21 Burst results for "Marc Randolph"

"marc randolph" Discussed on Habits and Hustle

Habits and Hustle

02:19 min | Last month

"marc randolph" Discussed on Habits and Hustle

"No it's fantastic. I mean to get on the podcast is people basically call They come to the website. It's marc randolph. Dot com slash guest. And they leave me a two minute message. They talk about who they are what they're working on..

marc randolph
"marc randolph" Discussed on Business Unusual with Barbara Corcoran

Business Unusual with Barbara Corcoran

03:09 min | 3 months ago

"marc randolph" Discussed on Business Unusual with Barbara Corcoran

"She announced <Speech_Female> success before. <Speech_Female> You're rich from <Silence> the very beginning. <Speech_Female> And it's <Speech_Female> held you on the straight <Speech_Female> narrow to <Speech_Female> to stay <Speech_Female> successful <Speech_Female> all along the <Speech_Female> way so i'm going to read it once <Speech_Female> for <Speech_Female> You say <Speech_Female> you measure your success <Speech_Female> based <Silence> on how happy <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> fulfilled a project <Silence> is making. <SpeakerChange> You <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> did say <Speech_Male> nobody made that <Speech_Male> up for you. I <Speech_Male> did say <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> you're <Speech_Male> you're lucky <Speech_Male> man. Indeed if you <Speech_Male> can spend your day <Speech_Male> working <Speech_Male> on things <Speech_Male> that you like that you're <Speech_Male> good at and that fulfill <Speech_Male> you <Silence> And <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> the key to that <Speech_Male> is not. My <Speech_Male> opinion is not <Speech_Male> working <Speech_Male> on things for <Speech_Male> reasons <Speech_Male> other than that <Speech_Male> with huge uncertainty. <Speech_Male> That <Speech_Male> if you're doing an <Speech_Male> entrepreneur project <Speech_Male> think gonna make you <Speech_Male> rich. I hate to break <Speech_Male> to is <Speech_Male> extremely <Speech_Male> likely <Speech_Male> if you think it's gonna make <Speech_Male> you famous. It's extremely <Speech_Male> unlikely. <Speech_Male> But if <Speech_Male> you pick something that <Speech_Male> you love doing <Speech_Male> that really fulfils <Speech_Male> you buy the work <Speech_Male> you do. Every day <Speech_Male> you work <Speech_Male> really hard at it for <Speech_Male> those reasons <Speech_Male> and lo and behold <Speech_Male> that ends <Speech_Male> up being the path to <Speech_Male> businesses being <Speech_Male> successful. <Speech_Male> If you're in the right place <Speech_Male> at the right time <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> with the right <Speech_Male> team <Speech_Female> that's a <Speech_Female> message worth <Silence> taking an <Speech_Female> <Silence> <Speech_Female> amazing <Speech_Female> guy. <Speech_Female> I'm not. <Speech_Female> I wish your mom was <Speech_Female> here mckee because i would <Speech_Female> definitely <Speech_Female> say <Speech_Female> to her. You <Speech_Male> did a damn <SpeakerChange> good <Speech_Male> job. Mickey notches <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> this young man. <Speech_Male> He's <SpeakerChange> he's <Speech_Male> top-drawer <Speech_Male> anyway. <Speech_Male> So i'm proud of <Speech_Male> thank you barbara <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> for all. Things <Speech_Male> marc randolph. I do <Speech_Male> have a website which <Speech_Male> for people who are <Speech_Male> purely phone there <Speech_Male> are these things called <Speech_Male> websites <Speech_Male> and this one's at marc <Speech_Male> randolph. dot <Speech_Male> com. Which is marc with <Speech_Male> a c and randolph. The <Speech_Male> ph but there you <Speech_Male> can find if <Speech_Male> you can find <Speech_Male> podcast links <Speech_Male> to the book and <Speech_Male> of course links <Speech_Male> to all the ways if you don't <Speech_Male> have the attention span <Speech_Male> for podcast books <Speech_Male> and everything and nice <Speech_Male> twitter <Speech_Male> length or <Speech_Male> instagram link. <Speech_Male> Bits and nuggets. <Speech_Male> But i'm <Speech_Male> trying to do the same thing <Speech_Male> you're doing barbara <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> inspire <Speech_Male> people. I'm only trying <Speech_Male> to give you <Speech_Male> all the advantages of the things <Speech_Male> that i learned the hard <Speech_Male> way to help. <Speech_Male> Other people you <Speech_Male> know get some <SpeakerChange> of the fulfillment <Speech_Male> than i have <Speech_Male> my new measuring <Speech_Female> stick. I'm going to start <Speech_Male> measuring anything. <Speech_Male> I was <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> like <Speech_Male> one bit it. But i'm going <Speech_Male> to do it. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Good <Speech_Female> thank you so much <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> mark. Thank <Speech_Male> me opener <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> being yourself. Appreciate <Speech_Male> my pleasure <Speech_Male> barbara. What <SpeakerChange> a pleasure meeting <Speech_Male> you thanks again. And <Speech_Female> that's all we have <Speech_Music_Female> time for today. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> If you have <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> a question leave <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> me voice. Mail in the business <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> unusual <SpeakerChange> hotline <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> eight <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> barbara. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> That's eight <Speech_Female> b. a. <Speech_Female> r. b. a. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> r. a. <Speech_Female> You can also tweet <Speech_Female> it to me at <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> barbara corcoran <Speech_Female> and i may just <Speech_Female> answered on a future <Speech_Music_Female> episode. <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> You've been listening <Speech_Female> to business unusual <Speech_Female> with me. Barbara <Speech_Female> corcoran <Speech_Female> come back. next <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> week. To hear more steps <Speech_Female> and missteps. <Speech_Female> I took <Speech_Music_Female> on the path to success <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> search and <Speech_Female> follow business unusual <Speech_Female> on iheartradio or subscribe. Wherever you listen to podcasts.

Barbara twitter randolph. dot randolph marc randolph instagram today barbara corcoran Mickey marc barbara eight Speech_Male iheartradio
"marc randolph" Discussed on Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

03:33 min | 4 months ago

"marc randolph" Discussed on Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

"Welcome back. I'm jv crumbling third. I'm the host of the conscious million or leap business show. We're here with our featured gas. The co founder and first of net flicks marc randolph. And yes. Now it's time for the twenty four hour challenge mark. What's the challenge you have for. Everyone listening today. You know i'm a big believer that The thing that holds all of us back from this innovation we talked about earlier in the in the segment. Here is that people are scared to get started. And i'm not just talking about whether you're an early stage entrepreneur. I know most listeners. Our quite a bit beyond that but all of us are trying to figure out what's next and that could be a major step. We're pivoting the entire company or could be some new idea thinking about of a different way to interact with customers different way to sell different manufacturer. And what. I've learned over my entire career as an entrepreneurs that the thing that holds all of us back. Is that little voice that says you don't wanna screw this up. You don't wanna look foolish. You don't wanna be wrong. You don't wanna fail and what i've learned is the only way past that is to try something to build something to make something to test something No matter how big the pivoted always starts with the first step so my challenge of course people to look at what you're doing and say i have these ideas. Why aren't they moving forward. What can i do today. That will help. Inform me to make my next. Might give me more confidence that i should take this step. It's not in your head. It's figuring out a way to quickly and easily take some idea collided with realities. You can it. And there's the courage piece right there. I want to thank you for tuning in for listening to the conscious millionaire. Elite edition are elite business. Show it's for seven and eight figure entrepreneurs and anyone who would like to become seven or eight figure entrepreneur. This is this show specifically for you. I want to thank you for showing up and want to thank you for the difference that you're making the world. I wanna reach out and think all our fans and friends and wayne ayers and melbourne and now let's talk about your new podcast. I love podcasting obviously have started eight of them and god knows how many i help clients start them. But you've got a new podcast and you also have a book by the same name that will never work. What was the inspiration for that specific. Podcast we you know. I've been out of netflix's for quite a long time. Now you know seventeen years something like that. And almost as soon as i left i began getting people reaching out to me looking for help. Starting their company or taking their side gig and making it into a real thing or making their real thing into a bigger thing And i've never stopped doing that. And i have some. You know founding teams. I spend a ton of time with but others. I just do an hour on the phone. And i've been doing that for you know eighteen years now. I just had a our call this morning with someone who i was coaching through a particular business problem and a while ago but a year ago i realized i was getting the same questions over and over and just being someone who's kind of efficient minded. I said i'm going to start recording these calls and then if someone asked the same question. I'm just going to say what you listen to this. Call ahead with another entrepreneur. Like you. And i did that a few times and the reaction surprised me i mean. Of course they came back and said actually work. This is really helpful..

marc randolph netflix twenty four hour wayne ayers seventeen years eight a year ago eighteen years jv third first today this morning seven first step melbourne an hour eight figure
"marc randolph" Discussed on Nobody Told Me!

Nobody Told Me!

01:32 min | 8 months ago

"marc randolph" Discussed on Nobody Told Me!

"Lend itself to a hundred two hundred pages or so. I have a website. Which is marc randolph dot com. That's marc with a c. n. p. h. at the end of the randolph And there you get a link to my blog and all that and i am on twitter at mb ran often instagram at. That'll never work linked in. And if you can't figure it. If lincoln will then you've got a different issue. Ask mark fake. It has just been such a joy to talk with you. I mean this was like a a masters class in really entrepreneurship. In man to you was a bucket list thing life and the bookie so fabulous than we can't recommend it highly enough for anyone who's even considering starting their own company and want some encouragement. I love vibe that you have there. Yeah really great tone agenda laura. I am a believer. And i'm show glad he gave me the chance to share this to share this with you and with your listeners to we really appreciate it. Our thanks to marc randolph. Again his book is called. That will never work. The birth of net flicks and the amazing life of an idea and his website is marc randolph. Dot com and mark is spelled with a c. I'm jan black. And i'm laura owens you're listening to. Nobody told me. Thank you so much for joining.

"marc randolph" Discussed on Nobody Told Me!

Nobody Told Me!

02:46 min | 8 months ago

"marc randolph" Discussed on Nobody Told Me!

"Success. Disappointment starting accompany life in general wherever you wanna take it before you started this grime. That's led to so many different companies that maybe wish they'd told you before i want to save you from some very tough times It's a good question and Is is going to sound foolish. I don't i've made. I've made so many millions of mistakes all these things that i've tried these ideas i've tried that didn't work. I don't view them as things. I wish i hadn't done them. Almost everything i've done that's turned out badly as been good. It ends up going some great direction. I guess you know. I wish someone had told me earlier much earlier about the note that the nobody knows anything thing that i had to learn more slowly on my own. I'm not sure. I would have listened to them. i would maybe i. It's almost a roenick to say. I wish i had listened to them when the lesson the Telling me is. Don't listen to me But that would have been a helpful thing. That was a trial and error So especially early on so easy to get discouraged when someone says that will never work And early on it would have been great to have known that. I mean i'm a moment ago. I told you that story about how took a year and a half of trial and error to figure out what the model for netflix would be to make it. Repeatable and scalable and one of the components was subscriptions and i'd been a magazine circulation director. I was a direct marketing guy. I knew everything about subscription but for some crazy reason. I never occurred to me that the try that a year and a half early earlier. And wow that would save my saved a ton of a ton of time and money. If i had somehow listen to that my own little voice saying this baby should try this. You know a lot about this. So i got a two-thirds right got the e commerce right i got the personalization right missed the damn subscription mark. How could people connect with you on social media and the internet so the best with first of all the best place to really absorb a lot of these. Lessons is through reading. That will never work. I really tried to reveal all the tips and tricks and secrets that i've learned over forty or poor but for my more Form if your attention span doesn't lend itself to a hundred two hundred pages or so. I have a website. Which is marc randolph dot com. That's marc with a c. n. p. h..

netflix two-thirds dot com two hundred pages a year and a half marc over forty components millions of mistakes ton of time marc randolph one of hundred ton first
"marc randolph" Discussed on Nobody Told Me!

Nobody Told Me!

03:44 min | 8 months ago

"marc randolph" Discussed on Nobody Told Me!

