24 Burst results for "Marco Werman"

"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:56 min | 9 months ago

"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hi Marco Werman this is the world it is good to be with you this Friday we begin with news that feels like it's all around us all the time now the corona virus here's a random question are you touching your face right now well stop it health officials have been telling us that for weeks but as the world's rupa Shenoy reports stopping is easier said than done the person you're most likely to get coronavirus from is yourself more specifically your hands think of them as sponges soaking up the world and putting it in your eyes and mouth when you touch your face because you probably touch it all the time turns out there's a likely reason why social anxiety psychologist Kevin Chapman director of the Kentucky center for anxiety and related disorders says face touching is often a way to comfort ourselves but it's not actually good for us although all feel better it alternately reinforces strong emotional state so yes it can be self tuning but also can backfire make strong emotion worse long term like any good bad habit it's hard to stop and Chapman says all the talk about not touching faces will just make us all want to touch our face having a more flexible thought related to face touching such as waking up and saying something along the lines of I will be more aware of touching my face today is a much more flexible way less punitive way to extinguish that behavior some people have been able to do it I haven't touched my face in the wings weeks I miss others struggle even Singapore's minister of health gone Kim young even at a meeting that we have on this the ministry task force while I was speaking it was touching my face until minister Lawrence Wong knocks me with his elbow as you stop touching your face it's possible people in some cultures might have an easier time stopping than others Vladimir alone so is a global health researcher with the university of sao Paulo was contrasted face touching habits in Brazil and the U. S. and he says he hasn't observed a big difference everyone seems to do it almost constantly but he says some cultures are more touch oriented in general than others may be making the face touching in those places more dangerous you can read and people would be like to greet each other early Walkley so I think that's going to we have a crises they're going on people keep doing that you know so you know once you see that how do you not know if that Italy's special commissioner for corona viruses suggested Italians need to tone down their warm culture France's minister went further advising people to stop greeting each other with kisses when German chancellor Angela Merkel swept into a meeting and offered her hand for a shake to the German interior.

Walkley chancellor university of sao Paulo Kim young Kevin Chapman Angela Merkel France commissioner Italy Marco Werman Brazil researcher Vladimir Lawrence Wong Singapore Kentucky center director rupa Shenoy
"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:00 min | 11 months ago

"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Marco Werman on the world we get an outside perspective because getting outside yourself can be a good thing somebody says to me Kwame I can't imagine what you go through as a black person and I'll see try it is the world when the world is on KQED this afternoon beginning at two one a spent a year going across America look along the river I didn't know I was black until I came to America they can anybody can come China does not have our farmers best interest at heart that's the problem what we learned from our travels and what more can we look forward to in the new year highlights from across America next time on one that when a program is here on KQED tonight beginning at eleven it's morning edition from NPR news I'm no well king and I'm Steve Inskeep almost any great writer needs a great editor a champion who understands their work and makes it better the editor of many a great writer has died Sonny matter was seventy seven the editor in chief of the publishing house all for a cut off where his authors included Toni Morrison Gabrielle Garcia Marcus and John look correct and peers rose Friedman has this appreciation something that I didn't like to talk about himself in fact in NPR's archived along this clip I could find of him was one in which he quoted to other people on the definition of a classic I think it was Mark Twain who described it as a book which people praise and on trade but the one I feel closest to is Clifton five amends and they said that when you read a classic you do not see more in the book than you did before you see more in you than there was before he was on occasion and brilliantly articulate but he largely left the articulation to his office is James Ellroy was one of those authors he says ministering was that he didn't just a choir books he reveled in hammering out the details with authors Sonny got him there with me for years all right the most complex crime books ever written and he could talk plot points with me chapter and verse on and on and on we met a published all rights novel white jazz the author says they discussed the syncopated style down to each sentence I could walk quite channels off my shelf right now so Sonny me Sonny me so that I was born in New Delhi in nineteen forty two he was the son of a diplomat and moved around the world frequently his career in publishing began in London but it was in New York that he became something of a legend he published six Nobel Prize winners celebrities pope John Paul the second thrillers by John le Carre and such literary authors as jumble Heery Joan Didion and Patti Smith metal live through huge changes in publishing the rise of E. books at Amazon but author Robert Caro historian whose books about power and the ways it's wielded take famously long to write says metal always gave him the room he needed nine one three one I would deliver the manuscript when I would be finished you really understood what I was trying to achieve with my books and you get a rate the thing I needed most farm card to achieve the best back court so he made a never stopped working and James Ellroy says he never stop looking for the next great book he had a troubled sniffing bloodhounds in the state for books at all points in the development of a manuscript his bloodhounds out was right down there on the page so I need to love the cigarette and a Scotch on the opera and a good book best of all rose Friedman NPR news New York as the.

Marco Werman
France Announces New Measures to Tackle Domestic Violence

The World

01:23 min | 1 year ago

France Announces New Measures to Tackle Domestic Violence

"I'm Marco Werman and you're with the world there were dozens of marches across France this weekend demanding government action against domestic violence today France's prime minister Edward Philippe unveiled some new measures including dedicated prosecutors to address abuse better police training and a plan to seize guns from violent abusers France has one of the highest rates of femicide in western Europe is defined there as women killed by their partners or ex partners according to one count at least one hundred sixteen women have been killed so far this year though the number is believed to be much higher what gets less attention is this fact about one third of those women were over the age of sixty Rebecca Rosman recently spoke with the daughter of a woman who was one of those statistics there's so many things not in new Bach or want to tell me about our moms on Thomas Hey she was a very confident woman for sure I could listen to her talking over and over she always taught me something new she says her mom was smart loved animals she even rescue two donkeys my sister and I were like what are you doing this month and she would say I just love donkeys now he lives in Michigan so she's playing a video for me over the phone that's from may

Marco Werman France Edward Philippe Europe Rebecca Rosman Bach Michigan Prime Minister Thomas
Hong Kong is in recession after almost 5 months of protests

