26 Burst results for "Marco Werman"

"marco werman" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

07:38 min | 1 year ago

"marco werman" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"Your role as chair of the senate select committee on intelligence. We've been following the concerning reports of various government employees being afflicted by unexplained attacks. What's become known as van syndrome. This week's news comes from india where us intelligence officer was traveling with the head of the cia william burns. That officer is reported symptoms consistent with a van syndrome. How is the senate intelligence committee dealing with this mystery. This is a phenomenon that the government has been very late to the game in acknowledging and treating people who've been hurt frankly under the trump administration for the first two or three years. There was an effort to sweep this under the rug. And i find it. Outrageous people were being denied The medical treatment they needed. We're talking about numbers and now in the hundreds it's not just people in the intelligence community. It's people out of the state department out of dod and the idea if somehow you can become a victim of something that is creating enormous headaches attentively permanent brain damage and you don't know what's causing it. We still don't have a fulsome answer on what nation state are launching these attacks. We don't have a full answer on how they're launching. And i can tell you we. Now have the resources trying to investigate. Who's doing it and how it's happening. And i think we'll have some of those answers very shortly. Because our spies are our diplomats. Our soldiers deserve to get the protection. They need when they sort of our country abroad. Like we can follow up with you when we have those answers. Thank you very much. We're feeling that question senator. Mark warner working on an international tax plan to be part of the democrats mega spending bill. Senator thank you very much for being with us today. Barco thanks for having me. I want my home to be a personal cocoon of happiness. But it doesn't have to be architectural digest perfect. We all know someone who must have everything in their house be just so the lamps the drapes. The carpets a sound turns out less than perfect is actually better for our love. Lives are at least for some mammals. Biologists from china and michigan teamed up to study giant pandas in nature reserve in china. They found that the bears need enough suitable habitat to thrive but not too much something close to eighty percent. Suitable habitat is optimal. If pens are to content they may not move around to explore like if the forest is really cushy with their favorite chow bamboo everywhere. What's the motivation to get out and meet other pandas. But when animals have to sit out for greener pastures literally. They do meet new mates which is obviously key for creating genetic diversity and sustainability of the species. The findings were published in this month's conservation. Biology scientists say the study likely has impacts for other species to the lesson. Good enough maybe the new perfect good news for animals and for land conservation managers everywhere. You lovers might wanna take note as well. You're listening to the world. I'm marco werman with the world leaders from around the globe of convened in new york for the un general assembly for the second year in a row the gathering china made some big pledges to fight climate change. Here's chinese president. Xi jinping speaking through an interpreter china will step up support for other developing countries in developing green and low carbon energy. Bill new coal-fired power projects abroad. No new chinese back. Coal plants outside of china. The world's environment correspondent carolyn. Bieler joins me now to discuss this so caroline. Us climate envoys. John carey said that he's absolutely delighted by this move which he's been talking about with chinese officials apparently for some time. The un secretary general antonio guitarist has also been pushing for this. What is the significance. It's a big announcement marco. China is the biggest remaining public funder of coal fire power plants. It's building coal-fired. Power plants abroad through its belt and road. Initiative concentrated largely in vietnam bangladesh indonesia. This announcement was really just those several words that you just heard so. It's not clear exactly what it means when it will take effect whether it will apply just to brand new power plants or those that are already planned but not yet built alvin. Lynn is an expert on china climate policy at the natural resources defense council and he told me that if it applies to power plants that are planned but not yet built nearly fifty power plants are going to be cancelled if you look at a huge sector aviation. This is equivalent of grounding a quarter of flights in terms of their emissions. And so this is a really important announcement both for the signal that it sends. And also i think you know what it means in terms of those Tons of co two. What kind of signal does this announcement said. That china is continuing to take significant steps forward on climate change even though it needs to be doing or just like most of the rest of the world and it gives a boost to expectations ahead of the un climate summit in glasgow. Does it change things for glasgow. There is starting to be some chatter that the un climate summit in glasgow might not be a success so climate policy experts were looking to the un general assembly for some concrete announcements that would signal that country's really were willing to come to the table with some big new promises next month so out of the un general assembly climate policy experts were looking for any announcements on coal from china which we've obviously seen and announcements from developed countries including the us on climate. Finance we also saw an announcement yesterday from president. Joe biden that the us would double its climate finance for developing countries by twenty twenty four. So taken together. Those are both seen by those reading. The tea leaves that there might be some real solid commitments made in about a month time at the climate summit in glasgow so the announcement from china to pledge to not support coal projects outside of china but president. She did not mention domestic consumption. did he he did. Not and none of the much larger source of both emissions and pollution for those who live near these plants than power. Plants financed abroad China accounts for about half of all of the coal fire. Power plants around the world. They're still building more of them. Even though last year at the un general assembly china said it would hit peak emissions. By the end of this decade. I spoke to fa lee. Who's an assistant professor of environmental studies at new york university shanghai today and he made this point that this is a reminder that a chinese authorities are also up against vested interests just like the rest of the world no reason to think that an authoritarian state like china can simply change the reality on the ground with the snap of a finger it simply is never the case still we are expecting to see maybe some more details about domestic call use in china as the glasgow summit approaches and of course at some point more details on what this announcement that came out this week. We'll actually mean and win. It will go into effect. The world's environment correspondent carolyn dealer. Thanks very much welcome marco. Los angeles is notorious for its traffic jams but now the most concerning one is in the ocean the ports of los angeles and long beach are jammed up with ships trying to get in dozens of them waiting offshore to unload their goods record numbers. In fact it's a similar story playing out. Imports across the nation. Largent follows this sort of thing. He's a ceo of spooky maritime and joins us from copenhagen. What's behind this massive buildup of ships at us ports in a single word. Kobe in a few more words colby leading to the average american consumer beginning to buy a lot more physical goods rather than services. This is one of the key reasons why we now seeing this.

china senate select committee on int senate intelligence committee un general assembly william burns marco werman glasgow Bieler antonio guitarist Mark warner un Barco cia Xi jinping us John carey india bears marco
"marco werman" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"marco werman" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"Save energy so we took the idea and we better in technology available today can reflect ninety eight point one person sunlight. That's way higher than the previous white paint available that the only reflect eighty to ninety percent so it's reflecting a lot of sunlight back into space as you say how does it impact the inside of a house. We have done some analysis using are paying. We haven't done experiment yet. We are paying for example used in phoenix arizona or reno nevada Up to seventy five percent of air conditioning knees in the summer. So that's kind of bursik significant shoo-in your paint is the worldwide. I mean how does one measure the whiteness of pain yeah we use instrumentation called a spectrometer to measure that we have the equipment to shine a certain among the light onto the surface. And we can merger how you know how much among is reflected so then people reporter these numbers into the scientific papers or recall literature based on what we know now. The number ninety eight twenty one percent is the highest reported so far and It is covered by by the news media as well. As by guinness volkov lord records would the average person see the paint notice. It was different more intensely white. Yeah we compared our new paying wiza- commercial white paint if you put them side by side Will are wide. Paint is wider. You can imagine it's it'll be maybe evenly being wider than the new snow. But he's not i- blinded though is because of reflection is that you use is not like a mirror that is directed it looks really really white but it will really hurts your eye or the flying by burs or so. How hot does it get in indiana where you live in west lafayette and have you ever considered using the pain to cool your own home. We can get above ninety degree. Fahrenheit in the summer very rarity over one hundred certainly I love to are paying on our own roof. So right now is not ready yet for that is getting close so are we can working with a large company to worst. Commercializing are paying. We have to do some further optimization to make sure it's durable lost for many years. I hope to have these happen in a year or two and this can be available on the market now. I can have do pain in my own house with that. She'll iran is an engineer at purdue university in west lafayette indiana. He created the world's whitest paint. Which is going to help with climate change. We hope she'll thank you very much. Akio it's migrate. Perjure talking to you. The world comes to you from the nan and bill harris studio at gbh in boston. You can find us online anytime at the world dot. Org i'm marco werman you stay safe. Be strong we'll be back with you tomorrow ex..

bursik guinness volkov reno nevada phoenix west lafayette arizona indiana purdue university iran Akio bill harris gbh marco werman boston
"marco werman" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"marco werman" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"Did not set out to become a virtuoso improviser on guitar. He went from togo senegal to study law in nineteen sixty six and picked up the guitar to make some extra money. The instrument came naturally and soon he was sitting in with the house. Band at one of dakar's famous nightspots. The miami club got offered a solo gig. One thing led to another and his partners in the house. Band started their own ensemble orchestra baobab. They offered bartolini. It so the job as lead guitarist baobab became world-famous virtual ambassadors for senegal. But i decided never forgot his home of togo where he returned to not just to live but to continue his practice as a lawyer. A successful musician who kept his day job. World stages one day contracts divorces the next we pay homage today to bartolini at isa with one of his smoldering guitar. Solos this is old mummy. The recently late guitarist bartolini atty so taking his solo there with his ensemble orchestra baobab from senegal. You are listening to the world. Germans head to the polls this weekend where the far right is stealing a page from the trump playbook claiming vote tampering with no proof there were even talks about dominion voting system. Who's supposedly changed voice. Sounds familiar one glaring problem with the machine. Tampering claim in germany. Germans vote on paper. That's still ahead here on the world. I'm marco werman you're with the world we're a co production of gbh boston npr rex. If there are some angry exchanges on the sidelines of the un general assembly meeting in new york. This week don't be surprised. I'm thinking specifically the diplomatic fallout between the us and its oldest ally on friday. France recalled his ambassadors from the us and australia. This followed an announcement from the two countries and the united kingdom that the three signed a new indo pacific security pact and excluded the french. It's the first time. France has ever recalled its ambassador from washington. The world's europe correspondent orla berry joins me now so the french are angry. Not least because security deal meant that a french australian deal on submarines was scrapped. How serious well it depends on. Who you talk to marco. Certainly the french are in short of using superlatives to describe how badly they feel that they've been treated. We sold the french foreign minister saying last week the move was stabbed in the back and the kind of behavior you would expect from president trump then over the weekend at the same foreign ministers eve lettera. He was on french tv and saying that france had met repeatedly with representatives from the us. Australia in the last few months including anthony lincoln and joe biden and no one reads word of this and he said this is why we had to take the action that we did you muscle. Upc do you measure the confused suicide. there's been alive. There's been a major breach of trump's there's been contempt so it's not okay between us. It's not okay. He said but white house officials are today being quoted as saying that they expect to relations will improve and they expect the french ambassador to the us to return to his role within week. And we do know. The president biden and emmanuel macron are due to me are due to speak. I should say on the phone later this week. And the french are at pains to point out that it was the us who asked for the coal to be made so if france recalled ambassadors from the us. Australia wine britain while the way the french applying language. That britain is insignificant in all of this the same french. Foreign minister johnny. Bolivia said a great britain is a bit of a fifth wheel on the courage as he reporters and the bars. Johnson is just happy to be along for the ride. We just the snow but breaking because britain has been quite intent on repositioning itself on the global stage following brexit. This alliance a seen to be a reflective of that. I should say the french have taken one form of action against the uk..

