35 Burst results for "March"

Biden slips into political quicksand amid Haitian migrant buildup

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

07:46 min | 2 d ago

Biden slips into political quicksand amid Haitian migrant buildup

"Starting off the show. Tonight we have a discussion about joe biden. Apparently he's doing more deportations than trump specifically deporting more asylum seekers than trump did well. Yeah we don't have the other categories of deportations as the numbers that That we came across. And it's a shocking number. I don't know the entire number. But i have here the us Moved over six thousand. Haitian asylum-seekers from the border at del rio so that's just haitian asylum-seekers just recently with you know the whip's did see that. Oh i saw that very scary stuff. There was ice agents. I guess they're ice. Sported patrol agents. Scroll on horseback whipping people catalyst. Yeah like cadillac. Wrangling them with whips and hitting them with the long whip. It looked incredibly frightening and in and scary to be in that situation with a bunch of armed men on horses attacking people who are just trying to escape the hellish life of living in haiti. And do you think the biden voters expected this to happen because the people on the left like biden love to position themselves as the friend of the immigrants they acted like trump was the worst for immigration and right immigration. I mean right. When joe biden got elected like somebody. I know got a deportation letter. Just and they're telling him oh. It's been a lot worse recently under biden. They told him that his friends sorry like his friends. That like is also a legal immigrant. Types may know some other people like that well according to the same place that you're looking here. It's says twitter account. Aj plus they're citing cnbc saying that biden is using what's called title forty two to expel asylum-seekers without a right to a hearing so you know what asylum is right. Yeah when you leave somewhere that is you're gonna die there or they're gonna put you in prison for the rest of your life or thereafter you for for whatever reason and the numbers here are just shocking. According to cnbc under trump and remember trump had four full years. And we're not even through year number one biden four hundred and forty th over four hundred. Forty thousand people were Were expelled under this title. Forty two during the trump administration and six hundred ninety thousand have been expelled under the biden administration under title forty two so that's a tremendous level of increase because if if biden is able to keep up the same amount over the next three years. Yeah he'd be like twenty four hundred weight. It was six hundred ninety thousand right now so yeah that'd be well over two million people well so you know that is just absolutely horrifying because these people if they are indeed being prosecuted or persecuted. They're going to be sent back to likely their deaths or likely to a prison cell. Yeah it's probably worse for you if you try to leave and then they find out about that absolutely it is. Let's see there's other story here from cnbc biden. Administration appeals judges order. This is from less than a week ago to stop. Expelling migrants under trump era pandemic policies. So there was a judge who said they need to stop using title forty. Two and biden is appealing so this is yet another example of how joe biden is more like trumpy than the trump haters thought. That trump was like people hated trump for all these different reasons and biden has continued trump's policies and crank them up. Yeah my friend. Sent me this weird video of biden today. It was him when he was younger. You know he. He's always been in government office. So i don't know what his title was at the time but he was being interviewed. Probably a senator or something. Yeah and he was saying he was saying. What do people think. I care more about bosnia than haiti because it's white people in bosnia and it's you know black people in haiti and then he just went on and said well if haiti sank into the ocean. I wouldn't care just like that was his answer to that was like what is that supposed to mean. Well i'll tell you clear what it means. It means he has no empathy right to say that about another an entire group of people living somewhere on the planet to say they just if they just all died one day he would have no concern whatsoever for that and you juxtapose that against what he says while he's running for office which is to make himself seem like this all caring. Oh the democrats we care about people that's clearly. Bs tel aviv From penn and teller thought he was going to heal us all with his love. Is that what taylor said. Y- you read that on the show. It was numbered teller's lider new saying let pendulum but tell her was going along with pen from what i could see. So presumably teller didn't disagree otherwise he wouldn't have been in the photo op. Yeah just mixed them up. Sorry according to the story here. Cnbc biden administration appealing. A judge's order to stop using a trump era pandemic policy that allows for the rapid expulsion of migrants without giving them a chance to apply for asylum. So they're using covert as the excuse. The departments for his just cove it. That's why we had to have horseback riders with the because of it. It's just you covered. The department of justice filed an appeal of district. Judge emmet sullivan's ruling thursday bars. The federal government from expelling migrants under the public health law known as title. Forty two sullivan. The ruling to go into effect in fourteen days the appeal is the latest move by the bided administration to address the twenty year high surge of migrants from mexico and central america crossing the border illegally which remains a political flashpoint between republicans and progressive democrats title forty two is first introduced by donald trump in march of twenty twenty over concerns about the corona virus pandemic. It gave the government the power to turn back any migrant caught crossing the border illegally regardless of their country of origin to supposedly stop cove nineteen. So if you had managed to escape from north korea and you made it to the united states which is no easy task. Mind you. it's one thing to get here from haiti or guatemala. Or duress or something. It's a whole other story to get here from north korea. But if he'd managed to and they caught. You did it cover. Nineteen you gotta go back to north korea and you back to north korea where you would certainly either be put into a hellish prison labor camp and then of course all your family members have probably already been put into a prison labor camp. Because that's what they that's how they roll over north korea. If you try to escape or you do something bad. They punish your whole family for it. So you know you're going to prison and it's going to be like the worst possible prison labor camp experience basically on the planet right now if they don't just go right ahead and just summarily execute you but this quote from a man at the border a haitian man with two children. He says the. Us government

Donald Trump Joe Biden Mexico North Korea SIX Taylor Twitter Central America Guatemala Two Children Forty Thousand People Fourteen Days Four Full Years Del Rio Today Bosnia March Of Twenty Twenty Six Hundred Ninety Thousand Over Six Thousand
Democrats Try to Distract From Real Border Issues With Pathetic Whipping Charade

Mike Gallagher Podcast

03:05 min | 5 d ago

Democrats Try to Distract From Real Border Issues With Pathetic Whipping Charade

"Would. this crisis. Did biden has at the border. Fifteen thousand nearly fifteen thousand illegals just just marching into the country and camp out under a bridge in del rio texas. I was thinking yesterday morning. The democrats needs something to distract the american people's attention from this catastrophe. Because this is a. This is a dumpster fire. This is a huge huge crisis. Everybody knows they sure know it. So what can happen. That will distract from the crisis of illegals pouring across the border. Yeah a border patrol agent on horseback with the reins of the horse and according to social media and now the left the beast. The beast has decided that border. The border patrol agent who was caught on video on his horse was whipping. Haitian immigrants you know like a like a a remnant of slavery like an image of slavery of slaves being whipped. Oh yeah that's exactly. They found their distraction. Listen to chris cuomo last night on cnn because thankfully they think we got something to take. Americans minds off of this catastrophic situation. In del rio texas the texas mexico border with thousands of haitian illegals. Many of whom are kobe positive. The guy the horseback that should do the trick. Right chris chris cuomo. We really are in the throes in this country. A- figuring out who we are what we're about and i was taken aback by a single image. That should make you pay attention to a problem. This one a lot here. Yeah as an image to me. It does smack of bygone era of slavery aided by reports of people being beaten whether with a riding crop where the rains most likely you may be drawn to the desperation of the man trying to escape others and the desperation of keeping our borders safe of what i believe the former president tried to depict the brown menace at our border is that one of the most sickening things you've ever heard. Is that not one of the most disgusting thing. So now they're going to investigate the border patrol agent on a horse they'll spend more time investigating a border patrol agent. Trying to do is damn job. they'll be. They'll be more disciplined meted out to that border patrol agent on horseback. Then there will be the actual illegals who are breaking our laws and storming into the united

Del Rio Texas Chris Cuomo Biden Chris Chris Cuomo CNN Mexico United
Maskless San Francisco Mayor Caught Breaking Health Order at Local Club

Mike Gallagher Podcast

03:08 min | 5 d ago

Maskless San Francisco Mayor Caught Breaking Health Order at Local Club

"You realize the democrats are capable of. Electing somebody like london breed. Now i know san francisco is wild. I get it it's a it's a. It's a world unto itself. Most americans can't relate in any way shape perform to the antics of san francisco and maybe a great example of that is the woman who runs the city. The mayor so she held a press conference this week over the firestorm of controversy. She's facing her own city ordinance. Which is one of the strictest ordinances in the country requires masks indoors whether you're vaccinated or not now. You got to hear her explanation. This is classic. This is a typical. This is the gavin newsom. French laundry thing all over again. This is chris. Cuomo caught on tape marching through his apartment building without a mask on confronting bicyclist south in his house in the hamptons when he's the middle of fighting kovin. These guys are such a joke but consider this woman. The mayor of one of america's most famous prominence cities. I give you the mayor of san francisco explaining why she violated her own. Strict mask mandate inside the city. Jazz club incredible musicians who performed and who really uplifted the spirits of not just myself but all of the people who were there and from my perspective you know i was there i was eating and i was drinking and i was sitting with my friends and everyone who came in there was vaccinated so the fact that we have turned this into a story about being massless. No i'm not gonna sit in. Put my mask on sip and put my mask on sip input mask on. Eat input my mask on. Well i'm eating and i'm drinking. I'm gonna keep my mask off and yes in in time. Why we're drinking like everyone else. There we were all having a good time and again all vaccinated so the fact that this is even a story. His sad got better. Where's the pit about feeling the spirit. Oh we got the. We left the best part out. She felt the spirit she wanted to move. She was feeling this get them. I'll play that clip. Maybe for alfredo ortiz. Because we let the best part out. She was feeling the spirit. She's having a good time and she was vaccinated. Never mind that. The city ordinance literally requires vaccinated people to wear a mask indoors. But she's the mayor

San Francisco Gavin Newsom Cuomo Hamptons Jazz Club London Chris America Alfredo Ortiz
Secretary of Homeland Security Alejandro Mayorkas Promised Open Borders

Mark Levin

01:23 min | 6 d ago

Secretary of Homeland Security Alejandro Mayorkas Promised Open Borders

"What he said A while back, right? This is the same secretary Andrew Mayorkas. That said, Listen. We're not telling you not to come to the United States. We're just saying Don't come right now. And this was at a time when the pandemic was really like, out of control. And it was for like, five minutes when he was saying Don't come right now. Right. It was it wasn't as forceful as came alive as the vice president, who when she said, she said, I'm telling you don't come right should have got that one. That's a funny audio, but She was more forceful in it, and she took heat for it. Mayorga says What he wants to say he doesn't take heat for anything. But so that's what he said today. Now he went on today and I think we have the clip from earlier this year in March when he said, I'm not saying that the countries don't come right. We are not saying Don't come. We are saying don't come now because we will be able to deliver, uh safe and orderly process to them as quickly as possible. Oh, safe and orderly. Yeah. Do you really think somebody saying I'm just saying Don't come. Just don't come right now, because we want to make this safe and orderly. Do you think anybody's going to listen to somebody that talks that way? I know I'm not. I'm just okay. Excuse me, sir. Step aside. I've got some border crossing to do, And that's exactly what they did, because he's literally opening the door. He's opening the border, and he's doing it at the command of the commander in chief, Joe L. Barbosa.