"The welcomed nobody told me. I'm laura owens and i'm jan black and we are so excited to welcome veteran. Silicon valley entrepreneur. Marc randolph. To the show as you may know. Mark is the co founder and founding. ceo of netflix's. He's toward hundreds of early stage entrepreneurs and help see dozens of successful ventures. In addition to many unsuccessful ones and mark is the author of the bestselling book that will never work the birth of netflix's and amazing life of an idea. Or we thank you so much for joining us. Oh it's exciting to be with you. Thanks for having me. We love the book. Because you have a great way of making the reader. Feel like they're right alongside you. As netflix goes from an idea to a big business you left net flicks in two thousand and three. And you say you're glad you waited sixteen years to actually write about net flex. Why is that was a couple of reasons. One reason i wrote the book was i did want to give people kind of the untold story of netflix's since there's all kinds of myths and false founding stories and i thought it was an interesting thing for people to really understand how a startup works but the real is. I didn't really understand why we been successful. And it takes perspective to look back and isolate which aspects were luck which were doing things. Well which were mistakes. What was my contribution. What was it of a team And i think it really was able to sort out some of the truths behind. Not just a success netflix. But some of the things that i felt you anybody could use to make an idea become real. What i thought was so fascinating was that netflix was actually your seventh startup. And along the way you said that you learned a very valuable lesson. I love this. Nobody knows everything. How did you learn that along the way and looking back at that impact. Everything will actually even stronger than that. It's not nobody knows everything. It's nobody knows anything basically The real thing is nobody knows a good idea from a bad idea Until they've seen whether it's a good idea bad idea and then of course. They're the expert at it but is it tremendously liberating thing once you realize that. No-one knows in advance a good idea. A bad idea because what that says is that any idea could be a good idea for you know. I called the book you know that will never work because that is what everybody told me when i went around saying i have this idea to do. Dvd rental by mail. I mean that's what investors potential investors told me potential employers. Even my own wife told me that but once you realize that no one really knows then the only way to figure it out is to try. And that's why it's such a powerful phrase. It suggests you have an idea. Just do it. You're gonna learn more in one hour doing it. Then you are in a lifetime of thinking about it. How can you shut off those voices though if they're telling you that's not gonna work. That's a stupid idea. How do you shut them off and say well you know what maybe it just will. So part of it is confidence in comes from doing it. and learning little by little. Wow that the thing that someone said wasn't gonna work it. I actually got to work. Maybe that person. I thought wasn't.

Marc randolph Mark laura owens netflix jan black sixteen years three one hour mark two thousand Silicon valley seventh startup One reason net flicks net flex dozens
Who really killed Blockbuster Video?

Land of the Giants

05:37 min | 1 year ago

Who really killed Blockbuster Video?

"I'm Peter Kafka and I'm Ronnie. Mola and this is landed the giants. The net flicks effect a podcast on Netflix's disrupted. Hollywood change the way we watch TV and movies. And how it should have been squashed by giant competitor, but ended up turning the tables and killing the video store. Okay Peter. Let's go back in time long. Before we had netflixing chill, we had blockbuster nights. Remember this tonight. Make a blockbuster. In the nineties and early outs, blockbuster was the world's largest video rental chain. It was a huge part of American culture at its peak, it was bringing in six billion dollars a year in revenue and had more than nine thousand stores around the globe. It was the place to rent movies it was. Social place like teens would meet their. You know people you know because that was one of the few things that you could always do as a high school student. Was You know you could get together with your friends and rent a movie and go to the cool, parents, house, and watch it where there's a copy of the wiz that I would like hide in a corner at blockbuster because I always wanted to be there when I come back for, and we would go in there her car then go into blockbuster and pick out a movie, and then we get a little treat you know I don't know. We pick two to three movies scary WanNa funny one and then in action. Nobody has the movie I want I. Even Video Blockbuster probably hasn't I mean? We have over ten thousand videos? Five six o'clock on a Friday night. Phones are ringing off the hook. It's never what do you have? That's good. It's always what you have. That's new that last voices Jason Bailey nowadays. He writes about movies for places like vulture in the New York Times, but years ago, he used to work at a bunch of video stores, including blockbuster, which he says wasn't as great as we might remember. I have much more nostalgic for the video store. Then I do for blockbuster in particular which really in a lot of ways. Ways killed the video store, flattening it into the sort of McDonald's version of the video store, right? That's what I remember about. Blockbuster killed my local video store replaced with blockbuster, which I did not like blockbusters were everywhere, and everyone rented from there, but that didn't mean it was a great customer experience, one of the big things that you always hear people who who don't remember blockbuster through a Golden Glove nostalgia talk about where the late fees or as they tried to rebrand them additional day fees or additional rental fees. They were outrageous. Boxer made a ton of money on late visas or additional day fees running. At one point late fees made up seventy percent of blockbuster prophet, and along with this highly fees, there are a long list of other problems limited new releases, long lines, shitty customer service all which is lousy for customers, which also made it lousy for employees. I got cursed out a fair amount. Again for you know just doing what I was told to do by corporate, but yes I would, I would be told that you know that. We were monsters that we were bloodsuckers. I had that thing back on time I saw you. You take it out of the box I was like I got called out like that I had people tell me I saw you in here when I dropped it off. You tell me you didn't check it in on time. I'm not paying that if it got heated, but this is all factored into blockbusters business model. The company even had a term for it managed. Dissatisfaction managed to satisfaction is a term that John Antioch. Oh the CEO Blockbuster explained to me, and that is is long as you give a consumer and. And of what they want. They will ignore the fact that they're not always getting what they want. This is unique heating. She's a journalist who covered enough for Reuters she also wrote a book and made a documentary about Netflix's history blockbuster understood that only twenty percent of customers who came in would get the movie that they wanted, and they would have to get something else the other eighty percent of the time. They weren't happy, but they weren't horribly angry. Managed dissatisfaction is one of the great corporate euphemisms for screw you give. Give us your money. You are ever going to hear and if you can't remember what it was like to go to. Blockbuster occurred analogy. Be Like an airplane. You WanNa. Airplanes are like it sucks every way, and if you want to improve it in any way, you have to pay additional fees for everything that is blockbuster in a nutshell in the nineties, yeah, customers felt trapped, and with all the smaller mom and pop stores being squeezed out. They didn't really have a better alternative, and then all of a sudden they did. Again you've gotta remember. That netflix emerged in the late nineties when the Internet still felt pretty new. Amazon was just becoming release accessible selling books online. They're doing it cheaper than the competition and they didn't have to operate stores, so Reed Hastings and Marc Randolph to tech guys in the bay area are surveying the landscape and they thought hey, we could be the Amazon of something else. There's a better way to rent movies as many as you want. Go to Netflix DOT COM. COM Bake a list of the movies you want to see and about one business day you'll get three. DVD's kept him as long as you want. Without late fees DVD's had just come out. And suddenly there was this new way to watch movies that didn't involve these bulky VHS tapes. DVD's were smaller, more durable, and you could ship them for price of a postage stamp. So? Hastings Randolph thought. Hey, we could be them on of movies. This may seem obvious now, but at the time this was a big deal. Suddenly instead of having to go to the store and deal the crummy customer experience, he could stay home. You can hit a button and someone somewhere sent you the dvd you wanted instead of the one you had to settle. for which Netflix customers loved by the way they tended to order? The kind of movies at blockbuster didn't feature or even carry it all they had all the indie movies and older movies and blockbuster was focused on what was new.

Blockbuster Ceo Blockbuster Netflix Peter Kafka Giants Hollywood New York Times Mola Jason Bailey Hastings Randolph Amazon Reuters Mcdonald Reed Hastings Boxer John Antioch Golden Glove Marc Randolph
"marc randolph" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

08:29 min | 1 year ago

"marc randolph" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"Oh Wow you know stumped that's a really good one that I can't riff off the top my head because it's too important I love it. Let's go downstream from that. Just a minute because it's not that I would imagine you don't know it but but like you're going to get an email from me like three or four weeks going down to how about if we go downstream from it. What are some of the core guiding principles in your life that influence your thoughts that influence the words that you choose the actions you take? Don't take like what are some of those guiding principles so probably one of the big ones is is even gonNA call my book this but nobody knows anything which is that. All the wisdom is usually needs to be validated individually Then when someone tells you your ideal never work They don't really know the only way to find things out is to try them for yourselves. That's a big piece of this ended also applies things you tell yourself battle number work. Wait way back up. How do you know? Let's try this You know it comes rock climbing. You look up at a cliff and go. I can't do that. You Go. Well maybe if I start up all see the route were clearly a little bit further up I have a business idea that will never work. Well wait wait a minute. Let's just what can we do to being gathering some evidence but whether my intuition Sir corrector not it's a big guiding principle for me? It's like I said earlier that I realized how little I know And then how important? It is to actually experience things to understand them. Okay so if you are so. You're you're a legend Titan incurred your industry. Okay so let let suspend that moment for a moment like in an say if you were to sit down with somebody who is a master of craft and yourself and I'm more interested in people that are in reverse order master of self and then craft right but let's say you're sit down with somebody. Who's a master? What would you WANNA ask them one question? I don't know how to do it in one question. I was GONNA say. Wow that sounds interesting. Which is my sitting next to someone at a bar statement my my my my son you know he's an adult but he he had a writer recommendation for me for something and it was really interesting he goes. My Dad is the kind of person who will end up sitting next to someone at a bar and no matter what they do or who. They are where they're from he'll end up talking to them for like an hour because he's so genuinely curious about who they are and where they came from and it's so completely true about me. I'll meet someone who is a a sanitation worker. Meet someone who was a cafeteria worker. I'll meet someone who's a brain surgeon and I just insatiably curious. But wow that sounds really interesting and off it goes there you go okay. So curiosities a big part of your framework. You would use that on them. Not Not on them but with them and you are more interested in who they are and what they do. They're they're they're linked they are they informed Yeah and and the thing is at least in this country who you. What you do is so tied to who you are. I mean it's interesting when you travel when you speak to the United States we go. What do you do as the way of defining who someone is you know in London England? Logo? Where are you from meaning different ways of defining people but all of these things are interesting to hear people's background? And what's interesting to them? What challenges did they overcome? I mean I think what probably makes your job at least the podcast host. Part of your job so fascinating. Oh Yeah. People are amazing. You know like flat capabilities. Human capacity and capabilities are amazing. I don't think we understand human limits yet by any means and I'd say you know we are governed in radical ways that is yet to be tapped in it. The main governor at this point is committed. Focus to the present moment and a ridiculous and I use that word purposely. Fear of what other humans are going to think of us when we express and so we're not GONNA get to human potential one's own or collectively unless we figure out how to stay in the present moment long enough into Authentically Express. And if you don't match that with some sort of risk and the most sorry for the soapbox here but the most dangerous thing that people are engaging right now is the risk of what others think of them and it is ridiculous at some level but it is so primal at another veteran. I understand it and I've lived in wrestled with it most of my life. You know early days I should say the anxiety of others approval. Then so yeah I I'm I'm fascinated by human potential and we have so far to go really interesting what you just said which is that that is the most powerful fear of not belonging of being drummed out of the tribe that we all needed back pre historically to survive just is something we have to fight against all the time. What's happening right now with the corona? Let's call it social isolation but it's really social social distancing is that there's GonNa be a an F. point affliction here where as we start to distance ourselves in the threat is invisible. You know the criminal viruses invisible but the host of the threat. The is are people are humans. And so there's a weird thing that's taking place where we don't know how to fit right now with each other and I'm sure it's GonNa pass but It might pull a deeper together post as pendulum swings. Yeah but we gotta get this thing right now. Get right really interesting mark. I've really embraced this conversation. Your intelligence is obvious. Your empathy is high your commitment to take risks into Explore and to create space for other people are party or crown jewels and At least from this conversation and it's feels to me that you learn so much from Mother Nature That you you carry that forward into how you work with people and you work with decision making so I just want to say. Thank you for your time and I just appreciate the tone that you operate with in just feels warm and thoughtful. Well thanks Mike. This is actually really really interesting. You know usually I spent all my time exploring other people knew kind of fun to be asked these questions. It made me kind of explore who I am to go okay. So where can people get your book? Where can they fall along? What can you know Working the next step speak the book is that will never work the birth and Netflix and the amazing life of an idea available at booksellers near as they say. And IT'S A it's not a business book but it has all those tips and tricks and secrets that I have learned over my career or you can follow me on twitter at M B Randolph for unlinked in facebook all unusual places. I've so appreciated the framework that we've Kind of chisels out together on this call so I WANNA encourage people to go. Get your book To fall along and To be better because of the committee. You've made to help people better as well as the pleasure talking to you. Thanks again for your time to mark all the best take care okay bye..