PRI's The World

08:01 min | 1 year ago

Hong Kong is in recession after almost 5 months of protests

"I'm Marco Werman this is the world Hong Kong is in recession and after nearly five months of street protests the economy in one of China's most important business hubs is slowing down retail sales are plunging also tourism is off fifty percent in October compared with last year and the U. S. China trade war is taking a financial toll the demonstrations in Hong Kong have been led mostly by young people protesting the way China governs a territory. It's easy to make a historical comparison to nineteen eighty nine when young people in Beijing's Tiananmen Square also protested in Beijing so two years ago we were begging for something called freedom that we member taste them by ones were you were smashed and we just gave up that's Han Dongfang. He was a protest leader in Gentleman Square after the bloody crackdown he spent a couple of years in prison and he later fled to Hong Kong now he's a labor organizer base there and he's watching and supporting this young generation protesters Han told me the movement in Hong Kong DOC is different from gentlemen in one crucial way today Hong Kong young people what they are doing is not begging in an Oscar for freedom is they have been living and freedom now someone attempting to take away so that is the fundamental for instance that is what I believe these people will never gave up how much have you been speaking with protesters in Hong Kong in recent weeks and what have you been hearing I am not really speaking to them I am participating in every major protest I am industries I observe them and I learned from on them because if I well remember in nine in two thousand fourteen I saw these young people into the highway and I run into them I said look you've got to get out from the highway you are giving them excuses the two shoe and I came from a nineteen eighty nine Tiananmen Square as what happens at the time they get shoes and these are shooting people and people don't want to listen to me an ICU kind of sad. about saw you know they are really not taking their life Catholic and they are really taking great risk but on fung aren't the protesters today also giving the the authorities plenty of reasons to kind of mistake reprisals I mean subway stations have been a set a a light they've occupied the airport I mean they're giving it seems the police a lot of reasons to to crack down on them yes you can say today even more than two thousand fourteen even more than thirty years ago in Tiananmen Square was they'll protesters are doing but the fundamental differences the protesters the mentality and courage so two years ago we we're fighting for something in or dreams we never know whenever taste it if we don't get it and we don't really lose anything but nowadays these people what from my observation in the street every major protest I can see a determination from their phase their body language and especially this is joined by men women young men and women and women are not following a man and men are on their own so all over in st they in their say's in their body language you can read they are ready to burn together it if it burns so dunk fung what is your advice to the Hong Kong protesters at this moment and where should they steer that courage I'm afraid I don't have a any strategic suggestions because I don't have it I am is a learning from them about the decorative ity of organizing difference activism protests every day during the week and evening date so this is a very new to mate so US Vice President Mike Pence says a America stands with Hong Kong and he criticised China for curtailing the rights is in liberties of Hong Kongers does that help the protesters or does it just add to the Chinese government's claim that this whole protest movement is a Western inspired separatist movement oh it's definitely help the movement the protests in Hong Kong and to make the Chinese government to think twice what to do but I have a very serious question here as Mista pants our Mr trump they taking this decision as a strategic move to make themselves in better position during the trade deal trade talk as a chip or as they are taking it as principal that no matter what even there there's no trade war they will take this human rights and democracy matter seriously what about if the U. S. China trade deal goes well while they oh back there will be no pressure there's no concern at what the Hong Kong people will do with that so help us with this one final question Dongfang despite some of the police crackdown on protesters disrupting business and mass transit in Hong Kong it seems many Hong Kongers have not abandoned or given up on the protesters and their actions why do you think that is what does it tell us you know Hong Kong people have enjoyed the freedom or snow much democracy Z. in a pause up to this point but enjoy the freedom freedom means you don't have to realize that every day morning would you tab use as I'm in freedom no freedom the beauty of freedom you don't realize that every day you don't have to pay attention but once somewhat attempt to AAC it whether your business person big business small business big like Miss the League coaching as more like other corners streets let you open a small restaurant leak catching as a big tycoon in Hong Kong right yeah big tie tongue one of the I didn't know riches Jason and Asia and the world maybe these people they all suddenly few their freedom as maybe a facing to a risk and this is a what make people bring people together you lose the same things that you enjoy didn't really have to feel it every day now you feel the same danger but the same even people were walking in the street protests the same things are fearful of losing freedom and they're not not necessarily show last or right middle or what but they are gathered together on this one same interests and fear which is fearful of losing freedom so that's my explanation about why Hong Kong people even the businesspeople they lose some business they're not but they're still tolerate this because they know that I had them. There will be bigger things to Luke's Han Dongfang a protest leader at Gentlemen Square nineteen eighty nine and currently a Labor activist thank you very much for your perspective I really appreciate it thank you thank you. Ns talking to you

Hong Kong China Han Dongfang Beijing Tiananmen Square Marco Werman Gentlemen Square Gentleman Square Luke Two Years Fifty Percent Thirty Years Five Months
"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Still back tonight AT truly devilish forty can we do thank you Julie her report brought to you by the T. J. Martell foundation that's why Zynga we do expect some drizzle and fog late tonight temperatures drop to the fifties more of the same weather tomorrow hi Marco Werman you're with the world it's bigger than Snapchat Twitter and linkedin but it's mostly teenagers who are using it tech talk the fastest growing social media app in the world but it's come under scrutiny for the practice of gift baiting that's when tech talkers use their live broadcast to coerce young fans into sending them hundreds of dollars in digital gifts the BBC's Joe tidy reports of one well I saw you do it live thank you for your call stumbling into a tech told live stream can be bewildering the once you learn the short hand in jargon it's clear take talk celebrities are effectively selling their attention remember you are the next person the quick I get boxes in a concert you gonna follow concerts rainbow peaks and pandas real names of gifts these animated cartoons pop up on screen during live streams highlighting the gift is username the little ones cost pennies but the biggest one called a drama queen costs uses forty nine pounds despite having one of the five hundred million uses the platform doesn't have any guidelines about what can and cannot be offered in exchange for gifts the the dropping of its own going you know speak to on Instagram for weeks striped shall towns video collaborations and falling back several common but some fans feel exploited we spoke to a twelve year old girl from the north west of England who didn't want our interviews we wrote cost you can use to talk a hundred a hundred pounds.

Julie T. J. Martell foundation Zynga Marco Werman Twitter linkedin BBC Instagram England Joe tidy forty nine pounds hundred pounds twelve year
"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Marco werman. This is the world. It's been a decade century-long kaput. It's long civil war in the past ten years of relative calm there. So yesterday's coordinated terror attacks across the island on Easter or shocking. Here's what we know for sure today. Three cities were targeted the capital Colombo where there were six bombing sites. Another site was in the city of Batticaloa. And the worst carnage was in the city of Negombo just the north of Colombo a single bombing at one church where more than one hundred people were killed. We reached out today to report Aurora almond draw who started her day in Colombo this morning there were people out on the streets, but far less than you would expect on a Monday morning rush. Hour people were passing by the hotels, where their windows were blown out where there bombings, and everybody's trying to get a look at what happened from combo when to Negombo where there was the the church of Saint Sebastian where they had the largest number of casual. Altis there people were trying to make sense of what was happening. There is a fair amount of tension, and obviously some fear and some anger among the people who were at the church in the hospital trying to identify the victims and find their family members and things like that. So what did you hear what who did you speak to spoke to when men is name was Denver. And he lived nearby to the church and her the large explosion after the suicide bomber detonated his his bombing. He rushed over to the Tricia tried to help the people of feeling for pulses trying to save the ones who are still alive. Big.