bartolini senegal togo miami club bartolini atty marco werman france dakar orla berry us un general assembly anthony lincoln australia npr germany boston united kingdom marco emmanuel macron new york
"marco werman" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"marco werman" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"Finally. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Laughter> <Speech_Male> You've got your nobel <Speech_Male> prizes prestigious <Speech_Male> commendations in <Speech_Male> science literature <Speech_Male> of course peacemaking <Speech_Male> and then there are <Speech_Male> the ignore bells <Speech_Male> awards. <Speech_Male> For the silliest science <Speech_Male> experiments <Speech_Male> the world sarah birnbaum <Speech_Male> reports on a few of <Speech_Male> this year's standout <SpeakerChange> winners <Speech_Female> it <Speech_Female> nobel prizes <Speech_Female> are supposed to <Speech_Female> and i'm quoting <Speech_Female> from the website here <Speech_Female> honor achievements <Speech_Female> that first <Speech_Female> make you laugh <Speech_Female> and then make you think <Speech_Female> the winner <Speech_Female> in the transportation <Speech_Female> category <Speech_Female> could be the poster <Speech_Female> child for that <Speech_Female> a team of <Speech_Female> researchers from all <Speech_Female> over the world studied. <Speech_Female> What happens <Speech_Female> when you hang <Speech_Female> rhinos upside <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> down for ten <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> minutes by their ankles. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Now what came <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> to mind when <Speech_Female> i heard that. <Speech_Female> Was those <Speech_Female> long <Speech_Female> silk scarves <Speech_Female> that hang down from <Speech_Female> the ceiling and circus <Speech_Female> tons. No <Speech_Female> that the acrobats do <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> all those cool tricks on <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> but <Speech_Female> instead of acrobats <Speech_Female> there <Speech_Female> are rhinos like <Speech_Music_Female> all tangled up <Speech_Music_Female> like <SpeakerChange> in cirque du <Speech_Music_Female> soleil <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Laughter> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> that was a dramatization. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> No <Speech_Female> animals were harmed in <Speech_Female> the making of this radio <Speech_Female> story <Speech_Female> turns out. My <Speech_Female> mental image <Speech_Female> was way off <Speech_Female> the mark. The <Speech_Female> scientists conducted <Speech_Female> this experiment at <Speech_Female> the request of the namibian <Speech_Female> government. <Speech_Female> They wanted to <Speech_Female> know if it's safe <Speech_Female> to hang rhinos <Speech_Female> upside down by <Speech_Female> their feet. So <Speech_Female> they can airlift them. <Speech_Female> Be a helicopter. <Speech_Female> Which is something. <Speech_Female> Conservationists have to <Speech_Female> do from time to time <Speech_Female> to evacuate <Speech_Female> rhinos from <Speech_Female> poaching hot <Speech_Female> spots and <Speech_Female> to move them to different <Speech_Female> areas to ensure <Speech_Female> the species maintains <Speech_Female> genetic diversity. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> And <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> i should mention. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> The rhinos are <Speech_Female> tranquilized. I <Speech_Female> with <Speech_Female> the ignoble winners <Speech_Female> discovered. <Speech_Female> Was that hanging. Upside <Speech_Female> down is actually <Speech_Female> easier <Speech_Female> on the animals heart <Speech_Female> and lung function <Speech_Female> than the alternative. <Speech_Female> Which is laying <Speech_Female> the sleeping rhinos <Speech_Female> on their sides <Speech_Female> on their chests <Speech_Female> in the back of a truck. <Speech_Female> Some of the <Speech_Female> night's other big winners <Speech_Female> the <Speech_Female> prestigious ignoble <Speech_Female> peace prize <Speech_Female> when two <Speech_Female> three scientists <Speech_Female> who looked into whether <Speech_Female> humans evolved beards <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> to protect <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> themselves from punches <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> to the face <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> the prize <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> in medicine <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> when to a team <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> that found that <Speech_Female> sex can <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> relief nasal <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> congestion. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> I will spare <Speech_Female> you my audio rendition <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> of that one <Speech_Female> for <Speech_Female> the world. <SpeakerChange> i'm <Silence> sarah birnbaum <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> that is definitely going to <Speech_Male> do it for us today. The world <Speech_Male> comes to you. Each weekday <Speech_Male> from the nanan bill <Speech_Male> harris studio in boston <Speech_Male> at gbh. <Speech_Male> I'm marco werman <Speech_Male> carol hills will be in the <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> host chair next week. <Speech_Male> You stay safe. <Speech_Male> Be strong <SpeakerChange> and have <Speech_Music_Male> a great weekend. <Music>

sarah birnbaum marco werman carol hills boston
"marco werman" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

04:41 min | 1 year ago

"marco werman" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"Four or five offer animals in the market just to raise money. They'll feed her that. Stop the livestock. And there are several examples off this in the of jewel in iraq city. We could already see the lifestyle out who had soulard off a big chunk of their lights stockholding and had migrated or displaced to the city and very using the small graphs around the pavements etc. Ask the posture for designing moms. Surely the taliban must understand that if their citizens are hungry and could potentially face starvation that is a fundamental dilemma. That will put their authority and check. Do you have any sense of how seriously the taliban is seeing this problem. I guess the is a question. Best asked to ben because I cannot really comment on this. How they are thinking about this. Is there a sense as you go through the countryside custom that afghans are concerned that this problem could get worse that there will be further food shortages that they're going to have to contend with people shortly Apprehensive of how and where this developments are going. The cycle of severe droughts is increasing its frequencies and so unless our programs and investments to address these causal factors of drought. It is not going to help so custom. What are the greatest needs. Afghans have right now safeguarding. The food security of the rural communities is one of the key needs and then in a broader sense at though climate change and disaster wrists focusing on supporting agriculture livelihoods would be quiet but key going forward custom. Delay is with the food and agriculture organization of the united nations. He's been speaking with us from kabul. Thank you very much for being with us. Thank you mark. Cooley might pleasure. We'll be right back with more on the second half of the show. You're listening to the world. After nine eleven there were other attacks when anthrax started showing up in the us mail at first bio security was beefed up but then that support faded to me. It's a reflection of no lessons. I think all of us working in biodefense we are all dismayed lessons for the pandemic. That story coming up here on the world. i'm marco werman you're with the world where a co production of gbh boston npr ex. It was twenty years ago this week. Four planes were hijacked on a sunny tuesday morning. And what happened over the next. Few hours shook many parts of the world this week. We're looking at the impact of those events right now. Let's look specifically at us. Foreign policy for two decades counterterrorism has been the top priority for washington. President george bush decided to invade afghanistan and iraq but president obama trump and now biden have all used. Us military might against extremist groups. The world sarah birnbaum looks back at the legacy of nine eleven and america's military footprint around the world twenty years ago on the afternoon of september. Eleventh i went with my dad to donate blood. We wanted to do something. It was a terrifying time. And i remember struggling at that moment to even begin to make some sense of what happened. And then george. W. bush came on the screen in the lobby of the donor center today. Our fellow citizens our way of life. Our very freedom came under attack in a series of deliberate and deadly terrorist acts. I never considered myself a fan of president bush. But as i listened to him something resonated maybe because he framed this terrifying attack in a way that fit with a narrative. I had grown up with in the nineteen eighties. Politicians and pundits called nine eleven. The day that changed everything. Maybe so but the ways we interpreted the attacks and responded to them quickly fell back on some pretty old patterns our homes our nation. All the things we believe in are in great danger this danger has been created by the rulers of the soviet union. The future of civilization depends on what we do on what we do now. And in the months ahead president harry..

iraq city taliban marco werman food and agriculture organizat President george bush sarah birnbaum Cooley kabul ben anthrax america npr biden boston afghanistan iraq washington obama W. bush president bush
"marco werman" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

02:50 min | 1 year ago

"marco werman" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"If they wished to an inari for france the twelve also going to be filmed twenty. People are on trial mostly for assisting the terrorists with logistics in the attacks meaning providing weapons combination vehicles to help carry out attacks that might have nine of the ten attackers died on november thirteenth. There was a suicide mission for them. But one of them a thirty one year old man named lobbed slum he fled. He was eventually caught by police several months later. And he's being charged with murder and association with a terrorist group amongst other things. Right sell a slum the sole surviving attacker on november thirteenth. Two thousand fifteen. I tell us more about him. I i gather he was in the courtroom today. He was in the courtroom today and he was simply asked to say his name and what his profession was and his response was no other god than a law and that he had abandoned all professions to become a fighter for the islamic state so nominee signs of remorse there and he was actually in a similar trial in two thousand eighteen in belgium where he refused to cooperate with investigators. So if that is a sign of of how this trial is going to go. It's it's not looking positive. In terms of his cooperation. The main people on trial including him. That won't start until january so we'll have to wait and see how he responds and cooperates. On what is the mood impairs. It's a very somber mood and people don't want to think about this and have tried especially survivors have tried their hardest. Not to think about it. Now there's this sort of acceptance and willingness to open up these old wounds because there's the sense of we need to heal from this. Rebecca have survivors been saying anything on what they hope. The outcome of the trial will be or what they expect. It will be. I think they're definitely looking for sentences. The accused face sentences ranging anywhere from twenty years to life beyond that. They're really like i said so. Many survivors say that they haven't really looked into the events of that evening since occurred six years ago. And now's going to get a chance for them to do that. Collectively journalists rebecca rosman. Paris has been following the trial of the perpetrators involved in the november twenty fifteen paris attacks. Rebecca thank you very much. Thanks nocco journalists in kabul. Come face to face with the new taliban regime. That's just ahead. You're listening to the world. I'm marco werman. You're with the world protesters in afghanistan and the journalists who cover them are being met with escalating force. One video posted online today says taliban militia clubbing female demonstrators other clip show brews and beaten afghan journalists one staggers out of detention and can only walk by leaning on the shoulders of friends..