London England Netflix United States social isolation facebook writer M B Randolph Mike
"marc randolph" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

06:51 min | 1 year ago

"marc randolph" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"With some of the most extraordinary tip of the era performers in the world. And I like to. There's a friend of mine who knows listening to this conversation. What's up mark and we battle have battled on the difference between mitigation and taking from the risk perspective and Yeah I'm really glad that you said risk-taking because marks now kind of you know crawling back into the whole that. He came from a book. Joking with those things are really those things the the you know. There's there's there's old mountaineers in his bold mountaineers but there's very few old bold mountaineers do you have to reckon you have to wreck. Mitigating risks is is. Do both the same time you know and you talk what shaped me. Spending the time I was thirty I'd probably spent close to four or five hundred nights sleeping on the ground which is a lot and you learn a lot doing that and working. Doing I was a knoll student than an instructor. And you learn things because those are set up to be learning situations so you get up and it's a beautiful clear sunny day and you're GonNa do some rock climbing on the other side of the lake and halfway through the session it begins to rain and you didn't bring a raincoat and worse than that. You left your sleeping bag out to dry pause right there. How do you speak to yourself in those moments that this was really stupid? I don't know what I was thinking. Okay so self self critical. I like doing by yourself a little bit sure. Okay and then what do you do then you go. I don't WANNA freeze to death. What do I do here and I am going to have to make the best of this. I'm not even sure what it is. Okay but then you go practical then you go optimistic yes of course and then if you were to measure the amount of time that you spend in those three frames and by the way. There's there's other ones we can do. But it's self critical or stay there. Some people stay there. It doesn't sound like you stay there. Long tactical practical. Stay there or optimism versus pessimism. And how much time do you stay there very very little time to stay there? Mean you're immediately going onto. What do I do how or how do I make the best of this or I go? Well I guess it's it's nothing's going to change the fact that I'm going to have been a wet sleeping bag tonight. So now what do we do? So you've got. You've got a little scar tissue. You gotTA hardiness in their from dealing and doing hard things in your life scar tissue the wrong word but maybe it is but when I was going with that whole analogy is that even now you know this is forty years thirty years forty years later. You will not find me leaving a trail head without the raincoat without the extra layers without the hat with my kids. Used to laugh at me. But you once you've seen the impact of what happens when you're unprepared when you've seen the capriciousness of nature Use Go. It's not a big deal. Be carrying extra pound or to you know. I always do a lot of crazy stuff down in the Tana. Carry a spot. You know the arrayed a that's called satellite locator. This just that is that mitigation. No that's just being careful And that's learned back when you're thirteen years old there. You go bring it forward. It's you go it. That happens in business all the time as an entrepreneur. I'm lying in bed at night. Thinking about is my sleep. Figuratively as my sleeping bag left out. What am I GONNA do? If it rains and you're preparing in your mind for all these contingencies that could happen because again startups. There's like nature is who the hell knows what's going to happen and you think through as many as you. Can you think through how I respond? And then bad stuff happens and Lo and behold you've thought it through and everyone goes. How did you know that was going to happen? You GO I. Didn't I prepared for about twenty other things that could have happened? And the same thing goes in the positive direction something breaks your way and loan. Behold you've thought about it but not because you anticipated that one thing is because she thought of twenty things nineteen of which was wasted Philip. How very cool framework in end? I also love that. You are particular with words. So I said Scar Tissue. Just rewind a moment ago and you said it's not that and so I love you. Yeah because like this so I feel like you and I could calibrate because of your sensitivity to words and I don't mean sensitivity bad I mean like yeah and so. I'm imagine you do that with most people in your life like no. I don't quite see it that way. I see it this way and then you go on and maybe even tell a story tell calibrate. Is that close to how of course because when you use the word scar tissue that's going to mean a lot of different things to a lot of different people and my little mind was like quickly zipping in and going that's Sorta of means that it's envision this thing which is permanent and inflexible and always influencing you and I. It's not really that I was trying to get not taking on the scar tissue on. I'm trying to say that you're absolutely right is that words are important because words conjure imagery in the pre. Hear them yeah me too and and I'm interested in people helping people. I'm trying to transfer an idea from my head to someone else's head. I'm trying to Zales stupid saw from the public speaking world. They don't remember what you told them. Remember how you made them feel so it's much more important to get the words right. Not because the words right but because how you make them feel is right okay. How about this thought it all comes down to WHO? What does it all come? What's it all about Alfie? Oh Wow you know stumped that's a really good one that I can't riff off the top my head because it's too important I love it..

Scar Tissue instructor Tana Alfie Zales Lo Philip
"marc randolph" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

12:34 min | 1 year ago

"marc randolph" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"Wow this is interesting and I do this because I can also charge of Goldman Sachs to come and speak their conference in pay them and they'll pay me an obscene amount of money to do that. All Work Works. Okay so in that respect. Your new mission is really to help people unlock. And they've got an idea or a dream in the the. Yana helped him unlock. And there's two parts of this one is I want to understand from your perspective your psychology because you have unlocked. Maybe you're being serious about having eighty. I don't know yet. But you've unlocked your potential and created something that has been durable and meaningful net flicks and and and companies so. I do want to understand how you're helping others unlocked but to do that. Let's talk about like your framework. I think you're optimistic without a doubt like that's part of your framework of course correct me if I'm wrong and you're and then you have tripled down on trying to control what's in your control and you're not interested in China manipulate leverage or control what others are doing. You're solely focused or or laser focused on controlling mastering. What's in your control? Which are your thoughts and behaviors? Is that an accurate statement. No that's true too. And then you have an incredible amount of clarity for the passion that you want to live with. And then you're able to roll and deal with the difficult things you've got this perseverance thing. You got clarity of vision on the other side. So you're working towards in a mission minded purpose driven approach and you deal with setbacks whether they're internal or external well is that true. Yes yes doctor you. You've got me wired here. Okay good and then so. Let's pause there for a moment like what? How do you deal when you get a blow? You get a piece of information that is difficult right like your lead salesperson your co founder of CO founder. Somebody is pissed off agitated. They're ready to walk or are they just did walk. How do you manage that I'm trying to put it in the framework that you kind of have laid out and even though your Articulation of Kind of how I think is correct. It's not necessarily how I think that I think so either. Have a blind spot glover okay. Let's go as my my self analysis is different is that I've become convinced how little I actually know and how. How universally errant are my preconceptions of what's going to work? I've become convinced that ideas don't count for anything that nobody knows anything that the whatever I think is right might be right but it may not be right which means I set myself up in advance to be extremely comfortable with being wrong. This might be your crown jewel. This is this is what psychologists the nerd. All cognitive flexibility. Emotional flexibility is that you have space to say nothing is precious. Let's let's explore and your ego is not involved in what you say and do it is more the exploratory adventure in you. That has created space and imagining. You do the same for other people. Is that close. Yes that one actually gave me a little chill serious? That one is dead on budget much closer to how I actually feel but also how I think about myself. So that's one of your crown jewels and you know when your did your hair. Just stand up the. That's that's pile erection. It's a fun name right. But that's how I measure success every day mark is like how many times can I be so present in pure and true to something that my hair stands up. So I'm stoked that you just you just have one you know. I compete with purely because I have no hair. Oh goodness okay all right so space so you create space. And that's why in this appointment like that. It's I'm not saying I'm I'm spock. Here they don't have these emotional lapses and go and be disappointed and upset and of course that happens but it doesn't usually last long so quickly pivots to how do I turn this around. Ottawa compensate for this. What have I learned from this? What can I do differently next time? What what does drop you to your knees or get your scared because I hear this is one of my Struggles is that I- Dampened my ego in such a way that I love you and I think vibrate in a very similar way about this creating the space and I can. I can be wrong in a lot of ways. Like 'cause I sometimes hold onto precious idea but you know that that that is not becoming but then sometimes it looks like I'm Teflon and things just roll right off me when I'm missing. Get the kind of emotional connection of what's happening with people around me because it's devastating to them and so that's not how I am turned in some ways. That's one of res. Wonderful powers is that he he is tough on aspect to him like that which allows them to make incredibly difficult business decisions but including personnel ones. I have the opposite problem. So you getting back to the thing that hurts me Come is like it's almost the flip side of what I consider one of my real strengths. You know we alluded to earlier. The fact that I'd been in the magazine circulation subscription business that I've been in the mail order business. I was in the direct mail business. I had these businesses that your Internet businesses and there's something interesting about all of them which is at all of them are selling remotely. I'm not you know they're they're working with dealing with customers. You never see And I realized really early on that. I'm really good at that because I have. I don't know what it's called in your world. I call it remote empathy which is cool. I have the ability to sense. I mean everyone has most people have direct whereas you say something and you watch someone's face drop you go. I disappointed them upset them. The tricky thing is to recognize if I write an email to them. What's the reaction going to be and it's even more if you can say I'm doing a male a male letter you know. He's a male. How are they going to react to that? And I've always been good at that. I'm very tuned to that. But what it also means. Is that when I have to do something which I know in my center of my being is going to hurt somebody. It's really hard for me to a weakness. In a way that I owe it has to happen. I know that maybe deserve this. But it pains me so it's a pain I can't help I just feel there isn't constant. Celebrate Clintonesque I feel their pain very viscerally and that. That's a problem okay. Quick break to talk about compete to create. Okay we're in high stress times right now and the strength of your mind. It's being tested mine too and I sincerely hope that you and your loved ones are doing well that you're healthy. About four years ago coach Carroll the head coach of the Seattle Seahawks we built an online mindset training program to help other people really understand what we're trying to share with the athletes and coaches that we work with like from the mindset training perspective and the whole design is to help people like really thrive and never never. Did we ever realize that we'd be in a global state of emergency that we're in right now with this incredible level of stress? That people are experiencing. And so. Here's how this works is that it's easy to be you when there's not like pressure or consequence or stress but as soon as there is chronic stress on board even acute sometimes for for many people we constrict our ability to think creatively freely into be ourselves at the highest level. And so that's really what this course is about. It's an eight week. Online course will pull back the curtain to show you how the best athletes in the world and performance across the planet. How THEY TRAIN THEIR MIND. They organized their inner life. So you can do the same so you can apply those same principles in your life. If you know you have more in you that there is a better way to live to be you. And if the timing is eloquent for you punch over to compete to create dot net Ford Slash finding mastery and received fifty dollars for just being a finding mastery listener okay so compete to create dot net Ford Slash finding mastery. And now let's jump right back into our conversation. What shaped you were the Go BACK TO NEW YORK. I think it was. I I heard your. You've only leaked one little kind of New York accent in the whole time. We've been speaking and so you're very west coast in inoculated there In I'm imagining you grew up surfing on the west coast. You Surf Surf now on the West Coast yet when they took it up. Thirty though so yeah. It's a tough one cup. After puberty I served to I mean it is a tough sport in that way so good. Nice job okay. So go back to what shaped you. Early days I know that you've got a deep interest in the planet You've been a part knowles longtime the national outdoor leadership school. You're you've got. I think you're on the board for one percent for the planet. Yes right so you've got some sort of routes to mother nature and but I also want to understand what what are some of the big movers that shaped you. Whether they're people are events so those it that's a great path to literally and figuratively path to go down. Which is that what really did shaped me as a lot of my experience outdoors Because in some ways So many things happened there which have proxy or proxies for what happens in the has happened in the rest of my life largely unpredictability Risk taking The sense of not knowing where a path is going to lead or how. You're going to overcome an obstacle and having to figure it out on the way and I've been doing outdoor stuff ever since I was tiny and had parents who embraced the inherent dangers or risk. Taking and going out into the outdoors. I remember even like in in middle school. All you know in sixth grade. You know coming home and saying. Hey we're going caving in Albany and my rather than my parents. What do you out of your mind? You can't go underground they go. Oh that sounds amazing. Cool describe your parents in like three lines. My parents in what three lines like? A just a quick hit overview doing note surface to their their brilliance or loved risk-taking but not themselves no other selves. They love themselves all they. My father was extremely risk averse but hated himself for not being more risk tolerant and so I think he pushed the opposite onto me. Are Your risk taker. Or mitigate or risk-taker me too. Okay absolutely question about it. Yeah me too. I spent a lot of time In the back country and very dangerous environments working with some of the most extraordinary tip of the era performers in the world. And I like to. There's a friend of mine who knows listening to this conversation..

