18 Burst results for "Marcia Johnson"

"marcia johnson" Discussed on Problematic Premium Feed

Problematic Premium Feed

07:19 min | 7 months ago

"marcia johnson" Discussed on Problematic Premium Feed

"So so what. We were thinking Todd has to leave. I so We're talking about is in the prize. That's the topic. I'm sure you've heard us Mentioned several times already and this new is on the price called is in the prize hallowed ground and. I'm not sure even what you call it. Can it a documentary or an ad or whatever. Because next thing i heard is that there's actually a new is in the prize coming. That's more in line with being official documentaries. I don't know if this was too wet appetites if this was just a resume booster. I don't know what this thing was. But it was not a documentary. It was they invented something. If the documentary version of adversarial that they have in the magazines. Whereas you think it's a article until you get halfway says and now by gillette is oh wait. This was a ad you know. It feels like they were all patrice homey so maybe it was just their way of gifting acting credit to you. You took all the comments. I was gonna make socially. And i'll i'll i'll just make mike with comments and then the rest of you guys know going through the is the prize name. But i mean to say one positive thing that did out of this. This infomercial The one the one is i was. I was impressed that she and wherever the relative of henry hampton was help to do this. I was impressed that they critique the hetero enormity of is product. I was impressed with that. But that's it the rest of it. Was you know a nice kind of art. Bill that literally just promoted her and black lives matter and and really with excel the hetero normative criti- really is not worth worth discussing on on like you said because he just said it but i know that the ball is gonna go deeper some look forward to hearing this. Yeah and i'm so sick. The jordan peele aesthetic like it was trying to be a war movie. Why is like a headless finger with anything about our for dancing and fire them. Good hair get out. It was just like okay. What's hot now we've got so this thing is like dated by the time it airs. I think worst eisner prize. I watched the original eyes on the prize. Before this. And then i'll watch this. How does this already feel more. Dated than something i. It's funny you said that. Because i just watched candyman last night. Mutiny jordan peele executive produce work. I didn't want. I'm sure hadn't seen aesthetics as been the same to set it But actually i think candyman is more radical than this is on the documentary snug the candy man. I agree to see. I don't understand how you're impressed with what they did. I didn't learn anything new address in addressing the hurdle hetero normativity of oslo low-priced did not give it. Didn't it so it was like thirty seconds. It basically just mentioned a bunch of quotes and then that was it. I didn't get any new information. I didn't really learn. They just listed a bunch of names. I wanted to. Actually we get get in there like really comes up and in depth. Don't just name one iconic person history and then have no other information about it. It was just super weird. Nothing they briefed about the icon. People only brought them up long enough to say and we're gonna nuclear people right exac- now even bringing up the hetero normative stuff like i'm open to argument that it was too hetero normative but Do you don't even stay on it. Long enough you have such i think more interested in padding your own resume and being up that debris to talking about yourself morning you talk about marsha p johnson and the rest of these people and be top of that is such lowest common denominator basic like okay marcia johnson and then a slave they brought up a save the might have been a transgendered. I'm like wait a minute. It's not even the era that is in the price of coverage. They're just pulling out gay people like it's not even coherent if he jumping drills yes. That's actually turn that kind of bothered me but The way we were going to do this especially because todd has to go first todd had a critique of the original is on the prize. And i'll be honest. I am one of those hook line and singer buy into the original is and the price. This'll be learning more simpson criticisms of their original new release. Yeah yeah very unpredictable. I i bet. I can tell i but i can know why you're on critical because i was. Let's see how allows nineteen when oslo prize And is only one reason that i'm critical of it and dr bond. Sorry boy this you've heard me say this. Two million times is the two main. The first time. I was raised in the new york metropolitan area but specifically newark new jersey. We had five black public affairs. Television shows that air on weekends five. We count the national. Tony brown's journal and we count the national essence magazine right. The most radical these programs was one the air on the abc affiliate and it was called like it is with gil noble. I wanna i was so good episode right and like it is and i guess yeah. Everybody remembers owed absolutely. But he'll again say as name again on dr perry. Who was the black informant who infiltrated several blog organizations and destroyed several blab organizations on the west coast estimate. Al gil noble like it is with gil noble arthur. Choose dr think that's what it is. Just noble was a public affairs program that aired on. Wabc television new york affiliate of wabc tv from nineteen sixty eight. I was three months old air and it ended in two thousand eleven after gil noble had a stroke and died and it is one of the best archive will programs along with by the way another program coming out of the south called for the people with mr dope middleton. These programs were two of the best programs that black people ever produced about black history by coach and politics and he's simple youtube search. In fact you'll know memorial is on youtube right a simple a simple youtube search for it is gil mobile and mister gold middleton for the people you'll find hours hours of things. Some of them were edited than others. Right because i can tell. Some people like certain content edited content allocated like right but you'll find hours of content about what these two black men produced And the reason i bring up like it is is because see like it is in one thousand nine hundred eighty in washington nineteen eighty but the thing is always repeat and repeat. It's they would do. They would not only do documentaries. They were series of documentaries. So one of the in nineteen eighty was called a decade of struggle. Now it's clear that you'll mobile sold it to the to the affiliate by going to do the black movement from the point of view..

jordan peele henry hampton marsha p johnson patrice marcia johnson gillette gil noble oslo candyman Todd eisner dr bond todd national essence magazine mike dr perry Bill Al gil noble gil noble arthur wabc tv
"marcia johnson" Discussed on Ringer Dish

Ringer Dish

04:18 min | 8 months ago

"marcia johnson" Discussed on Ringer Dish

"But like i don't really know who she is that she's got a podcast spotify And like just another like youtube stars and just like a lot of people that are not famous to me. And i was just like this is fascinating i think some of them are like really cool inclusions in some i find less school like There was the youtuber nikki tutorials who shot her dress paid homage to the black trans icon. Marsha p johnson. She had marcia johnson's catchphrases embroidered into the dress in her outfit. Was you know very much about supporting transmissibility and trans rates. And i think that this was a very lgbtq. I a aware event. Which i think is really cool. Because it's such a high profile celebrity event but then on the other hand. There's like someone. Like addison ray who. I'm just sort of like i still don't know what her voice sounds like and i don't know what she's contributing here so i think it's a mixed bag but mostly i just feel old. I mean the. Addison racing is also speaking of people. They're doing their promotional. I think she's desperate to be there in business. Depends on her being there but she has the show outright No that's the. But actually i was thinking about this morning as i sat in my car for alternate side of the street parking. I was thinking about how. I would not have guessed it as ray would become bigger star than the demilio but she sort of played a different game than the julia's who are sort of banking on becoming the next card. Kardashians ends by having their own show on hulu and everything but absent ray went to the kardashians and was became friends. With courtney like on the show and stuff and then she got the she's all that and i it also sort of to me. I thought the sort of like Another thing we'd have talked about with all the looks sort of like this. Kind of hyper sexualization. Which may be isn't new. But i thought it was like really display with so many stylists interpreting in america to be sheer and beaded and sort was like in some ways. The kind of showing your tests of the as has been telegraphed onto the mccallum in a more tasteful way and i. I just don't really do that in the same way. Like they're much more about like their family and sort of like a regular. Yeah a few different things that i want to unpack there because the nudity thing and we can talk more about like the idea of america but there is that's just like a faction moment right now that there is just. There was a lot of skin on display in various designers. Doing that in the new york times is writing. Various like scandalized pieces about Some of that. I think was last like interpretation of what it means to be. American and more anger designers like pushing their particular. Sing right now and to some extent my frustration with the theme was that no one seemed to have any idea or thought about what america men. And we're just pushing their various. Agendas the balenciaga thing. Like i just don't know what's going on inside and it's very cool right now. Still the leg. Total covering of yourself. Yeah the kim kardashian saying which is clearly being pushed on herbs still by konya which is a whole relationship that i don't want to unpack is still thinks that balenciaga's wall and sort of like a fashion wing thing. I did some research before this. Just why which. I mean talking to people who actually follow fashion. Because i don't really anymore to explain this to me. Because i just don't get it. I thought michaela cole was who was. Also wearing balenciaga looked great. I don't really what it had to do with america besides being blue which is also a color of uk. Her homeland the union. Jack that's below rate so my thing is just that i don't really think anyone about it at all which is usually true for the gala and i think also. I was glad that it wasn't a bunch of people. Just doing ralph lauren. Takeoffs which is like like the olympics uniform yeah very specific like limited non-representative idea of what america is obviously like american..

Marsha p johnson marcia johnson addison ray ray nikki america Addison youtube hulu mccallum courtney julia balenciaga new york times konya michaela cole kim kardashian Jack uk ralph lauren
"marcia johnson" Discussed on Throwing Shade

Throwing Shade

01:48 min | 9 months ago

"marcia johnson" Discussed on Throwing Shade

"Probably don't see it as a priority. Even though like i said marsha p johnson is one of the core group of people who is responsible for queer liberation in this country. It's an it's a such an easy way that a city can say to their artists like value. What you're making and to the people we value your identity. It's so easy. And they don't fucking do it and they could do it. I mean commissioner one hundred hundred fucking statues from local artists about people who are underrepresented. It's not fucking hard. So the sculptor jesse pelota is his name Said that this statute designed to be temporary and they are still breathing. Down the next of the city to complete the planned monument for both marcia johnson and sylvia rivera It would be nice if we could add pressure to that. It took so much campaigning to get statues of two real women in central park. It was like years of being pleased. Put two women in there And finally that happened after. The only women in there were mother. Goose and allison wonderland who are not real. so really phenomenal job to jesse pelada to erlich and to every person who pitched in to do this and put this in there because it should be in there there are. There is a monument in there. Now that i think his name was george. Segal was the artist of two women in two minutes of that Sort of an abstract sculpture of two women and holding hands the two men holding hands and stuff which is really nice at the went up a long time ago but it would be nice to actually honor a real person who led deaths. Because this.

marsha p johnson jesse pelota marcia johnson sylvia rivera allison wonderland jesse pelada central park erlich Goose Segal george
"marcia johnson" Discussed on TechNation Radio Podcast