france belgium Rebecca rebecca rosman marco werman taliban kabul Paris paris afghanistan
"marco werman" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

07:27 min | 1 year ago

"marco werman" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"With my colleague. Marco werman alexander and we just heard testified to congress in focusing your remarks to you're dead you write in your book that your father did not want you to testify in fact it was kind of a point of tension between you two. Why did he not want you to testify. Why ultimately did you. My family dynamic involves points of tension or with our dad kind of disagreeing with him on politics and certain things of that. Nature are common thread between immigrants from failed communist regimes where the pendulum swings in to an unhealthy brand of conservatism. But when he spoke to me about the dangers involved in challenging the president it was from his decades of experience in a deep understanding of power and how power works harking back to his time in soviet union where the consequences would be much more severe. Well family is central to you and your story. So let's back up to the beginning. You were born in ukraine in ninety seventy five. Your father took you your two brothers and your grandmother in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine to the us at a certain point. You're older brother. Len joins the us military as did your brother eugene. You also decided to take that path. What drew you to the military. While i think for us our older brother set the template. We were highly energetic kids. And by watching our older brother starting to see in enlist we try to emulate him and when he was going for ryan's or climbing ropes and all that kind of stuff we get the same thing and very quickly settled on going into university in. Rotc some service to repay this country in you know. It sounds kind of a little bit hokey but we did actually think about it in those terms. So you joined the us army. Tell me about your deployment to iraq. That was two thousand four. You weren't volusia. Some of the toughest fight in the us military's ever been involved with. I know you learned a big lesson. They're about letting down your guard. And i wanna know how that lesson came into play some years later first of all what happened in iraq. The incident with the id and the bicycle. This is early days in the deployment relatively soon after the war started. Not very long after at all actually and within the first month or so we were committed to phantom fury the second fight for palooza the largest urban fight that the us military had engaged in since vietnam in preparation for that. We're conducting a reconnaissance and on this patrol while we were driving around the battlefield. My convoy was struck by a particularly nasty kind of improvised explosive device. One that was designed to punch through armor at the time. I need new to combat. That was a phrase that was rattling around my mind the absence of the normal or the presence of the abnormal which is something that i would retain with me through my services tesha in russia or in the white house for that matter looking for markers that something is off and one of the other lessons i learned from this is frankly i was trainable and i reacted in a cool calm collected manner to being hit by an id you know. I remember the cabinet in the humvee filling up with smoke but very very quickly collecting myself. Assessing my counterparts were injured drivers. Only one that was completely uninjured and that we still in the middle of potential fight. And that i had a job to do so it was good early test of of my military training so fast forward to twenty nine hundred fiona hill. Trump's russia's specialists hires you to serve on the nfc so now you're working for the white house then on july twenty fifth twenty nineteen the so-called perfect phone call between trump and wlodimierz alinsky the former tv comedian who just become a president of ukraine. Tell us where you were in the white house of the time and the part you played in that call so i was the white house situation room. We were focused on intercom listening to a phone. Call that. I was extremely apprehensive about and as soon as the president came online. Not only was it not going to advance your special interest. But when the president went into his quid-pro-quo when he said. I'd like you to do us a favor. Though he was attacking both us national security and putting us in a position where ukraine would be more vulnerable easier for your russia to draw into its orbit and therefore russia would pose a much more potent adversary to the us with ukraine and at the same time attacking us the us domestically by undermining free and fair elections the very foundation of how our system works so taking that lesson from your deployment to iraq in two thousand four bueller to both the absence of normal as well as the presence of the abnormal. Did you sense either of those prior to that phone call. How much of a call surprise to you. I had a very good idea of what was happening behind the scenes. I was stubborn in thinking that these were baby. Folks looking to ingratiate themselves with the prison people looking to do the president's bidding but without the president's knowledge in forethought by thought that might have been the case and of course once. The president had vocalized became abundantly. Clear to me so that i couldn't kind of just set aside. Based on the fact i'm a army officer and the commander in chief was the one that was failing to live up to his oath to the constitution and threatening our democracy. I couldn't deny that anymore. And i didn't think the president was above the law. This is a country of laws. And i did. What i thought was right. Which is reporting after. You testified in the impeachment hearing many trump supporters and certain corners of the media started a smear campaign against you. You were called a traitor. You even accused of being a ukrainian spy how personal did get it. I mean for them. There were no kind of limit. What's interesting is that it was the president's press office that generated attack points and then of course there was a reverberating for years since their personal tax. Don't have a impact on me. Frankly i have in fact a lot of support from my colleagues as americans that reached out past letters of support or emails. And then you have these kind of anonymous tweets or something of that nature than attacking me. It's easy to kind of separate. What really matters putting perspective the rest of his background noise will those forces at smeared you after your testimony is still very much alive in the. Us and many feel the undermining of american democracy continues after the trump years. You're in the academic sphere these days alexander van men thinking about all of this. What occurs you about the way forward to preserving the values that this country represented like to your father when he brought you in the rest of your family here. Back in hundred seventy nine. It's interesting there have been probably brief moments where my confidence has wavered but largely remained unshaken. And that's probably because of perspective on where my family's come from but at the same time we're missing something that could help bring us together and that's turn ability that's accountability of public officials that failed to live up to their responsibilities. And that's accountability of media personalities that see profit in attacking the united states. Accountability is one of the passages. We need to pass through in order to get back to unity and keep this country. Strong retired lieutenant. Colonel alexander van. Been speaking with my colleague marco werman. His new book is here. Right matters an american story. You're with the world..

Marco werman alexander ukraine Len joins united states russia iraq white house fiona hill wlodimierz alinsky Rotc volusia soviet union us army eugene congress ryan vietnam nfc Trump trump
"marco werman" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"marco werman" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"World. The afghan national women's soccer team was formed fourteen years ago. A female team sent a strong message to the taliban. We will fight against you. Our fight is football. Our activists through the book and we have called the taliban our agency. Now those same women are in hiding still ahead here on the world. I'm marco werman you're with the world we're a co production of boston. Npr ex olympic athletes may have left tokyo but the athletes village is backing us. Filling up with four thousand olympians. The paralympic games start on tuesday. Two more weeks of sport and two weeks of cova challenges. There will be a hillier has been covering all the games for us. Hey bianca high. Marco so as the olympics were wrapping up. We were seeing record. High court case counts in tokyo and surrounding areas there. How is the situation been since then. Those numbers are still climbing. Tokyo and the surrounding regions are being hit by the delta area. Just like so many other places around the world and now sixty percent of the population will be under a state of emergency until september twelfth. So that's right through the paralympics and experts say the olympics did indirectly lead to rise cases. So now there's a worry. The same will happen during the paralympics. I spoke with dr. Kentaro awada an infectious diseases expert at kobe university. Who told me how the games can sort of interfere with important. Covert messaging if you are in Data emergency day. You keep saying that they have to stay home. Have to take these safety precautions. On saw these efforts were not seen on television radio by anybody. Because you come on tv then you watch these. Modding olympic athletes this gold medals. The thing is the international olympic committee and japanese government. Adamantly deny any connection between the games and infections and dr wada told me they are. Denial is irresponsible. If they denied it is not scientific was simply eliah. And i know that using stone that is true how bianca or their lessons. Paralympic committee has learned from the olympics earlier. This month there are. I got on the phone with stewart willik. He's the medical director for the international paralympic committee for this summer's games and he said watching the olympics earlier. This month was proof that the paralympics can go on safely. The paralympic movement often considered the olympics.

afghan national women marco werman taliban tokyo olympics Kentaro awada paralympic games kobe university bianca olympic hillier soccer Marco High court paralympics football boston japanese government
"marco werman" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"marco werman" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"Wherever you get your podcasts for years the afghan government work to disarm warlords. Now there's a rush to revive them. There have people with guns. How professional at how effective they are against the taliban. These are the questions. Meanwhile another provincial capital falls to the taliban fully kumari a strategic crossroads in northern afghanistan. There's really only one road. Through from north to south and that runs through fully krumrie also today predominantly muslim. Iraq has long been home to christians since the third of fourth century after christ after eighteenth century some iraqi christians are barely hanging on their ancient homelands. I'm marco werman and heading to france soon. You've got a petit pro. That's coming up today here on the world. i'm marco werman. You're with the world. Thank you for being here. The news is moving at a frightening pace in afghanistan. Not only are you. As military forces mostly withdrawn from the country at this point taliban aggression cities and provinces continues to yield more military victories for the militants. Afghan government troops have been overstretched and at times overwhelmed so kabul is searching for help anywhere can find it. Even if it means working with former warlords the world sharon jafari went to meet one of them recently in the western afghan city of herat to meet the former governor and warlord smile han at his villa. You need to pass by several concrete barriers to metal gates guarded by men with guns then escorted into the large garden.

marco werman afghan government taliban kumari afghanistan Afghan government Iraq france sharon jafari kabul herat gates
"marco werman" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