Andrew Mayorkas Mayorga United States Joe L. Barbosa
COVID has killed about as many Americans as the 1918-19 flu

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 6 d ago

COVID has killed about as many Americans as the 1918-19 flu

"Cope with nineteen has now killed about as many Americans as what's considered the worst pandemic disease in human history the Spanish flu pandemic a century ago killed an estimated six hundred seventy five thousand Americans coated nineteen has now claimed roughly the same number the population then was about a third of what it is today meaning that pandemic took a much a bigger toll but researchers say covert nineteen stole we'll grow the university of Washington's influential model projects another one hundred thousand American deaths by January first they're averaging about nineteen hundred a day the highest level since early March about two thirds of the U. S. population has received at least one vaccine dose Sager made ani Washington

FLU University Of Washington U. Sager Ani Washington
Even CNN's Jake Tapper Is Calling Out Anthony Fauci These Days

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:28 min | 6 d ago

Even CNN's Jake Tapper Is Calling Out Anthony Fauci These Days

"Ouchi is so discredited at this point. Even jake tapper calls them out over the weekend on cnn. Jake tapper is trying to get foul ci to his belief that boosters are needed for everyone now and who knows about boosters. i read an article about antibodies. And how the rich are supposedly running around getting antibody tests all the time to try to stay on top of that issue and it is. It is a kind of a reasonable question. Where are your antibody. What's your antibodies level. After a vaccine after the shot. And i know there's different types. The one is the mr a or the md anna supposedly part of the virus. So if i got the johnson. Johnson vaccine in march will my blood tests show antibodies. Now i don't know and this article said that people that have access to you know concierge medicine doctors. They're running off getting antibodies tests. What does that tell you somebody. I know that had that had coverted. I've shared this with you lot. It's anecdotal but it's true doesn't have any antibodies. According to her blood test

Jake Tapper Ouchi CNN Johnson
China's Evergrande Collapse Would Have 'Profound Consequences'

Wall Street Breakfast

01:27 min | 6 d ago

China's Evergrande Collapse Would Have 'Profound Consequences'

"Possibility of china property company ever grand is leading to concerns in markets. This morning as we saw shares of ever grant are off more than eleven percent today at the stock has fallen more than eighty percent this year as it struggles to meet debt payments. The company has more than three hundred million dollars in debt and has warned about default. It has a eighty three million dollar payments due on thursday for a march. Twenty twenty two bond according to reuters and this is leading to concerns of a domino effect as this would have an effect on other china and hong kong property developers and a systemic effect on the rest of the economy. That's according to jenny. Zang co head of asia fixed income at alleanza bernstein quote in the offshore dollar market. There is a considerable large portion of developers who are implied to be highly distressed. Zang said on cnbc. These developers quote can't survive much longer. If the refinancing cheinal continues to be shut but she played down the possibility of ever grant being akin to the collapse of lehman brothers noting that the fragmentation of the china property market is much less involved than lemans

China Zang Co Alleanza Bernstein Reuters Hong Kong Jenny Zang Asia Cnbc Lehman Brothers
R. Kelly Behavior Mirrors Abuse Tactics, Expert Witness Says

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 6 d ago

R. Kelly Behavior Mirrors Abuse Tactics, Expert Witness Says

"Prosecutors in the R. Kelly sex trafficking trial are expected to rest their case today in New York after one more witness I marches are a letter with a preview psychologist John Hughes who is an expert on abuse of relationships will be back on the witness stand for cross examination Kelly's legal team is expected to begin laying out his defense later today Kelly has pleaded not guilty to racketeering charges that accused him of running an enterprise of employees who helped him recruit and transport young victims for unwanted sex Kelly has said his alleged victims were groupies who wanted to take advantage of his fame and money closing arguments could happen before the end of the week

R. Kelly Kelly John Hughes New York
US Launches Mass Expulsion of Haitian Migrants From Texas

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:57 min | 6 d ago

US Launches Mass Expulsion of Haitian Migrants From Texas

"The. Us flu haitians cramped in texas border town back to their homeland on sunday and try blocking others from crossing the border from mexico in a massive show of force that signaled the beginning of what could be one of america's swiftest large-scale expulsions of migrants or refugees in decades more than three hundred twenty migrants arrived in port-au-prince on three flights and haiti said six flights were expected on tuesday in all. Us authorities move to expel many of the more than twelve. Thousand migrants camped around bridge in del. Rio texas off to crossing from mexico. The only obvious parallel for such an expulsion without an opportunity to seek asylum was in nineteen ninety-two when the coast guard intercepted haitian refugees at sea. Similarly large numbers of mexicans have been sent home during peak years of immigration but over land a not so suddenly central americans have also crossed the border in comparible numbers without being subject to mass expulsion although mexico has agreed to accept them from the us the pandemic related authority in effect since march. Twenty twenty when the border was closed on sunday. The migrants initially found other ways to cross nearby until they were confronted by federal and state law enforcement. Mexico said on sunday would also begin deporting haitians to their homeland. A government officials said the flights would be from towns near the us border and the border with guatemala where the largest group remains haitians have migrating to the us in large numbers from south america for several years. Many having left the caribbean nation after a devastating twenty ten earthquake. Some of the migrants at the del. Rio cam said the recent devastating earthquake in haiti and the assassination of president. Moe's made them afraid to return to a country that seems more unstable than when they left.

Mexico Rio Texas America FLU Haiti AU Texas DEL Guatemala Rio Cam Earthquake South America Caribbean MOE
How Long Can the Jan. 6 Capitol Rioters Be Locked Up for Trespassing?

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:16 min | Last week

How Long Can the Jan. 6 Capitol Rioters Be Locked Up for Trespassing?

"What's worse january. Six or stranding americans intentionally in afghanistan. What's worse if you're if you're one of those you know hyperventilating about january six and you think those people on a rotten jail for the rest of their lives and seriously. How long are you supposed to be locked up for trespassing. How long are in january six. Let's see this is timber seventeenth. How many people are still in jail. Because they put their feet up on nancy. Pelosi is desk. I get it bad thing to do. Punish them arrest of charges. Lock them up for the rest of their lives. Do you know how the fear of god has been put into these people and their families how their lives have been destroyed because of their stupidity on january six. Now you could argue. That's as it should be because what they did was a really stupid thing and it was. They became useful idiots for the beast. Those few hundred people became useful idiots for the media machine and the democrat apparatus and biden and all of us liars who pretend now january. Sixth is pearl harbor times nine eleven times ten. They gave them an opening to vilify trump and make him look like he orchestrated it which of course he did not had nothing to do with it. So now there are acting offense again around the capital because there's going to be a few hundred people marching around with signs tomorrow. Complaining about the people locked up still on trespassing charges. Well two things could be true at the same time the protesters tomorrow going to dc would be right in objecting to people rotting under the jail for the rest of their lives because of january sixth. It's also true that what the people did on january sixth was idiotic

Afghanistan Pelosi Nancy Biden
We Must Own Our Complicity in Afghanistan

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:55 min | Last week

We Must Own Our Complicity in Afghanistan

"The united states shame right over its precipitous sprint out of afghanistan shadow this country's conscience for generation every horror story and they will keep coming is partly the result of our decision to bug out the death and destruction that occur in previously secure parts of that country will be on the bipartisan decision to exit the fiasco of president biden ordered quick march out of the country with its arbitrary deadline and false proclamations of the heroic airline effort. Airlift effort will garner the most shame but barack obama and donald trump all wanted the same thing they wanted out to all three presidents lacked. What abraham lincoln possessed and george w bush often display the strenght to shoulder. The suffering of war brought home in dead and wounded. Young soldiers sailors airmen and marines the country. Tired of it too. We do not have the ability to fight a long war. Even with minimal casualties be because for us. There is no such thing as a minimal casualty. We can take station troops on board. We peacekeeping missions in kosovo but we cannot endlessly endure the loss of american life to enemy combatants so we left but our greatest centers to have left without first overseeing an exodus of those who were desperate to run from baruch theocracy. We did a portion of the saving at the last minute and those tens of thousands who did escape will be forever grateful for the eleven marines. One navy cormon and one army soldier who gave their lives at those refugees might live but for twenty years. We pretend it all of us at some sort of middle ground might emerge between the darkest midnight and the dawn of democracy. Turns out there wasn't such a middle ground and yet we owed an exit to those who relied on falso.

Biden Afghanistan Donald Trump George W Bush Abraham Lincoln United States Barack Obama Kosovo Baruch Navy Army
Wonder of the Seas to Debut in US and Europe, Not China

Cruise Radio News Briefs

00:30 sec | Last week

Wonder of the Seas to Debut in US and Europe, Not China

"Royal caribbean has announced that. Its upcoming mega ship. Wonder of the seas will no longer be debuting. In shanghai china the oasis class vessel will now make her first. Voyages in the caribbean starting in march wonder will operate seven seven night. Eastern and western caribbean sailings from port everglades. All featuring a stop at perfect day in may the ship will then head to europe to operate. Seven-night western mediterranean cruises. Wonder of the seas is royals fifth oasis class vessel and is currently the largest cruise ship in the world

Royal Caribbean Shanghai Western Caribbean Port Everglades Caribbean China Western Mediterranean Europe
Rep. John Garamendi Starts Biden Damage Control on Gen. Milley's Alleged Treason

The Dan Bongino Show

01:52 min | Last week

Rep. John Garamendi Starts Biden Damage Control on Gen. Milley's Alleged Treason

"Let's start here. Let's go to cut one. This is a hapless California Democrat John Garamendi, Um, again a complete zero. Um, a guy who realizes treason may have been committed and the Democrats were involved in a coup. That's not even a possible that that's a definite that they were involved in a coup. They admitted it, I'll show you a tweet. I'll read a tweet for you in a second from CNN. But here's Garamendi, hapless California Democrat defending Millie's decision saying, you know It's no big deal. We'll take a look. But this isn't a big already running damage control. Check this out. Key General Milley called a secret meeting in his Pentagon office of top military brass and basically said to them if you get calls, no matter who they're from, there is a process here. There is a procedure no matter what you're told. You do the procedure. You do the process and I'm a part of the procedure. Meaning he didn't want them. Responding really two calls from the commander in chief. Unless he was involved as a member of the Armed Services Committee. Do you see that as an end run somehow around the commander in chief? Or course Trump was, uh, unhinged by the election by his loss in the election, and he displayed that, uh, clearly from the evening of the election right on through to today, and he remains unstable with regard to his election loss. He clearly was deeply engaged in the 2000 election. 1000. January 6th insurrection He brought those people he encouraged them to come and he had done encouraged them to march on the capital. All of that is known. The investigations of all of this will are underway now. This select committee is delving into all of these communications.