Colombo Negombo Marco werman Aurora almond Batticaloa Tricia Saint Sebastian Denver ten years
"marco werman" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"marco werman" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Marco werman that says the world so what's for Christmas dinner this year, ham, roast beef goose Leister's, you may have noticed that the price point went up as I went through that list. Anyway around this time every year in Los Angeles, the line start formed for something traditional that's easier on the wallet soggy solace of KCRW in Santa Monica tells us that for some people it's just not Christmas without it at the bustling low single Bhutto's market in L A's Boyle heights neighborhood, you can buy all kinds of traditional Mexican ingredients and foods from Kearney, tacos and cheese. Tamales to dry chilies and herbs but during the holiday season co-manager Frank Britos says it's pretty much all about the tamales. Some people come in and order twenty dozen thirty fifty dozens at a box, and that's not unusual. No, not at all. If you haven't had a Tamale, let's review the culinary basics. Although recipes. Can differ? It's usually a filling wrapped in a thin layer of cornmeal dough called Masa, which in turn is wrapped in either a corn husk or sometimes a banana leaf all of it is then cooked the heart of the Tamale, the filling can be pretty much whatever rocks. Your taste buds this week the tamales or strawberry. There's fine. Apple their sentiment chicken tamales with cheese. Green chili and cheese sport, everything under the sun, everything. Yes, it depends on what you like. And how you've been accustomed to make tamales have been the staple of Mexican cooking for centuries dating back to the Mayan and aspects Ebola's Asians for Mexico. Tamales spread to the rest of Latin America and to this country where they were introduced at the eighteen ninety three world's fair in Chicago tamales have also become a dish associated with Christmas celebrations for poor Mexican American families.

Marco werman Santa Monica Los Angeles Boyle heights Mexico Masa Frank Britos co-manager Latin America Bhutto Apple Chicago
Former Canadian diplomat detained in China

The World

00:51 sec | 2 years ago

Former Canadian diplomat detained in China

"The British Prime Minister Theresa may says European leaders are showing determination to tackle the issues which have led to her Brexit deal being opposed. In Britain's parliament, she's been meeting European leaders. But correspondent say their reactions have been blunt Chancellor Merkel of Germany told MRs may there would be no renegotiation of the agreement. Rob Watson has been gauging. The response to this trip amongst Rune MP's in London. I think it's a sailors a pretty desperate mission one. That is unlikely to win round wavering conservative MP's. But I think it's incredibly important to say some conservatives MP's told me, do we think that's reason may as Winston Churchill absolutely not received disappointing as a leader. Absolutely. But they've also said to me, look you have to ask yourself if we replace the reason with another leader that wouldn't change the fundamental arithmetic. If she were to lose the vote who on earth would want the job an American. Neo Nazi who plowed? His car into a group of protesters in Charlottesville last year, killing a young woman has been sentenced to life in jail by jury in the city James field whose twenty one was found guilty of murdering Heather hair. India's prime minister Narendra Modi has accepted defeat in key state elections writing on Twitter. He congratulated the opposition congress party for its victories in several states, including Registan and charges gar which were previously governed by Mr. Modi's BJP party. Analysts suggest rural discontent could be one factor behind the swing. Russian cosmonauts are on a six hour. Spacewalk investigating a mystery hole which appeared in the Soyuz spacecraft in August is the first time they've examined the damage from from outside the saw us, which is docked in the international space station, the whole caused an air leak that was immediately fixed. BBC news. I'm Marco werman, and you're with the world good to have you with us today in this age of fake news and presidents

Rune Mp Narendra Modi Prime Minister Winston Churchill Theresa Chancellor Merkel Marco Werman Rob Watson Britain BBC BJP Germany Congress Party Heather Hair Twitter Charlottesville India London Registan Six Hour
Yemen's crushing war takes a tentative first step to a resolution

PRI's The World

02:04 min | 2 years ago

Yemen's crushing war takes a tentative first step to a resolution

"Yemeni capital by secret. Police last year they held him for five months in prison run by Yemen's who the rebels he shot and his family live in Cairo. Now, we spoke with him this afternoon about the planned release of thousands of prisoners who were captured in the Yemeni civil war. I remember what my family had to go through Joe tension. They constantly worried that I wasn't gonna make it alive out of the prison than even know where I was I was kept in dungeon for five months solitary confinement, one meter by one meter and a half cell. I had no windows. There was no light for the first two weeks. And. I was literally buried alive. People ask me what I stepped out of prison when I was released will I be seeking revenge against the footy. I guess my captors, but the one thing I kept insisting on repeating was that out of one vengeance out of entre. Vengeance. What has happened has already happened? Let's turn promote peace. So to my family to the prisoners inside those cells. It means a lot that those are breakthrough that has got to be a prisoner. Swap the prisoner. Swap is gonna mean, basically, giving them a second chance at life Yemeni political active at political analyst and former political prisoner. He Sean Allah Mesa. He spoke with us about the prisoner. Swap brokered by the UN this week in Sweden, which may help pave the way for further talks to end the Yemen war. I'm Marco werman, and you're with the world. So an African king walks into a barbershop, I'm king Joffe Jolfa ruler of someone. Yeah. We'll have see them to be ready to say that barbershop and Eddie Murphy's coming to America was one of many influences in a new play by Nigerian INA Elam's barbershop chronicles is set in. Also in Johannesburg, Harare, Legos London as well as.

Yemen Political Analyst Sean Allah Mesa Eddie Murphy Ina Elam Marco Werman Legos London Cairo Joffe Jolfa UN Johannesburg JOE America Sweden Five Months One Meter Two Weeks
"marco werman" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"marco werman" Discussed on PRI's The World