06:02 min | 1 year ago

"marco werman" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"Others imposing fresh sanctions on bellarusse putting the squeeze on strongman alexander lushenko but how much does sanctions actually squeeze their targets. You're not going to snap your fingers impose sanctions and then see some dictator. Throw of potenza. And say i surrender. That's not how it works. Also a triple threat in myanmar political instability covert and hunger. We did a survey. In the poorest areas of yang-gon ninety percent of the people had to borrow money just to buy food. i'm marco werman and observant muslim women in turkey are making a fashion statement with their jobs. Because for us as a huge arby's it's the only thing that is showing the jobs. Bright colors and styles or what become legend most in istanbul these days all of that and more today. You're on the world. i'm marco werman. You're with the world. Thank you for being here for months. Now we've been following the situation in northern ethiopia's tigray region today. The conflict took yet another alarming. Turn the central government abbas now calling on all capable ethiopians to join the military and fight to grind rebels. Alex the wall is following these developments. Closely is the executive director of the world peace foundation and joins us today from london. What is your reaction to the ethiopian. Government calling civilians to fight the to grind. So what does that signal to you. It's a sign of desperation. The to grind defense force has inflicted a succession of military defeats on the ethiopian government. Such that it is in a commanding military position but rather than do what one would hope which is at this point. Seek peak is seeking negotiated settlement. Prime minister i'll be outmanned is doing everything. He can to avoid the inevitable so he is courting full mass mobilization which really has no serious prospect turning the military tied its own for heath europeans to kill each other in larger numbers. Wasn't there a ceasefire in this conflict. There was no she's filed. The government announced a ceasefire when it had been driven out of tyrod but in the next breath the government said we will siege tick ride. We will not let any humanitarian aid in an hunger is the main weapon that they've been using in this war so a so-called ceasefire that did not desist from using starvation as a weapon was not very meaning. Alex do you think there's any appetite ethiopia for full scale conflict. I mean do you expect civilians of military age to actually heed the call of government. Well what has been happening has been some have been heating the core of the government and what is instead of the regular arming fighting against the tig ryan forces that turnaround resistance a whole host of different ethnic militia have been called up but in many cases these ethnic militia have been fighting one another rather than finding the tick ryan resistance. So this really is. I'm afraid is a recipe for the fragmentation that complete collapse of Theo pia as a as a viable political entertain the document calls on ethiopians to fight what referred to as to grind terrorists. Are you concerned that this call to aggression could spread to grant civilians. My worry air would be the large number of crohn's who live in samba. The capital city and and other parts of ethiopia who have been Tenny it by the public statements of the prime minister and other leading officials. most recently. They called the weeds to be uprooted or cancer in the state and these calls for violence against an ethnic group smack of of genocidal incitement. It's very very worrying. This national call document really seems to mark another stunning turnaround for prime minister. Ahmed a man who won the nobel peace prize in two thousand nineteen. Where do you think ethiopia and its leader miscalculated in their dealings with two grinds. I think prime minister amit was always misrepresented. Yes that would genuine democratic reforms that were absolutely necessary when he took office but it all seems to have gone to his head and so i think he grossly overestimated what he could achieve and ended up being really in in a bubble of make believe of alternative reality which has led him into a war leading into authorizing the most terrible atrocities. Finally i just want to follow up. How has prime minister appointed blame on the us. Or problems in ethiopia. What he is saying is that the united states is leading a coalition to misrepresent. What is going on in the country to invent stories about starvation about atrocities about war and to impose a solution that He and by implication the ethiopian people do not like it's frankly an absurd setup claims but it does resonate with a particular brand of his followers who seemed to be committed in a very diehard manner to his very particular vision of the future of ethiopia. Alex walls the executive director of the world peace foundation. He's been speaking with us from london. Thank you very much. You are very welcome. When the world economy ground to a halt last year many workers learned exactly what essential meant for bus drivers doctors in grocery workers to name just a few working from home with mostly not an option also on the list was at us own in mexico a partnership between the us and mexico got thousands of these workers vaccinated this summer but some worry. That won't be enough the world. Daisy contrasts has our story..

marco werman ethiopia alexander lushenko world peace foundation ethiopian government tyrod tigray arby Alex Theo pia myanmar abbas Tenny istanbul turkey prime minister amit heath london us
All Eyes Are on Teenage Track Star, Athing Mu, at Tokyo Olympics

The World: Latest Edition

01:29 min | 1 year ago

All Eyes Are on Teenage Track Star, Athing Mu, at Tokyo Olympics

"Meters the first time the us has claimed top spot and this event since nineteen sixty eight games in mexico city. As if that wasn't enough mo- also snagged new american record. Back home in a large room in trenton new jersey. A pandemic era olympic scene were quickly becoming familiar with jubilation from viewing party. Back home. you can hear al jennings who has coach mos since she was nine. Mo- was born to south sudanese. Parents moved to the us just before she was born in new jersey before the games her brother told the new york times quote when you are from an immigrant family that comes in with its back against the wall. You know what the bottom is. He continued it gives us a focus on pursuing things. That would help us improve our lives for a thing mo that focus was running before heading off to tokyo. She shared her hopes on her youtube channel. I want to be an olympic gold medalist completely honest so i was looking forward to that. And hopefully that comes god willing. That hard work paid off today at just nineteen years. Young one footnote the podium featured none of the medallists from two thousand sixteen summer games in rio because women with naturally high testosterone are now banned from the eight hundred meters if they don't take medication to lower their levels. That rule disqualified all three of the reigning medalists more stories from the olympic games. Coming up including france's love affair with judo plus super fans team israel. That's later this hour. You're listening to the world. i'm marco werman.

Al Jennings New Jersey Mexico City Trenton MO Olympic United States The New York Times Olympic Gold Tokyo Youtube RIO Olympic Games Judo France Israel Marco Werman
"marco werman" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

07:45 min | 1 year ago

"marco werman" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"Strain is more infectious. Are you seeing similar dynamics with delta transmission in other countries with similar vaccination rates to the us so certainly for example in the uk. We've had a very large wave of cases that through june into july despite having relatively speaking of very advanced vaccination program in terms of the coverage that we've achieved but was really noticeable is the rate of hospitalization has been significantly lower for the same number of cases than it has been in but the two previous waves to showing us again you know. These teams remain very effective even with delta against protecting us for the most severe outcomes. Even if they're not quite effective as were earlier variants for protecting us. Full stop dr marks throughout this pandemic in the us we've been told one thing about transmission about vaccines about masking and socializing and then the advice shifts again. What makes it hard to draw lasting conclusions about this virus and transmission. So i think there are a number of factors play here. Firstly the viruses mutate evolving. Over time you know we've seen the emergence of from the original Alpha beta delta different strains and they respond differently. Both to the vaccine in terms of the effectiveness of the vaccine. I'm to that inherent trump's miss ability and that means it's it's difficult to make a prediction now and not know that a new variant emerging three or six months time which responds differently to the maxine. Secondly we were making predictions based on the original trials of the vaccine and the original trials team all very focused on preventing symptomatic illness. I'm what's happening as those teams are rolled out on a larger scale is every week every month. We are understanding more about impact not only on symptomatic illnesses on your risk of coming infected. A toll or risk of transmitting on those things are constantly evolving and moving. So how do you recommend dr marks. People approach decision making and risk assessment. Right now i think people need to bear in mind. The vaccines are effective but not completely effective so just because you all vaccinated or the people missing with all vaccinated does not take away all at the risk so meeting outside meeting small groups meeting a distance use of mosques. These remain things that we can predate to be of value regardless of which strain of the virus. We're talking about regardless of people's vaccination status. Now that will change over time as everyone becomes vaccinated. The space for the virus transmit will go down so if we really want to address the fundamental problems. We're going casta improve batting coverage equity everywhere. Dr michael marks is a professor at the london school of hygiene and tropical medicine. Thank you very much for joining us today. Thank you so much. You're listening to the world. I'm marco werman you're with the world two years ago protests across sudan in east africa eventually led to the military ouster of then president omar al-bashir the new government is now trying to dismantle beshir's islamic regime. It's led to unprecedented change. The world's africa correspondent halima conde recently traveled to sudan and for the past two weeks. You've heard her stories on the show looking at the role. Religion plays in sudan. Today it's all part of the world's two year dive into religion and nationalism around the globe sponsored by the henry lewis foundation Condie y sudan. While i travel there for the series marco. Well the reason i went there is because it's a place that's going through such transformation it's place in transition which as a reporter is the most i think one of the most interesting place has to be when these protests were happening two years ago it was almost as if it was a complete rejection of amara but shears islamist autocratic oppressive government And the politics today are so different from the eighties. I mean i spoke about this. A bit with cameron hudson. He's a senior fellow at the atlantic council and he previously served as chief of staff to to us on voice to sudan. Clinical at the time was ascendant. It was you know reaching its years. Edith across the north african least you know sudan was intellectual center of the movement bounce the context in which bashir came up and it's also the context that many in sudan were rejecting But when it comes to actually dismantling this government it requires so much because political islam. Movement and sudan is reflected in the politics. It's reflected in education in society and the economy so your stories focused on religion how the sudanese government sees it and how its role in society is changing. How keen were sudanese people to talk about that with a foreign reporter so in general i mean it sudan is is. It's such an incredibly open and welcoming country. Sometimes they travel and taxi driver as wouldn't take my money because that wouldn't be hospitable since i'm a gas. So it's a combination of in general being a country that's welcoming to foreigners and also having a more open climate where people feel free to speak. What surprised you most about what you found when you were there. Yeah one thing. That surprised me when i compare it to two years ago When the whole country was very united against beshir's how now it seems like all of these old fishers and society are coming back up now. The only thing people agree on is That the economy isn't doing well but when it comes to these more fundamental questions that i've explained to my reporting about secular as About religious minorities about the status of women Nobody nobody agrees on that. In part because sudan is an incredibly diverse country. I mean there's what hudson had to say about that bigger questions about national identity. This country has been torn apart basically since its independence all over issues all race tribe. My serious focused on religion. Yes but one thing. Most people said when i was interviewing them was you know it's not just about religion and kind of different opinions about how that should factor into government. I mean the part of beshir's political project was not only pushing this islamic Vision of the society but also very arab version of sudan a country that is diverse. At has you know tribes with kind of an arab identity you have black africans. Very different tribes. So it's no surprise looking back why they're so many different opinions on some of these big social issues for many years under bashir. There were heavy economic sanctions on sudan. It was cut off from the international community and the global economy but sudan's now emerging from that and engaging with the world again have the reform paid off. Yeah they definitely paid off. I mean you can't even compare how sudan today compared to just a couple years ago when it was so isolated. sudan's received law financial support. It's received debt relief. Anti spoke with cameron hudson again from the atlantic council about this. But there's no question that the reforms that have been undertaken this. Our main snam are so far as all the darling of the west. So the darling of the west sudan has seen right now. is this success. Story that said on the ground at relief shaky even when i speak with people miscellaneous government they feel like the the revolution and kind of the transition is on thin ice because there's so many challenges facing the country the biggest being the economy. So everything's on shaky ground but they're still optimism..