Garamendi John Garamendi General Milley California Millie CNN Pentagon Armed Services Committee Donald Trump
Facebook Accused of Knowingly Ignoring Risk to Teen Girls From Instagram

KILF Morning New Podcast

01:01 min | Last week

Facebook Accused of Knowingly Ignoring Risk to Teen Girls From Instagram

"A wall street journal is out with a story about instagram pointing to research that it causes real harm to some teenage girls. Now it's not just the wall street journal pointing this at what the wall street journal is pointing out. Is that dave received internal slides like basically a slide show powerpoint presentation presented to facebook and instagram. Back in twenty nineteen two years ago saying things like thirty two percent of teen girls say that they feel bad about their bodies. Instagram made him feel worse. Of course also in two thousand nineteen teenagers blame instagram for increases in the rate of anxiety and depression. Here's what's why the stories relevant. Because in march of this year so two years later mark zuckerberg the congress says while the research we've seen. Is that using these apps. Connect with other people can have a positive mental health benefit. Maybe the key words there are can have sure yeah. That's very carefully crafted but still it sure is kind of misleading

A Wall Street Journal The Wall Street Journal Instagram Dave Facebook Mark Zuckerberg Anxiety Depression Congress
Becoming Technology Forward and Data Reliant in Marketing with Roku's Sweta Patel

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

02:13 min | Last week

Becoming Technology Forward and Data Reliant in Marketing with Roku's Sweta Patel

"How do you think about driving. Growth within marketing. And what do you feel like has changed over the years And the businesses that you've worked in can i. It's a really really complicated place to be right now to be a marketa it not only. Do you need the traditional side of marketing. But you really need to be technology forward and data the line. I think i think of them in three buckets like the way i look at these. Three levers are just kind of poke into a minute. And i looked at them in every job that i've had but it's just gotten much worse. Not only is is in enough growth to be had but you'll losing resource is having to just become more and more efficient and those three things i tend to focus on. Everything is moving so foster and humans can't keep up with it. I mean you need to be able to mock it and deliver personalized experiences at i. Cool at the speed over tick-tock swipe if you get to the consumer that quickly especially five years from now the relevance of you being around is just is just going to get northern and then with talking about like things like ticked off. The media. Landscape is so fragmented right. Keep her on instagram. In their own take talkin will watching. Tv they're watching multiple devices. And so you warm often channels than we've ever had before people are all over the place and they need to get to them quick us. So that's a challenge at roku the way we're trying to handle these things is we've really started to invest into a crm. And so all go. But before i got here we have channels. You know what they call multichannel marketing. We did that. Everyone's trying to do that and everyone's trying to do on me channel marketing but the way we're focusing about is really trying to now and get the power about platform out and one of my roles here at here. At roku is becoming hyper focused on really building tools automations so that the marches can actually be feeding the systems and and making the systems v. The brains of what we do is all this manual curation and execution that needs to happen.

Roku
COVID-19 Cases Climbing, Wiping out Months of Progress

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | Last week

COVID-19 Cases Climbing, Wiping out Months of Progress

"Covert nineteen deaths and cases in the U. S. have climbed back to where they were over the winter wiping out months of progress the U. S. is averaging over eighteen hundred covert nineteen deaths a day the highest since early March along with one hundred and seventy thousand new cases per day that's the highest since late January and both figures have been on the rise over the past two weeks the case is driven by the delta very and combined with resistance among some Americans to get vaccinated are concentrated mostly in the south well one time hot spots like Florida and Louisiana or improving infection rates are soaring in Kentucky Georgia and Tennessee fueled by children now back in school loose mass restrictions and low vaccination levels actually after

U. Delta Louisiana Florida Kentucky Georgia Tennessee
Jeff Bridges Says Tumor Shrank, COVID 'in Rear View Mirror'

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | Last week

Jeff Bridges Says Tumor Shrank, COVID 'in Rear View Mirror'

"Actor Jeff bridges says his cancer is in remission and he's recovering from a difficult bout with covert nineteen I'm marches are a letter with the latest Jeff bridges writes on his website that his tumor that was twelve inches is now the size of a marble he also says he and his wife Susan guest and came down with covert nineteen in January while he was undergoing chemotherapy bridges says his wife spent five days in the hospital while he was hospitalized for five weeks as he puts it he was getting close to the pearly gates because of his compromised immune system bridges says he had a tough recovery and needed oxygen to walk around but he got well enough to walk his daughter down the aisle and dance at her wedding

Jeff Bridges Susan Guest Cancer
Some of Broadway's Biggest Shows Reopen Tonight Like Hamilton

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | Last week

Some of Broadway's Biggest Shows Reopen Tonight Like Hamilton

"Some of Broadway's biggest shows reopen tonight like Hamilton The Lion King wicked and Chicago Alexander Hamilton Hamilton creator and star tweeted out with my dog this morning a kind neighbor walked by and whispered happy opening night Lisbon well Maranda went on and we say it's real so grateful happy opening night Broadway abruptly shut down in March because of the pandemic Chicago is also re opening covered vaccinations are required for all theatregoers performers and anyone working there masks are also required but there's no social distancing many more shows open later like Diana which first streams on Netflix before its Broadway debut in November Julie Walker New York

Alexander Hamilton Hamilton Maranda Chicago Hamilton Lisbon Diana Netflix Julie Walker New York
"march" Discussed on WLRN News

WLRN News

12:25 min | 6 months ago

"march" Discussed on WLRN News

"March of 2010, the jazz professors performing live at the UCF Orlando Jazz Festival, and you probably recognize no more blues, also known as chicken is dodgy. The jazz props Well, Jeff Rupert on tender with pear Danielsson at the piano. Marty Meriel drumming Bobby Colby on guitar and bassist Richard Drexler again. The jazz professors, theologies called Life from the UCF Orlando Jazz Festival. Is Jesse Jones Jr. Mm hmm. Right? Metal. Thank you. Yeah. All right. Brothers, Jesse Jones Jr. And Melton was.

Richard Drexler Marty Meriel Bobby Colby Jeff Rupert March of 2010 Melton UCF Orlando Jazz Festival Jesse Jones Jr. Danielsson
"march" Discussed on Cyber Security Headlines

Cyber Security Headlines

02:25 min | 6 months ago

"march" Discussed on Cyber Security Headlines

"Temporary fix for windows ten printing crashes following the installation of the march twenty twenty one cumulative on patch tuesday some windows. Ten customers have been experiencing a blue screen of death crash when trying to print. According to microsoft. This issue affects a subset of type. Three printer drivers and does not affect printer drivers that are type four printer brands impacted by this known issue include kyocera rico and dynamo microsoft suggests that affected users uninstalled the march updates but if they are unwilling to do so it is also offering a temporary workaround security agencies leak sensitive data by failing to sanitize pdf files in a research paper published this month. The french national institute for research in computer science and automation i n r a otherwise pronounced us in. Ria said security agencies are doing a poor job at sanitizing. Pdf documents that they published on their official websites and are leaking troves of sensitive information that could be collected and weaponized in future maller attacks in rio collected and analyzed almost forty thousand. Pdf files published on the websites of seventy-five security agencies from forty seven countries. And we're able to recover sensitive data from seventy six percent of the files. They analyzed including the author's name and email address device details and file path information. The research also revealed that nineteen of the security agencies had not updated their software for over two years most in cores. Beer production disrupted by massive hat the brewer which makes miller and coors products said in a filing with the securities and exchange commission that on march eleventh. It experienced a systems outage that was caused by cybersecurity incident. It further stated that the incident has caused and may continue to cause a delay or disruption to parts of the company's business including its brewery operations production and shipments and quote most course operates seven breweries and packaging plants in the us three in canada and ten in europe. Thanks for listening to this episode of cybersecurity headlines. If you wanna hear conversations about the topics that we cover every day on this show you will definitely want to check out our weekly see so series video chats every friday at ten. Am pacific one pm. Eastern. we've got a preview of this week's chat.

march eleventh canada dynamo Ten customers forty seven countries microsoft europe one pm seventy six percent march twenty twenty one seventy-five security agencies over two years Three printer drivers ten this month this week kyocera rico tuesday seven breweries forty thousand
"march" Discussed on The Slow Newscast from Tortoise Media?

The Slow Newscast from Tortoise Media?

02:00 min | 7 months ago

"march" Discussed on The Slow Newscast from Tortoise Media?

"The pointed caution that characterize the prime minister's lockdown exit plan on february twenty-second and differentiated sharply from previous promises of swift emancipation. I want to be frank about exactly what that means and be tradeoffs involved. I would be buccaneering is you. Put it with With people's lives right gradually to replace the protection afforded by lockdown. Our approach is to move with the utmost cab you've got to be humbled in the face of nature it is important and so to be to be cautiously cautiously cautious. This class reckless approach. To unlocking the country was intrinsically sensible. Johnson wants this to be the last lockdown and has been steered towards a less buccaneering approach in general by a new cohort of advisors but the change was also to a considerable extent the consequence of a specific concern that has not been hitherto reported according to one source. Close to the pm. What happened was this. The scientists told boris that the next month looked like a variant minefield that the genomic evidence made them very wary about february and march and what surprises the virus might have in store. Of course they could. Well be wrong but the warning definitely got under his skin. This many even the reopening of schools on march the eighth was at risk a risk in the end. The boris johnson decided he had to take but tests conditions written into the whole lockdown plan. No accident apprehension about new and existing variants is present everywhere in the strategy. The trip wires and emergency brakes everywhere to enable the pm to slow down or halt the knocking process. And if you're wondering why you won't be able to go to your local pint. Before may the seventeenth at the earliest note towards kent south africa and brazil. Fear of the mutants looms launch. The.