"I'm Marco werman. This is the world with so much talk about immigration before the midterms. We put out a call to new citizens. People voting for the first time here in the US one person we heard from his dealin Miranda. She lives in Massachusetts and became a citizen this year. I was born in foot Elizabeth South Africa. I'm a non white South African my parents will not allow to vote up until ninety four. That was the first time they will allow about two it's very pistol to me. I feel like the only realize I'm looking voting is once you've had to take it away. So when you were growing up in South Africa. What did you hear from your parents about voting about this civic responsibility that they actually were not allowed to have by law? My fans were very careful to not expose us to racism. We were very sheltered. My parents raised to not have hate in hot even though they were so oppressed back in the day. We had no idea that there was racism apartheid going on. I only became away when I hit high school and be allowed to go to a white school. That was when I saw it to understand that whites didn't like non whites. So I only at night is open the older, I got I mean, there's been so much rhetoric veiled and unveiled racism leading up to this midterm. How do you feel about that? I'm heartbroken at hog folk and absolutely hukou. Can I don't understand? I don't. I don't know when news book that Trump had mentioned dole countries, and I'm from the quote unquote till country. My mother was absolutely distraught. And she cried angry. Tis. Say that. Yeah. Have you voted already? Did you early vote? Are you going to cast your ballot tomorrow? No, I'm voting on Tuesday. I want to feel the full experience. I don't wanna vote I'm gonna see if I can take my son with me, and my husband, we're going to do a whole family affair. I'm very excited. How old is your son ten months old? Yeah. So a little early to be kind of explaining to him the value of voting. But I imagine I imagine though that when he gets older you will be able to pass on some stories to him about voting for the first time voting in South Africa. And what it means express team that it's very important to vote because you voting rights can be taken away. You don't think again be taken away? But you know, like everything can be taken away from me. You have to vote your vote is so important if you want anything to change you have to vote deal. Miranda for voter here in Massachusetts. Congratulations. Thank you very much. We have more great great feedback from first time voters, you can read more at the world. Dot ORG immigration healthcare, democracy itself. Those are some of the top concerns on the minds of voters during this midterm season. Typically, what is not top of my for a lot of voters are climate change in the environment. But that might be starting to change Nathaniel Stinnett heads up the environmental voter project, which looks at how environmentalist vote I ask them how the organization defines that we are focused on people who care so deeply about climate and the environment that they listed as either their number one or they're number two priority over all others. So these are really super environmentalists. Yes. So that's a small group. I'm imagining because environmental issues are quite often at the bottom of the list of voter concerns. Well, you're right that they're often at the bottom of the list of voter concerns, but believe it or not there are actually a really large number of these super environmentalists who are already registered to vote. They just don't show up in polls of likely voters because they don't. Fill up on election day when allies well there are two answers to that question..

Elizabeth South Africa US Massachusetts Marco werman South Africa white school Miranda Nathaniel Stinnett Trump dole ten months
"marco werman" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"marco werman" Discussed on PRI's The World

"I'm Marco werman. This is the world next Tuesday. You know, what you're supposed to do vote feeling that a lot of you are chomping at the bit to cast ballots this year, and that's what we're hearing. I just recently became a United States citizen literally on Halloween so two days ago. And I already had in mind. My first order of business was to go and vote here, North Carolina. I really wanted to do my parts and the stream portent election, that's another Marcos being there, Marco Rosa will hear more from him later market was one of the people who responded to our call this week. Asking new US citizens who are first time voters this election season for their thoughts. Your thoughts, we got some great responses. You can read some of them at the world dot ORG. Here's another one that came to us from Joe Zoellner who is a first time voter, she's originally from Taiwan. You got to vote in Taiwan when you live there. I'm just curious when you were growing up in Taiwan wooded voting into your did you think about the first time you'd be? Able to cast a vote. Yeah. I remember it being a really big thing. We were told that every vote is sacred, and you have to make your voice hurt something that I find strange here is voting on a weekday Tuesday is such a random day for an election. You move to in two thousand eight and there was a big and significant election that you're you were a permanent resident from two thousand twelve and two thousand sixteen so unable to vote during those years. Tell me about your decision to become a citizen. I decided I wanted to become a citizen because of election in two thousand sixteen before that I was permanent resident and didn't really have a strong urge to become a citizen. I just felt like everything's working. Everything's fine. I don't think y'all need just one vote for me. But after the election in two thousand sixteen I remember distinctly that night. I was like I have to do something in the first thing, I can't do was just put in my application for citizenship. And I. Did that the very next week? And I was determined to make sure they get my citizenship and vote and all of the elections. So with the unexpected turn of events in two thousand sixteen did you see something at stake for you? Joe personally if you didn't have the right to vote the next time round. I did see something personal. I IM an immigrant and this administration is not pro-immigrant. Whether it's my fellow immigrants, my fellow minorities. It just didn't sit. Well with me do not participate zone. It order to be in the discussion in order to be in the conversation. I feel like I need to participate. I mean, I'm guessing there are new arrivals in this country who will probably vote next Tuesday for the first time, and they'll vote Republican ticket straight down the line. Would that surprise you at this point? I'm not really surprised at anything anymore. They all say like make America, great, but immigrants are what makes Erika great like immigrants and slaves built this country. Everyone has their right? To vote for whoever they want. But for me voting Republican would not be advocating for myself or immigrants such as myself. So we were trading emails earlier this week setting up the interview, and you wrote America needs to wake up and learn from the rest of the world, and I hope my vote will help. So will you try to do anything more to wake up Americans other than casting your vote? Oh, absolutely. Since two thousand sixteen found this need to advocate for myself and for immigrants or minorities in for people who are disenfranchised in this country. I guess my way of doing my part Joe are you voting next Tuesday. Or did you do early voting? I did early voting actually went to the first day of early voting. Seven AM showed up at the polls in Kesse. My early vote job done Johann Zoellner originally from Taiwan. A first time voter already done it. Thanks for being with us. Joe really good to talk. Thank you so much Marco. So a lot of people are going to the polls on Tuesday with immigration on their minds. Others are thinking. About this. The United States will withdraw. From the Paris..

Joe Zoellner Taiwan Marco werman US United States America Marco Rosa Erika North Carolina Marco Johann Zoellner Kesse Paris Marcos two days
"marco werman" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"marco werman" Discussed on PRI's The World