TechNation Radio Podcast

05:41 min | 9 months ago

"marcia johnson" Discussed on TechNation Radio Podcast

"In twenty thirteen. I spoke with harvard. Psychology professor measure in banerjee about her book blindspot hidden biases in. Good people. don't think you have any hidden biases hint. They're hidden professor banerjee creditor interest in biased research to the work of yale professor marcia johnson who measured unconscious bias in people suffering from amnesia. It's exactly work like that. That got me interested in this topic. i did not come to the study of unconscious bias by worrying about things like race and gender and so on. I was busy as a graduate student studying. Human memory and when i was In the early nineteen eighties doing that kind of work. A little revolution was happening. In the field of memory people had begun to discover that for a hundred years. Psychologists had measured memory by simply asking people to report back on some prior episode. They would save you know. Can you remember where you lived when you were five years old. Or what did you eat for breakfast. All of these are very conscious deliberate ways of reaching back into our minds to pull out some information from the past and m music patients. Really don't have any of it In in different forms The severely amnesiac one's really can't even remember the face of a doctor that they might see Every day And and yet they seemed to remember certain things and that was for me a revelation. Because if that was the case not only an amnesiac patients but later shown to be true in all of us Then what would that say for how we go about remembering our attitudes. Do i even know what my preferences Maybe i don't know what it is and that that was so marshall johnson study was one of several studies that got us thinking about how you can both know and not know something in the same mind. So here's what she does that. So interesting she gave people amnesiac patients and then a control sample of people who had more intact memory She gives them faces of people to look at and with each face. She presents a little description of this person. This person was in the naval academy and received an award or this person was in the air force and and had to be dishonorably discharged. Let's just take those two as examples. Well later when you ask amnesiac patients. Tell me when you look at this face. Can you tell me anything about this person. They would say absolutely not. I don't even remember seeing this face before and yet if you said to them look at this face and tell me. Is this person a good person or is this person. A bad person and it turns out that with close to one hundred percent accuracy. If you had said awarded a medal for some for for bravery versus dishonorably discharged. They would with close to one hundred percent. Accuracy say good or bad accurately. Now that meant that something did remain in their minds and it was an important piece of information. It was whether to remember that this was somebody to approach or avoid in the future. Even though they had zero recollection for the face you ask yourself why at the end of a thirty minute interview. Do i love this person so much. A why do. I find myself being agitated by this person. Then you might ask yourself if something that happened in the first few moments set you up on a path whereby all you're doing is simply reinforcing the first impression that you had formed and at the end of thirty minutes. All you've done is made sure that you have evidence for that very first feeling that you had this archive technician interview features. Harvard professor mandarin on g and her book blindspot hidden biases of good people. Professor bonded g continues to.

banerjee creditor marcia johnson marshall johnson amnesia harvard naval academy air force Harvard
"marcia johnson" Discussed on The Bechdel Cast

The Bechdel Cast

04:34 min | 10 months ago

"marcia johnson" Discussed on The Bechdel Cast

"Was him. But she's not wrong. Betty for dan is a betty of note for better and for worse for. Dan was one of the figureheads of the liberal wing of the second wave going on to found the w the national organization for women in nineteen sixty six with forty eight others like anthony and stanton before them. The organization was extremely polarizing throughout the second wave due to. Its say with me over emphasis on the issues of straight middle class white women above everyone else also like the first movement the liberal wing of the second wave came with pretty clearly defined goal. It was all about passing the equal rights amendment a proposed constitutional amendment that had been unsuccessful in making progress since nineteen twenty-three the amendment sought to and get ready for some controversial stuff guarantee legal rights regardless of gender to this day. It's never been signed into law. Isn't that nice. This area of the movement was popularly referred to as women's liberation and those apart of it women's libbers the struggle to apply women's lib to everyday life is thoroughly explored in the first few years of the kathy comex but women of color while again being sidelined actively disregarded by liberal white centered organizations. Such as the no w were extremely active during the second wave years. Some organizations of note membership in the black panther party was over sixty percent women. Kathleen cleaver who was a communication secretary with the panthers was once asked. What a woman's role in the revolution was and she replied quote. No one ever asks what a man's place in the revolution is unquote. The national black feminist organization founded in nineteen seventy. Three was one of the first to include a lesbian agenda as part of their mission statement. Asian feminists were extremely active organizers as well with projects like asian sisters in la drug abuse center founded in nineteen seventy one and the asian. Women's center wasn't organizing hub until closed in seventy six in nineteen seventy four indigenous. American women formed women of all red nations or warn based on concepts of tribal women's traditions and with the key distinction that patriarchy and colonialism were inseparable concepts and because of the hostility that these organizations were sometimes met with by the white feminist mainstream. The label feminist sometimes be resisted. Here's angela davis speaking on this at eight twenty eight eighteen talk at the center of contemporary culture in barcelona. Everybody started referring to me as a feminist. And my response was i'm not a feminist. Flack revolutionary because. I didn't see how the two had anything to do with each other. But i realized that i was talking about a certain kind of feminism joie. Feminism feminism that is still might bourgeois. Feminism which is on fortunately the the most representative feminism today and most people think that s feminism but that ignores the fact that huge numbers of organic and academic intellectuals who women of color have transformed the very nature of feminism and the hallmark of feminism. Today is what we call intersection. -ality recognition of the and. Not only. not only the inter relating character of identities but as i frequently say i think intersection. -ality is is most helpful when we think about the intersection of social justice. Struggled slug queer women experienced active hostility from the mainstream movement. As well activists. Marcia johnson and sylvia rivera organized for trans rights with star after johnson had been a key figure at the stonewall riots and both worked with the gay liberation front during these years betty free. Dan was actively homophobic referring to lesbians as the quote unquote lavender menace in nineteen sixty nine and did not welcome queer women into the no. W and of course people were pissed. Rita mae brown who was a lesbian activist. Broke off from the new york branch of the w and began radical lesbians. Who.

Kathleen cleaver national organization for wome national black feminist organi la drug abuse center Women's center stanton Betty center of contemporary culture Dan anthony dan panthers angela davis Flack barcelona Marcia johnson sylvia rivera johnson betty
"marcia johnson" Discussed on Feast of Fun

Feast of Fun

04:50 min | 1 year ago

"marcia johnson" Discussed on Feast of Fun

"Movement was part of that moment the stem in ism she became she became radicalized and is a very young person in the early. Nineteen seventies started to advocate especially for the rights in the shoes of homeless homeless. trans use. incarcerated people and the this created tensions in the gay and lesbian movement because many middle-class gays and lesbians predominantly white gays and lesbians were. Just not interested. They were not interested in in homeless trans people. They could care less about incarcerated people. They did not care. The trans people were victims of sexual violence in prison. And those were the issues at. Sylvia was trying to raise awareness about. She started an organization called star street. Transvestite action revolutionaries. And you wouldn't call that today. Which you star with marcia johnson trans students right. So transvestite was the word that they use. It was the term of choice. Trans transgender did not really exist or certainly did not have the circulation towards the end of her life in the late. Nineteen ninety s. She did start to self identify as an in fact they rename star as street transgender activists and revolutionaries. But so i was. I've always been fascinated and interested in looked up to simba and the end and but i was reading a book about performance bit. At a certain moment. I realized as a political figure as a person who gave speeches as the person who had to fight to get on stage in nineteen seventy three to be able to share her message. There was a performative element. to her politics that entail embodying her ideas conveying swaying her awed convincing people like using rhetoric voice and body and those are elements as she shared with us she shared with drag performance with trans performance. So i integrated a discussion of celia celia diva in my book in the context of the drag of poverty of the that struggle to overcome sinai adversity to transform the world from a radical perspective. Without a doubt. I mean you couldn't be able to. You can't call yourself queer. If you haven't read or listen to at least a couple of sylvia rivera speeches because to me. She really embodies a lot of what queasiness means and she somebody who was booed when she spoke. That is so. Have the transcript here a very famous speech. Y'all better quiet down from june twenty-fourth nineteen seventy-three she starts with of course y'all better quiet down. She gets booed and she complains that she's been trying to get up there all day for gay brothers and sisters in jail that right me every mother fucking week and asked for your help and all. Y'all do don't do a goddamn thing for them. Have you ever been beaten up and raped in jail. I've been jail. I've been raped and beaten many times by men by heterosexual men that do not belong in the homosexual shelter. But do you do anything for me. No you tell me to go. Hide my tail between my legs. I will not put up with this shit. I have been beaten. I've had my nose broken. I've been thrown in jail. I've lost my job. I've lost my apartment for gay liberation and y'all treat me this way. What the fuck is wrong with you all think about that. I do not believe in revolution but you all do. I believe in the gay power. I believe an oscar getting our rights. Or else i would not be out there fighting for our rights. That's all i wanted to say. Gop and then she goes on to not forgetting people who have passed and she ends this with saying the people who are trying to do something for all of us and not men and women that belonged to a white middle class white club. That's what you all belong to. I want revolution now. And then she goes onto spelling gay power. What what do you What do you think is the main issue that sylvia.

Sylvia sylvia marcia johnson sylvia rivera star street celia celia diva Nineteen ninety s. Nineteen seventies today june twenty-fourth nineteen se Trans oscar -three three transvestite nineteen seventy trans
"marcia johnson" Discussed on Feast of Fun

Feast of Fun

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"marcia johnson" Discussed on Feast of Fun