sudan beshir dr marks Dr michael marks london school of hygiene and t bashir marco werman omar al halima conde cameron hudson henry lewis foundation Condie y maxine sudanese government delta atlantic council us east africa amara uk
"marco werman" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"marco werman" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"Marco werman this is the world we're a co production of gbh boston npr ex. When protests in sudan helped end the thirty year dictatorship of omar al-bashir twenty nineteen sudanese women were at the forefront of that revolution as the government moves away from the strict version of islamic law embraced by the older. Gm many women in sudan looking now for greater equality. The world's africa correspondent halima condie reports from khartoum. Tom late friday night in khartoum at a new rooftop venue called asta popular. Young singer by the dea is performing for a small mixed crowd of young people both men and women. The owner of the place is mia lobby. She pulls members of the audience to their feet trying to get them to dance highly. Had a little bit. Th-they tells me that until recently events like these were held underground to avoid the authorities but this rooftop space jollibee says is free directly under the sky lesbianic-ly legally donald three million gold. Mine tells me things were so much more strict before the revolution now. You can do what you want without fearing the government. Especially they're dreaded. Public order law manila abdul-karim a women's rights activists it's law got actually that the government put it so us to hinder the movement the mobility of the women because they based or related to sherri as they say because of sherry out because if terrier sudan's public order law said anyone who commits an indecent act in public or whereas indecent close could be flogged or find and moral decency was subject to the interpretation of the police enforcing it many women. All tell me they never would have come here. During beshir's rule a place where women don't have to cover their hair and can even dance openly with men. The public order law. One of the first things to go after bashir was ousted. Yanni moved the yankees muffins philosophy guy. Yeah now the laws have changed says chalabi citizens have the right to do or where whatever they want because we were suffering for thirty years women especially a blur him. The activists says they made the two thousand nineteen revolution possible sticking elite for this revolution icing wearing at especially worry they were actually lead this revolution but now she's concerned about what the role of women will be in the new sudan. The country's new transitional government has made plenty of promises when it comes to gender equality and women's rights ductless official document implicitly stated that the representations of women is not alleged forty percent in all legislative body. Look at the bodies diplomacy everywhere. But that hasn't happened yet. Only a handful of women now hold top government positions and they've run into opposition people who don't want to see women in leadership abdurahim says the government isn't prioritizing gender equality. She points to sedans personal status law as one example. This is for for the women coming from Sugar is not for the women. Living in these levels agreed about this. This law from nineteen ninety-one is shaped by islamic sharia law and governance rules about women marriage. Divorce in the family. It says that women must obey their husbands and makes the age of consent for marriage puberty. The law has been target for women's rights activists for years followed. Some yusef. mahama is a sudanese lawyer. We spoke at her office. The air conditioner is on high. Because of heat until recently mahama was working at the ministry of justice to review proposed legal reforms. She tells me that there have been some positive developments. mara masaba see dow. The female human homicide sudan recently ratified a un pact against the discrimination of women in nearly all male council of ministers signed onto it with some exceptions. They didn't endorse the parts of the pact. That says women are equal to men at political and social levels or the parts about them having equal rights in marriage divorce parenting with the the and he and the lama sabio homicide supporters of the former regime. Don't want to see fundamental changes regarding the status of women even though beshir's out many conservative islamists remaining government or influential and other ways. They don't want things to change says hania but among the women i speak with the don't agree about what should be next for sudan..

sudan Marco werman omar al khartoum halima condie bashir manila abdul beshir jollibee mahama npr dea karim sherri abdurahim Gm Yanni chalabi boston
"marco werman" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"marco werman" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"Prime minister of iraq is in washington today on the docket. Redefining the us mission in his country some argue. Today's meeting is a smokescreen. Only this is such a weird strategic dialogue because you know the main deliverable from it is an agreement that nothing will change also today. Half of australia's back undercover lockdown for millions of australian singles lockdowns lead to feelings of loneliness. No one is allowed to visit me not a single person. Meanwhile europe protests break out over vaccine passports. And what do the tokyo olympics sound like this year without fans the homes of athletes families pretty much the same. I'm marco werman those stories and more today here on the world. I'm marco werman you're with the world. It's good to have you here today. A challenge to democracy in north africa late last night. Tunisian president said he's firing the country's prime minister and suspending parliament. This happened after large anti-government protests this weekend. Tunisians are angry with their government's handling of the corona virus and generally an economy in crisis. The president's political opponents are calling the sacking of the prime minister aku and a threat to democracy lily. Ablaze is a tunisian journalists and the capital city of tunas lily. What's been the reaction to this news in tunisia today. So it's very interesting because yesterday night you could see a lot of people going in the streets chanting celebrating honking and being happy about what just happened because a lot of them were tired tired about the police coal turmoil that has been going on for several months now and then this morning it was quite different. It was quite calm in tunis. The military was deployed in a lot of places. And especially in front of the parliament where you could see a military's blocking the access to the parliaments and actually also blocking the access to the president of the parliament New she who also happens to be the leader of the party and who denounced what happened yesterday as a coup so some tunisians happy that the prime minister is gone others. Not it sounds like things are pretty divided right now. You mentioned how some people are upset by the political elite. Explain that it's a general feeling that has been going on for years in tunisia. Tunisia has no more than a dozen of different governments since the revolution since the pricing of two thousand eleven and this parliament has not managed to To to make an a prime minister and his government stay enough to actually enact reform that i'm describing feeding people often describing tunisia like the fact that every prime minister in tunisia is on in power for six or five months before he's a sack towards dismissed and this is a very contributing to the political crisis. And the idea that there is no leadership there is no governance and it was actually implied with dependent. So that's why people are very tired of the police leads for those of us. Who don't live in a parliamentary system. Lilia how does this actually work. Does the president have the right. To essentially just is all the entire government it will so the president doesn't have that many towers especially because before the revolution. Tunisia was endure. Presidential regime and twists considered as a dictatorship like the concentration of powers led to the dictatorship so after the russian. The new parliament voted for new constitution. That's team place a semi parliamentary regime. So the parliaments had has a lot of powers as the prime minister as well and the president is the.

marco werman tunisia parliament tunas north africa olympics iraq tokyo washington tunis australia europe us Lilia
"marco werman" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

06:09 min | 1 year ago

"marco werman" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"Marco werman you're with the world it's good to have you with us. This thursday another sign that things are getting back to normal pretty soon fans of the toronto blue jays can at long last here this in toronto. Ooh After nearly two years of playing home games in buffalo the blue jays are returning. Home is part of the canadian government's plan to reopen to some american travelers. Least but for canadians heading south. They'll need to wait a bit longer. The us now says it will keep its land. Borders closed too many travelers both from canada and mexico. Tony teaches at rice. University's baker institute for public policy in. Houston i tony. Let's talk first about the toronto. Blue jays canada's granted the team an exemption so they can resume play in toronto. On july thirtieth. That'll be the first time since two thousand nineteen are there any restrictions linked to that exemption. Not really i think. Canada is a country. That's behaved quite well. I think about seventy one percent of all canadians received at least one does of the vaccine in about fifty to fifty. Three percent are fully vaccinated. So it's well ahead. I think of other countries and This is symbolic this is a way to signal to the world. Canada is open with certain restrictions and precautions and is to signal to the canadians. That things are coming back to normal. And we'll all players and anyone associated with the team have to show they've been vaccinated before entering. Canada not seems the requirement. The canadian government is going to allow anyone to cross the border by land if they showed that they've been vaccinated. Canada also just announced its opening. Its borders back to fully vaccinated americans or non essential travelers which americans that will be any american resident or citizen of the united states. That can show proof of vaccination. That's something really significant those of us. Who are more focused on the us. Mexico border have been actually advocating for that. There is no reason to restrict anyone really who can legally crossed the border that can show that he or she has been vaccinated a stripped from from crossing the border. And i think it's really not justified any longer. So candidates different signaling. They're ready for an open border with those measures in place and today. Where are we at who who is allowed to enter in and out of mexico from the us nothing has changed throughout endemic and today any american or any us permanent residents can go into mexico. Travel freely around the country with no restrictions. No questions asked no tests in of course no proof of vaccination that's still going on in the case of mexico. It's really tragic as that. Mexico was able to discern carefully and put in place a system to check anybody that was coming in and ensure minimally they were not infected on my canada which was quite a contrast so the biden administration has not reciprocated in fact it's extended non-essential travel restrictions for its borders with canada and mexico until the twenty first of august. Why is that. And what does that just mean practically incomprehensible to me that the biton administration is not reciprocating. I recently wrote about the show. And i think that is very reasonable to allow those who show proof of vaccination to cross land borders both in canada and in mexico. Of course there is no reason to stop people from from using deportable crossers from going back and forth to conduct their family social and of course economic activities so even talking about non essential travel. Tony what about other people like asylum seekers and migrants. That's a very good question. Obviously asylum seekers. What they do. Is they show up the international bridges in texas at the ports of entry in arizona or in california and they turn themselves to us authorities. They are brought in. They are processed in the united states. They're given tests. The facilities are often crowded. There was a big problem with infections in detention facilities in the united states and then they were expelled back into mexico. The change of course between trump and biden was that minors are no longer deported into mexico. And they were kept in the united states and given a test and ensure that they were negative. But they were ultimately processed. That was a very different case. Though because many of these asylum seekers at the end of the day were allowed into the united states and then the authorities the bureaucrats the border were scrambling to figure out what to do with them and how to prevent higher infection rates that was exceptional any other mexican citizen or resident with a visa resident. The border was not allowed to cross. But if you were an asylum-seeker you had to be processed. Tony pylon is the director of the center for united states and mexico at rice university in. Houston tony thanks very much for your time. My pleasure in thailand. There's a big development for women struggling with unwanted pregnancies. Abortion had been mostly illegal in the country but as of this year. Thai women can get an abortion during the first trimester for any reason. Still pro choice advocates. Say that despite this progress women seeking abortions still face resistance and it's not because of the legal system. The world's patrick win. Reports someone in thailand goes to get an abortion and the doctor says i could help you. Legally won't soupy. Cia about tip is a pro choice advocate in bangkok and she says this sort of thing is happening a lot. Many women tell us that their retake tip from the clinic for ten years. Supachai has run a hotline for people seeking advice on how to get an abortion in thailand before the law changed back in february she'd steer people toward gynecologists who might bend the law to help them out or tell them about pills. They could take it home now. She hears from women who are trying to do it the legal way but still face an obstacle at the two of the doctor knows their attitude is often we feel. This procedure is morally wrong. Smaller than diffusing.

