelling so there were many slogans they mostly yelled something about putting that Putin is the.

Marco Werman Moscow Russia Daniel Putin Moscow Election Commission Alexina
"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Still back tonight AT truly devilish forty can we do thank you Julie her report brought to you by the T. J. Martell foundation that's why Zynga we do expect some drizzle and fog late tonight temperatures drop to the fifties more of the same weather tomorrow hi Marco Werman you're with the world it's bigger than Snapchat Twitter and linkedin but it's mostly teenagers who are using it tech talk the fastest growing social media app in the world but it's come under scrutiny for the practice of gift baiting that's when tech talkers use their live broadcast to coerce young fans into sending them hundreds of dollars in digital gifts the BBC's Joe tidy reports of one well I saw you do it live thank you for your call stumbling into a tech told live stream can be bewildering the once you learn the short hand in jargon it's clear take talk celebrities are effectively selling their attention remember you are the next person the quick I get boxes in a concert you gonna follow concerts rainbow peaks and pandas real names of gifts these animated cartoons pop up on screen during live streams highlighting the gift is username the little ones cost pennies but the biggest one called a drama queen costs uses forty nine pounds despite having one of the five hundred million uses the platform doesn't have any guidelines about what can and cannot be offered in exchange for gifts the the dropping of its own going you know speak to on Instagram for weeks striped shall towns video collaborations and falling back several common but some fans feel exploited we spoke to a twelve year old girl from the north west of England who didn't want our interviews we wrote cost you can use to talk a hundred a hundred pounds.

Julie T. J. Martell foundation Zynga Marco Werman Twitter linkedin BBC Instagram England Joe tidy forty nine pounds hundred pounds twelve year
"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Marco werman. This is the world. It's been a decade century-long kaput. It's long civil war in the past ten years of relative calm there. So yesterday's coordinated terror attacks across the island on Easter or shocking. Here's what we know for sure today. Three cities were targeted the capital Colombo where there were six bombing sites. Another site was in the city of Batticaloa. And the worst carnage was in the city of Negombo just the north of Colombo a single bombing at one church where more than one hundred people were killed. We reached out today to report Aurora almond draw who started her day in Colombo this morning there were people out on the streets, but far less than you would expect on a Monday morning rush. Hour people were passing by the hotels, where their windows were blown out where there bombings, and everybody's trying to get a look at what happened from combo when to Negombo where there was the the church of Saint Sebastian where they had the largest number of casual. Altis there people were trying to make sense of what was happening. There is a fair amount of tension, and obviously some fear and some anger among the people who were at the church in the hospital trying to identify the victims and find their family members and things like that. So what did you hear what who did you speak to spoke to when men is name was Denver. And he lived nearby to the church and her the large explosion after the suicide bomber detonated his his bombing. He rushed over to the Tricia tried to help the people of feeling for pulses trying to save the ones who are still alive. Big.

Colombo Negombo Marco werman Aurora almond Batticaloa Tricia Saint Sebastian Denver ten years
"marco werman" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"marco werman" Discussed on PRI's The World

"I'm Marco werman journalists in Venezuela say the Maduro government is trying to intimidate them. This reporter in Caracas felt at personally when a police officer tried to stop her from doing her job as case. Pulling me in my face. But as we'll hear she says, independent journalists in Venezuela are determined to be like fireflies shining collective light on the truth. Also, these kids in Germany have skipped school three Fridays in a row to let the adults know how they feel about global inaction on climate change if they win listen to us. We wouldn't be here. American students are also joining in those stories and more today here on the world. I'm Marco werman. This is the world. Good to have you here today. Blackouts protests detentions inflation political chaos. It's all happening at once in Venezuela. And for people who are living through all that. There is one more thing to deal with fear real fear that things could get a lot worse before they get better. Take the case of Luis Carlos Diaz an independent journalists in Caracas it was arrested earlier this week by the Maduro government one of forty. Journalists have been detained since the unrest. Started in January DA's was accused applauding the regime's. Overthrow I spoke with a friend of his today fellow journals loose Amelie raise who's also in Caracas. She went to Diaz his home as soon as she heard about his arrest. And while she was there several sunglass wearing police officers came to take everything away books, notes, computer, hard drives. And that's when Ray started to livestream. What was happening from her phone the world past basic? By berries. Call. You were doing that online at periscope. I did call and I explained to the people what happened there and police asked me to stop, and he took a mind my cell phone. He took his dog on for me in my face. So this police officer held a gun to your face while you're doing this thing. How did that make you feel in your journalists?.