"Movement was part of that moment the stem in ism she became she became radicalized and is a very young person in the early. Nineteen seventies started to advocate especially for the rights in the shoes of homeless homeless. trans use. incarcerated people and the this created tensions in the gay and lesbian movement because many middle-class gays and lesbians predominantly white gays and lesbians were. Just not interested. They were not interested in in homeless trans people. They could care less about incarcerated people. They did not care. The trans people were victims of sexual violence in prison. And those were. The issues at sylvia was trying to raise awareness about. She started an organization called star street. Transvestite action revolutionaries day. And you wouldn't to call that today. Which you star with marcia johnson trans students right. So transvestite was the word that they use. It was the term of choice. Trans transgender did not really exist or certainly did not have the circulation towards the end of her life in the late. Nineteen ninety s. She did start to self identify as an in fact they rename star as street transgender activists and revolutionaries. But so i was. I've always been fascinated and interested in looked up to simba and the end and but i was reading a book about performance bit. At a certain moment. I realized as a political figure as a person who gave speeches as the person who had to fight to get on stage in nineteen seventy three to be able to share her message. There was a performative element. to her politics that entail embodying her ideas conveying swaying her awed convincing people like using rhetoric voice and body and those are elements as she shared with us she shared with drag performance with trans performance. So i integrated a discussion of celia celia diva in my book in the context of the drag of poverty of the that struggle to overcome sinai adversity to transform the world from a radical perspective. Without a doubt. I mean you couldn't be able to. You can't call yourself queer. If you haven't read or listen to at least a couple of sylvia rivera speeches because to me. She really embodies a lot of what queasiness means and she somebody who was booed when she spoke. That is correct. So have the transcript here a very famous speech y'all better quiet down from june twenty-fourth nineteen seventy-three she starts with of course y'all better quiet down. She gets booed and she complains that she's been trying to get up there all day for gay brothers and sisters in jail that right me the fucking week and asked for your help and all. Y'all do don't do a goddamn thing for them. Have you ever been beaten up and raped in jail. I've been jail. I've been raped and beaten many times by men by heterosexual men that do not belong in the homosexual shelter. But do you do anything for me. No you tell me to go. Hide my tail between my legs. I will not put up with this shit. I have been beaten. I've had my nose broken. I've been thrown in jail. I've lost my job. I've lost my apartment for gay liberation and y'all treat me this way. What the fuck is wrong with you all think about that. I do not believe in revolution but you all do. I believe in the gay power. I believe an oscar getting our rights. Or else i would not be out there fighting for our rights. That's all i wanted to say. Gop and then she goes on to not forgetting people who have passed and she ends this with saying the people who are trying to do something for all of us and not men and women that belonged to a white middle class white club. That's what you all belong to. I want revolution now. And then she goes onto spelling gay power. What what do you What do you think is the main issue that sylvia.

marcia johnson star street sylvia rivera today Nineteen seventies Nineteen ninety s. celia celia diva june twenty-fourth nineteen se sylvia Trans nineteen seventy three -three transvestite trans oscar
"marcia johnson" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

07:49 min | 2 years ago

"marcia johnson" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"Does not include problems with general used the Internet online gambling in or use of social media or smartphones under the Some countries including South Korea and China video gaming is already been recognized as disorder. Treatment programs ends have been established Researchers have recently found that point three to one percent of the. US general population might qualify for potential diagnosis of Internet gaming disorder. Over a million. The people the author suggests that it is important distinction between passionate engagement someone enthusiastic and focus on gaming and pathology some with an illness and addiction when the person is distressed with his or his or her gaming You know that's when it becomes illness okay. So that so that concludes our investigation into bizarre mental disorders. I mean we could go on and on and on if you get a little bit repetitive. But I wanNA talk about one last condition it's another one not in the DSM It is not really been looked at as a mental illness yet. I think it will be some day. Definitely fits with his suck. It's called Mesa phony and I for sure have it. Means a phone or hatred or dislike like of sound is characterized by selective sensitivity to specific sounds accompanied by emotional distress even anger as well as behavioral behavioral responses such avoidance similar. OCD phony presents itself differently in each individual For a person who suffers with these phony a he or she can revolve a lot of their life around unavoidable personal triggers. And I know that we're overused and I myself have made fun of that word but it is the best word to use here. A trigger sounder side that causes a means of phone response. It may sound someone makes chewing slight slight Papa the lips and speaking will smack in person. Listen for a person with this. This can trigger an involuntary action of irritation if the trigger continues if the keep fucking smack. I'm the emotions quickly turned into extreme anger rage hatred or disgust. And I love that amounts to felony site. Website says that these emotions are jerked out of the person and trying to stay. Calm and being triggered is futile. Yeah so true. You don't WanNa out of angry but you are fucking enraged. You know it's crazy but the feeling states MEESE phony triggers generally start with a familiar person familiar sound a sound regularly really heard any afflicted life. survey was conducted of individuals with Mesa. Phony in two thousand thirteen which two thirds said. Their worst trigger was an eating chewing sound. Ten percent were breathing. Sounds the remaining. Twenty five percent had a variety of worst triggers including base through all our dog barking. Shut the fuck up. Coughing take a fucking cough drop. Clicking sounds no thank you Whistling parents taught her parents talking siblings to sound produced when you know saying words his son or chip and someone typing on a keyboard. I hate all the sounds maybe other than Para Sake that what does it bother me but I hate everything else. Music Phony Institute DOT ORG offers. A simple test has to determine if you have not just two questions starts with two questions. Here's the first one. Are there sound that you cannot tolerate even if the sound sound is soft. Yes do not eat potato chips around me and a quiet room you crunchy. Fuck also cannot be around Reverend Dr. Joey drinks thanks water because he doesn't he doesn't drink guys he gulps it down like a savage like he's been in the fucking desert for weeks just thinking about. It disgusts me. I love him but is this cost. Me cannot around Queens suck when she'd Salads by the fuck does she have to scrape the bottom of her bowl with every Goddamn bite you quietly. Poke the lettuce with the prongs of the fork. That's that's what is built for and then you can gently chew your mouth quite like a decent person instead of a post monster. The next question number two you instantly have response to this sound the starts with irritation tation disgust and almost immediately becomes anger. He see above response to question number one. Then the site says enter. Yes to both those questions. You have fonje check. How severe phone is depends on your answers to the next survey? So let's see how bad I have it. Let's see how bad maybe some of you have this. Follow along here this. Play along with this this. If you can't decide says the phone assessment questionnaire was developed by Dr Marcia Johnson Click on the following link. Fill it out. Add up your points from all your questions. The maximum score is sixty three. The higher higher your score the more severe Mesa phony okay. So here we go me Safaniah. Severity a score of zero to eleven sub clinical meaning. You don't need treatment. And then twelve. Twenty four is mild twenty. Five to thirty seven is moderate. Thirty eight to fifty severe fifty one to sixty three extreme so the rating scale is zero. This doesn't bother me at all one a little bit of time to a good deal the time with three almost all the time. Okay now question number one my sound or statement everyone. My sound is used currently make me unhappy unhappy one time one. My sound issues currently create problems for me one or two. But I'll say one one. Okay my sound issues. Have recently made me angry angry. Two if not three I'll go to. I feel that no one understands my problems with certain sounds one my sound issues. Do not seem to have a known. 'CAUSE no zero. I know what caused the Heff. Loud cheers and breeders drinkers off. My number six issues early May feel helpless Zero Awful help with Bob Number. Seven is currently interfere with my social life. Yeah I was a one little the time. Go to restaurants things because it's just you know it's too quiet here. The smack into much number eight my sound issues currently make me feel isolated one My sound issues have recently created problems from groups yet to avoid some mm stuff issues negatively affect my work life to one by the way so this is all me my sound issues currently make me. You'll frustrated too is frustrating to get so angry about this stuff My sound issues curly impact my life negativity one some negative. My sound issues have really made me feel guilty. Yes us at just today feel guilty. He's talking about Joe My sound issues classified is crazy too. I feel that can help you. Sound is just three. My sound Saudis used currently make me feel hopeless. No Man I feel like we can help but I don't hopeless cause whatever maybe me hopeless I should put more. I Dunno I feel the sound issues will only get worse with time. Yeah to my sound is used currently impact. My family relationships to my sound issues have recently affecting my ability to be with other people to my sound issues have now been recognized as legitimate to. It's it's real mom and then last I'm worried to my whole life will be affected by Saudi. She's three adding up all my response score thirty one right in the middle of moderate. It's not bad I was. I was worried I being the severe category and I gotTa say feels good to know that others have the same thing you know enough for a doctor to design a test. Numerous studies are being done on. It seems to be audio processing disorder. my brain amplify certain background noises too unbearable levels a one bit of recent research indicates that for people people with me Safaniah certain background. Noises can become four times as loud as they are for others. That makes so much sense to me. Sometimes I literally cannot focus on what Lindsay Assane when we're out together other because all I can hear. Is the mother fucker thirty feet away. Who just got released from prison? I guess and didn't get to eat for the past three weeks. And that's how they have to eat the fucking food like a savage average piece of shit. You makes me angry even to think about it. It's so ridiculous Good to have a sense of humor about stuff like this any condition or does already have Lino. I can laugh at like I do realize this is all laughable and laughing at it takes a series out of A while back somebody show me a phone support group on facebook and I saw the post it was the hardest. I laughed and I don't even know how long and it also made me feel so good to know that identified with so many of the crazy post. Let's have some laughs at my expenses laugh at some mental illness. Let's laugh at all fucking crazy. I'M GONNA come down with a special meeting phony as centric. It is of the Internet's were I in this week's whack.

Mesa US cough Dr Marcia Johnson South Korea Queens Para Sake Bob Number Papa MEESE Lindsay Assane facebook Dr. Joey Lino China Joe
"marcia johnson" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

