22 Burst results for "Marc Andreessen"

Where's the value in NFTs

Motley Fool Answers

05:13 min | Last month

Where's the value in NFTs

"You first saw the acronym ft show up in your tweets you got as far as not at four. And then you realize you're quickly going down the wrong path and trying to decipher it. Nfc stanford non fungible tokens now from there. If you're like me you thought it had to do with mushrooms. Maybe mario brothers. I don't know so then you read a paragraph of an article got bored or confused and moved on with the knowledge that all of your assumptions were wrong. But then you didn't actually replace it with any real knowledge okay. And so that was fine until you started seeing f. T. everywhere and you realize that maybe you should learn what it means and also you have a podcast taping coming up so here we are. And it's not that ludicrous bro. Stay with me all right. Mitchell mitchell clarke wrote a delightful article on the verge explaining t so i'm largely relying on that also wired new york times and a few other places. Let's go all right. Non fungible tokens are essentially a way that you can claim ownership of a digital thing. So think music art tweets yes. These are all reproducible. But so is a postcard of the mona lisa. So non fungible tokens exists on a blockchain at this point. Mostly a theory but others are getting on board and there are online marketplaces like open sea bull and fifty gateway where you can buy and sell the official ownership of the digital thing again. We're talking music video. Art animated gifts for artists provides a new way to sell your work and you can also set it up. So that you get a little kickback. Every time the nfc changes hands with a new owner. Lots nice so right now. You're like bro. Why would someone pay millions of dollars for an animated gif when you can just download it for free again. Why would someone bhai a monet painting for millions when you can get it on a mug from the gift shop for fifteen dollars so it all comes down to the basic tautology that some things have value just because someone decides it has value now for some people the value might be bragging rights to that end. You get to buy an nf t fred digital drawing of a cat because you are looking for a new way to show people. You are wealthy for others. Value might be about your phantom or support of an artist or musician. Kings of leon grimes dead mouse and many others have released. And fte's for music and art and for others. The value might be purely speculative. You're buying the nf t for digital drawing up a cat because you think it will rise in value as many other people agree. They want that authentic digital drawing a cat. And you're like seriously digital yes. Ten years ago. A guy named chris torres created the animated. Meam niane cat. You know it as the flying cat with a pop tart for a body and it's leaving a rainbow trail behind as soon as you google. It you're going to be like. Oh cat i totally know what you're talking about. So in february torres created an nf t version and put it up for auction and it sold for nearly six hundred thousand dollars following a last minute bidding frenzy other f- tease out there. William shatner is dental x ray digital baseball cards photos of lindsay lohan. And the first tweet. By jack dorsey just sold for two point. Nine million. don't feel too bad because the proceeds argos support a charity. So there's that and if t. Are definitely booming right now with probably more speculators than collectors and fans driving up prices but experts looking beyond the boom. See a great opportunity for a new way to guarantee authenticity. So for example nike already has a patent to create. Nfc's attached to shoes to guarantee their authenticity. Called crypto. kicks so when you consider that. A pair of air jordan twelve flu games are worth more than one hundred thousand dollars. Yeah i think. I want an fte with that purchase. Please and maybe you're still skeptical like a bunch of people in the comments of the articles. I read but seriously. How is this all that new and different. It's not like people buy sneakers art or baseball cards for the value of the materials themselves. They buy them for the aesthetics. The design the rarity as the new york times quoted. Marc andreessen. ben. Horowitz a two hundred dollar pair of sneakers is like five dollars in plastic. You're buying a feeling and right now the feeling that. Fte's is similar to one a stamp collector or baseball card collector or art collector or fashion. Or even a speculator might feel. It's that feeling that you are special because you own something someone else wants.

NFC Mitchell Mitchell Clarke Wired New York Times Leon Grimes Chris Torres Mona Lisa Mario Bhai Jack Dorsey William Shatner Torres Baseball Lindsay Lohan Google Nike FLU
"marc andreessen" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