Caracas Venezuela Maduro government Marco werman Luis Carlos Diaz officer Ray reporter Amelie Germany
Former Canadian diplomat detained in China

The World

00:51 sec | 3 years ago

Former Canadian diplomat detained in China

"The British Prime Minister Theresa may says European leaders are showing determination to tackle the issues which have led to her Brexit deal being opposed. In Britain's parliament, she's been meeting European leaders. But correspondent say their reactions have been blunt Chancellor Merkel of Germany told MRs may there would be no renegotiation of the agreement. Rob Watson has been gauging. The response to this trip amongst Rune MP's in London. I think it's a sailors a pretty desperate mission one. That is unlikely to win round wavering conservative MP's. But I think it's incredibly important to say some conservatives MP's told me, do we think that's reason may as Winston Churchill absolutely not received disappointing as a leader. Absolutely. But they've also said to me, look you have to ask yourself if we replace the reason with another leader that wouldn't change the fundamental arithmetic. If she were to lose the vote who on earth would want the job an American. Neo Nazi who plowed? His car into a group of protesters in Charlottesville last year, killing a young woman has been sentenced to life in jail by jury in the city James field whose twenty one was found guilty of murdering Heather hair. India's prime minister Narendra Modi has accepted defeat in key state elections writing on Twitter. He congratulated the opposition congress party for its victories in several states, including Registan and charges gar which were previously governed by Mr. Modi's BJP party. Analysts suggest rural discontent could be one factor behind the swing. Russian cosmonauts are on a six hour. Spacewalk investigating a mystery hole which appeared in the Soyuz spacecraft in August is the first time they've examined the damage from from outside the saw us, which is docked in the international space station, the whole caused an air leak that was immediately fixed. BBC news. I'm Marco werman, and you're with the world good to have you with us today in this age of fake news and presidents

Rune Mp Narendra Modi Prime Minister Winston Churchill Theresa Chancellor Merkel Marco Werman Rob Watson Britain BBC BJP Germany Congress Party Heather Hair Twitter Charlottesville India London Registan Six Hour
Yemen's crushing war takes a tentative first step to a resolution

PRI's The World

02:04 min | 3 years ago

Yemen's crushing war takes a tentative first step to a resolution

"Yemeni capital by secret. Police last year they held him for five months in prison run by Yemen's who the rebels he shot and his family live in Cairo. Now, we spoke with him this afternoon about the planned release of thousands of prisoners who were captured in the Yemeni civil war. I remember what my family had to go through Joe tension. They constantly worried that I wasn't gonna make it alive out of the prison than even know where I was I was kept in dungeon for five months solitary confinement, one meter by one meter and a half cell. I had no windows. There was no light for the first two weeks. And. I was literally buried alive. People ask me what I stepped out of prison when I was released will I be seeking revenge against the footy. I guess my captors, but the one thing I kept insisting on repeating was that out of one vengeance out of entre. Vengeance. What has happened has already happened? Let's turn promote peace. So to my family to the prisoners inside those cells. It means a lot that those are breakthrough that has got to be a prisoner. Swap the prisoner. Swap is gonna mean, basically, giving them a second chance at life Yemeni political active at political analyst and former political prisoner. He Sean Allah Mesa. He spoke with us about the prisoner. Swap brokered by the UN this week in Sweden, which may help pave the way for further talks to end the Yemen war. I'm Marco werman, and you're with the world. So an African king walks into a barbershop, I'm king Joffe Jolfa ruler of someone. Yeah. We'll have see them to be ready to say that barbershop and Eddie Murphy's coming to America was one of many influences in a new play by Nigerian INA Elam's barbershop chronicles is set in. Also in Johannesburg, Harare, Legos London as well as.

Yemen Political Analyst Sean Allah Mesa Eddie Murphy Ina Elam Marco Werman Legos London Cairo Joffe Jolfa UN Johannesburg JOE America Sweden Five Months One Meter Two Weeks
Is Climate Change Draining Nutrients From Crops?