07:49 min | 2 years ago

"marcia johnson" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"Does not include problems with general used the Internet online gambling in or use of social media or smartphones under the Some countries including South Korea and China video gaming is already been recognized as disorder. Treatment programs ends have been established Researchers have recently found that point three to one percent of the. US general population might qualify for potential diagnosis of Internet gaming disorder. Over a million. The people the author suggests that it is important distinction between passionate engagement someone enthusiastic and focus on gaming and pathology some with an illness and addiction when the person is distressed with his or his or her gaming You know that's when it becomes illness okay. So that so that concludes our investigation into bizarre mental disorders. I mean we could go on and on and on if you get a little bit repetitive. But I wanNA talk about one last condition it's another one not in the DSM It is not really been looked at as a mental illness yet. I think it will be some day. Definitely fits with his suck. It's called Mesa phony and I for sure have it. Means a phone or hatred or dislike like of sound is characterized by selective sensitivity to specific sounds accompanied by emotional distress even anger as well as behavioral behavioral responses such avoidance similar. OCD phony presents itself differently in each individual For a person who suffers with these phony a he or she can revolve a lot of their life around unavoidable personal triggers. And I know that we're overused and I myself have made fun of that word but it is the best word to use here. A trigger sounder side that causes a means of phone response. It may sound someone makes chewing slight slight Papa the lips and speaking will smack in person. Listen for a person with this. This can trigger an involuntary action of irritation if the trigger continues if the keep fucking smack. I'm the emotions quickly turned into extreme anger rage hatred or disgust. And I love that amounts to felony site. Website says that these emotions are jerked out of the person and trying to stay. Calm and being triggered is futile. Yeah so true. You don't WanNa out of angry but you are fucking enraged. You know it's crazy but the feeling states MEESE phony triggers generally start with a familiar person familiar sound a sound regularly really heard any afflicted life. survey was conducted of individuals with Mesa. Phony in two thousand thirteen which two thirds said. Their worst trigger was an eating chewing sound. Ten percent were breathing. Sounds the remaining. Twenty five percent had a variety of worst triggers including base through all our dog barking. Shut the fuck up. Coughing take a fucking cough drop. Clicking sounds no thank you Whistling parents taught her parents talking siblings to sound produced when you know saying words his son or chip and someone typing on a keyboard. I hate all the sounds maybe other than Para Sake that what does it bother me but I hate everything else. Music Phony Institute DOT ORG offers. A simple test has to determine if you have not just two questions starts with two questions. Here's the first one. Are there sound that you cannot tolerate even if the sound sound is soft. Yes do not eat potato chips around me and a quiet room you crunchy. Fuck also cannot be around Reverend Dr. Joey drinks thanks water because he doesn't he doesn't drink guys he gulps it down like a savage like he's been in the fucking desert for weeks just thinking about. It disgusts me. I love him but is this cost. Me cannot around Queens suck when she'd Salads by the fuck does she have to scrape the bottom of her bowl with every Goddamn bite you quietly. Poke the lettuce with the prongs of the fork. That's that's what is built for and then you can gently chew your mouth quite like a decent person instead of a post monster. The next question number two you instantly have response to this sound the starts with irritation tation disgust and almost immediately becomes anger. He see above response to question number one. Then the site says enter. Yes to both those questions. You have fonje check. How severe phone is depends on your answers to the next survey? So let's see how bad I have it. Let's see how bad maybe some of you have this. Follow along here this. Play along with this this. If you can't decide says the phone assessment questionnaire was developed by Dr Marcia Johnson Click on the following link. Fill it out. Add up your points from all your questions. The maximum score is sixty three. The higher higher your score the more severe Mesa phony okay. So here we go me Safaniah. Severity a score of zero to eleven sub clinical meaning. You don't need treatment. And then twelve. Twenty four is mild twenty. Five to thirty seven is moderate. Thirty eight to fifty severe fifty one to sixty three extreme so the rating scale is zero. This doesn't bother me at all one a little bit of time to a good deal the time with three almost all the time. Okay now question number one my sound or statement everyone. My sound is used currently make me unhappy unhappy one time one. My sound issues currently create problems for me one or two. But I'll say one one. Okay my sound issues. Have recently made me angry angry. Two if not three I'll go to. I feel that no one understands my problems with certain sounds one my sound issues. Do not seem to have a known. 'CAUSE no zero. I know what caused the Heff. Loud cheers and breeders drinkers off. My number six issues early May feel helpless Zero Awful help with Bob Number. Seven is currently interfere with my social life. Yeah I was a one little the time. Go to restaurants things because it's just you know it's too quiet here. The smack into much number eight my sound issues currently make me feel isolated one My sound issues have recently created problems from groups yet to avoid some mm stuff issues negatively affect my work life to one by the way so this is all me my sound issues currently make me. You'll frustrated too is frustrating to get so angry about this stuff My sound issues curly impact my life negativity one some negative. My sound issues have really made me feel guilty. Yes us at just today feel guilty. He's talking about Joe My sound issues classified is crazy too. I feel that can help you. Sound is just three. My sound Saudis used currently make me feel hopeless. No Man I feel like we can help but I don't hopeless cause whatever maybe me hopeless I should put more. I Dunno I feel the sound issues will only get worse with time. Yeah to my sound is used currently impact. My family relationships to my sound issues have recently affecting my ability to be with other people to my sound issues have now been recognized as legitimate to. It's it's real mom and then last I'm worried to my whole life will be affected by Saudi. She's three adding up all my response score thirty one right in the middle of moderate. It's not bad I was. I was worried I being the severe category and I gotTa say feels good to know that others have the same thing you know enough for a doctor to design a test. Numerous studies are being done on. It seems to be audio processing disorder. my brain amplify certain background noises too unbearable levels a one bit of recent research indicates that for people people with me Safaniah certain background. Noises can become four times as loud as they are for others. That makes so much sense to me. Sometimes I literally cannot focus on what Lindsay Assane when we're out together other because all I can hear. Is the mother fucker thirty feet away. Who just got released from prison? I guess and didn't get to eat for the past three weeks. And that's how they have to eat the fucking food like a savage average piece of shit. You makes me angry even to think about it. It's so ridiculous Good to have a sense of humor about stuff like this any condition or does already have Lino. I can laugh at like I do realize this is all laughable and laughing at it takes a series out of A while back somebody show me a phone support group on facebook and I saw the post it was the hardest. I laughed and I don't even know how long and it also made me feel so good to know that identified with so many of the crazy post. Let's have some laughs at my expenses laugh at some mental illness. Let's laugh at all fucking crazy. I'M GONNA come down with a special meeting phony as centric. It is of the Internet's were I in this week's whack.

Mesa US cough Dr Marcia Johnson South Korea Queens Para Sake Bob Number Papa MEESE Lindsay Assane facebook Dr. Joey Lino China Joe
From the LGBTQ Vault: Sylvia Rivera & Marsha P. Johnson

Making Gay History

10:24 min | 2 years ago

From the LGBTQ Vault: Sylvia Rivera & Marsha P. Johnson

"Sixth season of our podcast is focused on LGBT activism in the Post stonewall seventies two of the most prominent trans activists to emerge out of that period were Sylvia Rivera and Marsha p Johnson in one thousand nine hundred seventy the year after the stonewall uprising in New York City's Greenwich Village. The two friends founded street transvestite action revolutionaries or star and set up a barebones refuge in a run down apartment building on the lower east side in Manhattan for street kids much like themselves. They called it star House. In December Nineteen Seventy Liza Cowan and twenty year old reporter for Wbai radio conducted. What we believe is the oldest recorded interview with Sylvia Marsha and other members of star? She is a reel to reel tape recorder and set out to do a story on what was then known as crossdressing. Eventually a single reel containing an edited version of the interview found. Its way into the basement of the lesbian. Her story archives in Brooklyn New York. And that's where making gay histories self-described Archive Rat Brian. Free founded in the spring of two thousand nineteen before we share some of that incredibly rare tape with you. I thought I'd ask Brian about his experience of discovering this long lost interview. And how did you find this tape. Where were you what were you doing so I was looking for audio for the fifth season of making a history for our stonewall season listen and my mission was to find archival audio tapes that were made around nineteen sixty eight to nineteen seventy-one so I went to the LGBT center archives? I went to the New York Public Library and I went to the lesbian. Her story archives in the basement of Lesbian Her story archives. I was going through all of their cassettes for WBAI shows. I didn't find anything thing that reached back that was applicable to what we were looking for but out of the corner of my eye in the basement I saw a box of open. Reel you've you. Which is an older style of audio? Recording then cassettes would be. So what is can you describe. What Open Reel Recording is is you see in the movies or in photographs an actual real of tape. Yes these are the big reels. These are like three inch five inch the seven inch ten inch and I didn't know what was in this box when I saw it but I went upstairs to the volunteer archivist. I Rachel Gordon and I asked her if I could go through it and right there in the middle of the box. I pulled out this recording that was labeled star. I was afraid to open at because some of these tapes. They're so fragile when they're fifty Sixty seventy years old. They are so fragile that you can destroy them and I know how difficult it is to get archival material surrounding star. Yeah so what did you when you saw this. Besides being afraid that you would you could possibly damage the tape I mean it's almost like finding the holy we grow. You know you WANNA listen to it immediately when you find a tape like that and you can't why couldn't you just play it. Well for one there are some tapes that as you play. They will erase when they're fifty years old. So you will listen to it but nobody else will. So if you WANNA have a tape digitize like that what do you do. We took the tape to a studio in Harlem called Old Swan Studios that specializes in this type of digitisation. I took so much care when I took it out of that building I I was so afraid of damaging it it was like I had ten thousand dollars in my backpack and couldn't let anyone near it so I arrived at Swansea in Harlem and Robert. The sound engineer started rewinding the tape and when he did every single manual edit snapped. Oh my so. This is an edited. This was an that was done. That was then edited. And and and how do they edit tape. Well they had to take it physically and slice it and then with adhesive give glue at packed together so each and every time it hit one of these physical edits it would snap which for me was terrifying. But for him was just run of the mill he would just take the two ends reapply adhesive and keep rewinding it once he rebounded. What did he do next? Well he was kind enough to let me sit in the studio and listen to it as he played it for the first time and I knew I was listening to something very special. What made it special special for me? Because they're not just talking about the organization that they created they're also talking about their lives and they're talking about how they see the world around them and how they see gender. It's very personal. They're not altering the same line. What did you take away from hearing that recording? I think it reminded me of how young everyone was. Then I think the March Johnson and Sylvia Rivera that I've grown accustomed to. They were older by at the time. the film that I've seen of them the video that I've seen of them the recordings that I've listened to from them. They had more time under their belt. And this it was it was like they were freshly ride in New York and just letting it all about the quality of tape. You're about to hear in this remarkable and far-ranging conversation is a bit uneven. In addition to a snippet of Jefferson an airplane. You'll also notice hissing in the background. During part of the discussion anyone who has ever lived in an Old New York City apartment will recognize that sound. It's coming coming from faulty valve of esteem heat radiator. The first person to speak is nineteen year old Sylvia Rivera. The second is someone named Victor and the third is Marcia Johnson who was twenty five at the time before my mother passed away three years my mother used to Jesmyn Golf Clubs and my mother. My grandmother kept on one little blouses and girls stocks of about six seven years old. Before if I wouldn't start addressing boys 'cause during that period that's when I discovered my homosexuality was like you know watching television and placed in myself and the role of the female or just pricing myself As another there's another boy in the Mail on demand was praying such a fantastic love role in the television. And and when I left home at eleven was really when I went into transparent system and make hustling speech and the game against experiences. DIFFERENT THAN SYLVIA'S I. I didn't know secretly because My mother would catch me. She would forbid it. And by the time I was five years old I knew enough that Do these things secretly So I used to and no one was around to put on a and wear women's clothes close. I can get my hands on but otherwise I grew up quite masculine. I went to school. I played baseball. I went to college so and the beard and was the revolutionary did time in jail for Pacifist demonstrations and and Just recently I I decided what's You know why not wear the clothes. I prefer to wear what I was. I was the time I was living a masculine role that I didn't really prefer at least I didn't prefer to do it. Permanent preferred the times to be feminine And women's Lib people Feel that the women are forced to take certain roles which are unacceptable to them and they want to break out no. I've often felt the same way about being a man that I've been forced to take certain roles number one something as unimportant as the clothes I have to wear men's restrictions. Men's dress are much more severe than the restrictions on women's dress of men are forced to look a certain way and I didn't want to look that way then then of course there's a man has to be tough. He has to have responsibility to take care of people. You know suppose I wanted to be petted or I wanted to be taken care of. As I was growing up I met a lot of men. They never pale to me to my sexually. I used to try and keep away from because my hometown. You mistakes where you were out of it and they recall you all kinds of names And then when I first came in York seventeen years old that's when I started getting kind of invest breath more like a transvestite. I started out with makeup in nineteen sixty three nine thousand nine hundred sixty four And in one thousand nine hundred sixty five. I was coming out more and I was still wearing make up but I was still going to jail just wearing doing makeup in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine. I started wearing female attire full-time usually I wear dress every day of the week. I I just don't put on much makeup anything until after the dog because address too much attention if we make in the daytime they might think that I was a male. Al But if I were a little makeup they think I'm a female and he's right on I and if I will not make it night they automatically know female female they really can tell the difference about me because I'm on my way to be. SX teams