mexico canada canadian government united states Marco werman Blue jays toronto baker institute for public pol biden administration biton administration Tony jays Houston buffalo tony Tony pylon center for united states Travel
"marco werman" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"marco werman" Discussed on PRI's The World

"President biden to iron out to talk about. Some of the wrinkles is constanza celts. In muehler with the brookings institution consents. I know you listen to angle. Miracles remarks at johns hopkins university where she received an honorary degree earlier today. What was her message. Well i think message was one. That was firmly focused on things that the america and germany can agree on or to put it slightly more precisely defined ministration and germany agree on. Which is the importance of science based approach to common global challenges like pandemic and climate change. She said that's what we need to work on. The floods at home have shown how urgent this is. What about joe biden. I mean what does he get out of this visit. I think the biden ministration realizes just how central not just europe but to germany are to their transatlantic agenda to their europe agenda and even to relations with china because so much of what not just china but also russia are doing to exert influence over the outcomes not just in their own neighborhoods but in europe too in fact pressure european nations to align with them is done with non-military means through disinformation propaganda corruption. It's buying trade. Which for germany is extremely important to make the german side with them rather than with the us. so yes. This is very important for biden to get anger. Merckel and the german government on his side. So one thorn in the us. German relationship is a russian nord stream pipeline. Which will deliver natural gas directly from russia to germany. But bypassing ukraine explained the issue here concerns on why. This is a problem for the white house for now. Most russian gas comes to europe through the ukrainian transit pipeline. The ukrainian government feels very strongly and some eastern central eastern european. Governments agree with it that this is the key factor or preventing the of putin from putting even more pressure on ukraine It is right now. With this ongoing proxy war in the eastern provinces of ukraine the us and the biden ministration agree with critique and have been urging germany for years to stop the pipeline. That's probably no longer an option. They biden reservation stationed. There seems to agree with this because it's nearly completed so concerns a miracle as i said has been there for fifteen years as germany's chancellor and that's a long time as head of state. How did this likely final visit to washington. Make you feel just in terms of marker in the history books. It's not irrelevant to me. That she was germany's first female chancellor but as the next on foreign and security policy. I look at her record with very mixed feelings. I think that she modernized the country. She made germany more powerful. She added into the economic and political hub of europe. But i also think that her style of governance careful brokering of compromises bouncing out in particular of america and eastwards. Russia and china is no longer persuasive at a time when russia and china are aggressively interfering in our concerns within the west and within europe in my own country. And so i think is a very real sense in germany. And i subscribe to that that it's time for a new approach. The question is whether her successor will do that consultant. Mueller is the fritz stern share on germany and transatlantic relations at the brookings institution concerns. A thank you very much for your time today. Well thank you for having me on the show as always. You're listening to the world. I'm marco werman you're with the world time for a fish fishtail decidedly english one about eels. Yup not the most attractive of fish. They're kind like swimming. Snakes slithery and slightly creepy in britain eels used to be a really big deal and highly valued jellied. Eel pie with mashed. Potatoes was a popular dish in. Mediaeval times you could pay your rent in eels not so long ago. Ills were everywhere. People in some now could remember a time when ales was plentiful. The could pretty much fish them out with buckets reporter. Catherine knicks has been writing about eels for the economist. The fish were the topic of a recent episode of intelligence a podcast from our partners at economist radio suffering from.

germany russia biden europe President biden constanza Merckel german government china america ukrainian government johns hopkins university joe biden putin white house marco werman washington Mueller swimming britain
"marco werman" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"marco werman" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"The con film festival <Speech_Music_Male> and the red carpet. <Speech_Music_Male> Were back <Speech_Music_Male> things are <Speech_Male> different. There <Speech_Male> are fewer. People <Speech_Male> organizers <Speech_Male> requiring masks <Speech_Male> and discouraging the <Speech_Male> famous french greeting <Speech_Male> a kiss on both cheeks <Speech_Male> but there were <Speech_Male> plenty of smiles <Speech_Male> on the red carpet <Speech_Male> and some kisses. <Speech_Male> Despite the warnings <Speech_Male> the influence of <Speech_Male> the pandemic is felt <Speech_Male> in the films. <Speech_Male> French director catherine <Speech_Male> corsini filmed <Speech_Male> la fracture or <Speech_Male> the divide <Speech_Male> during the pandemic. <Speech_Male> It takes place in <Speech_Male> a hospital <Speech_Male> onset. Last <Speech_Male> fall corsini told <Speech_Male> urine is about <Speech_Male> the challenges <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> cova presented <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> sit <Speech_Male> on metal graphics <Speech_Male> co. bid. <Speech_Male> It's so anti <Speech_Male> cinematic graphic. <Speech_Male> She said it's <Speech_Male> against everything. I love <Speech_Male> to hug to talk <Speech_Male> at. The actress <Speech_Male> can see your expressions <Speech_Male> this year. <Speech_Male> The festival is debut in <Speech_Male> a new section for films <Speech_Male> about climate <Speech_Male> one <Speech_Male> is above <Speech_Male> water a french documentary <Speech_Male> that follows <Speech_Male> a girl in kashmir <Speech_Male> who must walk <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> miles <SpeakerChange> each <Speech_Music_Male> day for water <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Laughter> <Laughter> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> in one saying <Speech_Male> the girl fills her bucket <Speech_Male> and asks. <Speech_Male> Is that all <Silence> the water. We got <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> one last note. There <Speech_Male> is no virtual <Speech_Male> component to the con film <Speech_Male> festival this year. <Speech_Male> Everything is old <Speech_Male> fashioned butts <Speech_Male> in seats movie going <Speech_Male> after <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> a year of watching films <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> on small screens <Speech_Male> at home. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> There's something refreshing <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and <SpeakerChange> hopeful about <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> that. <Speech_Male> And that's going to do it for <Speech_Male> us. On this wednesday. <Speech_Male> The world comes to <Speech_Male> each weekday from the <Speech_Male> non bill harris studio. <Speech_Male> Gbh in boston. <Speech_Male> I'm marco werman <Speech_Male> thank you you for being here. <Speech_Male> We'll see <SpeakerChange> again tomorrow <Music> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Music> ex.

kashmir marco werman bill harris boston
"marco werman" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"marco werman" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"Marco werman you're with the world. It's good to have you with us on a friday. The bug from air base in afghanistan. It's been one of the most visible symbols of the us military presence there just north of kabul in the town of bog rom. It was once the largest us military base in afghanistan today after almost twenty years. The last remaining american troops left by. Gram the rules. You're jafari has been covering this news closely. What do we know about this withdrawal sharon. Now we know that. American troops live in the early hours of morning afghanistan time. Us army infantryman closed the airfield and there was no report of any sort of ceremony or any lowering of the flag or anything like that that typically comes with events like these. The troops basically packed up and left quietly in the dark. Just to give you a bit of background about the base. Markle background has been the main center of operation for the us military in afghanistan for the past twenty years. It's a huge base and it was built in the nineteen fifties by the soviets. They use the when they were in afghanistan for about ten years between nine hundred seventy nine and nine hundred eighty nine and then in two thousand one the us a nato forces took over the base and it grew at one point. There were about ten thousand troops stationed at the pace and there are two runways for aircrafts hospitals restaurants dental clinics james. You name it. I should also point out that. There is a prison at bagram which has been described as afghanistan's guantanamo the. Us held prisoners there up until two thousand fourteen. When it handed over the facility to the afghans and over the years there have been numerous allegations of torture and abuse at this detention center. Over the years. Sharon tens of thousands of us troops. Pass through background as you said during deployments to afghanistan the veterans who were deployed there. What are they telling you today. Today i spoke with david carry on. He was a marine corps pilot in afghanistan in two thousand twelve and twenty thirteen. This is what he remembers of. Background was a little bit of military and a lot of Comfort david said he met a lot of people from different countries service members who were serving at the base in afghanistan the members of the coalition partners and i asked him what was his favorite thing to do their turkish coffee. He just wanted the coffee he really loved getting turkish coffee at the base and then i asked him how his feeling today when he heard the news that i- mccann forces have left program very disappointed. I think we need to stick with it. I think we need to honor the sacrifices that Many of us have made going there and especially those that Shed blood there. David says the. Us is leaving afghanistan at a vulnerable time. The taliban has been making advances. He says there is no political settlement yet. And so that leaves the door open for chaos. Right i mean it's something we've reported on the show. It's a concern. Many experts have how is the taliban responding to the us. Leaving the baghram airbase. I misses the taliban spokesman zabihullah moudjahid and he said the group has no immediate plan to take over background airbase but that afghans will make decisions about that later. That's what he said. I also heard from another taliban spokesman sohail shaheen. This is what he said in a voice message we will come the american forces leaving the mean. He had a base up but rahm. We hope all the foreign soldier american soldier pull out from our country. Soon marco dis as you know has been a request of taliban for very long time. They have been asking for for troops to leave afghanistan and now they have their wish. The issue though is that they have not engaged in peace talks with the current afghan government. So it's really unclear what will happen next. So troops have left the baghram airbase. Are there any. Us troops left in afghanistan nashrin. It's important to point out that even a lot of american and coalition forces have left there are going to be some troops left for example the us has said that it will keep about six hundred and fifty troops in country to protect its embassy. In kabul there are also ongoing discussions between the us and various other countries including turkey to keep some military personnel at the kabul airport to make sure that it remains open and it remains operational the wilshire and jafari speaking with us about the us departure from the bagram airbase afghanistan afghanistan. Sharon thank you for your reporting. You'll look marco so far this year thousands of migrant children have arrived alone at the us mexico border but the number of children in us custody has dropped from a high of twenty two thousand this spring to about fourteen thousand now. More children are being placed in homes outside of government custody. That's led to some emergency shelters shutting down as the world's immigration editor monica campbell reports many are welcoming the shift and say further changes overdue earlier. This year the government quickly set up about a dozen emergency shelters to take in unaccompanied migrant children. The biggest shelter is at fort bliss. An army base in el paso texas at one point were than forty four hundred. Children were there in giant white tents ages. Thirteen to seventeen cramped in rows of cots. Heavier peseta is the secretary of health and human services which oversees the care of migrant children. He spoke with reporters this week. While they're in our care we understand that we have a job to do and a legal obligation to make sure they are safe and healthy..