The World

04:44 min | 3 years ago

Is Climate Change Draining Nutrients From Crops?

"Looking at another few ninety plus degree days here in Boston and before the end. Of August more, carbon dioxide. In the atmosphere will fuel climate change for decades to come. As if. That's not enough here's another downside it's going to make the food we eat less nutritious there's a direct effect. Of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere on plants that's reducing crop nutrients that's Harvard. Scientists Sam Myers he co wrote a study published today in the journal nature climate change it found that hundreds, of millions of people could suffer from. Iron zinc, and protein deficiencies in? The, coming. Decades and that's because more carbon means fewer nutrients in staple crops around the world we're seeing on the order. Of roughly five to fifteen percent reductions in these very important, nutrients from colluding iron zinc and protein five to fifteen percent. You said is that a lot. Well yeah it turns out that It is but the only way to answer that question in a rigorous way is to ask how many people in the world. Are living relatively close to a threshold of nutrient deficiency and are also depending on these kinds of food crops for significant portions of the. Nutrients that they're. Getting and what we found is. Somewhere on the order. Of one hundred to two hundred million people around the world would be expected to fall. Into new risk, of zinc. And protein deficiency and that there'd be large large numbers of. People that. Would lose important amounts of their dietary iron as well which crops are we talking about here the crops that. Provide most of the calories in the human diet I mean things like wheat. And rice and soy and just about every crop that falls into what's called a c. three crop which essentially, is every single food crop that we. Eat except, for maize or corn? Sorghum, and. Some of the millet And I know you kind of separate the effect of. CO two on plants and CO two in the atmosphere but it is striking the people who are going to feel these effects, the most are the same people who are going to be most impacted overall by climate change people in the Asian subcontinent southeast Asia Africa the Middle. East why is that there's no question that the most vulnerable people in the world tend to be the poorest people in lower income countries will have the fewest sort of insulating layers, to protect them from these effects whether we're talking about more extreme storms or we're talking about increased exposure to infectious disease or we're talking about less, nutritional foods in this case the greatest risk is in India's South. Asia much, of Africa and the reason for that, is that those are places where diets are less diverse eighty percent of calories, in India's diet come from cereals and relatively low income people tend to have much lower, intake of animal source foods Which are rich in iron zinc in protein and can protect. Those people to some degree from these effects so it's it's not very diverse diet not very much animal source foods heavy reliance on cereals and then those cereals. Are losing key nutrients Sam did this study personally worry you Yeah I mean it worries me that hundreds of. Millions of people are going to be. Pushed into new risk of some pretty serious nutritional deficits but I also think there's an awful lot we can do so I think we. Need to, step, up our commitment, to doing research to reduce our vulnerability to these. Kinds of affects Sam give us a bit of. Hope here are there fixes, for this problem that crop researchers are public health officials are already thinking about another a variety of things we can do I mean obviously first and foremost. We need to start reducing our carbon dioxide emissions that's the most direct thing that we can do but in addition to that. There are all kinds of other areas for, research that could be engaged in one is breeding crops, that are actually less sensitive to this carbon dioxide effect there's work being done in bio fortification of crops. Meeting that you enrich those crops with, respect to certain nutrients are supplementing, diets there's an enormous, amount that can be done particularly in, the, most, vulnerable countries to encouraging increased, consumption Of foods like fruits and vegetables and nuts and seeds and legumes that would provide. Additional amounts of these nutrients so there are all kinds of. Promising and interesting areas for research but I think we really need to step up our commitment to doing that research where right. Now I think the global commitment is. Relatively tepid Sam Myers head of the planetary health alliance and a research at Harvard School of public health thanks for being with us all. Right thank, you, so much

Mexico President Trump Sam Myers Canada United States Marco Werman Harvard School Of Public Kendall Boston Sonora K. J. Z. Hollywood Kai Ryssdal Protein Deficiency Phoenix
Global Reach & Statistics - Uber Expansion