Sylvia Rivera New York City Marcia Johnson Sylvia Marsha New York Public Library Manhattan Greenwich Village Harlem Liza Cowan Brooklyn Rachel Gordon Old Swan Studios Marsha P Johnson Reporter Wbai Brian Baseball Sylvia York New York
"marcia johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:11 min | 3 years ago

"marcia johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Steve Inskeep. And I'm Rachel Martin the sound of someone chewing or smacking gum can be annoying. But for some people these noises trigger instant, rage or panic. This is not just an excellent trysofi. It is a real condition, and it's called me. So phony a- here's NPR's April Fulton when eighteen year old L D, raps sits down to dinner. This happens. My heart begins to pound, I go one of two ways. I either start to cry or I just get really intensely angry. That's because the sound of her family chewing creates an automatic and extreme emotional response. She has to eat in another room. It's really intense. I mean, it's as if you're going to die, and she's been experiencing this intense reaction to certain noises since she was a toddler, but it wasn't until middle school. When her mom showed her an article about something called me Safaniah that she was able to put a name on it. I said this is what I have this is it. She started seeing Julian Jaffe a psychotherapist in Los Angeles who specializes in Mesa phone. Nya Jaffe says the most common triggers for people like Ellie our mouth noises chewing is almost universal gum chewing is almost universal. They also don't like the sound of throat clearing coughing sniffing. It could also be humming tapping or pen clicking. Sometimes just the sight of someone chewing is enough to cause a panic attack. It's as if the survival part of the brain thinks somehow it's being attacked, and this prompts the fighter flight reaction. Now, not much is known about me Safaniah. It was only given a name a few years ago and people who have it often think they're going crazy. Many doctors have never heard of it. And if people do talk about their symptoms, they're dismissed or diagnosed with a mood disorder, but a small study published recently suggests that the brains of people with me Safaniah actually react differently to certain sounds Philip gander studies how the brain makes sense of sound at the university of Iowa we pretty convinced that we found some very good. Evidence for relating this disorder to particular patterns of brain activity when researchers put people in an MRI scanner and played trigger sounds like chewing and eating. He says you could see the difference. Let me group the activity was far greater in particular areas of their brain. And they showed classic signs of stress their heart rate increased. And also their palms were sweating more. It was phenomenal. It was the first piece of research that showed our our population that what they have is real. That's Marcia Johnson. She's not just in Portland, Oregon. She was one of the first to recognize the disorder in the nineteen ninety s she says Mesa Fonje is really devastating to families. If you're a mother, and your child has is a means of phony person in this sibling is the trigger. You try to stop this one from eating and this one from reacting. It's just absolutely awful. The national institutes of health calls me Safaniah, a chronic condition, and the causes unknown. More research is needed to understand it. But for people who have me Safaniah, they need strategies. Now Johnson says for one don't force everyone to sit around the dinner table together have a buffet style. Everybody eats where they want. But why don't you plan the big event of a family day called taking a hike going up to a waterfall going bowling? Of course. People suffering from me Safaniah can't totally avoid their trigger noises. So Johnson suggests try wearing headphones to flood the ears with pleasant sounds or mindful breathing, but the most important advice comes from Eli's. Mom, Kathy Rapp, if your child complains of these symptoms, don't dismiss them. It sounds bizarre. But it's very real and a family's help. I think is critical to helping somebody live a fuller. Life April, Fulton NPR news, Los Angeles when older people have dementia. It's commonly assumed that they have Alzheimer's disease. But that is not the only form of dementia. There are other causes NPR's. John Hamilton reports on why it's important to get the right diagnosis when Julie Schneider was training to be a doctor in the nineteen eighties. Nineties dementia was simple. We were taught that almost all dimensions Alzheimer's disease. And that there wasn't other things going on in the brain today. Schneider is a professor at the rush Alzheimer's disease center in Chicago. And last week she served as scientific chair of a summit on dementias at the national institutes of health. Schneider says one key message from that summit is that dementia can have many causes these include strokes a form of Parkinson's and disease that damages brain areas that regulate emotion and behavior, we still believe that Alzheimer's is important, but these other pathologies are also important Alzheimer's is associated with plaques and tangles in the brain. But Schneider says a different culprit causes Lewy body dementia which affects more than one million people in the US. It's these little aggregates called Lewy bodies, which were first identified in the brains of people with Parkinson's disease and Schneider says people with Lewy body disease can expect different challenges then people with Alzheimer's, you're going to be more rapidly declining. You might have more motor problems more falls. Gate changes balanced problems. Sleep problems, hallucinations, many of these symptoms can be treated, even though the underlying disease can't be after Walter corresponds directs the National Institute of neurological disorders and stroke. He says frontal temporal dementia damages areas of the brain involved in personality and behavior, and he says that can lead to tragic misunderstandings. If family members don't know the cause not infrequently the spouse thinks that their spouses, just not worth being married to anymore, and they believe it's a psychological thing. And they get divorced and later there's a lot of guilt. One preventable. Cause of dementia is stroke says Roger Corvo a program director at the NIH one third of the people who have strokes. Go to have dementia preventing strokes is about preventing damage to your brain. Carbo says people who've had one stroke can often avoid a second by taking blood thinners and controlling their.

Julie Schneider Alzheimer NPR Safaniah Marcia Johnson Alzheimer's disease Steve Inskeep Rachel Martin Los Angeles Julian Jaffe April Fulton Parkinson mood disorder Mesa Fonje Kathy Rapp hallucinations throat clearing
"marcia johnson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:04 min | 3 years ago

"marcia johnson" Discussed on KCRW

"It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Steve Inskeep. And I'm Rachel Martin the sound of someone chewing or smacking gum can be annoying. But for some people these noises trigger instant, rage panic. This is not just an accent. It is a real condition, and it's. Called me. So phony a-, here's NPR's April Fulton when eighteen year old Ellie wraps. It's down to dinner. This happens. My heart begins to pound, I go one of two ways. I either start to cry or I just get really intensely angry. That's because the sound of her family chewing creates an automatic and extreme emotional response. She has to eat in another room. It's really intense. I mean, it's as if you're going to die, and she's been experiencing this intense reaction to certain noises since she was a toddler, but it wasn't until middle school. When her mom showed her an article about something called me Safaniah that she was able to put a name on it. I said this is what I have this is it. She started seeing Jillian Jaffe a psychotherapist in Los Angeles who specializes in Mesa Fonje Jaffe, says the most common triggers for people like Ellie our mouth noises chewing is almost universal gum chewing is almost universal. They also don't like the sound of throat clearing. Coughing sniffing. It could also be humming tapping pen clicking sometimes just the sight of someone chewing is enough to cause a panic attack. It's as if the survival part of the brain thinks somehow it's being attacked, and this prompts the fighter flight reaction. Now not much is known about me. So phony a- it was only given a name a few years ago and people who have it often think they're going crazy. Many doctors have never heard of it. And if people do talk about their symptoms, they're dismissed or diagnosed with a mood disorder, but a small study published recently suggests that the brains of people with me Safaniah actually react differently to certain sounds Philip gander studies, how the brain makes sense of sound at the university of Iowa we pretty convinced that we found some very good evidence for relating this disorder to particular patterns of brain activity when researchers put people in an MRI scanner and played trigger sounds like chewing and eating. He says you could see the difference. Let me group the activity was far, greater and. Particular areas of their brain. And they showed classic signs of stress their heart rate increased. And also their palms were sweating more. It was phenomenal. It was the first piece of research that showed our our population that what they have is real. That's Marcia Johnson. She's not just in Portland, Oregon. She was one of the first to recognize the disorder in the nineteen ninety s she says Mesa phone is really devastating to families. If you're a mother, and your child has is a means of phony person, and this sibling is the trigger you trying to stop this one from eating and this one from reacting. It's just absolutely awful. The national institutes of health calls me Safaniah, a chronic condition, and the causes unknown. More research is needed to understand it. But for people who have me Safaniah, they need strategies. Now Johnson says for one don't force everyone to sit around the dinner table together have a buffet style. Everybody eats where they want. But why don't you plan the big event of a family? Day called taking a hike going up to a waterfall going bowling, of course, people suffering from USA phony can't totally avoid their trigger noises. So Johnson suggests try wearing headphones to flood the ears with pleasant sounds or mindful breathing, but the most important advice comes from Elliot. Mom, Kathy Rapp, if your child complains of these symptoms, don't dismiss them. It sounds bizarre. But it's very real and a family's help. I think is critical to helping somebody live a fuller. Life April, Fulton NPR news, Los Angeles when older people have dementia. It's commonly assumed that they have Alzheimer's disease. But that is not the only form of dementia. There are other causes NPR's. John Hamilton reports on why it's important to get the right diagnosis when Jewish Neider was training to be a doctor in the nineteen eighties and nineties dementia was simple. We were taught that almost all dementia Alzheimer's disease, and that there wasn't other things going on in the brain. Rain today. Schneider is a professor at the rush Alzheimer's disease center in Chicago. And last week she served as scientific chair of a summit on dementias at the national institutes of health. Schneider says one key message from that summit is that dementia can have many causes these include strokes a form of Parkinson's disease that damages brain areas that regulate emotion and behavior, we still believe that Alzheimer's is important, but these other pathologies are also important Alzheimer's is associated with plaques and tangles in the brain. But Schneider says a different culprit causes Lewy body dementia which affects more than one million people in the US. It's these little aggregates called Lewy bodies, which were first identified in the brains of people with Parkinson's disease and Schneider says people with Lewy body disease can expect different challenges than people.