NEW YORK West Coast Goldman Sachs co founder Yana China glover Ottawa Seattle Seahawks I Albany Carroll
"marc randolph" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

12:16 min | 1 year ago

"marc randolph" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"And now let's jump right back into our conversation I've heard some your interviews talking about net flicks and having I think you call it like a deep focus or laser. Focus about what they're doing and I I can't remember the exact word but no focus was part of it in the second. Double Click on. That was that Companies that diversifier hedged their bets. You your antenna pop up a little bit in as it relates to culture. I have that problem is that I have three companies in One is a partnership beautiful partnership with head coach of the Seattle Seahawks Pete Carroll and its compete to create and both of us were were founders of that and were not our sleeves are not Completely rolled up because we also have other projects that we're doing he's running NFL franchise. And I've got a couple of other projects so I I'm struggling with what you're saying right now. I'm craving that that focused but at the same time My a appetite To explore is seems to takeover. It's I'd love for a little coaching love. For just to hear your your position on culture and business growth and appetite well. So let's not give you the caveat which I'm going to say some things with tremendous cots based on two or three minutes of understanding what the real issues are. But and also say of course. It's not a one-size-fits-all solution for the people that I generally talk to have an idea that they want to try and make real a singular idea so they're not saying how do I do eight things at once. I don't know I don't have no idea how you do. Things wants or even three things at once. So you'll have to find someone else to tell you how to do three things at once. Well I'm a huge believer that usually taken a new idea that hasn't been done before and making it successful in taking that path where you learn and change and adapt. It is so difficult that it's the ultimate Hubris to think that you can do that with more than one thing at a time and that by not taking every single bit of focus you have and putting it on a singular problem. You're selling your your selling at short And it's not easy. It's very very easy for us to get distracted. It's very easy for us to believe that we have to get multiple components of the problem right in order to make the ultimate Business successful but what I've learned is it is very very much a triage situation that in any startup. There's hundreds of things that are broken hundreds of things that are crying out for attention that are in pain so to speak and that your job is an entrepreneur is to recognize that a huge group of those things. Sure they're broken but they're not going to sink. The enterprise and a huge bunch of things are broken and even if you get them right it's not going to change anything but there's a handful of things that if you get those rice all the rest of the things don't make a difference. You can list of things that will be good to get right but just for example you could say culture is collaborative but listen right now. We're in a crisis and so right now we're going into a war footing so yes for example but I again. These are complicated scenarios. But the thing is you. It changes over time. You wrecking also keep us more specific. This is going to sound trite but at the very beginning after reading. I in the car decided. Let's go for this guy you know we put in place a rate read wrote the check and Iheart doesn't people and we rented a little crappy old bank building with dirty carpet. We couldn't afford to clean but you know we said okay. We're going to build a company. There's a hundred things that go into launching a company and you begin thinking about them all you know what is the website need to look like what are benefit packages have to be. How do I get people comfortable with this? But ultimately ultimately if you don't have customers nothing happens and so even though people would come in and say Mark. Help me solve this problem. Help me solve that problem. I'm tuning almost everything out. I'm happy to have the website behalf. Ast I'm happy to have misspellings and Typos. Make a long list of all the stuff that I'm completely happy being shoddy because I realized that if I cannot put together some way to have customers coming in the door nothing happens but then once customers begin coming in the door you begin saying what's the next big problem if I don't get this right sunk and if I do get this right it lifts everything else and that and you shift your attention there. And it's a constant battle to be focused on the most important thing to get right but it's an equally important to know what it is. You need to focus on and seriously when I talk to young on. I'll say young but I mean early stage entrepreneurs. They don't need to be young. It's that's the biggest problem you see is that they are all over the place. They believe they have to get everything right. There are working on things which don't count until the future you know there's they I call it the sawing. The t shirts I imagine when that we're brand is big so we're putting in place. This new line of merchant I go. Oh my God every moment. You're thinking about what you'll do. Once you're successful is taken away from the likelihood that you actually will be successful and are you more interested in recurring benefit models Or more interested in Products that are able to endure. It seems like your businesses more about recurring. Well certainly the ones that Have yes there's a pattern here and it's because I happen to be really good at recurring revenue model stuff. Originally going way back. I did magazine circulation Rizal subscriptions and stuff in and then I and then once you get into the mail order business reserves in for a long time. That's all about repeat business and certainly Netflix. Subscription model on the most recent startup. Looker is a SAS. You know suffer as a service model which has subscription so. Yes but that's not necessarily the thing that's most interesting to me. It's most interesting thing to me. Is this problem solving piece? And I'm working with some businesses. Don't have subscription models in them and they're equally fascinated mark. What is Your Life Mission? Newly newly minted you know in the last seven or eight years actually but it was interesting when you know once I left I decided I did not have it in me to start another company which ended up being resolution. Which didn't last that long but nonetheless it I began saying how do I get my entrepreneurial fix and after a bunch of Trial and error. I kind of realized that the thing that really gave me that fix was mentoring other people. Now there's helping them start their companies helping them take these ideas in their head and making them real and as part of this process I also began doing a lot of work with You Know University students with high school students with a people who are launching ideas which were not designed to change the world but they were just dreams people had and as I went through years of that tour of coaching. I came to this really interesting. Revelation which is that all of these exact same things that I learned over forty years as an entrepreneur. All of these little tips and tricks and secrets of had a break apart. A problem of triage and focus and culture were equally valid. No matter what your dream was that everybody has these ideas and the process of taking an idea and making it. Real is the same whether you're trying to launch a multi-million dollar tech startup or whether you just want to do something better with your own life and so my passion from that point forward began being. My job is to take these people who have these ideas and feel that they can't go anywhere with them unless unless I have a degree unless I have money unless they have a co-founder unless they have a backer of I've heard them all and convince them that that's bullshit that there are ways to get started and it is not as complicated as difficult expensive as you think it is and that the real barrier getting started. Is You not you Michael but some themselves? So that's my. That's my theory. Goes on wound up here because what? I'm about okay good. So that's the mission there and then can let me let me do the other passenger in your car you know. Let me do the read thing which is an playing. I'm way out of my knowledge base here but okay mark but How are you going to make? I know you don't really need money. You've got one of the most successful businesses on the planet right now. But how are you going to actually make that into any sort of business and you might come back and say no? No you said mission. You didn't say like entrepreneurial spirited business model and so how would you and I wanna I wanNA also back. I'M GONNA I'm saying this out loud for me Tips tricks and secrets owner. Come back to that in a second but how did How would you answer that? That first part well part of it is. I am unbelievably lucky in that this in that I actually found a career that someone who has attention deficit disorder and probably couldn't hold a real job of actually finds valuable and is compensates. You really really well. So that's the that's the true answer which is a I can afford to dedicate my life to something doesn't necessarily have a PNL attached to it all that's more more more helpfully is that I don't want this to be necessarily something which I just And Mother Theresa Ing. I do we do want it to be sustainable so to speak And there is a model where certain people are willing to pay a tremendous amount of money for this type of advice and I've identified those people and there's an ecosystem you can where you can give this listening for example. Okay so I give it away free to to university students that I work with and I give it away free in some sense to the early stage entrepreneurs metrics. I do it in exchange for equity in their companies. Go free in some ways but I actually gave away. I'm I have about twelve to sixteen hours worth of content in my book in that. I'll never work and you can get that for thirty bucks on Amazon or if you want if you WANNA have become speak to your conference of two or three thousand people I'll do that. But that's GONNA cost you a considerably bigger amount than thirty dollars And when you kind of blend that whole model together it does create something which is a an economically viable business. And it's it's the freemen model in a way like right now. You know full disclosure. You're not paying me for this. I'm doing this because I want to. Spread the word that people can actually do this stuff without requiring them to be a PhD in Computer Science But listen they're gonNA understand that..

You Know University Seattle Seahawks Pete Carroll NFL Netflix Theresa Ing Mark Iheart co-founder Amazon t Michael
"marc randolph" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"marc randolph" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"How did you appreciate the relationship in a way that these wild ideas that you might be exploring and you bounce over to somebody who is more linear logic and you know I think rational may be in some respects. Like how did you guys balance that where felt still that? There was enough space to continue exploring where you work critiqued than judge than shutdown like. How did the two of you do that? Well listen the Short Answer. Of course respect but of course. It's more than that you know. I I do a lot of mentoring now for early stage entrepreneurs and I warn people at the beginning. I say you've got to be really careful because what I'm going to do. I'm going to issue opinions with tremendous conviction. That's GONNA make it sound like. I really know the answer and I'm warning you. I don't just the way that I may conform. An argument and read recognize that from the very beginning. Both of us did that. We both kind of recognized that the best way to get to the right answer was this combination of logic and imagination and that we could bad things back and forth as aggressively as we needed to. We can raise voices I could make points about what I thought people might like. He could make points about. What evidence showed that was happening but by going back and forth vigorously without having the Eagle involved we almost were able to arrive at what both of us ultimately agreed. Were the right decisions and when you're with someone you can do that. It's so refreshing and you just immediately feel it and I know that read felt that too because a proceeding from logic leave you on a solid foundation at all times but you just don't get that far whereas these leaps of imagination. Sometimes you end up way way beyond any kind of sustainable solid ground and both of us really liked where this combination of approaches took us so in the most romantic sense. How much do you miss those car rides because as you guys have built? I don't know the nature of your relationship. It might be very difficult. It might be wonderfully. I really don't know it but if we just kept it to the car rides How much do you miss it? How do you still have some semblance of that creative genius outlet Combative Exploratory Nature? So we're GONNA have to struggle to keep this conversation on topic because he leaves into all these interesting areas yet look and so the two of us are probably dangerous. Amounts I promise you you know that I've got this thing in the back of my head is this. I'm trying to understand your psychology and I'll play it forward at when we get to the end like a bit of a snapshot we can wrestle there too but okay yeah so played this part for the romance of that those cards so the the reason that it's GonNa lead off track and you'll see where I'm going to second is first of all of course I miss it and that it's a great way to make decisions and it's a very pleasurable way to make decisions. So do I miss the the habit the ongoing one on one with read in the car every morning and every evening of course but let's talk for disco seconds about company Culture and company. Culture is not this thing that you right up on a piece of paper or the you design it springs organically from how the founders treat each other and how you tend to act and because read and I were this way. The company we built was this way so this was not like read my only outlet for this type of decision making this type of making progress. This was how I dealt with everybody. This is the type of people I surrounded myself with so this was how I would work with people prior to Netflix and even what's Netflix kicked off? All of our meetings were these arguments so to speak these vigorous debates Working making trying to make intuitive leaps but grounding them in a logic based manner okay. Quick break to talk about Athletic Greens. Obviously this is a high stress environment that we're in right now and health could not be more important than it is right now and for me taking athletic. Greens is a massive accelerate to my health. In it's just a really great insurance policy that I'm getting the right micronutrients that I might be missing in my otherwise thoughtful diet but I might be missing it in. This is how I take. It's so simple I get a little cup. It's got a lid on it. Take the lid off poor one scoop of Athletic Greens in bit of water on top of it about you know eight. Twelve ounces somewhere there shake it up. That's it that's how I consume it. It's amazing and so.