"The Bollywood lose their if it wasn't clear detract from the CD Hindi, ma'am, LA's music from Ocoee Kumar, you're with the world. I'm Marco werman. This is the world. There's a witch hunt going on in Tanzania the regional governor of Doris along the country's largest city has called on Tanzanian citizens to report anyone they suspect of being gay poma Kanda. The governor made the announcement Monday and says he's already received thousands of messages. He also says he's created a surveillance quad to hunt down gay people the squad will use social media to find and arrest people in same sex relationships. Erin Kilbride is media coordinator at the human rights organisation, frontline defenders, she spent time in Tanzania working with LGBTQ activists there Aaron what are you hearing from those actives intensity about the impact of this crackdown? A few days ago, we started hearing from defenders in Dar-es-Salaam in particular that the regional governor there had announced the creation of a surveillance squad to hunt down numbers of the community for sex workers for people who had made sex. Really explicit videos loads of different things that he sort of lumping in together and his call was repeated on believe more than a dozen radio stations throughout Tuesday. And then he came back on to tell us that so far the impact had been more than five thousand calls allegedly reporting more than one hundred names, assuming we take him at his word in terms of the numbers. The same names are being repeated over and over again when people call in so this is really increasing fears amongst human rights defenders who are of course, the most visible people on this issue while there would be a few journalists maybe social media stars television stars who are kind of thought to be gay or representatives of the communities. They're few and far between the people who are really the most visible, especially at the local level are the human rights defenders who work on those issues. So they are incredibly terrified that they are the ones who are going to be targeted in this crackdown. The regional governor said that the Roundup's is one of the words that he used would begin next week. So that he can try to eliminate LGBT people from the country that is extraordinarily the rounding these. People up on what charges prior to this. Call people who I thought to be members of the community or sex workers are sometimes arrested using of the penal code that deal with brothels or homosexuality, but very often they're arrested for thievery or hooliganism or without any charges at all and are held in detention without access to a lawyer occasionally brought to court casually just held at police stations and severely mistreated. So it's honestly unclear if there would be any actual charges that they would face homosexuality is legal intense near but the criminal Justice system has never been fair to members of this community in Sanz NIA and very often. What you see instead is people being detained sexually assaulted their colleagues their communities and their families being asked for bribes in order to free them. And this is something that you know, activists are often put in the position of making decision of whether or not they are going to pay a bribe. Right. Whether or not they are going to do some of the things that police asked them to do to free their colleagues and members of their community because they know how people are. Treated in detention of the eighty interviews that I did over the course of the summer, all but two of them had been sexually assaulted or raped by police in detention, and for activists, the psychological burden of knowing that this is what they're community is facing is immense. So is much as they are fearing for their lives and contacting us for help. They're also very much not wanting to go underground because these are the people that the community depends on if they are arrested. So the regional governor they have these names what's happened to that hundred or so people as far as I'm informed than have not been published. Now last year there was a sort of related incident in which the minister of health actually supported the notion of publishing the names on line of people who were thought to be queer in the country, these names as far as we know have not been published again it's unclear if you has actually received one hundred names, right? We're sort of taking the governor on his word in that. However, it's not like he needed to make this call for a rest to have started..

Tanzania Marco werman Erin Kilbride Ocoee Kumar Dar-es-Salaam LA Sanz NIA Doris coordinator Aaron
"marco werman" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"marco werman" Discussed on PRI's The World

"I'm Marco werman and this is the world. Corruption is a part of everyday life in Guatemala. Few Guatemalans surprised when they hear stories about politicians using public funds for lavish vacations or shopping abroad, but that's been changing in recent years with help from the United Nations. Guatemala created an anti-corruption commission. It led to some three hundred convictions and put two former presidents behind bars. These days, the Guatemala's president, Jimmy, Morales thinks the crusade against corruption has gone too far. This week, morale is prevented the head of the anti corruption commission from re entering the country that has activists like Gabrielle. We are outraged, he's ahead of a citizens group called who still Shii or Justice. Now, in Guatemala City, we are says, president Morales wants to stymie the commission because it's investigating him. It was revealed after an investigation from the commission that during his campaign, he was mostly. Funded from illegal sources and he doesn't want to respond to this. He's trying to shut down the investigation. So intellectually president, Morales supported the commission. But when they got to efficient and found he might be corrupt. He started pulling support, yes. And he not not only convoke, but also his son and his brother are in both in another case of corruption. And we know now that he's going to try to dissolve the commission unilateral without asking the UN and in the in the that was signed almost ten years ago, it was designed in a way to to avoid this sort of thing that if a government that was being investigated, wanted to dissolve the commission, that it would be illegal and stewing that and the high, our highest court court. The constitutional court has now ruled that it is legal to do what he what he's trying to do. So we're in the brink of really a coupe that he's doing to disobey. Situational court, which is really, really, really something that no one wants get. You said you see kind of a constitutional coup d'etat in all of this. Yeah, exactly. So what can civil society groups like yours do about this within mobilizing for the past two or three weeks in every part of the country, even groups of what amounts that leave in the United States are more or less in the embassy there and in the UN and just trying to get our voice hurt that we don't want the commission to be. So we want to commission to continue and that all this that have happened in these just because we have a sitting president doesn't want to face Justice. So the president wants to get rid of the UN anti-graft commission. What is the way forward? We see a lot of other countries putting, for example, the European Union has been very clear about Canada's who've been very clear about its port towards the commission, and also the UN secretary general. The new therapies has been also very clear about the supports. And for us here in with my lies about voicing our concerns. And that's why, for example, last week we had almost every day there was some sort of demonstration around the country, and we're going to see bigger demonstrations these week as well. So we were under the impression that military tanks that actually encircled the Commission's headquarters, can you tell us what you saw? I saw them. They're not there anymore, but the day that presume rallies announced that the Commission's agreement would not be renewed. She was standing with military officials in the press conference. At the same time, we saw military vehicles around the commission and also around the US embassy, which was very surprising because these vehicles were donated by the United States to fight drug dealer and Rucker tells in the borders. So it was it was really surprising to see them here in what city they should be in the borders guarding. Safeguarding the borders, I can struck her tells. So that was something that really shocked people that's also with what's happening in cut out what with happening. Venezuela, we're really worried too. What more capable of Gabrielle wear is an anti corruption activist in Guatemala. He's the head of justicia or Justice. Now speaking with us from Guatemala City. Thank you very much. Gabriel. Thank you. Before we let you go. We wanted to spend a few minutes talking about grooming standards and thank goodness. I'm in character. I actually shaved this morning routine..

president Guatemala Morales UN Guatemala City Marco werman United States Gabrielle United Nations Rucker Gabriel European Union Venezuela Canada Jimmy three weeks ten years
Is Climate Change Draining Nutrients From Crops?

The World

04:44 min | 2 years ago

Is Climate Change Draining Nutrients From Crops?