Alzheimer's disease NPR Marcia Johnson Schneider Alzheimer Ellie USA Steve Inskeep Los Angeles Rachel Martin Safaniah mood disorder Parkinson Mesa Fonje Jaffe Jillian Jaffe April Fulton John Hamilton Kathy Rapp
"marcia johnson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:10 min | 3 years ago

"marcia johnson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And I'm Rachel Martin the sound of someone chewing or smacking gum can be annoying. But for some people these noises trigger instant, rage panic. This is not just an excellent, and it is a real condition, and it's called me. So phony a- here's NPR's April Fulton when eighteen year old Ellie, raps sits down to dinner. This happens. My heart begins to pound, I go one of two ways, I either start to cry or just get really intensely angry. That's because the sound of her family chewing creates an automatic and extreme emotional response. She has to eat in another room. It's really intense. I mean, it's as if you're going to die, and she's been experiencing this intense reaction to certain noises since she was a toddler, but it wasn't until middle school. When her mom showed her an article about something called a phony ah that she was able to put a name on it. I said this is what I have this is it. She started seeing Jillian Jaffe a psychotherapist in Los Angeles. Who specialize? Is is in Mesa. Fonje Jaffe says the most common triggers for people like Ellie our mouth noises shoeing is almost universal gum chewing is almost universal. They also don't like the sound of throat clearing coughing sniffing. It could also be humming tapping or pen clicking. Sometimes just the sight of someone chewing is enough to cause a panic attack. It's as if the survival part of the brain thinks somehow it's being attacked, and this prompts the fighter flight reaction. Now, not much is known about me so phone. Yeah. It was only given a name a few years ago and people who have it often think they're going crazy. Many doctors have never heard of it. And if people do talk about their symptoms, they're dismissed or diagnosed with a mood disorder, but a small study published recently suggests that the brains of people with me Safaniah actually react differently to certain sounds Philip gander studies how the brain makes sense of sound at the university of Iowa we pretty convinced that we found. Some very good evidence for relating this disorder to particular patterns of brain activity when researchers put people in an MRI scanner and played trigger sounds like chewing and eating. He says you could see the difference. The phone group the activity was far greater in particular areas of their brain. And they showed classic signs of stress their heart rate increased. And also their palms were sweating more. It was phenomenal. It was the first piece of research that showed our our population that what they have is real. That's Marcia Johnson. She's not allergist in Portland, Oregon. She was one of the first to recognize the disorder in the nineteen ninety s she says Mesa Fonje is really devastating to families. If you're a mother, and your child has is a means of phony person in this sibling is the trigger. You're trying to stop this one from eating and this one from reacting. It's just absolutely awful. The national institutes of health calls me Safaniah a chronic condition. And the cause is unknown. More research is needed to understand it. But for people who have me Safaniah, they need strategies. Now Johnson says for one don't force everyone to sit around the dinner table together have a buffet style. Everybody eats where they want. But why don't you plan the big event of a family day called taking a hike going up to a waterfall going bowling? Of course. People suffering from me Safaniah can't totally avoid their trigger noises. So Johnson suggests try wearing headphones to flood the ears with pleasant sounds or mindful breathing, but the most important advice comes from Eli's. Mom, Kathy Rapp, if your child complains of these symptoms, don't dismiss them. It sounds bizarre. But it's very real and a family's help. I think is critical to helping somebody live a fuller. Life April, Fulton NPR news, Los Angeles when older people have dementia. It's commonly assumed that they have Alzheimer's disease. But that is not the only form of dementia. There are other causes NPR. John Hamilton reports on why it's important to get the right diagnosis. When Julie Schneider was training to be a doctor in the nineteen eighties and nineties dementia was simple. We were taught that almost all dementia Alzheimer's disease, and that there wasn't other things going on in the brain today. Schneider is a professor at the rush Alzheimer's disease center in Chicago. And last week she served as scientific chair of a summit on dementias at the national institutes of health. Schneider says one key message from that summit is that dementia can have many causes these include strokes a form of Parkinson's disease that damages brain areas that regulate emotion and behavior, we still believe that Alzheimer's is important, but these other pathologies are also important Alzheimer's is associated with plaques and tangles in the brain. But Schneider's has different culprit causes Lewy body dementia, which affects more than one million people in the US. It's these little aggregates called Lewy bodies, which were first identified in the brains of people with Parkinson's disease. And Schneider says people with Lewy body disease can expect different challenges than people with Alzheimer's. You couldn't be more rapidly declining. You might have more motor problems, more falls, gate changes balanced problems. Sleep problems, hallucinations, many of these symptoms can be treated, even though the underlying disease can't be Dr Walter Coronets directs the National Institute of neurological disorders and stroke. He says frontal temporal dementia damages areas of the brain involved in personality and behaviour me says that can lead to tragic misunderstandings. If family members don't know, the cause not infrequently the spouse thinks that their spouse is just not worth being married to anymore, and they they believe it's a psychological thing. And they get divorced and later there's a lot of guilt. One preventable. Cause of dementia is stroke says Rodrick Corvo a program director at the NIH one third of the people. Who have strokes? Go onto have dementia preventing strokes is about preventing damage to your brain. Carbo says people who've had one stroke can often avoid a second by taking blood thinners and controlling their blood pressure. John.

Julie Schneider Alzheimer Alzheimer's disease Marcia Johnson Safaniah Jillian Jaffe Ellie Los Angeles John Hamilton NPR Rachel Martin Parkinson April Fulton mood disorder Mesa Fonje Kathy Rapp Mesa throat clearing Portland
"marcia johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:14 min | 3 years ago

"marcia johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Now, the time it's twenty two past five. It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Steve Inskeep. And I'm Rachel Martin the sound of someone chewing or smacking gum can be annoying. But for some people these noises trigger instant, rage or panic. This is not just an excellent it is a real condition, and it's called missile phony a-, here's NPR's April Fulton when eighteen year old Ellie wraps. It's down to dinner. This happens. My heart begins to pound, I go one of two ways. I either start to cry or I just get really intensely angry. That's because the sound of her family chewing creates an automatic and extreme emotional response. She has to eat in another room. It's really intense. I mean, it's as if you're going to die, and she's been experiencing this intense reaction to certain noises since he was a toddler, but it wasn't until middle school. When her mom showed her an article about something called me Safaniah that she was able to put a name on it. I said this is what I have this is it. She started seeing Jillian Jaffe a psychotherapist in Los Angeles who specializes in Mesa phony a- Jaffe says the most common triggers for people like L E R mouth noises. Shoeing is almost universal gum chewing is almost universal. They also don't like the sound of throat clearing coughing sniffing. He could also be humming tapping or pen clicking. Sometimes just the sight of someone chewing is enough to cause a panic attack. It's as if the survival part of the brain thinks somehow it's being attacked, and this prompts the fighter flight reaction. Now, not much is known about me so phone. Yeah. It was only given a name a few years ago and people who have it often think they're going crazy. Many doctors have never heard of it. And if people do talk about their symptoms, they're dismissed or diagnosed with a mood disorder, but a small study published recently suggests that the brains of people with me Safaniah actually react differently to certain sounds Philip gander studies how the brain. Makes sense of sound at the university of Iowa we pretty convinced that we found some very good evidence for relating this disorder to particular patterns of brain activity, when researchers put people in an MRI scanner in played trigger sounds like chewing and eating he says, you could see the difference. Let me Sephora group the activity was far greater in particular areas of their brain. And they showed classic signs of stress their heart rate increased. And also their palms were sweating more. It was phenomenal. It was the first piece of research that showed our our population that what they have is real. That's Marcia Johnson. She's not Yala just in Portland, Oregon. She was one of the first to recognize the disorder in the nineteen ninety s she says Mesa Fonje is really devastating to families. If you're a mother, and your child has is a means of phony person, and this sibling is the trigger you trying to stop this one from eating and this one from reacting. It's just absolutely awful the National Institute. Health calls me, Safaniah, acrostic condition, and the causes unknown. More research is needed to understand it. But for people who have me Safaniah, they need strategies. Now Johnson says for one don't force everyone to sit around the dinner table together have a buffet style. Everybody eats where they want. But why don't you plan the big event of a family day called taking a hike going up to a waterfall going bowling? Of course. People suffering from me phony can't totally avoid their trigger noises. So Johnson suggests try wearing headphones to flood the ears with pleasant sounds or mindful breathing, but the most important advice comes from Eli's. Mom, Kathy Rapp, if your child complains of these symptoms, don't dismiss them. It sounds bizarre. But it's very real and a family's help. I think is critical to helping somebody live a fuller. Life April, Fulton NPR news, Los Angeles when older people have dementia. It's commonly assumed that they have Alzheimer's disease. But that is not the only form of dementia. There are other causes NPR's. John Hamilton reports on why it's important to get the right diagnosis. When Julie Schneider was training to be a doctor in the nineteen eighties and nineties dementia was simple. We were taught that almost all dementia Alzheimer's disease, and that there wasn't other things going on in the brain today. Schneider is a professor at the rush Alzheimer's disease center in Chicago. And last week she served as scientific chair of a summit on dementias at the national institutes of health. Schneider says one key message from that summit is that dementia can have many causes these include strokes a form of Parkinson's disease that damages brain areas that regulate emotion and behavior, we still believe that Alzheimer's is important, but these other pathologies are also important Alzheimer's is associated with plaques and tangles in the brain. But Schneider's has a different culprit causes Lewy body dementia which affects more than one million people in the US. It's these little aggregates. Lewy bodies, which were first identified in the brains of people with Parkinson's disease and Schneider says people with Lewy body disease can expect different challenges than people with Alzheimer's. You're going to be more rapidly declining. You might have more motor problems, more falls, gate changes balanced problems. Sleep problems, hallucinations, many of these symptoms can be treated, even though the underlying disease can't be Dr Walter Coronets directs the National Institute of neurological disorders and stroke. He says frontal temporal dementia damages areas of the brain involved in personality and behaviour me says that can lead to tragic misunderstandings. If family members don't know, the cause not infrequently the spouse thinks that their spouses, just not worth being married to anymore, and they they believe it's a psychological thing. And they get divorced and later there's a lot of guilt. One preventable. Cause of dementia is stroke. Says Rodrick Corvo a program director at the NIH one third of the people who have strokes. Go onto have dementia preventing strokes is about preventing damage to your brain. Carbo says people who've had one stroke can often avoid a second by taking blood thinners and controlling their blood pressure..