Johnson brazil march february next month kent south africa february twenty-second seventeenth one source johnson prime eighth
"march" Discussed on The Slow Newscast from Tortoise Media?

The Slow Newscast from Tortoise Media?

06:10 min | 7 months ago

"march" Discussed on The Slow Newscast from Tortoise Media?

"The fastest spread in the south east of england by this stage hancock and his boss. The prime minister were finally persuaded the kentish variant was the culprit and with good reason by december the nineteenth. It was clear. The new flavor of covid was much more easily transmitted a bleak reality. The drove boris johnson to impose tier for restrictions on a million people across london and eastern and southeast england. Move tags early analysis suggests the new variant could increase the are by not point four or more and although this considerable uncertainty it may be up to seventy percent more transmissible. Then the old very original version of the disease the two-week curfew let's the cancellation of millions of christmas. Day family gathering at any hope that the tier four restrictions would get. The virus under control was quickly. Dashed january the fourth. The prime minister announced the third lockdown with great reluctance. But in the face of ming evidence. From chris witty the chief medical officer answer. Patrick valance the government's chief scientific advisor. The was what they called a material risk of the health service being overwhelmed by the number of covert admissions with most of the country already extreme measures. It's clear that we need to do more together to bring this new variant under control while our vaccines a road in england. We must therefore going to a national lockdown. Which is tough enough to contain this berend. That means the government is once again instructing you to stay at home by now. A nagging voice in the back of ministers minds was growing ever more insistent as one put it to me. Why the fuck didn't sage us sooner. If the scientists knew the details of the. ken barrington. october. Why did they wait. Till december two you know. Let us know in private the scientists. Reply that this sentiment shows how much the politicians still have to learn about public health policy. According to one sage expert look we have the best nomex capacity in the world with constantly mapping the variance more than any other nation. Half of all covid sequencing in the world. We didn't have enough data and october to say with any confidence that this particular variant was the cause of the spike. In cases the same source added the better question. People might like to ask is why weren't ministers interested in various until so late in the year. And why didn't they actively see kara advice on the subject in which context. Let's return to that extraordinary statement by died a harding to the science and technology committee on february third that nobody could have predicted the kentish variant later in the same hearing the committee's conservative chair. Great clock invited to revisit this remark now under in this session. Brunson said that quote. We've seen the new variant emerge which is something none of us were able to predict. What did you just like to reflect on that and was it not possible. Is it not possible to be primed and ready to respond actually two mutations which most scientists we've heard from across the Felt was not only likely over certain. Well i think on the basis that this country is absolutely at the leading edge of genomic sequencing we are better placed than i would argue any other country in the world to be able to sports mutations and to then predict which ones will cause material problems which ones ones what i was referring to earlier is predicting exactly when not is going to happen and therefore being ahead of the curve. That's much heart in other words died at harding who's successful businesswoman. But was in this case. Speaking on behalf of the embattled science public health community was saying to the incredulous. Mp's get off our back. This stuff isn't as easy as you political time. Servers reckon as so often in the pandemic story human foible and failure to communicate is as important as outright failure and there is exasperation on both sides. The politicians accused the scientists of giving them the wrong kind of advice. Oh the right condo advice but too late. The scientists throughout the hands in despair the short termism of the politicians and the inability to walk and chew gum at the same time but the criticism leveled in private by some of the scientists is even more damning. It is this. The boris johnson and his team were not only uninterested in variants of the virus until the problem was jammed in front of their faces. They had also managed to create a dream context for mutation as we've seen viruses always evolve their subject to what's called selective pressure if we try to shut them down the look for evolutionary escape hatches changing and altering in response to any new circumstance or context but there are a context that they're specially love. They can have great fun in the body of an infected individual patient morphing and transforming in the course of one wretchedly long stay in hospital what they really relish though the coronavirus playground. If you like is a context of high case rates the more people that are infected even without symptoms the greatest scope. The pathogen has to biological dance and try on new genetic costumes. So the most damning charge against the government is at the ferocious emergence of the kentish. Variant was the consequence of bad decisions taken earlier in the year as one. Sage member says if we had looked down a week or ten days earlier the first time in march it would make all the difference. We might have had a chance at least a chance of nipping. The whole in the bud instead..

Patrick valance february third Brunson december the nineteenth england london december two two-week chris witty january the fourth october both sides boris johnson hancock third lockdown first time million people two mutations millions christmas
"march" Discussed on Books and Boba

Books and Boba

10:25 min | 1 year ago

"march" Discussed on Books and Boba

"Back to another soaks. Bobo of the Pope and treatments by Asian and Asian American author minds. Marvin you're and I'm re-re you and it is our mid-month episode are locked down for March. Twenty twenty We're recording this on Friday. The Thirteenth March twenty twenty. It's probably a couple of days afterwards but we are in the middle of I. Guess Super Flu season here in La and across the world. I guess. How're you doing Rita doing okay? I work at a bookstore so it has not been a good time for for authors in independent bookstores and just small businesses in general But I'm glad that like bloggers and podcasts. Like us are picking up the slack. I guess and promoting books. That should been on tour this month. Ya for community how you doing. Are you keeping keeping healthy? I mean do you have your month's supply of toilet paper like everyone else getting right now have you seen. The lines are costal. It's insane. I saw it insane and also like do you really need that much toilet paper even for like a month supply. I think that is that is exceedingly too much. It's really annoying. Yeah like for for me. I GO GROCERY SHOPPING. Like maybe like once every week and a half. I never really by any more than I need. So it's it's just been really really annoying to just see people online talking about how much they went how. They went to trader Joe's and everything like wiped clean. And I'm like this is not helping a lot of families who can't afford to buy groceries until they get their paycheck and elderly folks who can't have access to the food that they need like it's like I have like my own hot takes on it and it's just been me like for the past few days. It's just been me on twitter just like getting angrier and angrier because of people selfishness and just like how bad our country has just been like with the testing and not having an available. It's just been a mess and of course because I have family in Korea I get updates and it's like why can't we have the drive through testings here like nationwide? Why is that? No why is that not possible? Why do we not have the? Who's free testing? It's it's it's a lot. I have a lot of anger over it but I'm I'm just really glad that there are books that exist these types of situations. Where you're in lockdown. I mean I was thinking about it. It's kind of a little frightening. How accurate some of these books have been predicting what a reaction to a pandemic would look like and of course you know. We've learned nothing from reading these books. We have not come together and work together towards the common good. We are all looking after ourselves. And that is harrowing. Yeah go listen to our severance filing Ma discussion and also interview with Mike Chen. The author of a beginning at the end. Yeah it's it's quite something but like you said there's never been a better time to curl up with a good book Especially since we're going to be spending a lot of time by ourselves in the near future Case in point in case you haven't noticed. This is the first time in the while that we were and I have recorded remotely. I am recording from my house. Rearrest recording from hers Because the studio that we usually used in downtown. La is on lockdown but Okay and let's get into our book deals for March Twenty Twenty Re-re why don't you start us off our right in a three book deal? Holt acquired surviving the wild by author illustrator. Remmy lie the author of Pie in the sky inspired by True Events. This early reader graphic novel series comprises stories of animals heroically escaping. Dangerous situations that have arisen due to man made environmental changes the publication of the First Book Bima. The elephant is planned for twenty twenty two. I wish I had like early reader. Graphic novels growing up. I had one. I think I mentioned this. Before it was like a collection of Jules Verne's hills But I am the only thing that I had these kids. They have a good. You know I feel like they're like in a couple of years. Maybe there might be like an early reader series about surviving pandemic and just like how to prepare and you track. I'm just saying that that is something that might happen. In the course of so many authors being cooped up in their house with you know just Theaters that's true next up. Aladdin acquired debut middle great author Jenner Unions Korea. Methology inspired novel Leah Park and the missing jewel pitched as Harriet. The spy meets race to the Sun. This contemporary finally follows a twelve year old. Who was a part of a magical spy organization and must use her skills as she chases clues with your best friend to rescue her parents from an evil diviners spirit. Publication is scheduled for summer. Twenty twenty two re-re. Do you know which career mythology this is inspired by. Not a clear. Nothing with joy. I think we've mentioned as like multiple times on those podcasts. My my knowledge for Korean mythology and folklore almost non-existent ninety two. And that's about maybe it's a social world where it's like you have like the Fox spirits and the what do you guys call Goblins in the whole k. Drama Potter Right. Yeah took maybe yeah. Yeah but but the English title is Goblin Magical spy organization. I mean there were spy networks In like quote Unquote Futile Korea. So it might just be like a spin on that. I don't know sorry. I'm like a very uneducated person when it comes to Korean mythology. Yeah I have nothing to contribute. One of our listeners can witness or we can talk to one of these days. Yeah so next up little. Be Yellow Jacket. Bought North American rights to writer food long and illustrator and Rica's graphic novel black blood in a world where magic is outlawed a young age versus the Kingdom of Aliyah to rescue his sister. Publication is set for fall. Twenty twenty one a lot of magic. I love it. We need it. We need a desperately time coming out until two thousand twenty one okay. That's for though next. Inky wordpress acquired debut author Kylie Baker's the keeper of the night and it sequel set in nineteenth century Japan that is haunted by the goddess of death. The novel stars a half reaper. Have Sheena Gami copy between her two worlds and belonging to neither as she fights monsters and struggles for acceptance. Publication is set for fall. Twenty twenty one way so half reaper. Have Schnitt gummy. So like is that like some sort of hopper situation where you're half lake the Western death and half the the eastern gotTA death. I'm not sure it wasn't really clear. If like half the half Chigney Gami part was just like Explaining what should he got me was a three per half. She got me but like I am not sure that is probably what it is because there is a common in between the two so. I totally read that wrong. I thought it was going to be a battle between death. And he's a nominee the Japanese of death and this this percents pick sides. This is still cool. I guess not. Yeah I mean like there's a lot of cool stuff out there. That's based on like shinnied. Gummy Lor like. That's always call like bleach and like you. Hawker show which bleach ripped off their soul eater. There's lot there's also death node obviously lots of good stuff to pull from. But if you think about it are we always haunted by? The God of death is in a constant state of being. Just think about well in these times against so so deep Marvin next up MC Eldery Books Bought Twenty Twenty Morris Award Finalist Nafisa Assads. Why a novel? The wild ones a broken anthem for a girl nation. The novel is a multi perspective feminist narrative about a fierce band of magic wielding girls. The wild ones who have survived unspeakable things and are determined to save other girls from the cruelties and tragedies they have had to endure. Publication is set for summer. Twenty twenty one. I feel like there are a lot of these stories coming on now involving like a is which organizations like I think I think like May Matt like Magic Organization has always been part of literature. It used you're seeing an uptick for the next year or two years. Judging by like the book deals that people have been getting cool. Our next deal. Harpercollins acquired North American rights to NBA. A newbery honor author tank lies. I Picture.