"Looking at another few ninety plus degree days here in Boston and before the end. Of August more, carbon dioxide. In the atmosphere will fuel climate change for decades to come. As if. That's not enough here's another downside it's going to make the food we eat less nutritious there's a direct effect. Of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere on plants that's reducing crop nutrients that's Harvard. Scientists Sam Myers he co wrote a study published today in the journal nature climate change it found that hundreds, of millions of people could suffer from. Iron zinc, and protein deficiencies in? The, coming. Decades and that's because more carbon means fewer nutrients in staple crops around the world we're seeing on the order. Of roughly five to fifteen percent reductions in these very important, nutrients from colluding iron zinc and protein five to fifteen percent. You said is that a lot. Well yeah it turns out that It is but the only way to answer that question in a rigorous way is to ask how many people in the world. Are living relatively close to a threshold of nutrient deficiency and are also depending on these kinds of food crops for significant portions of the. Nutrients that they're. Getting and what we found is. Somewhere on the order. Of one hundred to two hundred million people around the world would be expected to fall. Into new risk, of zinc. And protein deficiency and that there'd be large large numbers of. People that. Would lose important amounts of their dietary iron as well which crops are we talking about here the crops that. Provide most of the calories in the human diet I mean things like wheat. And rice and soy and just about every crop that falls into what's called a c. three crop which essentially, is every single food crop that we. Eat except, for maize or corn? Sorghum, and. Some of the millet And I know you kind of separate the effect of. CO two on plants and CO two in the atmosphere but it is striking the people who are going to feel these effects, the most are the same people who are going to be most impacted overall by climate change people in the Asian subcontinent southeast Asia Africa the Middle. East why is that there's no question that the most vulnerable people in the world tend to be the poorest people in lower income countries will have the fewest sort of insulating layers, to protect them from these effects whether we're talking about more extreme storms or we're talking about increased exposure to infectious disease or we're talking about less, nutritional foods in this case the greatest risk is in India's South. Asia much, of Africa and the reason for that, is that those are places where diets are less diverse eighty percent of calories, in India's diet come from cereals and relatively low income people tend to have much lower, intake of animal source foods Which are rich in iron zinc in protein and can protect. Those people to some degree from these effects so it's it's not very diverse diet not very much animal source foods heavy reliance on cereals and then those cereals. Are losing key nutrients Sam did this study personally worry you Yeah I mean it worries me that hundreds of. Millions of people are going to be. Pushed into new risk of some pretty serious nutritional deficits but I also think there's an awful lot we can do so I think we. Need to, step, up our commitment, to doing research to reduce our vulnerability to these. Kinds of affects Sam give us a bit of. Hope here are there fixes, for this problem that crop researchers are public health officials are already thinking about another a variety of things we can do I mean obviously first and foremost. We need to start reducing our carbon dioxide emissions that's the most direct thing that we can do but in addition to that. There are all kinds of other areas for, research that could be engaged in one is breeding crops, that are actually less sensitive to this carbon dioxide effect there's work being done in bio fortification of crops. Meeting that you enrich those crops with, respect to certain nutrients are supplementing, diets there's an enormous, amount that can be done particularly in, the, most, vulnerable countries to encouraging increased, consumption Of foods like fruits and vegetables and nuts and seeds and legumes that would provide. Additional amounts of these nutrients so there are all kinds of. Promising and interesting areas for research but I think we really need to step up our commitment to doing that research where right. Now I think the global commitment is. Relatively tepid Sam Myers head of the planetary health alliance and a research at Harvard School of public health thanks for being with us all. Right thank, you, so much

Mexico President Trump Sam Myers Canada United States Marco Werman Harvard School Of Public Kendall Boston Sonora K. J. Z. Hollywood Kai Ryssdal Protein Deficiency Phoenix
Global Reach & Statistics - Uber Expansion

The World

01:00 min | 2 years ago

Global Reach & Statistics - Uber Expansion

"Does Uber dominate. The ride sharing industry globally Not exactly that was the case may be Two years ago their national strategy is is pretty interesting before it used to. Be in the over one point zero. Days it was boots on the ground everywhere you need to be anywhere where it needs to be the transport platform of choice for everyone in. The world that clearly was not. Financially sustainable so they've pulled. Out of Russia they pulled out of China we saw in southeast Asia were had to pull out the yield at, the company came to with the homegrown player grab was more favorable than deals that were, had with China's home from. Player TD still it was out of necessity the company was definitely not doing, as well as expected to across southeast Asia and that's why. They've had to pull out on in India market share might be a little. Bit, more comparable to its competitor there Ola however it. Is a very difficult market to

Spain New York City James Asquith Asia India Indonesia James Uber Marco Werman Middle East China London Johanna James Oscar Southeast Asia OLA United States Johanna Company
Trump, NPR and Ted Anthony discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

04:10 min | 2 years ago

Trump, NPR and Ted Anthony discussed on Morning Edition

"Local member, station by, name This is NPR news Ahead on, morning edition for Tuesday you'll hear a story about rethinking the practice of solitary confinement for inmates the story. Out of North Dakota more about that on that, story on morning, edition as it continues we'll get the Traffix story two from Ted Anthony and just a. Few minutes right now today's weather pretty much the conditions remain the same that we've seen the, past couple of days sunny skies for the bay area after some morning clouds and patchy fog do watch for the clouds though to hanging hanging around along the coast through, the day highs today the low sixty s along the coast through the seventies around the bay into the low nineties inland and for. The southern Sacramento valley a sunny day today with areas of smoke through the day is between ninety. Two and one hundred they predicted high for the capital, city of Sacramento. Today ninety six degrees I'm Michael state the time it. Is nineteen after four From NPR news in Washington I'm Dave Mattingly Afghan officials say a roadside bombing in the west. Of the country today has killed eleven people aboard a passenger bus in the east militants have launched. An assault on Jalalabad Afghan officials say gunmen stormed a, government building and. Took hostages after a suicide. Bomber attack the front gate Iran's, president is expressing skepticism over President Trump's offer, to meet with Iranian leaders as NPR's Peter Kenyon reports Trump says he's willing to do so without preconditions president Hassan. Rohani says a country that breaks its, promises a reference to Trump pulling out of the twenty fifteen nuclear agreement cannot be trusted and further talks Ronnie also says. Tehran will protect its right to export. Oil a vital economic lifeline at a time when Iran's inflation rate is soaring in the currency rapidly, losing value, to history professors. Are resigning from university of Virginia think-tank over the appointment of a former, aide to President Trump has caused Spencer with. Member station w. c. v., e. reports Mark short is also a UVA alum the resigning professors point to Mark Short's, history of working for such conservatives. As former marine Ollie north the coke brothers and, Trump nevertheless short remains on track to begin a one year fellowship on Wednesday UVA's Miller center Short worked as the president's legislative affairs director I'm Dave Mattingly NPR, news in Washington On the next fresh air you want a husband will take a. Bullet for you not one who points to the attic and says they're up there Tony. Shalhoub has been nominated for an EMMY for his performance in the Amazon comedy series the marvelous MRs Mazel shalhoub also starred in the TV series monk. And the film big night join us It's fresh air, one o'clock this afternoon and again this evening, at seven here on kqed public radio I'm Michael state help you. Have a nice safe trip to your place of employment this morning let's see how smooth. It is at this hour here's Ted Anthony Wright in. A good morning to you Michael will head over to Pittsburgh. Westbound four near a railroad just getting word of a, two vehicle accident which may have the right lane block CHP. Already headed out there San. Jose hit and run accident right shoulder McLaughlin avenue on ramp and northbound six. Eighty and we still have this situation in south San Francisco the point boulevard Dubuque. Avenue on ramp to southbound one zero one remains shut down this from a big rig action which happened late last. Night and it produced an oil spill so the cleanup there continues now we're. Hearing maybe. Seven o'clock this morning when you have that. Ramp reopen I'm Ted Anthony for Ted's update brought to you by. FEMA and the Ad Council I'm Marco werman PR is the world brings you a global. Perspective on the news with a worldwide network of correspondents you meet people at the heart.