Julie Schneider Alzheimer Marcia Johnson Alzheimer's disease NPR Steve Inskeep National Institute Los Angeles Rachel Martin Jillian Jaffe Safaniah Parkinson April Fulton mood disorder university of Iowa Mesa Fonje Kathy Rapp Ellie
"marcia johnson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:01 min | 3 years ago

"marcia johnson" Discussed on KCRW

"And I'm Rachel Martin the sound of someone chewing or smacking gum can be annoying. But for some people these noises trigger instant rage. Panic. This is not just an excellent trysofi. It is a real condition, and it's called me. So phony a-, here's NPR's April Fulton eighteen year old Ellie wraps. It's down to dinner. This happens. My heart begins to pound, I go one of two ways. I either start to cry or just get really intensely angry. That's because the sound of her family chewing creates an automatic and extreme emotional response. She has to eat in another room. It's really intense. I mean, it's as if you're going to die, and she's been experiencing this intense reaction to certain noises since she was a toddler, but it wasn't until middle school. When her mom showed her an article about something called me, a phony ah that she was able to put a name on it. I said this is what I have this is she started seeing Julian Jaffe psychotherapist in Los Angeles who specializes in Mesa phony a- Jaffe says the most common triggers for people like L E R mouth noises. Shoeing is almost universal gum chewing is almost unit. Reversal. They also don't like the sound of throat clearing coughing sniffing. It could also be humming tapping or pen clicking. Sometimes just the sight of someone chewing is enough to cause a panic attack. It's as if the survival part of the brain thinks somehow it's being attacked, and this prompts the fighter flight reaction. Now not much is known about. It was only given a name a few years ago and people who have it often think they're going crazy. Many doctors have never heard of it. And if people do talk about their symptoms, they're dismissed or diagnosed with a mood disorder, but a small study published recently suggests that the brains of people with Mesa phony actually react differently to certain sounds Philip gander studies, how the brain makes sense of sound at the university of Iowa we pretty convinced that we found some very good evidence for relating this disorder to particular patterns of brain activity when researchers put people in an MRI scanner and played trigger sounds like chewing and eating he. He says you could see the difference phony group the activity was far, greater and particular areas of their brain. And they showed classic signs of stress their heart rate increased. And also their palms were sweating more. It was phenomenal. It was the first piece of research that showed our our population that what they have is real. That's Marcia Johnson. She's not Yala just in Portland, Oregon. She was one of the first to recognize the disorder in the nineteen ninety s she says Mesa Fonje is really devastating to families. If your mother, and your child has is a means of phony person in this sibling is the trigger you trying to stop this one from eating and this one from reacting. It's just absolutely awful, the national institutes of health calls Mesa Fonje, a chronic condition, and the causes unknown. More research is needed to understand it. But for people who have me Safaniah, they need strategies. Now Johnson says for one don't force everyone to sit around the dinner table together have a buffet. Style everybody eats where they want. But why don't you plan the big event of a family day called taking hike going up to a waterfall going bowling? Of course. People suffering from me Safaniah can't totally avoid their trigger noises. So Johnson suggests try wearing headphones to flood the ears with pleasant sounds or mindful breathing, but the most important advice comes from Eli's. Mom, Kathy Rapp, if your child complains of these symptoms, don't dismiss them. It sounds bizarre. But it's very real and a family's help. I think is critical to helping somebody live a fuller. Life April, Fulton NPR news, Los Angeles when older people have dementia. It's commonly assumed that they have Alzheimer's disease. But that is not the only form of dementia. There are other causes NPR's. John Hamilton reports on why it's important to get the right diagnosis when Julie Schneider was training to be a doctor in the nineteen eighties. Nineties dementia was simple. We were taught that almost all. Alzheimer's disease. And that there wasn't other things going on in the brain today. Schneider is a professor at the rush Alzheimer's disease center in Chicago last week. She served as scientific chair of a summit on dementias at the national institutes of health. Schneider says one key message from that summit is that dementia can have many causes these include strokes a form of Parkinson's and a disease that damages brain areas that regulate emotion and behavior, we still believe that Alzheimer's is important, but these other pathologies are also important Alzheimer's is associated with plaques and tangles in the brain. But Schneider says a different culprit causes Lewy body dementia which affects more than one million people in the US. It's these little aggregates called Lewy bodies, which were first identified in the brains of people with Parkinson's disease and Schneider says people with Lewy body disease can expect different challenges than people.

Julie Schneider Marcia Johnson Alzheimer's disease Alzheimer Mesa Fonje Safaniah Los Angeles Rachel Martin NPR Julian Jaffe mood disorder April Fulton Parkinson Kathy Rapp throat clearing US Portland
"marcia johnson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:10 min | 3 years ago

"marcia johnson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Steve Inskeep. And I'm Rachel Martin the sound of someone chewing or smacking gum can be annoying. But for some people these noises trigger instant, rage or panic. This is not just an excellent trysofi. It is a real condition, and it's called me. So. Sonja? Here's NPR's April Fulton when eighteen year old Ellie wraps. It's down to dinner. This happens. My heart begins to pound, I go one of two ways. I either start to cry or just get really intensely angry. That's because the sound of her family chewing creates an automatic and extreme emotional response. She has to eat in another room. It's really intense. I mean, it's as if you're going to die, and she's been experiencing this intense reaction to certain noises since she was a toddler, but it wasn't until middle school. When her mom showed her an article about something called me. So phony that she was able to put a name on it. I said this is what I have this is it. She started seeing Jillian Jaffe psychotherapist in Los Angeles. Who specializes in research, phony a- Jaffe says the most common triggers for people like L E R mouth noises chewing is almost universal gum chewing is almost universal. They also don't like the sound of throat clearing coughing. Sniffing. It could also be humming tapping pen clicking sometimes just the sight of someone chewing is enough to cause a panic attack. It's as if the survival part of the brain thinks somehow it's being attacked, and this prompts the fighter flight reaction. Now not much is known about. It was only given name a few years ago and people who have it often think they're going crazy. Many doctors have never heard of it. And if people do talk about their symptoms, they're dismissed or diagnosed with a mood disorder, but a small study published recently suggests that the brains of people with me Safaniah actually react differently to certain sounds Philip gander studies, how the brain makes sense of sound at the university of Iowa we pretty convinced that we found some very good evidence for relating this disorder to particular patterns of brain activity when researchers put people in an MRI scanner and played trigger sounds like chewing and eating. He says you could see the difference. Let me Safaniah group the activity was far greater in particular areas of their. Brain. And they showed classic signs of stress their heart rate increased. And also their palms were sweating more. It was phenomenal. It was the first piece of research that showed our our population that what they have is real. That's Marcia Johnson. She's not just in Portland, Oregon. She was one of the first to recognize the disorder in the nineteen ninety s she says Mesa Fonje is really devastating to families. If you're a mother, and your child has is a means of phony person, and this sibling is the trigger you trying to stop this one from eating and this one from reacting. It's just absolutely awful. The national institutes of health calls me Safaniah, a chronic condition, and the causes unknown. More research is needed to understand it. But for people who have me Safaniah, they need strategies. Now Johnson says for one don't force everyone to sit around the dinner table together have a buffet style. Everybody eats where they want. But why don't you plan the big event of a family day called take? Ding, hike going up to a waterfall going bowling, of course. People suffering from me phony can't totally avoid their trigger noises. So Johnson suggests try wearing headphones to flood the ears with pleasant sounds or mindful breathing, but the most important advice comes from Eli's. Mom, Kathy Rapp, if your child complains of these symptoms, don't dismiss them. It sounds bizarre. But it's very real and a family's help. I think is critical to helping somebody live a fuller. Life April, Fulton NPR news, Los Angeles when older people have dementia. It's commonly assumed that they have Alzheimer's disease. But that is not the only form of dementia. There are other causes NPR's. John Hamilton reports on why it's important to get the right diagnosis when Julie Schneider was training to be a doctor in the nineteen eighties and nineties dementia was simple. We were taught that almost all dementia Alzheimer's disease, and that there wasn't other things going on in the brain today. Niger is a professor at the rush Alzheimer's disease center in Chicago. And last week she served as scientific chair of a summit on dementias at the national institutes of health. Schneider says one key message from that summit is that dementia can have many causes these include strokes a form of Parkinson's and a disease that damages brain areas that regulate emotion and behavior, we still believe that Alzheimer's is important, but these other pathologies are also important Alzheimer's is associated with plaques and tangles in the brain. But Schneider's has different culprit causes Lewy body dementia, which affects more than one million people in the US. It's these little aggregates called Lewy bodies, which were first identified in the brains of people with Parkinson's disease and Schneider says people with Lewy body disease can expect different challenges than people with Alzheimer's. You couldn't be more rapidly declining. You might have more motor problems, more falls, gate changes balanced problems. Sleep problems, hallucinations, many of these symptoms can be treated, even though the underlying disease can't be Dr Walter Coronets directs the National Institute of neurological disorders and stroke. He says frontal temporal dementia damages areas of the brain involved in personality and behavior. He says that can lead to tragic misunderstandings. If family members don't know, the cause not infrequently the spouse thinks that this house is just not worth being married to anymore, and they they believe it's a psychological thing. And they get divorced and later there's a lot of guilt. One preventable. Cause of dementia is stroke says Rodrick Corvo a program director at the NIH one third of the people who have strokes. Go onto have dementia preventing strokes is about preventing damage to your brain. Curve says people who've had one stroke can often avoid a second by taking blood thinners and controlling their blood pressure..