The World

01:00 min | 3 years ago

Global Reach & Statistics - Uber Expansion

"Does Uber dominate. The ride sharing industry globally Not exactly that was the case may be Two years ago their national strategy is is pretty interesting before it used to. Be in the over one point zero. Days it was boots on the ground everywhere you need to be anywhere where it needs to be the transport platform of choice for everyone in. The world that clearly was not. Financially sustainable so they've pulled. Out of Russia they pulled out of China we saw in southeast Asia were had to pull out the yield at, the company came to with the homegrown player grab was more favorable than deals that were, had with China's home from. Player TD still it was out of necessity the company was definitely not doing, as well as expected to across southeast Asia and that's why. They've had to pull out on in India market share might be a little. Bit, more comparable to its competitor there Ola however it. Is a very difficult market to

Spain New York City James Asquith Asia India Indonesia James Uber Marco Werman Middle East China London Johanna James Oscar Southeast Asia OLA United States Johanna Company
Trump, NPR and Ted Anthony discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

04:10 min | 3 years ago

Trump, NPR and Ted Anthony discussed on Morning Edition

"Local member, station by, name This is NPR news Ahead on, morning edition for Tuesday you'll hear a story about rethinking the practice of solitary confinement for inmates the story. Out of North Dakota more about that on that, story on morning, edition as it continues we'll get the Traffix story two from Ted Anthony and just a. Few minutes right now today's weather pretty much the conditions remain the same that we've seen the, past couple of days sunny skies for the bay area after some morning clouds and patchy fog do watch for the clouds though to hanging hanging around along the coast through, the day highs today the low sixty s along the coast through the seventies around the bay into the low nineties inland and for. The southern Sacramento valley a sunny day today with areas of smoke through the day is between ninety. Two and one hundred they predicted high for the capital, city of Sacramento. Today ninety six degrees I'm Michael state the time it. Is nineteen after four From NPR news in Washington I'm Dave Mattingly Afghan officials say a roadside bombing in the west. Of the country today has killed eleven people aboard a passenger bus in the east militants have launched. An assault on Jalalabad Afghan officials say gunmen stormed a, government building and. Took hostages after a suicide. Bomber attack the front gate Iran's, president is expressing skepticism over President Trump's offer, to meet with Iranian leaders as NPR's Peter Kenyon reports Trump says he's willing to do so without preconditions president Hassan. Rohani says a country that breaks its, promises a reference to Trump pulling out of the twenty fifteen nuclear agreement cannot be trusted and further talks Ronnie also says. Tehran will protect its right to export. Oil a vital economic lifeline at a time when Iran's inflation rate is soaring in the currency rapidly, losing value, to history professors. Are resigning from university of Virginia think-tank over the appointment of a former, aide to President Trump has caused Spencer with. Member station w. c. v., e. reports Mark short is also a UVA alum the resigning professors point to Mark Short's, history of working for such conservatives. As former marine Ollie north the coke brothers and, Trump nevertheless short remains on track to begin a one year fellowship on Wednesday UVA's Miller center Short worked as the president's legislative affairs director I'm Dave Mattingly NPR, news in Washington On the next fresh air you want a husband will take a. Bullet for you not one who points to the attic and says they're up there Tony. Shalhoub has been nominated for an EMMY for his performance in the Amazon comedy series the marvelous MRs Mazel shalhoub also starred in the TV series monk. And the film big night join us It's fresh air, one o'clock this afternoon and again this evening, at seven here on kqed public radio I'm Michael state help you. Have a nice safe trip to your place of employment this morning let's see how smooth. It is at this hour here's Ted Anthony Wright in. A good morning to you Michael will head over to Pittsburgh. Westbound four near a railroad just getting word of a, two vehicle accident which may have the right lane block CHP. Already headed out there San. Jose hit and run accident right shoulder McLaughlin avenue on ramp and northbound six. Eighty and we still have this situation in south San Francisco the point boulevard Dubuque. Avenue on ramp to southbound one zero one remains shut down this from a big rig action which happened late last. Night and it produced an oil spill so the cleanup there continues now we're. Hearing maybe. Seven o'clock this morning when you have that. Ramp reopen I'm Ted Anthony for Ted's update brought to you by. FEMA and the Ad Council I'm Marco werman PR is the world brings you a global. Perspective on the news with a worldwide network of correspondents you meet people at the heart.

Donald Trump NPR Ted Anthony Michael State President Trump President Hassan Dave Mattingly Iran North Dakota Washington Ted Anthony Wright Sacramento Valley Mrs Mazel Shalhoub Sacramento Mark Short San Francisco Jalalabad Afghan Assault Marco Werman