Athletic Greens Netflix Eagle
"marc randolph" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

11:52 min | 1 year ago

"marc randolph" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"My team wants to use the product and or service and we think that you might benefit as well so punch over to finding mastery dot net ford slash partners. You can also if if you really want to help us out. Also tell a couple friends about what you're learning about where to go do it. Not everyone knows how to download a podcast. Believe it or not not. Everyone knows how to do it so maybe tell them show them pick up their phone. Oh maybe can't pick up the phone right now. Can you like talk to them about how to download it and so the UPS store might be intuitive for you? But it's not for everyone so be awesome if you did that. And maybe even write a review on itunes or any other podcast plates. Great Way to demonstrate to other people that You know there's something value here so with that. Let's jump right into this week's conversation with the Legend. Marc Randolph. Mark How are you where? We'll thanks good. Okay so I've been looking for to this conversation for a long time The company you built one of the companies is the staple in most households. In certainly ours. So congratulations on your body work with net flicks and macworld and some of the other ventures that you've been part of so super excited to be with you well thank you. It's a pleasure to be with you this morning as well. Okay so I wanNA start with a moment in time and I want to understand where you came from just to get some context what it was like growing up but I want to start with this particular moment in time. Which is the car ride? Where you and your co founder of Netflix Reed. Hastings were sorting out and envisioning this idea of what eventually turned into net flicks. Can You bring me into that moments or series of moments? We'll certainly and but first. Let's Kinda set the context. This was in nineteen ninety seven so this is quite a while ago and this set a point where we're in many ways kind of just the dawn of the Internet age and you know I was living in Just outside of Silicon Valley California so I was certainly pretty aware of what was happening. Technologically and at that point There are some interesting things going on in my life as well and specifically I was on the verge of being out of a job one of the companies that I was working for was being acquired. And it was one of those Good acquisitions where You actually in some ways pay you to stick around the golden handcuffs so to speak. But then I knew it would only be better months and I'd be on the street again but for me Someone who kinda thrives on chaos. This wasn't a depressing thought. This was an opportunity a chance to do something new. And at that time The company that was being acquired had been founded was being run by someone named Reed Hastings. Who was a friend of mine And really it was also going to be losing his job in this Acquisition and read and. I were Carpool buddies. And we used to drive back and forth where we lived in a little town called Santa Cruz up over at the Santa Cruz. Mountains and this winding highway to our offices in Sunnyvale California right in the hardest Silicon Valley. And that's when and where this was taking place and on these car rides. We were brainstorming. The next business we wanted to start and more specifically. It was really the next business that I wanted to start at I'd already either been founder of and part of the founding teams of five previous startups so pretty natural thinking to me that if I was leaving one company well. Let's just start another one and Reid wasn't quite in the same place He was really in this feeling that he wanted to do a big give back. He wanted to change the world of education and he was going to go get a higher degree in education. But you know once you're not you're always an entrepreneur and read wanted to keep his finger in this entrepreneurial pie so to speak and so the agreement we had was that he was going to be the angel investor that we come up with an idea together he would fund it. I would start and run it and off. We'd go and that's what found us in this car. Driving on the hilly turns of highway. Seventeen going up and over this the Santa Cruz mountains every morning for months brainstorming ideas and although of course you know jumping to the end. What came out of it was Netflix. This was not that reading our both video files that we both debating who the best French directors were. We we were both extremely a proletarian tastes. You know we're like any other person and in fact at that point a doing something in video was probably the furthest thing from my mind. I really only had the criteria that I wanted to do. Something that involved selling things on the Internet and if possible involved personalization or subscription both things. I'd had some experience in and that was it so these ideas that we were brainstorming. Were kind of out there. You know one of them. I remember pitching read was for personalized shampoo. That we I I told appears is going to work read. We're GONNA. They're gonNA cut off a lock of their hair and mail it to us and our scientists will formulate a custom shampoo just for them and then they'll subscribe to it and reads role in these conversation was kind of the voice of reason you know he would think about it and he'd Logically Bat Down Bat away all the bad ideas he'd find the flow as in my thinking but you know I would fight back and I would argue why these were good ideas but shampoo went out the window. Another one we came up with was custom dog food formulated for your pet. Your pets gender and activity level and breed size and and also got thrown out. The window and one of the ideas was video rental by mail which was in some ways just as ridiculous as the personal shampoo and custom dog food. Because at the time you know there's a blockbuster and every corner but this was the dawn of the Internet and we were watching Amazon. Which if you remember that time was only selling books and We go what else is there? We didn't want to sell video but we go. Maybe we can figure out a way to rent it by mail and that was an idea and it was a bad idea because back then the only video rental that took place with vhs cassettes if you remember those you know. They're heavy expensive and fragile. And I didn't take a lot of research for me to realize that was not going to work and so back to brainstorming and then not too much longer three or four days later we read about this new technology called a DVD LITTLE DISC. Which could have movies on it and in some ways it. Was this feeling that that feeling you get. When you're like you know maybe doing a jigsaw puzzle and you are cleaning up the couch and you find this missing piece under a cushion and you realized this is the piece that completes the puzzle. You've been working on for a while. And that was that was feeling we had that. Wow this actually might unlock this video rental by mail idea that we'd rejected a month or so ago and then to prove our thesis that this little disc might be the answer we turn the car around mid commute. Drove back down to Santa Cruz to see if we could actually mail a DVD to ourselves but of course there's DVD's is only a test market in a few cities so we decided we'd just by used music CD. We went to use music store but one of those and a few doors down and boy the little gift envelope. The typing put a greeting card in and we put this CD in the hemp. Lope went to the Santa Cruz Post Office and bought a stamp put. It reads address on the envelope in dropped it in the slot and then went to work and then the very next morning when read picked me up. He showed me this pink envelope with an unbroken CD in it that had gotten to his house less than twenty four hours later for the price of a first class stamp. And if you look back and if you're looking for as a screenwriter would put it the inciting event Behind net flicks. That was probably it. Okay so you're storyteller. I really like like. There's a double joy here one to learn about how you work and but you love stories you know it's funny my We we're all genetically hard wired to be storytellers It's almost as IRINI that I ended up Being involved in many way transforming how storytelling takes place. 'cause I've always loved the story telling it listening to it Being a great way to communicate with people and you know we're jumping way ahead. You know but one of the things that I learned about being a leader about what it takes to make people want to join you on these completely irrational adventures that I've been taking people on my start up life. The most powerful way to motivate someone is storytelling. Okay you'll it definitely speaks to different parts of our brain rather than just the logic Centers networks because when we're doing just logic which there's nothing wrong with that obviously It triggers the logic in the other person than they contain about back and forth bounce back and forth between a go or no go based on probability but when you invoke the emotional centers in the imagination but using different circuitry it engulfs people into what could be in a fantasy world and it's so much easier and compelling to walk people down a path when you've created imagination as part of the path and so. Yeah Yeah I'll take imagination versus logic anytime so I'm imagining an we're ping pong back and forth but I would imagine you're more steam than stem. Science Technology Engineering Math. Imagine you're more steam right at the for art? Yes absolutely in fact. It's kind of what what made the partnership between read. Nye worked so well. That's what I wanted to get into like because you. So let's let's pull this thread about your imagination and storytelling and I can just imagine what kind of car you guys driving was alternating between Reed's Gold Avalon. Back Hewlett we clean put consumer middle middle class little car and I was driving a Volvo station wagon which usually had a moldy wet suit in the back on it and maybe some bike crammed into the in the Baxter so with diapers like not dirty ones but like a things. I'd picked up to bring home like in the in the backseat. Like the odd couple. So you but you're okay. I mean it's too simplified to say right brain left brain for the two of you but you embody that a little bit in. How did you?.

Reed Hastings Santa Cruz Netflix Santa Cruz Post Office Netflix Reed Marc Randolph Sunnyvale macworld Amazon California Mark co founder founder Silicon Valley California Reid Nye Volvo station
"marc randolph" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"marc randolph" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"Started you. Okay WELCOME BACK. Or welcome to the finding mastery podcast. I'm Michael J. A. And by trade and Training Sport performance psychologist as well as the CO founder of compete to create. And if you like this podcast and you haven't checked out compete to create yet. I really hope that you would need a lot to me. And the whole idea behind this podcast behind. These conversations is to learn from people who have committed their life efforts towards mastery of self and so we use craft as an excuse to really figure out what are the mechanics. What are the processes? What are the practices that they go through to build themselves to be resilient and dynamic to be able to flourish in a life of high stress and high consequence? And when it's really on the line how do they train their mind to become their very best okay? This week's conversation is with Marc Randolph. He is a absolute vet in Silicon Valley as an entrepreneur advisor and investor. You know his work. Mark is the CO founder of Netflix. And he also served as their founding. Ceo as the executive producer of their website and as a member of their board of directors and talk about being involved as founder co-founder spinning up the website being you know the CEO at the helm and also serving to guide on their board of directors. I mean he really has a depth of knowledge about what it takes to build a titan not only industry but a titan of a business although he is best known for starting Net flicks marks career as an entrepreneur spans more than four decades. He's founded or co founded more half a dozen other successful startups he's mentored rising entrepreneurs including the CO founders of looker. Data which recently sold to Google for two point six billion how about it and he's also invested in numerous successful tech ventures as well not only that not only does understand business at that level but he also is on the Board of the environmental advocacy group one percent for the planet. If you're not familiar with that I really want you to go check that out. It is a phenomenal program. And so he's got roots in the outdoors and he also chairs Renaissance Man. The National Outdoor Leadership Schools Board of trustees. I love this conversation for not only the wisdom and the insight and the practicality of it but just the well rounded nature of Silicone Valley to outdoors to doing good for the planet for mentoring young people and also building businesses That you were not even thought to be an industry and he built it from ground up. I mean I love this conversation as you can tell. And we dive into how he developed with his co founder Reed Hastings developed. The idea for Netflix. Like how that was born and how that came to be but also the ways that he worked to create strong culture and why according to him. Focus is Viki for any entrepreneur. And if you enjoy learning remark which I'm betting that you will as a flat out Titan in the world of business you are going to also be interested in one of our sponsors to learn from some of the amazing instructors on Master Class..

CO founder Reed Hastings Marc Randolph Netflix Mark National Outdoor Leadership Sc Ceo founder Google Silicone Valley Renaissance Man Michael J. A. Master Class Silicon Valley advisor executive producer co-founder
Co-Founder Marc Randolph Shares Why Everyone Doubted Netflixs Success

The Small Business Radio Show

05:20 min | 1 year ago

Co-Founder Marc Randolph Shares Why Everyone Doubted Netflixs Success

"We wanted to kick this year off with one of the most explosive entrepreneurs of our time. Marc Randolph is the co Oh founder of netflix serving as their founding CEO as executive producer of their website as a member of their board directors until his retirement in two thousand and four. He's got a new book out. It's called That will never work the birth of Netflix and the amazing life idea mark. Welcome to the show with you explosive explosive. If that was explosive go well you know. I love the book because we hear that all the time we come across entrepreneurs and certainly when I was running my own businesses. They said that will never work. Why did you choose that title? Well that's pretty simple because basically most of the ideas you come up with a pretty crazy on the surface maybe crazy a few feet below the surface and when I began telling everyone about this crazy idea that we had to rent video by mail That's what they said was. That'll never work. And that came from employees it came from the people we pitch to raise money even came from my wife that was pretty universally panned as an idea so why marked if people think it never would work because folks enjoyed going into a store and getting their videos and seeing it all kind of up there on the shelves. I remember that I'm not too young for that. Yeah there was a that was probably the dominant reason. Well everyone is brought. That video rental by mail is pretty crazy because at the time this is back in nineteen ninety seven. We were pitching this nine thousand blockbuster stores while you could basically throw a rock from pretty much anywhere in the country in the world then hit a blockbuster shore so people couldn't understand how we possibly thought that somebody would be willing to you go online ordering movie way two or three days for to arrive when they could just pop in their car or walk down the block and get a blockbuster store just seem completely wheatley. Irrational and the weird thing is that you know ideas originally envisioned in fact the ideas originally launched didn't work it was a a bad idea and which is why kind of the subtitle for the book is the amazing life of an idea because most of these ideas you have are not what the final businesses. They're not that'd be all and end all they're just starting point and it really. What makes success in companies where you take it from there somewhere? What was the idea that didn't work and then I guess you involved into into mailing the DVD's by by mail well original idea listen work was vhs because back in the summer of nineteen ninety seven the news you may remember back then back in the good old days? All video came on Vhf so that didn't take a lot of research realized that's not going to work. Unless you're like me right right exactly. Yeah even less likely. But you know the breakthrough came maybe a month or so after we originally had the idea we learned about this new technology called the D and it was test marketed in San Francisco and it was small and it was like and we realized that we might actually be Taylor this then like using envelope and a stamp and so to validate that we as things my business. I'd turn the car around commuting at the time and drove back down to Santa Cruz where we lived actually went and bought a music CD because there was no DVD's too. We mailed it to reach House and Santa Cruz and it got there in less than a day for the price of a stamp. And that's when we realized wow we actually might be able to make this work and so the the business that launched this was an April now of nineteen ninety hey was mailing people. DVD's through the mail and it took anywhere from one to three days to arrive and we do eight late fees and you had to mail it back back and we charge you know. Four dollars per rental charge pretty much the only real innovation here was the fact that we had a single store Rather than trying to build out a chain of franchises or something like that I remember. I was an alert subscriber. I was excited when those red envelopes came in the now there was we were wrong about some things in fact people were willing to rent. DVD's but reluctantly but only for a weird reason only because I just was no other place to get a DVD that for those first few years while the install base was building out you know none of the video stores had any incentive doc DVD's there might only be a handful of players and their own neighborhood whereas for us. We're the only place to come and so we were getting pretty much. Anybody would a DVD player coming together. DVD's from us. Our problem is that it really was a pretty unsatisfactory experienced. And even though we maybe get somebody to rent from us once we'd have pretty pretty much no repeat business and they were small orders and it was a dog and we struggled for a year and a half trying to find something that could unlock Video rental by mail but it really wasn't until a year and a half later you know in the fall of nineteen ninety nine that we finally stumbled on the season more crazy idea of doing it as a subscription and be eliminating do late fees altogether. Just let people keep the discs as long as they want and when they were they were done it went back and we shouldn't excellent and that was an idea. Even more people thought would never work but as the strange strange story sometimes turn out it works and it worked really really well