Alzheimer Marcia Johnson Julie Schneider Alzheimer's disease Safaniah Los Angeles NPR Jillian Jaffe Steve Inskeep Rachel Martin Parkinson April Fulton Sonja mood disorder Kathy Rapp Ellie hallucinations Mesa Fonje
"marcia johnson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:14 min | 3 years ago

"marcia johnson" Discussed on KCRW

"It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Steve Inskeep. And I'm Rachel Martin the sound of someone chewing or smacking gum can be annoying. But for some people these noises trigger instant, rage or panic. This is not just an eccentric as it is a real condition, and it's called me. So phony a-, here's NPR's April Fulton when eighteen year old D wraps, it's down to dinner. This happens. My heart begins to pound, I go one of two ways. I either start to cry or I just get really intensely angry. That's because the sound of her family chewing creates an automatic and extreme emotional response. She has to eat in another room. It's really intense. I mean, it's as if you're going to die, and she's been experiencing this intense reaction to certain noises since she was a toddler, but it wasn't until middle school. When her mom showed her an article about something called me Safaniah that she was able to put a name on it. I said this is what I have this is it. She started seeing Jalen Jaffe, a psychotherapist in Los Angeles. Who specializes in Mesa phony a- Jaffe says the most common triggers for people like Ellie our mouth noises chewing is almost universal gum chewing is almost universal. They also don't like the sound of throat clearing coughing sniffing. It could also be humming tapping or pen clicking. Sometimes just the sight of someone doing is enough to cause a panic attack. It says if the survival part of the brain thinks somehow it's being attacked, and this prompts the fighter flight reaction. Now not much is known about. It was only given a name a few years ago and people who have it often think they're going crazy. Many doctors have never heard of it. And if people do talk about their symptoms, they're dismissed or diagnosed with a mood disorder, but a small study published recently suggests that the brains of people with me Safaniah actually react differently to certain sounds Philip gander studies how the brain makes sense of sound at the university of Iowa we pretty. Convinced that we found some very good evidence for relating this disorder to particular patterns of brain activity when researchers put people in an MRI scanner and played trigger sounds like chewing and eating. He says you could see the difference. Let me Safaniah group the activity was far greater in particular areas of their brain. And they showed classic signs of stress their heart rate increased. And also their palms. Sweating more. It was phenomenal. It was the first piece of research that showed our our population that what they have is real. That's Marcia Johnson. She's not Yala just in Portland, Oregon. She was one of the first to recognize the disorder in the nineteen ninety s she says Mesa Fonje is really devastating to families. If you're a mother, and your child has is a means of phony person in this sibling is the trigger. You try to stop this one from eating and this one from reacting. It's just absolutely awful. The national institutes of health calls me Safaniah, a chronic condition and the causes. Unknown. More research is needed to understand it. But for people who have me Safaniah, they need strategies. Now Johnson says for one don't force everyone to sit around the dinner table together have a buffet style. Everybody eats where they want. But why don't you plan? The big event of a family day called taking a hike going up to a waterfall going bowling, of course. People suffering from pneumonia can't totally avoid their trigger noises. So Johnson suggests try wearing headphones to flood the ears with pleasant sounds or mindful breathing, but the most important advice comes from Eli's. Mom, Kathy Rapp, if your child complains of these symptoms, don't dismiss them. It sounds bizarre. But it's very real and a family's help. I think is critical to helping somebody live a fuller. Life April, Fulton NPR news, Los Angeles when older people have dementia. It's commonly assumed that they have Alzheimer's disease. But that is not the only form of dementia. There are other causes. Is NPR's John Hamilton reports on why it's important to get the right diagnosis when Julie Schneider was training to be a doctor in the nineteen eighties. Nineties dementia was simple. We were taught that almost all dementia Alzheimer's disease, and that there wasn't other things going on in the brain today. Schneider is a professor at the rush Alzheimer's disease center in Chicago. And last week she served as scientific chair of a summit on dementias at the national institutes of health. Schneider says one key message from that summit is that dementia can have many causes these include strokes form of Parkinson's and a disease that damages brain areas that regulate emotion and behavior, we still believe that Alzheimer's is important, but these other pathologies are also important Alzheimer's is associated with plaques and tangles in the brain. But Schneider's has different culprit causes Lewy body dementia, which affects more than one million people in the US. It's these little advocates called Lewy bodies, which were first identified in the brains of people with parking. Disease and Schneider says people with Lewy body disease can expect different challenges than people with Alzheimer's. You're going to be more rapidly declining. You might have more motor problems, more falls, gate changes balanced problems. Sleep problems, hallucinations, many of these symptoms can be treated, even though the underlying disease can't be Dr Walter Coronets directs the National Institute of neurological disorders and stroke. He says frontal temporal dementia damages areas of the brain involved in personality and behavior. Me says that can lead to tragic misunderstandings. If family members don't know, the cause not infrequently the spouse thinks that their spouse is just not worth being married to anymore, and they they believe it's a psychological thing. And they get divorced and later there's a lot of guilt. One preventable. Cause of dementia is stroke says Rodrick Corvo a program director at the NIH one third of the people who have strokes. Go onto have dementia preventing strokes is about preventing damage to your brain. Carbo says people who've had one stroke can often avoid a second by taking blood thinners and controlling their blood pressure. John.

NPR Julie Schneider Alzheimer Alzheimer's disease Marcia Johnson Safaniah Los Angeles Steve Inskeep John Hamilton Jalen Jaffe Rachel Martin April Fulton mood disorder Mesa Fonje Kathy Rapp throat clearing Portland Oregon Rodrick Corvo
"marcia johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:12 min | 3 years ago

"marcia johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Steve Inskeep. And I'm Rachel Martin the sound of someone chewing or smacking gum can be annoying. But for some people these noises trigger instant, rage or panic. This is not just an eccentric trinity. It is a real condition, and it's called me. So phony a- here's NPR's April Fulton when eighteen year old alley raps sits down to dinner. This happens. My heart begins to pound, I go one of two ways. I either start to cry or I just get really intensely angry. That's because the sound of her family chewing creates an automatic extreme emotional response. She has to eat in another room. It's really intense. I mean, it's as if you're going to die, and she's been experiencing this intense reaction to certain noises since she was a toddler, but it wasn't until middle school. When her mom showed her an article about something called me Safaniah that she was able to put a name on it. I said this is what I have this is it. She started seeing Julian Jaffe, a psychotherapist in Los Angeles. Who specializes in Mesa. Fonje Jaffe says the most common triggers for people like Ellie R mouth noises. Shoeing is almost universal gum chewing is almost universal. They also don't like the sound of throat clearing coughing sniffing. It could also be humming tapping or pen clicking. Sometimes just the sight of someone chewing is enough to cause a panic attack. It's as if the survival part of the brain thinks somehow it's being attacked, and this prompts the fighter flight reaction. Now, not much is known about me Safaniah. It was only given a name a few years ago and people who have it often think they're going crazy. Many doctors have never heard of it. And if people do talk about their symptoms, they're dismissed or diagnosed with a mood disorder, but a small study published recently suggests that the brains of people with me Safaniah actually react differently to certain sounds Philip gander studies how the brain makes sense of sound at the university of Iowa we pretty. Convinced that we found some very good evidence for relating this disorder to particular patterns of brain activity when researchers put people in an MRI scanner and played trigger sounds like chewing and eating. He says you could see the difference. Let me Safaniah group the activity was far greater in particular areas of their brain. And they showed classic signs of stress their heart rate increased. And also their palms were sweating more. It was phenomenal. It was the first piece of research that showed our our population that what they have is real. That's Marcia Johnson. She's not just in Portland, Oregon. She was one of the first to recognize the disorder in the nineteen ninety s she says me Safaniah is really devastating to families. If you're a mother, and your child has is a means of phony person, and this sibling is the trigger you trying to stop this one from eating and this one from reacting. It's just absolutely awful, the national institutes of health calls me, Sonia, chronic condition, and the causes. Is unknown. More research is needed to understand it. But for people who have me Safaniah, they need strategies. Now Johnson says for one don't force everyone to sit around the dinner table together have a buffet style. Everybody eats where they want. But why don't you plan the big event of a family day called taking hike going up to a waterfall going bowling, of course. People suffering from me funny can't totally avoid their trigger noises. So Johnson suggests try wearing headphones to flood the ears with pleasant sounds or mindful breathing, but the most important advice comes from Eli's. Mom, Kathy Rapp, if your child complains of these symptoms, don't dismiss them. It sounds bizarre. But it's very real and a family's help. I think is critical to helping somebody live a fuller. Life April, Fulton NPR news, Los Angeles when older people have dementia. It's commonly assumed that they have Alzheimer's disease. But that is not the only form of dementia. There are other causes. NPR's John Hamilton reports on why it's important to get the right diagnosis when Julie Schneider was training to be a doctor in the nineteen eighties. Nineties dementia was simple. We were taught that almost all dementia Alzheimer's disease, and that there wasn't other things going on in the brain today. Schneider is a professor at the rush Alzheimer's disease center in Chicago last week. She served as scientific chair of a summit on dementias at the national institutes of health. Schneider says one key message from that summit is that dementia can have many causes these include strokes form of Parkinson's and a disease that damages brain areas that regulate emotion and behavior, we still believe that Alzheimer's is important, but these other pathologies are also important Alzheimer's is associated with plaques and tangles in the brain. But Schneider has a different culprit causes Lewy body dementia which affects more than one million people in the US. It's these little aggregates called Lewy bodies, which were first identified in the brains of people with parking. Nsen disease and Schneider says people with Lewy body disease can expect different challenges than people with Alzheimer's. You couldn't be more rapidly declining. You might have more motor problems, more falls, gate changes balanced problems. Sleep problems, hallucinations, many of these symptoms can be treated, even though the underlying disease can't be Dr Walter Coronets directs the National Institute of neurological disorders and stroke. He says frontal temporal dementia damages areas of the brain involved in personality and behavior. Me says that can lead to tragic misunderstandings. If family members don't know the cause not infrequently the spouse thinks that their spouses, just not worth being married to anymore, and they believe it's a psychological thing. And they get divorced and later there's a lot of guilt. One preventable. Cause of dementia is stroke says Rodrick Corvo a program director at the NIH one third of the people who have strokes. Go onto have dementia preventing strokes is about preventing damage to your brain. Carbo says people who've had one stroke can often avoid a second by taking blood thinners and controlling their blood pressure..

NPR Julie Schneider Alzheimer Safaniah Alzheimer's disease Marcia Johnson Los Angeles Steve Inskeep Rachel Martin Julian Jaffe April Fulton mood disorder Kathy Rapp hallucinations throat clearing Portland Oregon Rodrick Corvo Mesa