Donald Trump NPR Ted Anthony Michael State President Trump President Hassan Dave Mattingly Iran North Dakota Washington Ted Anthony Wright Sacramento Valley Mrs Mazel Shalhoub Sacramento Mark Short San Francisco Jalalabad Afghan Assault Marco Werman
"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:04 min | 2 years ago

"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To public radio i'm marco werman and you're with the world angela merkel is in political trouble the german chancellor is getting major heat from within her own coalition the issue is miracles immigration policy kind of sounds familiar in two thousand fifteen miracle took an open door pros toward migration now germany's interior minister horse seehofer wants miracle to take a tougher line on migrants crossing into germany from africa the middle east and south asia what makes us all the more politically precarious from article is that seehofer's party is part of merkel's own governing coalition if that's not enough president trump's stepped into the political debate via twitter to talk all of this through let's go to my bbc colleague jenny hill and berlin so just give us some background on why this change in immigration policy is such an important issue for the christian social union the cs you party in some respects it's not actually too much of a change now angela merkel has been gradually very quietly hardening has stance on asylum policy having promised germany that she won't give them a repeat performance of twenty fifteen jose hoffer interior minister wants to implement a plan one part of which is to turn away migrants from the german border if they've already registered in another e you country also to sign him in another eu country fast as part of the system as it used to be she doesn't want to do that because she says what you need to do radius look at this as a whole get a european solution to this because you can't just send a migrant back from the german border into austria he says i'm going to do it anyway now normally an interior minister would get fired for such a rebellion roy mrs markle is having to really just take this mutiny because as you say he leads the bavarian christian socialists they are the bavarian sister party to mrs markle's conservatives their reliance forms the very heart of this coalition government which in itself is very fragile no the ceus you the christian social union are met today to decide whether to accept or reject seehofer's plan what did they agree to basically they back in they say that they want him to go ahead and implement this plan mrs markle's off to a european summit of leaders in a week or so time today we saw bits of a temporary ceasefire mr say hoffa said well i'm going to implement this plan but we'll wait i'm let's see if mrs michael can make good on her promise to deliver a european or at least a bilateral agreement with a couple of other countries greece italy maybe if she can do that then maybe things are different but he's gonna sticking to his guns her the reason most people think he's doing this is because the various goes to the regional polls in october and you'll have heard of the farright antimigrant party al tentative fedorowicz land afdc right now making gains in bavaria and so mr say hoffer is grandstanding really ahead of an election it's a position which is putting an awful lot of strain on this government and it could still awful apart as difficult actually when you look at the nor hair to really determine who has got the power on this particular issue he reckons he's got the power to just go ahead and impose his crackdown at the border if he decides to do that then she'll probably have no choice but to side came and then as i say the government falls apart.

marco werman angela merkel chancellor
"marco werman" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"marco werman" Discussed on PRI's The World

"I'm marco werman and you're tuned to the world ireland is not as catholic as it used to be the church has taken some big hits to its power and influence in ireland in recent years in two thousand fifteen voters decided to legalize same sex marriage and last month there was that overwhelming vote to legalize abortion but one big part of life in ireland where the church remains very powerful is education around ninety percent of the country schools are overseen by the church and that includes public schools but now there's a growing debate about that too here's the world's matthew bell emily mckenna is in her thirties she didn't want to tell me exactly how old she is and like just about everybody else she grew up with in county cork she was raised catholic you went to catholic school to the there was i mean there really wasn't another option for us in the price the country that we were in i can't even think actually have been on religious school in court as so yet catholic school that's eight in in the morning say your morning prayer to some lessons have your say your prayer before meals and after the whole ship same goes for mckenna's partner they met at nineteen and have two kids now and live outside of dublin but emily endured stopped going to church years ago so when they had their first child alice they decided not to get her baptized why bother if they're not religious at least that's what they thought at first a couple of years later it came time to start thinking about finding a school for alice at that point mckenna says she endured change their minds about baptism basically what it came down to was after doing our research we decided we had better get her baptized just in case just in case they couldn't find an opening in a local kindergarten most schools in ireland are catholic schools when they fill up and start a waiting list sometimes it's the kids who've been baptized that get priority usually babies get baptized in their first six months.

marco werman ireland matthew bell catholic school partner dublin emily mckenna ninety percent six months
"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm marco werman and you're with the world thanks for being with us today when you just look at the pictures and realize that this is the first time a sitting us president has spent hours together with a north korean head of state after almost seventy years of tensions this is a remarkable moment but start scratching away at some of the details and you're left wondering what the moment actually means that's what will lead off with on the show today with us to scratch away at some of those details is jean lee she's a former ap bureau chief in north korea and now runs the career center at the wilson center in washington so gene what's actually in the signed agreement are any concrete points laid out this signed agreement as just three hundred sixty where it's actually put it in microsoft because it's so brief and so what it is is a very broad and frankly very vaguely worded statement and not the kind of concrete historic nuclear deal of all nuclear deals that president trump had been promising us when it does is sort of lay out the main objectives that they want to achieve in perhaps the months and years ahead so it really is a template more than anything else i mean if i go down the four points made in a communique summing them up number one is about peace and prosperity number two is about peace and prosperity number three is reaffirming complete denuclearization of the korean peninsula and number four is recovering pow mia remains which is kind of a goodwill point number three the complete denuclearisation i mean that's not really new i mean he's promised that before and we're still at where we're at right indeed has been saying that that's what he wants and he can say that only once but what he really needs is i give up my nuclear weapons when you give up yours when you give up the nuclear umbrella that you maintain over northeast asia so they're clearly an impasse and i think that those discussions those negotiations between the two sides must have been incredibly difficult but it's clear from that wording that.

marco werman us president bureau chief north korea wilson center washington microsoft trump mia asia seventy years
"marco werman" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"marco werman" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Coming up on the show after the break how the immigrants spirit influenced the spiciest meemaw rd on jeopardy you're with the world i'm marco werman and this is the world we talk on the show a lot about the immigrants spirit that grit that people knew to america's seem to have to succeed i know that sounds like the contours of many a hollywood screenplay but lots of kids of immigrants say they've caught that spirit and today there are more kids of immigrants in american than ever before the world's rupa shenoy has one example of how a second generation immigrant spirit is shaping modern american culture including a staple of mainstream tv jeopardy getting on jeopardy isn't just about being smart lily chin learned that the first time she auditioned everyone has to do an interview with producers chin was additioning for a spot in the show's college championships representing mit where she was studying robotics the jeopardy producers asked her about being a woman in science i mean the stories been set a lot of times i can't really add much to that spin but meanwhile the person next to me was like oh i got injured in the boston marathon bombings yada yada and i was like okay okay i'm not getting it but lily doesn't just give up when she was growing up her dad told her stories about their family history emphasizing all the times there was a crucial decisive moment where things could have gone lots of ways nothing was ever guaranteed like the plane that my grandpa flew from shanghai to taiwan was so heavy you know just barely skimming the water and they couldn't really like turn the planer all like there's so many things that happened even like my parents story lili's parents are professors who study neuro degenerative diseases her mom lianne grew up in china and was one of the first people who got to go to college after the cultural revolution leeann went on to grad school in iowa where she meant lillies dad lee he grew up in taiwan.