Netflix Santa Cruz Doc Dvd Marc Randolph Founder San Francisco CEO Executive Producer Taylor
"marc randolph" Discussed on The Small Business Radio Show

The Small Business Radio Show

08:15 min | 1 year ago

"marc randolph" Discussed on The Small Business Radio Show

"Get ready for the craziness of small business. It's exactly that craziness that makes it exciting and totally unbelievable small business radio is now on the air with your host. Mary Moles well. Thanks for joining this week's radio show remember. This is the final word in small business for those keeping track Iraq. This is now showed number five hundred and sixty seven and a happy new year. Five hundred sixty seven. This episode of course is provided by nick. Stephe the all in one communications platform for your small business. It's also sponsored by linked in the place to generate leads drive traffic and build your brand awareness for free one hundred dollars credit to launch your campaign. Hey go to. WWW dot lincoln dot com slash SB are it's also supported by Ivanov forbids the easiest Wade. Electrically process and file your ten ninety nine and W. Twos for your business go to. WWW DOT e foul four Biz dot com. It's also sponsored by visa. All you need to run your business in a tiny little. Hey I'm andy if you don't know me it's probably because I'm not famous but I did start a men's grooming company called Harry's the idea for Harry's came out of a frustrating experience I had buying razor blades. Most brands were overpriced over designed and out of touch. At Harry's our approach is simple. Here's our secret. We make sharp durable blades and sell them at honest prices for as low as two dollars. Each we care about quality so much that we do some crazy things like by a world class German blade factory obsessing over every detail means we're confident and offering one hundred percent quality guarantee. Millions of guys have already made the switch to Harry's so thank you if you're one of them and if you're not we hope you give us a try with this special offer get a Harry starter. Set with a five Blade Razor waited handle Shave Gel and travel cover offered just three bucks plus free shipping just go to Harrys DOT COM and enter five thousand at checkout. That's Harrys Dot com code. Five thousand. Enjoy enjoy up. Try for free at. Www Dot V. C. dot com. That's the letter. V C. I T DOT Com. It's also supported by blue supplies. I'M GONNA have to take that one more time that last thing we can just let them blue summit supplies get your. Irs Ten eighty nine in w the two forms go to blue summit supplies. Last SB are well. We wanted to kick this year off with one of the most explosive entrepreneurs of our time. Marc Randolph is the co Oh founder of netflix serving as their founding CEO as executive producer of their website as a member of their board directors until his retirement in two thousand and four. He's got a new book out. It's called That will never work the birth of Netflix and the amazing life idea mark. Welcome to the show with you explosive explosive. If that was explosive go well you know. I love the book because we hear that all the time we come across entrepreneurs and certainly when I was running my own businesses. They said that will never work. Why did you choose that title? Well that's pretty simple because basically most of the ideas you come up with a pretty crazy on the surface maybe crazy a few feet below the surface and when I began telling everyone about this crazy idea that we had to rent video by mail That's what they said was. That'll never work. And that came from employees it came from the people we pitch to raise money even came from my wife that was pretty universally panned as an idea so why marked if people think it never would work because folks enjoyed going into a store and getting their videos and seeing it all kind of up there on the shelves. I remember that I'm not too young for that. Yeah there was a that was probably the dominant reason. Well everyone is brought. That video rental by mail is pretty crazy because at the time this is back in nineteen ninety seven. We were pitching this nine thousand blockbuster stores while you you could basically throw a rock from pretty much anywhere in the country in the world then hit a blockbuster shore so people couldn't understand how we possibly thought that somebody would be willing to you go online ordering movie way two or three days for to arrive when they could just pop in their car or walk down the block and get a blockbuster store just seem completely wheatley. Irrational and the weird thing is that you know ideas originally envisioned in fact. The ideas originally launched didn't work it was a a bad idea. and which is why kind of the subtitle for the book is the amazing life of an idea because most of these ideas you have are not what the final businesses. They're not to be all and end all they're just starting point and it really. What makes success companies where you take it from there somewhere? What was the idea that didn't work and then I guess you involved into into mailing the DVD's by by mail well original idea listen work was vhs because back in the summer of nineteen ninety seven in an as you may remember back then back in the good old days all video came on Vhf so that didn't take a lot of research realize that's not going to work unless you're like me? We had a Betamax right right. Exactly yeah even less likely. But you know the breakthrough came maybe a month or so after we originally had the idea we learned about this new technology called the D and it was it was in this market in San Francisco and it was small and it was like and we realized that we might actually be Taylor this then like using envelope and a stamp and so to validate that we as things my business. I'd turn the car around commuting at the time and drove back down to Santa Cruz where we lived actually went and bought a music cd because there was no. DVD's too we mailed it to reach House and Santa Cruz and it got there in less than a day for the price of a stamp. And that's when we realized wow we actually might be able to make this work and so the the business that launched this was an April now of nineteen ninety hey was mailing people. DVD's through the mail and it took anywhere from one to three days to arrive and we do eight late fees and you had to mail it back back and we charge you know. Four dollars per rental charge pretty much the only real innovation here was the fact that we had a single store Rather than trying to build out a chain of franchises or something like that I remember. I was an alert subscriber. I was excited when those red envelopes came in the now there was we were wrong about some things in fact people were willing to rent. DVD's but reluctantly but only for a weird reason only because I just was no other place to get a DVD that for those first few years while the install base was building out you know none of the video stores had any incentive doc DVD's there might only be a handful of players and their own neighborhood whereas for us. We're the only place to come and so we were getting pretty much. Anybody would a DVD player coming together. DVD's from us. Our problem is that it really was a pretty unsatisfactory experienced. And even though we maybe get somebody to rent from us once we'd have pretty pretty much no repeat business and they were small orders and it was a dog and we struggled for a year and a half trying to find something that could unlock Video rental by mail but it really wasn't until a year and a half later you know in the fall of nineteen ninety nine that we finally stumbled on the season more crazy idea of doing it as a subscription and be eliminating do late fees altogether. Just let people keep the disk as long as they want and when they were they were done it went back and we shouldn't excellent and that was an idea. Even more people thought would never work but as the strange strange story sometimes turn out it works and it worked really really well and that was really was my next question because I think initially it was like three a month and then you went to unlimited. It'd were you afraid about the financial risk of doing that. No there was a natural to natural governors at work. What what is your only allowed to keep out three at a time or for the time we had different plans and so the rate could turn them back and forth with limited someone? I wonder if they really worked at. It might have been able to twenty movies a month and that would have been a definitely.

Harry netflix Iraq Mary Moles nick Santa Cruz one communications Blade Razor doc DVD Irs Ivanov San Francisco Marc Randolph Wade founder Taylor CEO executive producer
"marc randolph" Discussed on Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Differentâ„¢

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Differentâ„¢

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"marc randolph" Discussed on Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Differentâ„¢

"Thanks for pressing play this is Christopher Locke Ed folly are different and this is a very different podcast we aspire to have real conversations let's celebrate the people ideas and companies that stand out conversations that we hope inspire educate and entertain you this is the the first in a special two part series real different conversations about two of the most legendary category king companies in the world right now net at flicks and Amazon on our next episode you'll hear a conversation with the outstanding John Rosman and he's the author of a brand new book bestseller alert called think like Amazon and on Today's Episode Legendary Entrepreneur Marc Randolph he's the founding CEO of Net flicks and he's got got a kick ass bestseller out and I love the title of his book it's called that will never work the birth of Net flicks and the amazing life of an idea and mark and I have a fun insightful conversation about what it really takes to start a world changing category King Company how Netflix came so close to failing link in many life and business lessons that mark has gleaned over his incredible career this is a guy who's created well in excess of one hundred hundred and twenty five billion with a B. in value and he's the rare entrepreneur that's had incredible success in both business to consumer and business is this to business recently a company that he co founded was on the Board of called looker was purchased by Google for inaccessible two billion dollars in this episode you'll also love the story love it about how net flicks almost sold to blockbuster and instead drove them out of business so so listen especially for that and you know look I know I say it a bunch but this is another legendary example of the power of a real dialogue podcast the value of a conversation like the one you're about to hear with mark is is a stunner all right our friends at spunk are the category Queens and kings as of big data they want to help you bring data to everything every.