Twenty twenty March Twenty Twenty Twenty Twenty Morris La Marvin Bobo Rita twitter Jules Verne Chigney Gami Korea Magic Organization Sheena Gami Harpercollins Joe Holt NBA Remmy
"march" Discussed on Unspoken Stories: A March of Dimes Podcast

Unspoken Stories: A March of Dimes Podcast

11:52 min | 2 years ago

"march" Discussed on Unspoken Stories: A March of Dimes Podcast

"It wasn't safe to hold off on her medication any longer but that meant giving up breastfeeding. I kept asking for an extension extension because the breastfeeding was going so well and I didn't WanNA stop. Stop just the idea that my body was really working for me and doing what I wanted it to do. Even though that was happening my m._S. Mass was like making another decision for me and so I had to go back on my medication and then he was struggling with new food and having a bad tommy how me and having a lot of reflux and so he was crying more and sleeping less and so it's just like this whole trickle down Afaq. Those are the moments where I still get kind of frustrated castrated. I wish my body would just show up for me right now. Now that her disease was interfering with a relationship with her children she had had it and she did what a lot of us is due. When we're feeling alone she opened instagram. When you're vulnerable it actually is a sign of strength and it's a sign of power so I decided decided to take that moment whereas feeling really emotional vulnerable and post about it. She wrote all my fellow Mommy's deal with M._S. or anything that causes them to.

reflux
"march" Discussed on Unspoken Stories: A March of Dimes Podcast

Unspoken Stories: A March of Dimes Podcast

13:05 min | 2 years ago

"march" Discussed on Unspoken Stories: A March of Dimes Podcast

"I feel like it was so devastating that the only way that I could talk about it without melting down was to see it as movie like it wasn't an happening to me but I had to separate myself from the pain of it because it was so admit my physical state didn't matter to me at that point because of what I had just experienced. I didn't realize how sick I was was. The emotional pain was compounded by the trauma of delivery Patina had lost so much blood she was going in and out of consciousness and it was her mom who noticed her haemoglobin test results were dangerously low. The normal range was twelve to fifteen miles about six so I had less than half of what I'm supposed to have. My mom really stayed on my mom was like you have to help her. You have to help my daughter. She's she's just gone through this so they they agreed that they would do a blood transfusion. I know for my own experience giving birth to my son that you have to advocate for yourself. I feel like if my mom was in there to advocate for me. I would probably have lost consciousness business. I may have suffered more health.

Patina
"march" Discussed on Unspoken Stories: A March of Dimes Podcast

Unspoken Stories: A March of Dimes Podcast

16:06 min | 2 years ago

"march" Discussed on Unspoken Stories: A March of Dimes Podcast

"The following episode contains graphic depictions of childbirth and miscarriage. Listener discretion is advised. I thought I was going to be a mom of two and I wanted that life really badly for myself. I felt like this was taken from me. I was I was supposed to have this life so I was determined to try to have a family. I'm Patina Dixon Jenkins and this is my unspoken store. Welcome to unspoken stories real stories of pregnancy parenthood and loss so often these stories go on shared but not anymore now. It's time for us to raise our voice and share our truth. I'm Tatyana Ali. I have a son at home who is two and a half and another baby on the way. When I I got pregnant I had no idea what was coming and to be honest? I was scared birth was something mysterious that happened behind the curtain. So my son's birth didn't go as plant. I was not only traumatized. I didn't think I could talk about it now. I kept it all inside but recently I opened up to a few of my close friends and the floodgates opened in their stories came pouring out I realized I would have healed a lot faster if my husband and I had just opened our mouths so I wanted to talk to other moms and DADS about their experiences because stories have the power to connect he'll and inspire today. We meet Patina. She's got to little ones at home. I.

Tatyana Ali Dixon Jenkins
"march" Discussed on King's Last March

King's Last March

02:54 min | 3 years ago

"march" Discussed on King's Last March

"We mean business now and we are determined. The gain, our rightful place involved. Oh. And I saw this whole thing is about we on engaged in a negative protests and in negative arguments within about it. We are saying that we are determined to be men. We determine to be people. We are saying. We out saying that we are God's too. And we have got to when we don't have to live like we are forced to live. Kinks last March is a production of American public media and APM reports support for kings. Last March comes from the old Seth family foundation working to improve community through support of the arts education, the environment and the under served to hear more speeches and see photos from king's final year. Please visit our website APM podcast dot org slash MLK. serious produced by Kate Alyssa me. Stephen Smith with Kate Osborn proce- piece. Interesting. It was edited by Kathryn winter. The technical director was Veronica Rodriguez with production help from Corey Schrapel. The executive producer is Nathan Toby. This is a PM American public media. If you're looking for more history, listening checkout history unplugged, it's hosted by Scott rank, and he looks at the forgotten stories that changed our world every week. He interviews bestselling authors and historical consultants for movies like Steven Spielberg's, Lincoln. He also dives deep into topics that range from medieval healthcare to spies during World War Two. You can listen and subscribe to history unplugged on your favorite podcast platform or go to history unplugged podcast dot com.

Nathan Toby Kate Alyssa Steven Spielberg Kathryn winter Kinks Corey Schrapel Kate Osborn Seth family foundation Veronica Rodriguez executive producer Stephen Smith Lincoln Scott technical director king
"march" Discussed on King's Last March

King's Last March

06:05 min | 3 years ago

"march" Discussed on King's Last March

"Where there are high concentrations of the people who I just mentioned. And we've also launched the survey online at black census dot org, and thus far even within a month, we've gathered five thousand responses from black people all over the country who are eager to be listened to and seen for the first time in a very. Longtime. We plan to use this data to be able to shift the way that institutions engage black people politically and to be able to shift the way that policy is developed and created as it relates to black lives. So in August, we will launch are black to the future public policy institute that will use the data from the black census project to inform new policies that legislate solutions for the problems that exist in our communities. I have what I think may be a final question for you, and it's this I've been. I've been thinking about you. I've been thinking about Martin Luther King and one of the other sort of dimensions of our documentary about him in our podcast is really about something that you touched on earlier, which is the fact that he was human and he struggled, and we get some glimmers of that in some of the final just some of the sir. Germans that he gave in the last year of his life that sort of reveal more of that inner suffering and and striving to be better. And and then I thought about you and the kind of leader that you are in the kind of work that you're doing and the range of people's deaths that have been protested sense. Just black lives matters was organized. And so I wonder about you as a person as a leader, how you cope in the dark moments. It's a great question, and as you know, I'm I'm in my own kind of personal dark moment. I'm losing my mother to advance stage brain cancer, and it has meant that. I'm transforming before my own eyes in terms of how I see and practice leadership. And certainly what I'm more aware of now, then I think I was even a month and a half ago when my mom got sick, I'm is that for many people who enter this movement, they come into it through their own sense of tragedy. And I think about people likes to fon Clark who was brutally murdered by police in Sacramento, California, just a few weeks ago, and I think about the very public grieving of his brother while on need you to be sorry. 'cause I can't do when I'm sorry. Okay. We tired of the sarees and the trying to explode our pain and all that. Okay. We're trying to move trying to bring peace and just one community centers. Research centers, libraries are all security things which get as result. For Stefan Clark, which together as and I have a lot of compassion and empathy for that because. I mean, I personally think that I have a lot more resources to be able to. Choose how public Migrelief is. But when someone has lost a family member to gun violence at the hands of police, the people that they believed. Keep them safe. I'm that public grieving. I'm is something that both capitalizes their leadership, but it also changes their lives. And for me as a leader in this moment where I am saying goodbye to my mother and watching so many people have to say goodbye to their loved one without the amount of time that I've had with her to be able to say goodbye is additionally heartbreaking in a way that has moved me and transformed me. I'm. Very rapidly and the thing that I am just really conscious of is how important it is for us to pay very close attention and resource and invest in. I'm tools that help people address the trauma. That often is what brings them into movements in the first place. And if we don't and we're not able to address in real authentic ways that trauma, I'm then it impacts movements themselves. And certainly, I think when we talk about king's legacy, we should be mindful right that most of the stories that we hear are not all of the stories that there were. And certainly some of the challenges that people had was dealing with grieving families. Who were catapulted into spotlights that they weren't prepared for. And frankly, if they were able to have their loved one back, they would trade that for their loved one in a minute. And so I guess for me as a leader. I'm reminded even more now that. There are many, many things that we are fighting for and that part of what we are fighting for is the right for people to live full and dignified lives and to not have their lives stolen from them before it is their time. We

Martin Luther King brain cancer fon Clark Stefan Clark Sacramento California
"march" Discussed on King's Last March