afghanistan us jafari Marco werman taliban baghram airbase kabul Markle zabihullah moudjahid Us army bagram sohail shaheen sharon marco dis david Sharon guantanamo nato afghan government mccann
Moscow's jails overwhelmed with detained Navalny protesters

PRI's The World

01:32 min | 2 years ago

Moscow's jails overwhelmed with detained Navalny protesters

"Foreign ministry says is expelling diplomats from germany poland and sweden for allegedly attending recent protests. Protesters have been out showing support for the jailed. Russian opposition politician alexei navalny so far more than ten thousand russians have been arrested during these demonstrations leaked photos. Show some pretty grim conditions. In detention cells. Sergei diabetes is a moscow based human rights advocate who works with prisoners and he spoke with my colleague. Marco werman sergei. How would you assess the current conditions in some of these holding cells and jails around moscow and across russia. Can you just describe what you've seen. Extra is conditions are very bad because never could so many people detained and more school schimmel tenuously and neva police stations or special detention centers on For so many people there is no room there and a lot of people had to be kept in a cold but at least wins for muslin one day reports about forty hours in these police. People didn't have possibility to sleep to eat or go to many police. Stations and police ransomware. They head to spend a lot of times now. You detention facilities opened was detained people but everything is slow in this process and the people spend a lot of time raging for possibility to be a place to this new

Foreign Ministry Alexei Navalny Sergei Diabetes Marco Werman Sergei Moscow Neva Police Poland Sweden Germany Schimmel Russia
France Announces New Measures to Tackle Domestic Violence

The World

01:23 min | 3 years ago

France Announces New Measures to Tackle Domestic Violence

"I'm Marco Werman and you're with the world there were dozens of marches across France this weekend demanding government action against domestic violence today France's prime minister Edward Philippe unveiled some new measures including dedicated prosecutors to address abuse better police training and a plan to seize guns from violent abusers France has one of the highest rates of femicide in western Europe is defined there as women killed by their partners or ex partners according to one count at least one hundred sixteen women have been killed so far this year though the number is believed to be much higher what gets less attention is this fact about one third of those women were over the age of sixty Rebecca Rosman recently spoke with the daughter of a woman who was one of those statistics there's so many things not in new Bach or want to tell me about our moms on Thomas Hey she was a very confident woman for sure I could listen to her talking over and over she always taught me something new she says her mom was smart loved animals she even rescue two donkeys my sister and I were like what are you doing this month and she would say I just love donkeys now he lives in Michigan so she's playing a video for me over the phone that's from may

Marco Werman France Edward Philippe Europe Rebecca Rosman Bach Michigan Prime Minister Thomas
Hong Kong is in recession after almost 5 months of protests

PRI's The World

08:01 min | 3 years ago

Hong Kong is in recession after almost 5 months of protests

"I'm Marco Werman this is the world Hong Kong is in recession and after nearly five months of street protests the economy in one of China's most important business hubs is slowing down retail sales are plunging also tourism is off fifty percent in October compared with last year and the U. S. China trade war is taking a financial toll the demonstrations in Hong Kong have been led mostly by young people protesting the way China governs a territory. It's easy to make a historical comparison to nineteen eighty nine when young people in Beijing's Tiananmen Square also protested in Beijing so two years ago we were begging for something called freedom that we member taste them by ones were you were smashed and we just gave up that's Han Dongfang. He was a protest leader in Gentleman Square after the bloody crackdown he spent a couple of years in prison and he later fled to Hong Kong now he's a labor organizer base there and he's watching and supporting this young generation protesters Han told me the movement in Hong Kong DOC is different from gentlemen in one crucial way today Hong Kong young people what they are doing is not begging in an Oscar for freedom is they have been living and freedom now someone attempting to take away so that is the fundamental for instance that is what I believe these people will never gave up how much have you been speaking with protesters in Hong Kong in recent weeks and what have you been hearing I am not really speaking to them I am participating in every major protest I am industries I observe them and I learned from on them because if I well remember in nine in two thousand fourteen I saw these young people into the highway and I run into them I said look you've got to get out from the highway you are giving them excuses the two shoe and I came from a nineteen eighty nine Tiananmen Square as what happens at the time they get shoes and these are shooting people and people don't want to listen to me an ICU kind of sad. about saw you know they are really not taking their life Catholic and they are really taking great risk but on fung aren't the protesters today also giving the the authorities plenty of reasons to kind of mistake reprisals I mean subway stations have been a set a a light they've occupied the airport I mean they're giving it seems the police a lot of reasons to to crack down on them yes you can say today even more than two thousand fourteen even more than thirty years ago in Tiananmen Square was they'll protesters are doing but the fundamental differences the protesters the mentality and courage so two years ago we we're fighting for something in or dreams we never know whenever taste it if we don't get it and we don't really lose anything but nowadays these people what from my observation in the street every major protest I can see a determination from their phase their body language and especially this is joined by men women young men and women and women are not following a man and men are on their own so all over in st they in their say's in their body language you can read they are ready to burn together it if it burns so dunk fung what is your advice to the Hong Kong protesters at this moment and where should they steer that courage I'm afraid I don't have a any strategic suggestions because I don't have it I am is a learning from them about the decorative ity of organizing difference activism protests every day during the week and evening date so this is a very new to mate so US Vice President Mike Pence says a America stands with Hong Kong and he criticised China for curtailing the rights is in liberties of Hong Kongers does that help the protesters or does it just add to the Chinese government's claim that this whole protest movement is a Western inspired separatist movement oh it's definitely help the movement the protests in Hong Kong and to make the Chinese government to think twice what to do but I have a very serious question here as Mista pants our Mr trump they taking this decision as a strategic move to make themselves in better position during the trade deal trade talk as a chip or as they are taking it as principal that no matter what even there there's no trade war they will take this human rights and democracy matter seriously what about if the U. S. China trade deal goes well while they oh back there will be no pressure there's no concern at what the Hong Kong people will do with that so help us with this one final question Dongfang despite some of the police crackdown on protesters disrupting business and mass transit in Hong Kong it seems many Hong Kongers have not abandoned or given up on the protesters and their actions why do you think that is what does it tell us you know Hong Kong people have enjoyed the freedom or snow much democracy Z. in a pause up to this point but enjoy the freedom freedom means you don't have to realize that every day morning would you tab use as I'm in freedom no freedom the beauty of freedom you don't realize that every day you don't have to pay attention but once somewhat attempt to AAC it whether your business person big business small business big like Miss the League coaching as more like other corners streets let you open a small restaurant leak catching as a big tycoon in Hong Kong right yeah big tie tongue one of the I didn't know riches Jason and Asia and the world maybe these people they all suddenly few their freedom as maybe a facing to a risk and this is a what make people bring people together you lose the same things that you enjoy didn't really have to feel it every day now you feel the same danger but the same even people were walking in the street protests the same things are fearful of losing freedom and they're not not necessarily show last or right middle or what but they are gathered together on this one same interests and fear which is fearful of losing freedom so that's my explanation about why Hong Kong people even the businesspeople they lose some business they're not but they're still tolerate this because they know that I had them. There will be bigger things to Luke's Han Dongfang a protest leader at Gentlemen Square nineteen eighty nine and currently a Labor activist thank you very much for your perspective I really appreciate it thank you thank you. Ns talking to you

Hong Kong China Han Dongfang Beijing Tiananmen Square Marco Werman Gentlemen Square Gentleman Square Luke Two Years Fifty Percent Thirty Years Five Months
Former Canadian diplomat detained in China

The World

00:51 sec | 4 years ago

Former Canadian diplomat detained in China

"The British Prime Minister Theresa may says European leaders are showing determination to tackle the issues which have led to her Brexit deal being opposed. In Britain's parliament, she's been meeting European leaders. But correspondent say their reactions have been blunt Chancellor Merkel of Germany told MRs may there would be no renegotiation of the agreement. Rob Watson has been gauging. The response to this trip amongst Rune MP's in London. I think it's a sailors a pretty desperate mission one. That is unlikely to win round wavering conservative MP's. But I think it's incredibly important to say some conservatives MP's told me, do we think that's reason may as Winston Churchill absolutely not received disappointing as a leader. Absolutely. But they've also said to me, look you have to ask yourself if we replace the reason with another leader that wouldn't change the fundamental arithmetic. If she were to lose the vote who on earth would want the job an American. Neo Nazi who plowed? His car into a group of protesters in Charlottesville last year, killing a young woman has been sentenced to life in jail by jury in the city James field whose twenty one was found guilty of murdering Heather hair. India's prime minister Narendra Modi has accepted defeat in key state elections writing on Twitter. He congratulated the opposition congress party for its victories in several states, including Registan and charges gar which were previously governed by Mr. Modi's BJP party. Analysts suggest rural discontent could be one factor behind the swing. Russian cosmonauts are on a six hour. Spacewalk investigating a mystery hole which appeared in the Soyuz spacecraft in August is the first time they've examined the damage from from outside the saw us, which is docked in the international space station, the whole caused an air leak that was immediately fixed. BBC news. I'm Marco werman, and you're with the world good to have you with us today in this age of fake news and presidents

Rune Mp Narendra Modi Prime Minister Winston Churchill Theresa Chancellor Merkel Marco Werman Rob Watson Britain BBC BJP Germany Congress Party Heather Hair Twitter Charlottesville India London Registan Six Hour
Yemen's crushing war takes a tentative first step to a resolution

PRI's The World

02:04 min | 4 years ago

Yemen's crushing war takes a tentative first step to a resolution

"Yemeni capital by secret. Police last year they held him for five months in prison run by Yemen's who the rebels he shot and his family live in Cairo. Now, we spoke with him this afternoon about the planned release of thousands of prisoners who were captured in the Yemeni civil war. I remember what my family had to go through Joe tension. They constantly worried that I wasn't gonna make it alive out of the prison than even know where I was I was kept in dungeon for five months solitary confinement, one meter by one meter and a half cell. I had no windows. There was no light for the first two weeks. And. I was literally buried alive. People ask me what I stepped out of prison when I was released will I be seeking revenge against the footy. I guess my captors, but the one thing I kept insisting on repeating was that out of one vengeance out of entre. Vengeance. What has happened has already happened? Let's turn promote peace. So to my family to the prisoners inside those cells. It means a lot that those are breakthrough that has got to be a prisoner. Swap the prisoner. Swap is gonna mean, basically, giving them a second chance at life Yemeni political active at political analyst and former political prisoner. He Sean Allah Mesa. He spoke with us about the prisoner. Swap brokered by the UN this week in Sweden, which may help pave the way for further talks to end the Yemen war. I'm Marco werman, and you're with the world. So an African king walks into a barbershop, I'm king Joffe Jolfa ruler of someone. Yeah. We'll have see them to be ready to say that barbershop and Eddie Murphy's coming to America was one of many influences in a new play by Nigerian INA Elam's barbershop chronicles is set in. Also in Johannesburg, Harare, Legos London as well as.