"marc randolph" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

09:47 min | 2 years ago

"marc randolph" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

"Are you looking to reach your full potential and achieve success in business and life want only tried and tested guidance let's from people who have truly made an impact you have come to the right place welcome to five questions with Dan Shah Bell Knew times bestselling author Dench Bell distills the most actionable and tangible advice from a variety of world-class humans including on Ignores Authors Olympians Falon Titians Billionaires Nobel Prize winners Ted speakers celebrities astronauts and more inspirational guidance practical advice and concrete solutions our power chat start sal welcome to the fifty third episode of five questions Dan Shaw Bell as your host my goal is to create the best advice from the world's smartest and most interesting people by asking them just five questions my guest today is the CO founder her and the first CEO of Net flicks Marc Randolph born in Chappaqua New York mark's father was a nuclear engineer his paternal great grand uncle was go now says Pioneer Sigmund Freud and his paternal great uncle was pr legend Edward Bernice after he graduated college in one thousand nine hundred one he began working at Cherry Lane Music Company based in New York and was in charge of the small mail order operation it was there where he learned marketing techniques how to sell music directly to customers and use technology to track buyer behavior mark continued to gain experience building direct to consumer marketing operations at Borland then at various silicon valley startups becoming a founder of integrity Qa a year later pure a tree acquired his startup and CEO read Hassi's retained mark as vp of corporate marketing later that year rational software acquired bureau trio for eight hundred fifty million market we decided to join forces to lodge Netflix in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight with mark as CEO I sat down with Mark Learn more about his fascinating background hear stories from his new book that will never work and get advice on everything from pitching ideas overcoming criticism you from a family of overachievers in Pioneers Hound Bay influence you growing up so one thing in my household there was always this the two of risk taking the point I was outdoors guy and I would come home one came home and told my dad handling caving and rather than being one of those dads what are you nuts yet crazy it was always like oh it sounds great so every junction it was always take the riskier path the other thing kind of interesting that for our family when someone said no that was more the cue that it was time to try and figure out awesome way to work around this so I've never been a person who takes no for an answer yeah I'd read that your big into pitching why do we pick your mom and your co founder what makes a good pitch to investors to anyone influence them to buy into your as a person in your business idea well actually in the book talk about not explicitly by pitching but about asking and the story they told the Book of course is that it's so much about pitching or asking I was leading trips for urban youth they were outdoors trips we take kids from inner city bring them out into the wilderness where they're totally disoriented and so someone had the great idea that the staff should have an experienced equally disorienting and so they soften the streets in Hartford with no money wallet no ide- No watch nothing and said we'll pick you up in three days and you get hungry so I decided well I I I begin stealing food by swooping in after someone gets up at the food court and cutting out the middleman and I began panhandling and what you learn when you ask for money just the naked ask give me something nothing in return is eventually the way to do it is to be on I am to be vulnerable and reveal your voice in your words your body what you're looking for and in that case it was hungry but when you're looking for money raising money in a pitch it's really letting people know that this is not yes I believe in this and here's why I think I'm vulnerable here's why we're strong and people see those things but the ultimate skill this is not learned the streets Hartford is empathy you have to understand in advance how what you're saying is going to be perceived by somebody how were the offer you're making going to impact that person because his trade as it is business walked repeated the win win so much more powerful than than you are and so you're going to do what I said yeah that's a really good point eight with the idea early on but what does it take to overcome that and continue to follow the path that Leinster your dreams and goals whether anybody who's ever had an idea has had that exact same thing that you and I had you wake up only this great idea and you can't wait to tell someone in rushing down you tell your wife you tell your kids you come to work and tell your co workers and you're right they all say the same thing which is after work and then they helpfully tell you all the reasons so stupid but my favorite saying is actually it comes from William Goldman as a screenwriter but he wrote a nobody knows anything talking about Hollywood no one knows of movies going to be successful until after its launch and every ideas like that really. no-one knows so to answer the question one preamble you have to venturi realize they have no idea this so-called experts they have no idea whether it's going to work or not the only way to find out which were the only off my book is going to be good the only article is going to resonate the only way older it's going to get accepted is to write it try it pitch it and see what happens yeah and different from Your Business Partner you've kind of been a little behind the scenes I know you've been in the public soaking seen speaking to big audiences but it takes a certain level of humility can step back and not constantly be out there like your business partner and so just tell me about that in your view of fame instances success your role it's really a very common question Sadler you better or you you you gave up stock at I I don't get it sometimes because I consider I was in it because I just loved solving really hard problems I had this dream of starting a company that sold stuff on the Internet and I got to see my dream come true through which is that's the most unbelievably fulfilling thing and the company went public and so I did find and now I get a chance to work with other early the judge Breyer's and I got a chance to win found my family my kids know me that's like light like me I was knocking on wood if you're just listen how could I possibly resent what's happening in the matter who was in the front what's your best piece of gird start and do anything he can which is even tangentially related to what you want but actually here it is l. down and just a handful of words my advice this is advice for people who are starting out actually I take that back anybody who's thinking about getting into something new number one find the smartest person you know that will take you seriously and do anything they want simple as that restaurants test no they say sweep the floor yes sir yes Ma'am by being there you will see you'll see how they do their job you'll see how the industry works you'll see how all the moving pieces and you are an amazing sweeper when they're looking around one where's the person go to now run this small little thing they're going to pick a person they know is responsible hardworking rather take a chance and outsider and then all of a sudden that moves when you do that job as evidence knowing don't go wait I've got a degree in I should be doing this ed where he shares his live appearances entrepreneurship articles life rules and business tips to watch the full extended video version of this episode where I asked Mark more questions you can go to YouTube dot com slash Dan Shaw about three hope you enjoyed today so and the amazing advice our guest provided remember that you can only benefit from advice if you packed on it before you do we appreciate your feedback in the form of review you can leave a review I tunes stitcher for Pod Catcher of your choice your feedback would be very much appreciated head over to Dan Shaw.

Dan Shah three days
"marc randolph" Discussed on Short Story Long

Short Story Long

10:42 min | 2 years ago

"marc randolph" Discussed on Short Story Long

"Cooler than ever and everyone wants to start a thing and they have their instagram page and like. I said they probably have their shop store. Their Amazon drop shipping chip in and they got whatever and I just think someone like you that has such big experience and then has worked with so many people in this space like this advice. There's the problem is when something becomes popular. There's also a lot of people that don't really know what they're talking about in the space writing books and doing podcast like that so they have someone like you sort lord of giving these lessons and telling this. I think is really important and really valuable so the book is called that will never work incredible title. Thank you and the one thing that I just WanNa get right into because you keep mentioning it and I loved it. When I saw was essentially that no one knows what they're doing and I want to say a story of mine. I always for a very long time and I still try to still catch myself. Sometimes felt like everyone else did know what they were doing. I just I didn't I didn't. I like to sit here and say I didn't go to business school. I didn't go to Blah Blah but I always kinda felt like yeah but that probably mean. I'm you know what I mean. Everyone knows class yeah and so. I think hearing that from people like you is is so amazing. I think it's so important for young people to hear that early. Yeah I know that okay if I can start with knowing that nobody knows what they're doing and approach it that way. I can not ever have have that insecurity or that thing in the back of my mind but can you expand on that a little bit. I completely agree. No one knows anything. No one can tell in advance. It's a good idea badia so anyone who listens to your idea and goes that will never work call bullshit on them if they do not know. There's only one way to figure out whether it's a good idea and that is detriot riot or do it now tested or build something or make something you have to do that. The other important thing is this issue shoe of like this person's better at it than they know something than I do. It is so untrue probably the most important lesson to take away from listening to me. Leib Blather on for an hour or whatever it is that I am no smarter than anybody who's listening now. I'm not they're smarter than I am. Probably they're certainly probably harder harder-working but almost unquestionably better prepared than I was so. Why are you so much more success because I actually did something about it. I didn't sit and build this castle in my mind that four years later someone else does and I go. Oh I had that idea yeah. This guy had the idea and he did something about it. There's a guy named Nolan Bushnell who's was founder of Atari. Yeah and he has east quote that I'll try and remember it from memory. I'm not that kind of quote whip moth but he said something like everybody who has taken a shower has had an idea but is the person who gets out of the shower towels off and does something about it that makes a difference yeah and that is the key that it's not easy. It's really easy for me to say just do it. It's really hard because what you have to have the skill is to figure out the quick simple easy way to test your idea eh without actually doing it and we have time for a quick quick story everything yeah. I if you're okay on time we can go a little old cool okay. This is is fun. Yeah I love so we we were we were flailing and we were basically doing we had to do at the the beginning. The company took off. We had a hundred thousand dollars a month but it was all selling. DVD's and that was death because Amazon on was about to enter and we knew we had a business and so we go a crap was worse doing both selling running at the same time. It's impossible to complicated. Confusing customers. Titles were some rented by so we had this courage moment reset. We're GONNA walk away from selling ailing. DVD's in one moment turn the switch ninety nine revenue was gone and we've got to figure this out so we did that too. That's big courage moment yeah. Here's here's the story is that now were desperate and we have all these ideas we begin testing these ideas and I'm this perfectionist at the time so I'm making these beautiful tests custom photography arguing over every line of copy and stress testing the site and every link and then you take us probably three you weeks to build a test and that wouldn't work and we go we just wasted three weeks and see okay faster so we do a test in two weeks and fail week and then a test every day and then we're doing two or three tests today and as you probably can guess things are getting pretty shitty. you know broken links and the wrong photos of the watermark is in or misspellings and refreshing the site and didn't make a difference because if it was a bad idea that no matter how beautifully this test we had put together was still wasn't a good idea but it was a good idea then even the crappiest piece the crap customers immediately would raise their hand and go this. This is what I like yeah. They knew what the fix and the insight was that it wasn't wasn't about having a good idea. It was about building the system in the culture to test lots and lots about ideas and that is the key to you just do it is don't get caught up in this perfect thing. Do don't get don't you don't need the test everything try something and fail at it. Yup because the failure is learning moment and it's one learning moment sequentially after another that is the difference between someone like myself and the person who has the idea and just begins embellishing it in their mind adding as they start with a simple house and then all of a sudden they got the wing and the second story and the tar read the Gargoyles and then of course your castle. It's a castle millions of and then they're going. I can't do idea 'cause I've got a raise raise two million dollars. Alex hire thirty people. Go your knock that shit down and just do something yeah. That's why I also think. Perfectionism is so dangerous just because I've heard so. Many people say oh well. I'm a perfectionist as if it's like. Oh so you your special. Everything you put would out is gold and it's like man. I think ninety nine percent of the time if not a hundred it's a way to avoid taking risks and and it seems to work for you man and I think that like you know the game. I've learned so many times now. The game is how do you take as many risks as as you can handle to be able to find the thing not to never take them or not to take one shot a year but you feel like it's perfect perfect. The it's a quantity it's Dr throwing more game than but I've just I feel like so. Many people are trapped in the label themselves perfectionists as if it's there's something to be proud of in fact the by Vice. I've never actually given it. This way is be an imperfect honest yeah. What's the key being imperfection. Yes it's fascinating man. I think steal that from you. Yeah take it. I mean you dug it out because I think that if you really look at your story you can see this personality trait runs all the way along meaning to me going and taking job you know I going for for geology then going taking this job then in the mailing figuring that out then you never took yourself too seriously. It doesn't sound like I think a lot of people back to my question. In of how did you find your purpose. I think there's sixteen year olds out there that WANNA just put their flag in the ground and say I am this and I want to be the best of this and it's like they're afraid to even and be maybe fired from a job or maybe not good at something. It seems like that's just something I'm really grabbing onto is your whole story has been about try and stuff and seeing what works and not taking anything to I haven't I haven't really thought about that way. You're absolutely right. Yeah I mean I I'm jealous. Sometimes my kids had friends like in even elementary school and you know look I wanna be a vet and God bless them all the way through high school. They're going to be a vet and they caught him. I'd be a bit and I go wow that is so cool. That person knew what they wanted to do and they were like eight and it stuck but boy I sure wasn't me and it's not most people and that's why I was reacting like going. Just chill. It will come if you take some risks. If you try a lot of stuff yeah yeah and it's and once again it's fascinating to me how that same lesson the same lesson that applies when you're starting a business tomorrow applies when you're Netflix and you're already very successful and you just need to try a new website out or whatever it's the same thing we put people might. He's smart. You know I am like you. Almost all of my ideas were bad ones but I tried a whole ton of bad ones and the sequential learning came from all lows bad ideas eventually meanders. Its way into something that works so it's a it's a it's a it's a it's a cool story. I mean it's non intuitive. It's lots and lots of false starts but has happy ending is shared as man what how many people would you say you. How many small businesses are startups to do work with now. Four I can really my model is I used to do. Something used to be an adviser. uh-huh which is the most the worst word in the world yeah because you come in and you do this pattern recognition thing and use dispense some advice then you leave and it's completely unsatisfactory to the person who asked the advice and completely unfulfilling you and you so much looking models. I abandoned that eh go. I've got to be deeply enough immerse. I've gotTA understand the product and the market and the competitors and the employees but mostly. I've really got understand the founding running people so you to invest that amount of time. You can't do very many so I'll I'll do. Three to four is probably about what the right numbers. The number is and some of them when they work then go on for a long time someone they don't work..