King's Last March

09:42 min | 3 years ago

"march" Discussed on King's Last March

"Of the founders of the black lives matter movement. And I'm curious how you think kings work and his legacy informs black lives matter. I think that kings work and king's legacy informs black lives matter in a number of ways. I am. And one of those ways in particular that I would just highlight is his commitment to civil disobedience and an understanding that business as usual would result in business as usual. And so you know please to Power that weren't backed themselves by Power would not produce any kind of fundamental change and in king's writing. You see his frustration with with the lack of movement that was created as a result of of the actions that he helped to lead. But he also let me say at this way. We remember king today as a venerated hero. He's almost reached sainthood status, I would say, and in reality towards the end of his life, king was attacked and not supported by a lot of people people that he thought were in his corner, and it is only now after his death years and years and years later that people see the importance of the work that he did and the sacrifices that he endured alongside many, many other people for us to get to this point. And I think with black lives matter, there are some similar tendencies, although I feel like black lives matter is just getting started. So it's hard in some ways to drop parallels in a way that is able to be retrospective about. You know, how do these things come together when when this movement is still very much in progress and process. But I can't say that I'm the the notion that we appreciate people when they're gone is something that black lives matter certainly endures rate. So during the height of protests that were happening in twenty fourteen and twenty fifteen. There was a lot of pushback and contention around whether or not these protests were necessary whether or not these protests would result in anything. And even still today, there are some of those sentiments rape and at the same time I think we're in a moment now, particularly with some of the most recent police killings or the recent of failed efforts to hold police accountable where people are getting much clearer that protest is absolutely necessary. That civil disobedience is absolutely necessary. And with the added. I was going to say something not good for the air with the Athen burden of the change in administration and the extreme ideology and viewpoints, and now of the president and his administration. I think it's becoming even more clear to people who may not have chosen aside in twenty fourteen or chose to stay neutral or silent that we have some real problems on our hands that if not resolved now will impact this country for many generations to come. If we are still around by, then I wanna circle back to women's leadership after king and SEAL see, as you know, of course, had an approach to leadership that was male dominated and organiz and a top down structure women as you also know, played a crucial role at the SEC not to mention the rest of the civil rights movement, but they weren't giving. A public platform. Black lives matter is an intentionally intersectional coalition with no, you know, centralized organized structure, right? And I'm wondering what you and your fellow activists are doing today as as leaders. What is your thinking about leadership are approached to leadership? Is that in order for us to win the transformations that we seek, we have to develop many, many leaders. We need to build a movement in the millions in order to counter the attacks on many of our communities. And so what that means is that we can't afford to kind of coalesce around a model that lifts up one leader who then can dictates what needs to be done to a massive people around them and their several reasons for this. I'm first and foremost. What we understand is that movement looks different in different places in the country. I live in Oakland, California, and there's no way that I could tell somebody in Saint Paul, Minnesota, what they should be doing to change conditions there. I don't know anything about Saint Paul, Minnesota, and they may not know anything about Oakland, California. But what we can do is build the capacity of each of us to be able to lead based on a deep understanding of time place in conditions, and we can also connect each other as leader so that we make sure that we're lifting up each other's fights and each other's visions and each other's demands. So that's one piece. And I think oftentimes black lives matter, and it gets described as leader lists, which I think is is amiss description of how we operate. In fact, we. Are driven by creating many, many leaders building the capacity of many people to lead so that we can't easily be stopped. Now, what we know about Dr. king's legacy is that he was assassinated. And when Dr. king was assassinated it, it had deep insult, beer impacts on the ability of that specific movement to endure in the way that it had because everything was organized around him. Similarly with leaders like Malcolm X who were assassinated. These are targeted strategies to destabilize and derail movements that are successful. So really what we see ourselves doing is learning from lessons of our past so that we can actually solve different problems this time out this time around. We don't want our movement to collapse because you. One or two anointed leaders were taken out, and therefore people are disoriented and unclear about how to move forward. In this case, we have many leaders that have a number of different strategies that make sense for their particular geographical locations, their particular community dynamics. But what we do is connect those leaders across boundaries across geographies. I'm so that we can be bigger than the sum of our parts. You recently launched the black futures lab which focuses on electoral politics. What is the goal of this new project and how does it how does it intervene in the politics you have just described the politics of now, the black futures lab is geared towards building independent, progressive black political Power, and we aim to transform black communities in the constituencies that build Power in cities and states so that black people can make. Visions over our own lives. And so that we have an opportunity to live well and live powerfully and to be able to access the things that all people deserve to have. And we think that that is an incredible intervention because the current leadership in this country has a completely opposite agenda. And for us, it is about using the tools of electoral organizing to transform the status quo. But it is also about transforming those tools themselves to make them work better for black people and are unique and specific needs. So we just launched a black census project to better understand the ways in which black communities our selves are changing demographically and to be able to build an agenda for our lives that really reflects the complexities of who we are. So that means a focus on. On black people living in rural areas, black people who are immigrants, black people who are incarcerated and formerly incarcerated and black people who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered and gender non conforming. We are aiming to talk to two hundred thousand black people across the country about what we experience about how we act politically and most importantly about what we envision for our futures, and we are training one hundred black organizers to take this survey into twenty states where

Dr. king Oakland Minnesota California rape president Malcolm X Saint Paul SEAL SEC
"march" Discussed on King's Last March

King's Last March

07:28 min | 3 years ago

"march" Discussed on King's Last March

"About. How to take on contradictions in a way that propels us forward as opposed to keeps us stuck or keeps us moving backwards and I'll just give a quick example. This debate about violence versus non violence, for example, is an age old debate, and it is certainly not as nuanced as it could or should be. And we've seen that a lot over the last five years with the kind of explosion of the black lives matter movement, the movement for black lives and also other movements as well, right? We're not the only game in town, and I often think that these contradictions get weaponized in ways that are not intended to seek greater understanding, but are instead intended to critique progress. I think that a conversation around nonviolence is only. Only helpful if we're depending on what we're talking about specifically and how we understand what violence is and what violence is not for me protesting is not violence rate, but for others, they feel like protests are violent because they are, or they can be confrontational or they can be loud or disruptive or make people feel uncomfortable things like stopping traffic. Some people think that those are violent actions. I'm not somebody who agrees with that, but it also really depends for me on the context in which we're having the conversation. And I think that sometimes the push for nonviolence is really a push to say, you know, let the process unfold how it will and for someone who has lost a loved one to gun violence unnecessarily and unexpectedly to tell them to wait for a process. That may never happen is in of itself violet. And so I do think that there's a need for us right to use king's legacy to learn about how we grapple with the contradictions of this moment right where for example, many people believe that police in policing are intended to keep them safe, and there is a contradiction in how many police killings we have now become aware of where people don't feel safe around police because there are no checks and balances. And so I think there's a way in which we can use king's legacy to really examine how do we grapple with contradictions like that in ways that help us unlock new opportunities for action and forward motion as opposed to getting stuck into having kind of circular debates that don't get to the heart of the issue or that result in moving us back. Words like what's happening right now at the federal level with the department of Justice, for example, where their approach has been to double down in their support of law enforcement to dismantle policies that have been fought for for the last twenty five years to increase transparency and oversight over police in policing I'm in. And so there's a way in here that I think reclaiming king's legacy means really more deeply, understanding the ways that systems work and also understanding the ways through contradictions that fundamentally, if resolved could move us to a different place if we wanted it to. Garza, you are activist on a variety of fronts. And one of them is with the national domestic workers alliance in many ways. One would think that there are parallels between your work and that of Dr. king's, especially at the end of his life when he was trying to build a coalition of poor people for what he called a new front in the civil rights movement. But I wonder if we're falling into one of what you've cautioned us to think of as lazy parallels. I mean, is there, is there a line from king's work to yours in the domestic workers lions? There definitely is. And. I think that the domestic worker movement really needs to be credited to Dorothy Bolden and Dorothy Bolden was a black woman from the south. She was from Atlanta, Georgia, and she organized the very first domestic workers union in this country. That was one. This was in the nineteen fifties, and she did so because domestic workers during the nineteen thirties alongside agricultural workers were excluded from labor for most federal labor protections in this country. As a result of a racist compromise between labor leaders and southern lawmakers at the time and Dorothy Bolden is responsible for creating an organization for domestic workers that would not only address inept. Equities in wages and pay, but that would also fight to reunite his domestic work as work. Reunites is domestic workers as people and also fundamentally challenged systems of governance that were functioning in an undemocratic way as it related to black women in particular. For calls. And the reading was winning and the cost of making that cheering. I had to pay the same price lights. I have to frame same price, water. I have to pay tax at you. Do I have to pay. Bag is lacking had to close my cheering, which expect the damn me way make nothing that I said, but I wake Domo my knee. And I get. I see another woman on her knees. Dorothy Boldon's work can also be traced to the washerwoman strike of eighteen eighties, which was very similar process where women and women of color got organized to not only improve their lives, but to transform the industries and the communities that they lived in worked in. So I do think that where there are parallels that can be made in terms of kings work being an inspiration for other movements to emerge. I also can't help but know that it is often the narrative of history that men are credited often with the work that women do to improve the lives of all of us. And so I would say that the domestic workers alliance certainly sits within kings legacy, but I would be remiss if I did not also give credit and. Admiration to Dorothy Boldin who made sure that domestic workers could win rights, respect and dignity for for themselves and everyone. You're one of

Dr. king Dorothy Bolden Dorothy Boldon Dorothy Boldin Atlanta department of Justice Garza Georgia Bag twenty five years five years
"march" Discussed on King's Last March