Yemen Political Analyst Sean Allah Mesa Eddie Murphy Ina Elam Marco Werman Legos London Cairo Joffe Jolfa UN Johannesburg JOE America Sweden Five Months One Meter Two Weeks
Is Climate Change Draining Nutrients From Crops?

The World

04:44 min | 4 years ago

Is Climate Change Draining Nutrients From Crops?

"Looking at another few ninety plus degree days here in Boston and before the end. Of August more, carbon dioxide. In the atmosphere will fuel climate change for decades to come. As if. That's not enough here's another downside it's going to make the food we eat less nutritious there's a direct effect. Of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere on plants that's reducing crop nutrients that's Harvard. Scientists Sam Myers he co wrote a study published today in the journal nature climate change it found that hundreds, of millions of people could suffer from. Iron zinc, and protein deficiencies in? The, coming. Decades and that's because more carbon means fewer nutrients in staple crops around the world we're seeing on the order. Of roughly five to fifteen percent reductions in these very important, nutrients from colluding iron zinc and protein five to fifteen percent. You said is that a lot. Well yeah it turns out that It is but the only way to answer that question in a rigorous way is to ask how many people in the world. Are living relatively close to a threshold of nutrient deficiency and are also depending on these kinds of food crops for significant portions of the. Nutrients that they're. Getting and what we found is. Somewhere on the order. Of one hundred to two hundred million people around the world would be expected to fall. Into new risk, of zinc. And protein deficiency and that there'd be large large numbers of. People that. Would lose important amounts of their dietary iron as well which crops are we talking about here the crops that. Provide most of the calories in the human diet I mean things like wheat. And rice and soy and just about every crop that falls into what's called a c. three crop which essentially, is every single food crop that we. Eat except, for maize or corn? Sorghum, and. Some of the millet And I know you kind of separate the effect of. CO two on plants and CO two in the atmosphere but it is striking the people who are going to feel these effects, the most are the same people who are going to be most impacted overall by climate change people in the Asian subcontinent southeast Asia Africa the Middle. East why is that there's no question that the most vulnerable people in the world tend to be the poorest people in lower income countries will have the fewest sort of insulating layers, to protect them from these effects whether we're talking about more extreme storms or we're talking about increased exposure to infectious disease or we're talking about less, nutritional foods in this case the greatest risk is in India's South. Asia much, of Africa and the reason for that, is that those are places where diets are less diverse eighty percent of calories, in India's diet come from cereals and relatively low income people tend to have much lower, intake of animal source foods Which are rich in iron zinc in protein and can protect. Those people to some degree from these effects so it's it's not very diverse diet not very much animal source foods heavy reliance on cereals and then those cereals. Are losing key nutrients Sam did this study personally worry you Yeah I mean it worries me that hundreds of. Millions of people are going to be. Pushed into new risk of some pretty serious nutritional deficits but I also think there's an awful lot we can do so I think we. Need to, step, up our commitment, to doing research to reduce our vulnerability to these. Kinds of affects Sam give us a bit of. Hope here are there fixes, for this problem that crop researchers are public health officials are already thinking about another a variety of things we can do I mean obviously first and foremost. We need to start reducing our carbon dioxide emissions that's the most direct thing that we can do but in addition to that. There are all kinds of other areas for, research that could be engaged in one is breeding crops, that are actually less sensitive to this carbon dioxide effect there's work being done in bio fortification of crops. Meeting that you enrich those crops with, respect to certain nutrients are supplementing, diets there's an enormous, amount that can be done particularly in, the, most, vulnerable countries to encouraging increased, consumption Of foods like fruits and vegetables and nuts and seeds and legumes that would provide. Additional amounts of these nutrients so there are all kinds of. Promising and interesting areas for research but I think we really need to step up our commitment to doing that research where right. Now I think the global commitment is. Relatively tepid Sam Myers head of the planetary health alliance and a research at Harvard School of public health thanks for being with us all. Right thank, you, so much

Mexico President Trump Sam Myers Canada United States Marco Werman Harvard School Of Public Kendall Boston Sonora K. J. Z. Hollywood Kai Ryssdal Protein Deficiency Phoenix
Global Reach & Statistics - Uber Expansion

The World

01:00 min | 4 years ago

Global Reach & Statistics - Uber Expansion

"Does Uber dominate. The ride sharing industry globally Not exactly that was the case may be Two years ago their national strategy is is pretty interesting before it used to. Be in the over one point zero. Days it was boots on the ground everywhere you need to be anywhere where it needs to be the transport platform of choice for everyone in. The world that clearly was not. Financially sustainable so they've pulled. Out of Russia they pulled out of China we saw in southeast Asia were had to pull out the yield at, the company came to with the homegrown player grab was more favorable than deals that were, had with China's home from. Player TD still it was out of necessity the company was definitely not doing, as well as expected to across southeast Asia and that's why. They've had to pull out on in India market share might be a little. Bit, more comparable to its competitor there Ola however it. Is a very difficult market to

Spain New York City James Asquith Asia India Indonesia James Uber Marco Werman Middle East China London Johanna James Oscar Southeast Asia OLA United States Johanna Company
Trump, NPR and Ted Anthony discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

04:10 min | 4 years ago

Trump, NPR and Ted Anthony discussed on Morning Edition

"Local member, station by, name This is NPR news Ahead on, morning edition for Tuesday you'll hear a story about rethinking the practice of solitary confinement for inmates the story. Out of North Dakota more about that on that, story on morning, edition as it continues we'll get the Traffix story two from Ted Anthony and just a. Few minutes right now today's weather pretty much the conditions remain the same that we've seen the, past couple of days sunny skies for the bay area after some morning clouds and patchy fog do watch for the clouds though to hanging hanging around along the coast through, the day highs today the low sixty s along the coast through the seventies around the bay into the low nineties inland and for. The southern Sacramento valley a sunny day today with areas of smoke through the day is between ninety. Two and one hundred they predicted high for the capital, city of Sacramento. Today ninety six degrees I'm Michael state the time it. Is nineteen after four From NPR news in Washington I'm Dave Mattingly Afghan officials say a roadside bombing in the west. Of the country today has killed eleven people aboard a passenger bus in the east militants have launched. An assault on Jalalabad Afghan officials say gunmen stormed a, government building and. Took hostages after a suicide. Bomber attack the front gate Iran's, president is expressing skepticism over President Trump's offer, to meet with Iranian leaders as NPR's Peter Kenyon reports Trump says he's willing to do so without preconditions president Hassan. Rohani says a country that breaks its, promises a reference to Trump pulling out of the twenty fifteen nuclear agreement cannot be trusted and further talks Ronnie also says. Tehran will protect its right to export. Oil a vital economic lifeline at a time when Iran's inflation rate is soaring in the currency rapidly, losing value, to history professors. Are resigning from university of Virginia think-tank over the appointment of a former, aide to President Trump has caused Spencer with. Member station w. c. v., e. reports Mark short is also a UVA alum the resigning professors point to Mark Short's, history of working for such conservatives. As former marine Ollie north the coke brothers and, Trump nevertheless short remains on track to begin a one year fellowship on Wednesday UVA's Miller center Short worked as the president's legislative affairs director I'm Dave Mattingly NPR, news in Washington On the next fresh air you want a husband will take a. Bullet for you not one who points to the attic and says they're up there Tony. Shalhoub has been nominated for an EMMY for his performance in the Amazon comedy series the marvelous MRs Mazel shalhoub also starred in the TV series monk. And the film big night join us It's fresh air, one o'clock this afternoon and again this evening, at seven here on kqed public radio I'm Michael state help you. Have a nice safe trip to your place of employment this morning let's see how smooth. It is at this hour here's Ted Anthony Wright in. A good morning to you Michael will head over to Pittsburgh. Westbound four near a railroad just getting word of a, two vehicle accident which may have the right lane block CHP. Already headed out there San. Jose hit and run accident right shoulder McLaughlin avenue on ramp and northbound six. Eighty and we still have this situation in south San Francisco the point boulevard Dubuque. Avenue on ramp to southbound one zero one remains shut down this from a big rig action which happened late last. Night and it produced an oil spill so the cleanup there continues now we're. Hearing maybe. Seven o'clock this morning when you have that. Ramp reopen I'm Ted Anthony for Ted's update brought to you by. FEMA and the Ad Council I'm Marco werman PR is the world brings you a global. Perspective on the news with a worldwide network of correspondents you meet people at the heart.

Donald Trump NPR Ted Anthony Michael State President Trump President Hassan Dave Mattingly Iran North Dakota Washington Ted Anthony Wright Sacramento Valley Mrs Mazel Shalhoub Sacramento Mark Short San Francisco Jalalabad Afghan Assault Marco Werman