Amazon detriot Nolan Bushnell badia Atari Netflix founder Alex hundred thousand dollars ninety nine percent two million dollars sixteen year three weeks four years two weeks
Blockbuster Exec 'Struggled Not to Laugh' At Netflix When They Offered to Sell For $50 Million In 2000

Bob and Sheri

03:57 min | 2 years ago

Blockbuster Exec 'Struggled Not to Laugh' At Netflix When They Offered to Sell For $50 Million In 2000

"Back in the year two thousand the CO founder of Netflix Mark Rudolf. He was the first CEO of net flicks was able to get a meeting with the C. E. O. of blockbuster. I named John and Yoko and this meeting eating was going to be in Texas so Marc. Randolph and his netflix executives jumped onto a private jet owned by Van Away. Yeah that's right from wheel of fortune. She has a private ship when she's not using it. She charters it and let other people use it on so that's just one inside note. Here is also making money off of chartering a private jet that sinking letters she doesn't even turn them she ports letters for a alluded go back around the fire we go so the net flicks team gets on. Vanna White's private jet and they fly Dallas and they meet with the CEO of blockbuster and and the other blockbuster executives and the Netflix guys pitch a plan to blockbuster. They said we need to merge blockbuster. We've got Dr Incredible Netflix. Dvd By mail operation which seems to be going very well and you've got all of these stores think what we could do take gather and and the CEO of blockbuster. people in the room said was struggling not to bust out laughing in their faces. No kidding it at the time. Netflix offered blockbuster net flicks for fifty million dollars which is a lot of money and in the year two two thousand when this meeting went down Netflix was actually losing money. They were going to lose like eight million dollars that year. Netflix wasn't then what it is now fifty the million dollars in this league at this level is chump change even then right fifty million dollars and at that point the C. Joe lost his composure and started of blockbuster and started to giggle and the whole deal went down they got laughed out of the room and the net addicts team got back on Vanna White's plane and they headed back home to their headquarters now at first blush. You're saying what an idiot the blockbuster. CEO Oh was but given the time and given the situation that Netflix was in and given their delivery system which when they were sending those to your house I always thought was a little oh sketchy as far as a business platform. I don't think the blockbuster guys were really stupid. Guys now what you know now. I don't think the the blockbuster guys were paying enough attention and here's why when I was a freshman in high school I remember learning that soon in movies were gonNA come to our houses over the phone lines and that was significantly before the year two thousand. I see what you mean so they weren't they were cocky and arrogant again and they weren't paying attention to what was coming down the road just a couple of years later. Netflix went public with a market cap of six and a half billion dollars yes and then seven years later they began offering streaming movies as opposed to DVD. Reynolds meanwhile blockbuster peaked in two thousand and four and went bankrupt in two thousand ten. The streaming thing was the key you're right. They should have been aware that straightening was going to become as the old delivery system through the mail was not not that big of a competition a blockbuster anybody that was paying attention knew that the the DVD's through the mail and the DVD's at the store there was an a a ticking clock on that store it right right but the blockbuster guys were so arrogant and so- dismissive of this little scrappy weird startup that nobody's ever heard of that they left them out of the room and back onto Vanna White's and today net stream is a global force of domination and and blockbuster is a punchline on

Netflix Vanna White Mark Rudolf Yoko Texas Co Founder Randolph John Van Away E. O. Reynolds Dallas C. Joe Fifty Million Dollars Eight Million Dollars Billion Dollars Million Dollars Seven Years
Mark Randolph talks about turning a No into a Yes

The GaryVee Audio Experience

13:24 min | 2 years ago

Mark Randolph talks about turning a No into a Yes

"Everybody Buddy welcome to episode three twenty five of the ask. Garry show and I'm very excited about this episode. Let's go right into it. I know a lot of people watching livestream across all the platforms but it's GonNa be Lincoln today. As we continue testing out Lincoln live linked in. Please put in your phone numbers. If you have a question for for my distinguished guest here today Markham and allow you to introduce yourself in a second. new book is out. Obviously I'm really excited about talking about Netflix and his career but I want to get into a bunch of questions because even the first three or four minutes of just hanging with him before we went live. I think the energy is going to be really good which which is exciting to me from a content standpoint so mark. Why don't you introduce yourself and tell everybody a little bit about your origin. Story sounds good. Gary so Marc Randolph co-founder co-founder for CEO net flicks and now soon to be author. which is kind of adding something totally new to my mix for you origin story well? I'm I'm sixty one so I'm still working out with. My origin story is what were you born. I was born just over there in Chappaqua up so I'm a New York boy. He's so for the first half of my life and so. What kind of kid were you so? I was a kid who anytime I wanted to do something. My parents said go for it. That's I I come home and go dad. I'm going to caving in rather than being like what are you. What are you nuts. I get the fantastic. That sounds really cool. That's really neat. It was really neat. Where where were you in the only child you have siblings. I'm the oldest of three okay so right off the bat. Even you know it's funny you hear that a lot more from third child's else perspective so even as the oldest. Your parents had gave you some room. I think for third child. It's like what's what's your name. I know knows it was is really great. It all other thing I do reflect back on. What was it about how I grew up that maybe gave me? Some of the things I have and one is that it was also a family. We're no is always something to get around. It was like not something that you took no and walked and left from the standpoint of if your parents said no oh they appreciated you trying to figure it out a little bit 'cause my mom was like that a little bit yeah and also them kind of recognizing that whenever barrier came up it wasn't like we give up and walk away okay it. It was always being said there's amazing. Go right into this a little bit later this. I was graduating from college okay and I wanted to get a job as a advertising EXAC back. Okay I was really into yet anyway. I applied for this job at. NWEA air no longer here but firm Yup and it was one of those jobs which only usually usually goes to MBA's yup is an undergraduate so as long shot thing and those like I don't know a thousand people applying and I got the first round and then the second round they bring it in York and and I got the second round in the third round they bring you back and I got down to the point where there's only four people applying for this job and it was like Holy Shit and I went in in an interview with everybody whole day and didn't get it and went slinging backup to upstate New York college and going well screw it. I'm I'm not going to up so I wrote these long emails to our letters letters letters to everybody and basically was saying like all right. I'll try again. What what could I do better. What should I learn. What do you want to see and then the guy goes. Come on down and brings me up and offered me the job and the crazy thing is that no one was given the job none of the four of us interesting that this was a job which was about turning a no into Oh yes and so they said no to everybody and waited to see who would not take no for an answer really absolutely. That's amazing that a crazy crazy thing thing. I love it so that really is probably the best articulation of how I grew up interesting so you took that job kind of actually notice how I kind of the way you tell us what I'm like. He didn't take the fucking job I did and I took it even crazier job. which was there was the guy? I've ever told history before. There was a guy in Memphis. Tennessee owned a big cotton company sold it in the family of two hundred years made a gazillion dollars and was basically driving around throwing money out the window basically feels like today you're go he'd he bought these properties and I'm kind of an outdoorsy guy. They have always been into like your story was caves. Yes absolutely WHOA. This guy had bought a ski shop. He'd bought a place out veil and he was looking for someone to tie them altogether and he goes. You'RE GONNA. You're going to run this kind of this big CO marketing business. Did you know that family friends that someone like that. That would give you that at bat at that. Young of an age. There was some other variable relationships. You're you're drag me down. These complicated stories but you're pro so there's an organization that I apologize business where I wanNA bring value to the audience mark. Here's why the reason I'm probing is because I have a very good sense of my audience and ironically. I'm pretty good at this other than the fact. I love to interrupt all the time. I'm because I'm just because I already know what the answers are and because I'm usually on a time crunch so they actually the audience gets mad at me. 'cause I interrupt everyone on the flip side. I've an incredible sense about what stories could bring value. I promise you mark let me tell you one thing about this audience. This is not the today show like what's amazing about. This audience is thirty. Four people bull arbitrary number just heard that story and literally in the next twenty four hours are going to reply to a no and one was gonna get yes and you and I literally right now. Just change the course of somebody's life and that's what gets me high. It's it's unbelievable and by the way don't worry about the interrupting. I mean if you just said like pass the roles and the thought I was talk about the story cool. How'd you get them. So when I was fourteen they packed my parents pack up to Wyoming to do this. backpacking trip in the mountains uh-huh and it turns holidays again which one of your parents was super outdoorsy. If either my dad my dad grew up in Austria so he kind of just if you've gone so and then I loved this program and it was a personal teaches leadership using a wilderness as a setting and I was a student there for three or four summers and then I ended up teaching there as a leader and then eventually got to the point is leading leading the whole courses so a lot of responsibility young that was my college summer job and so this Julian Jay Hohenberger the third the guy with the Cotton Company at one of the things he did when he was throwing the money the window was. I'm GonNa take a course he. He went out to Wyoming. He did this course you taught it. I did not he was so in Namur d- by the course and instructors that when he heard from my through through someone else that I was of course leader there he goes. I want that guy. You know what's so funny. I to this day still have that in me. You show me a kid a guy or a gal who flips sneakers cells blow. POPS does cards like I believe in that Shit Genetic Markers for entrepreneurship I do not it's candy the arbitrage everyone almost everyone. I meet like you says the same thing. It's going in and buying it for ten cents in the next day you go to school for a buck and if you show me people not that it's why. I love people that sell weed who sought like if you tell me that you sold we'd from a bad neighborhood obviously a normally but not always and and you sold nickel bags. I already am interested in you because it means literally arbitrage dime bags. Somebody who's never smoked weed telling the story Free College. I always thought my friend Bob use would have been a good entrepreneur because he had the discipline and the grind to go down to the nickel bag bag level that takes a real fucking commitment and so- arbitrage anyway absolutely right. It's it's the vision to go knocking. It's seeing an opportunity. It's seeing a pressure differential hundred and that happens for kids who are six when it's candy. It happens for people in their twenty six or forty six when they see oh man taxis suck. I'M GONNA do hundred thousand percent. It's that's why it's a marker for that is someone who sees things really matched of course with all these other things. Of course you've seen which is what happened your kid out of school. You're twenty two and you're now running this conglomerate of different businesses and then even worse. I did this job percents and this company better the company that one of the properties was in in the ghost town resort in outside of Vale and the manager did your left and they go and I go I want that job and so they moved me out and now you're this twenty-three-year-old knows nothing and he's running this place which a sixty employees and as he's huge cash flow issues and a restaurant bar and and I'm going down. I'm doing the marketing and the advertising and it was like cashflow one. Oh one it was management one. Oh one it was thrown into this super deep pool and going to swim. You don't know how you're sitting. You're quiet because I'm like. Oh my God we grew up the same way. I'm the byproduct of the same thing in a liquor store. Yeah it was a small base of four five and six employees and then I grew it but by the time I was twenty five years old. I had managed people. I'd paid all my bills with my cat own cash flow. You know credit no credit line. I forget about fucking raising capital. No credit line the first business I built from three to sixty million dollars hours year in fucking eight years had no credit. That's awesome because then you don't see credit as a crutch. You see it's a thing that you is what you know now how to use that the US it's awesome and even if you're trained in it when I raised money for empathy. I didn't spend it as well when when that's exactly right it is something that could save you overspend your business and that is a very very strict teacher so I mean did that cool. Thanks yeah some stuff did that then. It got probably the the job which influenced me the most is. I got this weird job. Quick quick question. I struggle with Sir Twenty three and you're in in this resort town right. Yes resort town SORTA. It's halfway between Vail and steamboat which means the middle of nowhere but it's close to both and you're twenty three twenty three and you've got this kind of cool big job. How did you balance your personal life and your professional life at that point in your life because I've actually I'm not going to lead lead the question. What did you do. How how much did you date. How much fun were you having how much fun where you having a great thing it. Was it was a really good lesson. I had a lot of fun and So don't get me wrong. Because everyone was working. There was twenty three going go ahead and so and and it was the Alpha of the twenty three and that was leverage. That was the bad part though was that these guys it was on the banks of the Colorado River so they'd all go. Hey we're all going rafting going. I've gotTa do you know inventory. I gotta how to pay these responsibilities and it kind of really was painful. So I got a lot of funds. I'm not bemoaning it but there was this realization that there's a different level level of responsibility that I had but I did meet my wife there and so amazing did come out of come out of that go ahead all right so the come come back east and got this how old must've been only twenty four quick twenty-five two years in Colorado two and a half years okay keep going so come back and get this crazy job basically as gopher to the CEO of Music Publishing Company. I think my title was like a I chief of staff or something looking at all. These guys is like literally my so far. I just want everybody who's listening to you right now. I'm sorry mark I'm taking episode over listening. I just I don't know if you've been listening but I think I could see some of you in the room putting the pieces together my core so my advice is to do and like manage and like like actually make and sell it and then or and or if you want to be somebody go work as an Admin a gopher chief of staff for somebody. That's extremely at a very high level each shit. It is basically what I'm saying. Basically is what I'm saying and I'm just GonNa make it simple here so far. What I've heard from mark is the first two things didn't his career was jumped in full throttle. Sacrifice is what he was saying couldn't have as much fun dealt with all that was practical and then and then have the humility. Let's say one more time for all the people out there that love being a CEO had the humility to go from being the lead dog of something like that in that ecosystem going and being a gopher a chief of staff of whatever about the here and I just want to remind all of you this all lead for him to be the CO founder and CEO of Netflix so it's such a I'm so glad you called a little time out on that one because that that is the the piece of advice I give to every single person who goes.