King's Last March

08:11 min | 3 years ago

"march" Discussed on King's Last March

"We need to build a movement in the millions in order to counter the attacks on many of our communities. And so what that means is that we can't afford to kind of coalesce around a model that lifts up one leader who then can of dictates what needs to be done to a massive people around them. The American public media. This is king's last March. I'm Kate Ellis, and I'm Stephen Smith. For this final episode of the podcast, we spoke with Gaza one of the women credited with creating the black lives matter movement Garza is an activist on many fronts. She currently works for the national domestic workers alliance, which fights for labor rights for housekeepers, nannies, and workers who care for the elderly. Many of these workers are women of color. Gaza also recently launched the black futures lab, which is a project devoted to building black political Power. Among other things. The black futures lab is trying to mobilize black voters and to recruit progressive black candidates. So our podcast kings us March focuses on the last year of Dr. king's life in large part because that was a sort of forgotten year and his legacy, and it was the year that he officially broke with LBJ and voices opposition to the Vietnam war. And he really, really staked out ground in terms of tackling the ills of capitalism. So my first question for you is two pronged, which is how do you think the nation remembers, Dr. king and how do you think he should be remembered? Let me start with the how I think he should be remembered, which is that I think Dr. king should be remembered in the full complexity as he lived as a human being. And I think that that's important because it actually shows us a lot more about how important he is and was. To this country and to civil rights and to human rights as a series of movements. I think how Dr. king is typically remembered is in a fairly sanitized way that really strips the exemplary way in which he both progressed as a human being. And as he progressed in his thinking about what problems he was trying to solve and how he thought those problems might be solved in a way that could be enduring. So to give an example, I think, you know, I don't always look forward to Martin Luther King day because there are so many stories that are just not true about who he is who he was and what his impacts were. Oftentimes, Dr. king's legacy gets weaponized particularly against black people to encourage black people to be passive and. And his doctrine of nonviolence gets taken way out of context in the sense that it often gets read as being non-confrontational, which as we know from history, I'm king was incredibly confrontational in that. He believed that in order to create a moral shift in this country around race relations around racism and around class and economic divisions that you actually had to confront Power where it operated that was the entire point of citizens and marches and all of the direct actions that he led. They were fundamentally about confrontation in his letter from Birmingham. Jail king talks about how disappointed he is in what he calls the white moderate. And this letter is one of my favorites, and I read it every year, especially on Martin Luther King day because he says that essentially the white moderate has. As constructed his actions and his words in such a way that it translates to. The absence rate of confrontation rather than the presence of peace that comes from exposing where injustice operates. And I think that those words are really critical for us today given our political climate and the kind of moral questions at this country faces given the way that the world has evolved, are there aspects of king's philosophy or his leadership style that don't resonate with you or that you you would disagree with, or you would want to evolve from. That's a great question. You know, for me, I am of the opinion that what I take from king's legacy is the deep, an imperfect humanity that he displayed for everyone. And I think that that's a a huge sacrifice that deserves to be honored because the impacts of his. Very flawed and imperfect humanity. I'm. I think, have impacted generations following him. And when I think about him, I think about how. We place very unrealistic expectations on leaders to be superheroes with superpowers, that kind of transcend the very natural way in which we are flawed beings rate. So king himself was deeply flawed. I know they're, you know, after he died right there have been many stories that have emerged about, you know how his leadership style evolved over time. Some of the disagreements that existed within the movement around king and his highly visible profile. There was a lot of tension between king and Ella Baker, for example, around the approach to leadership and what it meant for everyday people who were not anointed as leaders. No, there are also conversations that have happened about, you know, his infidelity and what that meant about his abyss. To kind of stand in or on this moral high ground. But for me, I mean, I while acknowledged the ways in which all of those factors have problematic aspects to them. I'm also very clear that. He's deeply an imperfectly human and I have an appreciation for that. Now, with that being said, I think that. Every situation calls for specific strategies and specific tools based on time place in conditions. That's how I think about movement building. And that's how I think about organizing. And for me, I think that it is not as helpful to draw. What I think are generally like lazy parallels between the civil rights period which was actually a period of forty years to today. There's just very, very different conditions. People are existing in different. Time place in conditions, and especially with the. The integration of technology, I just feel like they're almost apples and oranges. So to me today, what I the ways in which I tried to think about king's legacy is what can we learn about.

Martin Luther King Gaza Kate Ellis Garza Stephen Smith Birmingham Ella Baker forty years
"march" Discussed on King's Last March

King's Last March

09:27 min | 3 years ago

"march" Discussed on King's Last March

"We often take on by time. Do you know those gentlemen of massive verbal persuasion? And they have a way of saying things to you that kinda get you in the bind. To be a man of the fiction. You must drink this whiskey in order to make your neighbor envious. You must drive this type of in order to not making love. You wrap this kind of lipstick, this kind of cute. And you know before, you know, just buying stuff, he spoke to the influence of advertisers whom he referred to as those gentlemen of massive verbal persuasion. So. Selective editing has been going on for quite a while. And I think also it's important to keep in mind that king was a critic of capitalism. And that does not mean to say that he was a communist. In fact, he was a critic of communism also that for most Americans, they don't see that there's a third alternative that you can reform capitalism, and that's what he wanted to do was to make it more humane. Yes. A lot of the things that he was advocating at the end of his life did not require the end of capitalism. It just met that he was demanding that the system recognize the problems that recreated, as I said before, it's been ten years since we worked with you so closely on the two thousand eight documentary about king's last year of life. And so much has happened since then. When we had the first black president, you might have noticed. And now we have a president who in some ways, as I think we've seen is not willing at least to disavow white supremacists. We've had some unraveling voting rights legislation, and we certainly are still struggling with incredible inequality. How do you make sense of king's legacy? Just in these last ten years. I think that after every great social movement, you have a retrenchment. Social movements are disruptive, you know, after the civil war and the passage of thirteenth fourteenth fifteenth amendment. We had a period in which the nation backtracked our, we call it the the end of reconstruction. When all these Jim crow laws were passed and and rather than black people getting the right to vote the entire social structure. Political structure in the south was based on the notion of denying votes to black people. So so it's not that uncommon that after the twenty years of after World War Two, when historically important movements were going on around the world to to gain citizenship rights know not only the end of the Jim crow system in the United States. But the end of colonialism in many places in the world, the end of the apartheid system, and those were disruptive and people who are part of the existing social order. That's. Getting disrupted tend to react by retrenchment that wanna go back to the old days before that before there were demonstrations before there were sit ins and before there were people like now max Martin Luther King, and you know, other people who disrupted their piece, you know, when President Trump talks about make America great. Again, to me, America became greater when these changes came about. But for many Americans, they wanna go back to the nineteen fifties where America was great and forget that for many people, it meant we were living under segregation. They re. That wasn't so great for all Americans. And I see that as part of a historical pattern, and now we're in a period where I think we're entering a period of increasing disruption as people realize that a lot of changes need to happen, especially when young people realize that the society could be more just where did you first? How did you first become exposed to Martin Luther King junior, if you will, where does that story start for you? I guess I grew up hearing about Martin Luther King. The freedom struggles of the fifties and sixties were the way I learned about the black community. I grew up in a small town in New Mexico where there only three black families. So whenever I read the newspaper and I saw some reference to black Americans, they would often be in connection with the Montgomery bus boycott the Little Rock nine. They were heroes of mine growing up the students who started the sit ins. And of course, you know, hearing about Martin Luther King. He was the most prominent figure to emerge during my teenage years. So I had heard about him a lot and and when I went to the March on Washington, he was the one who I knew was going to be the concluding speaker and the the highlight of the that that was when I was nineteen. And I, I saw him at the March on Washington impacted that have on you at the time. Well, you know, I get asked that a lot and and it wasn't so much kings particular impact because you know, he was an orator, I couldn't be like him. I definite-. We would not have gotten up in front of several hundred thousand people and gave speech, but the younger people, you know, right before the March. I met Stokely Carmichael few months after the March. I met Bob Moses. I started meeting people who were closer to my age and were active in the freedom struggle, and they were doing things I could imagine myself being involved in and eventually I was, you know, they were. They were involved with the student on violent coordinating committee. And when I went to Los Angeles, I became involved with a group called the non-violent action committee which was very much influenced by snick. Those were people who I, I saw more as role models, and I think that in some ways, king was trying to catch up with the movement. He was kind of like Gandhi, you know, I need to catch up with my followers in order to because I am their leader. That was certainly true with the young people. I knew they weren't waiting for Martin Luther King. They thought of themselves. We thought of ourselves as the vanguard of the struggle and saw Martin Luther King trying to catch up with us. But I think all of us had admired his ability to articulate a vision for our movement. I think one of the differences between activists and visionary leaders is that activism is often about just the immediate goal, a better seat on the bus. Being able to sit at a lunch counter. It takes visionary to say it's about more than that when I was at the March on Washington, when I was nineteen, many of us thought that the purpose of the March was to try to get John Kennedy's civil rights legislation through Martin Luther King didn't mention civil rights Bill. And that was typical of him. He wanted everyone to be aware that it was about more than that. We know that now we know that the Civil Rights Act of nineteen sixty four was not the end of the struggle. You, you realize that once you get. Get to sit at the front of the bus, that isn't enough, it never is off. It's always simply one step and a long process of becoming a equal human being. And you know that's a continuing process that never ends. Yeah. I think one thing about human rights as they can never be written down on paper, they're always being invented. There's always going to be something in the future. And I think that will always be the case. Next time on king's last March. There was this great graffiti it said, be realistic demand the impossible. And I think that what came was reminding us of is that is the meaning of nonviolent revolution that you are daring to attempt the impossible. Our interview with the late historian and activist Vincent Harding. Martin Luther King junior's, longtime friend and advisor kings last March is a production of American public media and APM reports support for kings. Last March comes from the also family foundation working to improve community through support of the arts education, the environment and the underserved to hear more speeches to see photos from king's final year. Please visit our website APM podcasts, dot org, slash MLK.

max Martin Luther King Washington America president black community Vincent Harding Stokely Carmichael Jim crow Montgomery United States Los Angeles New Mexico President Trump Bob Moses Gandhi
"march" Discussed on King's Last March