marco werman shanghai lili lianne china iowa taiwan america hollywood boston
"marco werman" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"marco werman" Discussed on PRI's The World

"I'm marco werman and you're with the world saudi arabia's trying so hard to show the world how serious it is about doing better on human rights maybe the best example is the kingdom's decision to allow women to drive but the recent arrests of activists in the country have raised concerns it all started last weekend and has been going on since our own sharon jafari has been following the story sharon how many people are we talking about in these arrests talking about at least eleven people most of them are women that at least thorough our two men among them one of them is an activist and the other lawyer the latest update is that another activist has been arrested and three of the woman have been released okay why these particular people why this group and why is it saudi leadership not happy with them well let's come on among them is that they've all been involved in some form of activism in the past most of them have been pushing for the lifting of the driving band for example they've also worked on putting an end to the guardianship laws now the guardianship laws these are quite interesting and honestly quite oppressive requires a male relative to make an important decision on behalf of women for example to travel or get a passport yeah and i wanna tell you a story markle that really shows what these activists have been working for and fighting against this morning i spoke with a woman her name is moody gilani and she's a woman's rights activists from saudi arabia she told me that four years ago she came to study in the us as she was on a scholarship from the saudi government the saudi government has out scholarships like that very often then when she was on a break from school she went back to saudi to visit her family and then own finally stopped her from leaving the country and coming back to the us they were not happy off.

marco werman saudi arabia sharon jafari markle gilani saudi government saudi four years
"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm marco werman with the world the economy in venezuela continues its collapse basic foods vase goods food medicine are hard to find and prices are skyrocketing in fact the international monetary fund says the inflation rate in venezuela will hit thirteen thousand percent this year yes that is right thirteen thousand percent so the country's currency the bolivar isn't worth much right now at all my bbc colleague bars miranda recently visited colombia's border with venezuela he wanted to check on the situation there as menace waylon abandoned their country in large numbers and bars came back with an interesting souvenir a handbag made from bolivars here's the backstory i traveled to cuckoo in the northeast of columbia right in front of the border with venezuela and suddenly i saw a little trout and when i get close to that place i saw hand scarf man you're seeing venezuelan banknotes to mate this humpbacks over had said even close as soon as i saw that i decided to make a video people were really interested in the art of this guy named richard segovia richard segovia east twenty years old born and raised in caracas she tried to get to college by he couldn't because their expenses where so much for him so he chose to try to cook with and start living selling handbags on this he's been in cucuta i think of four or five months because they finished situation is really difficult in caracas he couldn't get food and he needs to support his mother because his mother is sick why not welcome but i think he looks for teeth of holiday venezuelan economy is going on because minnesota usa eighteen hundred back notes to make one hundred eighteen hundreds banknotes in just one hand back to sell in ten dollars it's saying that that banknotes warts nothing wait that's it quantity of cash he can buy uptown the fries he can't buy a liter of milk because the hyper inflation.

marco werman international monetary fund venezuela bolivar colombia waylon columbia caracas bbc miranda richard segovia minnesota thirteen thousand percent twenty years five months ten dollars one hand milk
"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"marco werman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm marco werman and you're with the world where covered action of the bbc world service pri and w gbh here in boston going in being in getting out that's a cycle of incarceration and it's what are across women's lives team has been investigating the rate of women going into prison in the us is rising it's a trend that's happening around the globe but once they get out then what this week we've been looking at what it takes to stay out of prison andrea crossing heads are across him lives project and joins me now it's multiple challenges facing women when it comes to staying out isn't it there are so many things that are stacked against women when they're coming out of the doors of a prison and there is this kind of this window of time where it's so crucial that they get support because they are the most vulnerable what we found in our reporting is that it's really common for women to be going into prison specifically for addiction issues so whether that be drug dealing whether that be shoplifting to support a habit so what you also have to realize that when they're coming out they still have to deal with the addiction where isn't we this had a problem though for to both say men and women yes and no yes there are men who are facing a lot of these similar fresh challenges air's executive but what's producer different is about danny women is that for interviews so many and reviews of them the produced living environment an edited that they had by before any they salad went into phyllis prison myers they call it reverted an insecure sure san environment brigger lauren what crandell do you do heidi with these soman women theresa who they're coming madden out the door moods and eighty and their seth option kelly is either they to are challenor move back directed in with the today's person show who was i'm abusive terry gross somebody they potentially did drugs with somebody they potentially committed crimes with or be homeless so the story we're going to hear today is you met a woman who's working to help other women during this challenging period.

marco werman boston us shoplifting executive producer kelly bbc andrea danny phyllis soman terry
"marco werman" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"marco werman" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Of it as a place to get insights from some of the world's leading thinkers on markets industries and the global economy that's exchanges at goldman sachs available on itunes stitcher soundcloud and google play and a gs dot com slash podcast i'm marco werman and you're with the world the metoo movement has expanded far beyond hollywood and us borders women from all kinds of different backgrounds as well as different industries and countries have stepped up to break their silence about their own sexual harassment and abuse and they continue to do so often using the hashtag me to or some variation of it before we continue a quick warning some of the language in this next conversation may not be suitable for younger listeners egyptian american author mona l to highway started hashtag mosque metoo to give muslim women outlive speak about sexual abuse experienced while on the hajj the annual pilgrimage to mecca mona thanks for being with us what sparked this need for hashtag mosque me to the first week offend remarkable i read about a young pakistani woman cold sabika khan and a facebook post that she created about being sexually harassed at islam holiest sites in mecca in saudi arabia not this was a sadly familiar story to me because back in nineteen eighty two when i was fifteen years old and my family had just arrived in saudi arabia we went to on the muslim pilgrimage has an i was sexual to twice and i've shared the story with several women but to read about so because experience and to read that help post on facebook had been shared at least two thousand times and that so many women were still going through this offered experience of being so terribly violated in our holiest site doing these religious rituals really upset me so i began a new threat on twitter and i asked fellow muslim in around the world to share their experiences on the hashtag most me too i had heard that there was a hashtag church too in which christian women shared experiences about being sexually harassed sexually assaulted in christian sacred environments so i wanted to similar space for muslim women around the world and so what kind of ripon.

goldman sachs google marco werman hollywood harassment mecca saudi arabia facebook twitter ripon mona l fifteen years