King's Last March

06:45 min | 3 years ago

"march" Discussed on King's Last March

"Way. We Entin to go on in search of that way. And I hope that you who loved and admired him would join us in fulfilling his dream. He's the one who takes part in the sanitation workers March that Martin wanted to take part in. And of course, you know, after Martin's death, she's the one who takes the lead in sustaining his legacy. And of course I wouldn't be doing the work that I'm doing today if not for her professor Carson, I wanna take us back to nineteen sixty three because for many people, Dr. king is sort of become frozen if you will, in time on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial delivering his. I have a dream speech. I have a dream. But one thing. This nation will rise up. Live out the true meaning of its creed. We hold these twos to be self evident that all men are created. And the fact that the speech is the most known. And you know, people often encounter thirty or forty, five seconds of it may have them believe that the dream was somehow fulfilled. What gets missed in the memory of that speech oversight of all think they should. Anyone should know who studied the speech is that he didn't plan to give the dream part of it. The the speech that he prepared was a speech that was in an African American tradition, pointing out the hypocrisy of the of the country of saying that here's a country that justified its own revolution by saying that committed to the ideals of life liberty and the pursuit of happiness for everyone not just for American citizens that that was a human right generations of black leaders have pointed out that, yes, here's a country. That says we are for equal rights, but routinely denies those rights. So I think that that's what the speech was about is he starts out by talking about the architects of the Republic. Nation. Capital throws catch a. When the architects of our Republic. Wrote the magnificent word. Itunes, and then the declaration of independence. Was finding a promissory note. With Everett American befall half. This no was promised all. Like men as well as Whiteman. The big Arron teed the go right of life liberty. And the pursuit of happening. You know, I I was involved in designing the king memorial and one of the things we knew about that site is that we could have king. Looking across the tidal basin. At the Jefferson immoral. And so Mike conception of of the memorial was king carrying on this symbolic dialogue with Jefferson also that when he says, when the architects of this Republic wrote the words of the declaration of independence, he would be addressing at least symbolically Thomas Jefferson who was one of the architects of the declaration of independence and and and a slave holder and slaveholders and making it clear that this is the great American dialogue between the ideal of freedom and democracy and equality that was part of the founding of the nation, but also the reality of oppression, systematic oppression of denial of rights of a. Society where injustice was in some ways endemic. So you see, that's the basic tension in American history, this tension between the ideals and the reality and the visionaries who want to change the reality into the ideal this year for the Super Bowl, Chrysler licensed Dr. king's drum major instinct sermon for a pickup truck at. Wonderful. If you want to be recognized. Recognize who is greatest among you. A new definition of what did you make of that? Well, I think in some ways that's what the nation uses king four. On the one hand, you can see that people who encounter the actual king found him very troublesome presence and his popularity by the end of his life. Even among black Americans had gone down. I think that it's difficult for Americans to accept the controversial king, but the moment he died. It was easy to create another king and it started right at the funeral that many of the prominent political leaders who showed up at Martin Luther King's general a week earlier would not want have wanted to be photographed with him, and the people who are actually working with king couldn't get into the funeral. So almost immediately, Martin Luther King became kind of a symbol for on the unfinished business of the movement, but for the success of the movement. So America could look at king as the symbol for where we once had this race problem. But Martin Luther King helped solve it it, it's it was a convenient way of emphasizing the dream and forgetting about, you know what? What we're all those beaches he was giving during the last three years, his life, we'll just consign those to the historians. Well, in talking about selective memory, the drum major instinct speech itself is a critique of advertise, right? We

Martin Luther King king memorial Lincoln Memorial professor Thomas Jefferson Jefferson Carson Arron Whiteman America Mike conception Chrysler five seconds three years one hand
"march" Discussed on King's Last March

King's Last March

05:40 min | 3 years ago

"march" Discussed on King's Last March

"Helping. A man of another rates came bomb. You got down from his beach, decided not to be compassionate by proxy, but it got down with them administered first aid and help the man in need these ascended up saying, this was the good man. This was the great man. You can't just pass it by. And that's what he was saying about the sanitation workers, what he was called to come and help them. He, he felt that he had an obligation. So to me, I, I see his life as being very consistent. Right? And that some of these dichotomies that have been placed around ideas of who was radical and who wasn't in a sense, are contemporary contemporary framing, look to remember that any movement against injustice is seen as radical, you know, when you think about it, if someone had said in the middle of the eighteenth century, that my goal is to eliminate slavery in any place in the world. So that no person will be a slave that would have been seen as a radical goal because slavery had existed since the beginning of civilization, it was one of the definitions of civilization, yeah, practically every society that had slaves. So the idea that you could eliminate the institution of slavery. It was radical, but yet it was accomplished in in the lower one hundred years. We define things as radical because that's where we are in our historical perspective. I wonder if you can bring Kereta Scott King in to the picture. I think sometimes she's sort of occasionally if people haven't been looking carefully seen as a shadow character, the woman behind the man, but is that an incorrect understanding of her? I think that's definitely the case. I think that there was always that sense of she was the the wife and then the widow. And that's the way most people saw her. And I had a chance to know her for twenty years. And I, I saw different person and the more I learned about her, the more I realized that she was an activist before she met Martin Luther King. She was actually much more politically active than he was at that time. She had been involved in the Progressive Party. Movement of the nineteen forties. She had been involved with the N W P and protest activity. She was involved in the peace movement during the nineteen fifties and sixties. She was more outspoken on the war in Vietnam that he was and took a stand earlier than he did when she met Martin in nineteen fifty. Two. I I remember her telling me that when I said when I met Martin, he had a lot of ideas in his head, but he had never done anything. And she was two years older than Martin and Martin had gone to college. But he had gone to Morehouse while living at home under the in the shadow of his father who wanted to protect him from kind of controversy. Oh political activity. He had been gone to Crozier theological seminary in a small town. On and Pennsylvania with few opportunities for political activism of any kind. So it's only after Martin gets to Boston and meets Kereta that she opens his eyes to people like Paul Robeson who Kereta new Martin P was an icon of the progressive movement and the fact that she emerges as a an active as Enron, right? It's gradual because she does reluctantly take on the role of staying at home, raising the kids and allowing Martin to be the person out front. But by nineteen sixty two, she's suggesting I need to join you in jail. And by the time of the cell modem Montgomery March, she's marching by his side. She's the one who meets with with Malcolm X and early nineteen sixty five when she goes to Selma and by the. End of Martin's life, she is interaction right? An activist. She's the one who a week after Martin's assassination. She and her children go to Memphis eve as she is mourning. The death of her husband. Often told the children that. If a man had nothing that was worth dying for, then he was not fit to live. He said also that it's not how long you live, but how will you. He knew that at any moment, his physical life could be cut short. He gave his life for the poor of the world. The garbage workers of Memphis, and the peasants of Vietnam. He gave his life in search of a more excellent way. A more effective way. Creative rather than a destructive way.

Martin Martin Luther King Kereta Scott King Vietnam Memphis Progressive Party Martin P Crozier theological seminary Pennsylvania Morehouse Enron Malcolm X Paul Robeson Boston Selma one hundred years twenty years two years
"march" Discussed on King's Last March

King's Last March

06:55 min | 3 years ago

"march" Discussed on King's Last March

"From American public media. This is king's last March. I'm Stephen Smith and I'm Kate Ellis. He died. It was easy to create another became kind of a symbol for dot, the unfinished business of the movement, but for the success of the movement. And so America could look at king as the symbol for where we once had this race problem. But Martin Luther King helped solve it. Clayborn Carson director of the king papers project at Stanford University. We caught up with them their few weeks ago. We talked to Curson more than a decade ago when we were first putting together this program about king's last year. Carson was the person to call because in nineteen eighty-five Coretta Scott King herself picked him to be the editor of her husband's life work. Carson says he was skeptical at first, but now he has spent the better part of his life as the scholastic bearer of king's legacy. When we are making this podcast, we wanted to know in the ten years since he last worked with him has understood. Banding of kings like a c- changed. Will I've come to think of his life as he was kind of an accidental civil rights leader in the sense that he started out as a social gospel minister. And I think most people have very little understanding what that means, but what it meant to him was that the job of the Christian minister was to provide answers for people who are oppressed, people who are poor people who are feeling the weight of social injustice. And he saw that as the basic message of Christianity in one of the letters to Kereta when he was courting her in Boston and nineteen fifty two, he says that I look forward to the day when there will be a less world, a better distribution of wealth and a brotherhood that transcends race or color. So the civil rights part of his agenda, which he doesn't even mention in this letter was more accidents happen to be in the same. Place as Rosa Parks in nineteen fifty five and got caught up in a movement that he didn't start, and it was already successful before he became the leader of it. And that's what brought him to prominence. And for the next ten years he he really, I think most of us would agree. He was pretty successful as a civil rights leader. He was one of the key figures in a movement that resulted in the nineteen sixty four Civil Rights Act, the nineteen sixty five Voting Rights Act. But once that civil rights agenda was accomplished, he didn't retire. He didn't feel like he had achieved his goal. Instead. I think the last three years of his life were. He was at least as active as he was before that I never intend to adjust my show two evils of Sigara Gatien and discrimination. I never intend to become a justed to religious bigotry. I never intend to become a Justice to the madness militarism, the self-defeating effects of physical violence. Nice admit that is need for a little more mala judgment for you. See, it may well be that the salvation of our world is in the hands of the maladjusted. He was trying to go back to that original agenda award this world, a better distribution of wealth and a brotherhood that transcends race or color. You know, he's trying to end the war in Vietnam. He's launching the poor people's campaign and his vision has become more global. You know about how do you build as he put it community rather than chaos. You know something that really strikes me as you say that clay is that a lot of that, at least in today's world still sounds kind of radical, and yet he is often when he's remembered is sort of thought of as the tame civil rights leader when you compare him to Malcolm X and this idea of, you know, by any means necessary or the black Power movement or the Black Panthers. How do you view him in terms of how one thinks about the word radicalism and whether he was radical, I think he would describe himself as as radical and that that's what he felt was necessary at that time. So I think in terms of his goals, he was not that different from Malcolm X and terms of seeing things and global perspective, you know that global human rights rather than simply citizenship rights is not that different from the Black Panther party who were also concerned about issues of poverty and social Justice and had kind of global perspective. So the difference was that he felt that it could be done nonviolently. And I think that that was where he departed from a Stokely Carmichael or Huey Newton or Malcolm X I think they were skeptical about the notion that it could be done non-violently, but he believed that that nonviolence was potentially. A powerful force. That's what he got from Ghandi's example is that when it was noblest, then nonviolence didn't have to give way to the Power of violence. It didn't have to say that there were certain kinds of injustice that were beyond the Power of people to change. And so I think he was always inspired by that notion that if you could just mobilize people to, you know, if you could just mobilize Christians, for example, to understand that any central part of the Christian message is doing Justice to those less fortunate to be concerned about the least of these and in a community to be concerned about the sanitation workers in Memphis or the sharecroppers at Mississippi, and and that a society is judged on how those people at the bottom of the social order. Are treated. That's the point of the good Samaritan story for him, which he often quoted one day a man paint Jesus. That that notion of who is going to. Stop and help the person in need on the side of the road. You remember. By the priest past bound on the side, they didn't stop the helping.

Martin Luther King Clayborn Carson Malcolm X Kate Ellis Rosa Parks Stephen Smith Black Panther party America Curson Stanford University black Power movement Sigara Gatien Stokely Carmichael Kereta Vietnam Ghandi