05:05 min | 3 months ago

"marc andreessen" Discussed on Venture Stories

"There. We have a lot of listeners who are from india. Water indians and So this may not be too flexible. Everybody By this was definitely my time and my you know my education and upbringing was so doesn't broadly applying g definitely not trying to states this but i think the broader context at least four indian. Education system is You know india's a very populated country. There are lots and lots of people getting very few spots and this applies for education is low where the top colleges have only the number of seats and there are lots of ten x twenty x number of people competing for That same those few seeds said these colleges and so it just basically becomes actress and what really happens is at least for me was it just starts a pushing up earlier earlier in your in your age group and range. Where in a by the time. You're twelve thirteen years old. You start prepping for what you kind of wanna do and You know you're hired asian or middle school do Goal is all about. Like how do you get yourself into a really good college. Where does that mean so you start thinking like extra lessons you start figuring out where you want to apply if seen like really crazy things where you know. Parents were just totally approved themselves to move closer to these like really big colleges so that they could just have a shot at getting their kids through there and so mine was you know i think starting may tenth grade. I actually know very little about the american education system. Because i was not united in the study here And so You know a tenth grade in india. Basically what you start doing. Is you finish school. Monday to friday And then saturday and sunday pretty much. Most of the day You kind of these extra lessons and We they could for me. Were just like bicycles from one place to the other and get these like classes to learn so usually entirely stem basal. It will do Chemistry physics mad. Whoever took biology. Which didn't they hated it for the passion You know you kind of take. These three hour classes followed by homework followed by tests. So i remember doing this for years and years on every meter to college and then there was this like brief fight and then you realize that you still have this rat race to figure out where you land a job in And you know this is you know i've seen like Full over here. I think might want my cousin. Brothers actually hit on the stub host for the first time and i think we all went through the decisions And it's very very different to what i've seen here at least superficially viewing it and I think you know the point here is like part of it. Is you kind of get forced into this because of scarcity and you just have to like make it through to get to the top colleges are of it they we're talking about this on the kind of preps you for later in life and a really reread defend the pressures at different but you kind of get a handle flake just being able to handle pressure Especially you know. Just a stereotype Asian strang to expect. Nick the very best from you back. Definitely my experience. I heard you know might be blowing up. I think the describing not the face at all the poking open. India will know very well. Here's one week ray. You're entire life is determined that you provide for that the age seven or onwards i think we just seven hundred people. You like beginning vm. Instead share your numbers at any point. You're wondering what number is. Gp numbers reichen classroom. Oh we hadn't seen. I wanna move on. It will kill me right of the show. some on a good idea that i've known for some of you know back when i met her In a in inches in college She won an award for being. The student ever would not miss a single class across several years of college. Laid a rich knock one. You don't miss a single day. A single session. Of course the carnage actually. Give him an award for that Which is ever been mentioned before is one that we've documented online forever But eddie sorta gotta get up. I'm dead. I okay so this is amazing. Okay thank you so much and thank. You aren't the so but let me recap from upcoming upper head and clean attempt etiquette or do some i think so just joining us This is the nightly a good time show where we talked about the future of education and now. Rt was amazingly dorky. Good student back in college..

india saturday sunday friday twenty one week Monday three hour seven hundred people reichen first time twelve thirteen years old Nick a may one India single class single day tenth grade
"marc andreessen" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

08:01 min | 3 months ago

"marc andreessen" Discussed on Venture Stories

"Leads gentlemen it's time put a good time. Hey hey hey Heavy a to another exciting episode of good nine on the show are arthur's every single night at ten pm where we talk about What's happening in the world of heck culture and pretty much anything else that boxing door minds. We very exciting show for you tonight. The time have a special guest every night but we also have the usual suspects of we have. Marc andreessen have stevenson offs. You have abigail joining us tonight But our special guests is addict. orenburg an ethic. Someone have gotten general pretty well over the last year or so entirely online virtually. He's one off the yet. I'd like to say he puts me to shame because he read so much. Consumed much dislike prolific. He's always asking the really great questions and just always like braver. Dot by just as an introduction if an entrepreneur investor community builder is general continental co at college global He's also the founded on deck. And he's going to explain to us. Older what on deck does and just ahead an acquisition or a another companies are going to talk about that as well He also hosts one off the really popular. Podcasts out there venture stories and our chairman. I thought we should ask him about that as well. Because it will every part gas especially the good ones such an art form it. We've been learning largest doing the snap house in. It's like chaos it's just ad hoc in we don't do any. Perhaps as marple constantly point outdoors and behind broadcast is the exact opposite. It's like really gets great guests and so on. I have been unemploy so not so great. Great guests but balka. You're so happy to have your here. I know you're like prolific on flop-houses well to relief to have your here. Thanks for thanks for the first time a first time caller longtime listener first-time caller now. Yeah welcome tell us about the ondeck. That's one of the things that gave. We really cute survived a also saw your tweet storm a couple of days ago explaining to us what it was and it it basically started out with saying it stand foot adults and that really got my attention. What does that mean. Explain to us. What on dicta yet. So that's That's that's a long term vision. I mean if you look at what universities do they. They serve as places where people find what they wanna do. They'd be learned the skills to get better at it and then they make the most meaningful professional and personal relationships of their lives. And and so we're we're we're thinking about is why does it have to end at twenty two and so why can't be like long activity And so we started. Initially i with this cohort model for for people who are looking to start or join their necks company. I started when i was at. And i was looking to start or join my next thing. And it's hard to have a community of other people co-founders bat around start-up ideas and so we ended up having this sort of imagine like a y combinator for founders before they have a company and so that works well and we wanted to take this sort of cohort peer to peer fellowship. Model and apply it to dozens of other categories like investors Creators professional peer groups of any position. You can imagine. Basically each category services the supply for another groups demand like powders hire people raise money distribution of an israeli the broader idea of back stanford when he goes down for. Just meet people in your major but you also meet people the art school. You also get a network of mba's and you benefit from that that rich network in diversity so the division for just close by mid week serve people from soon as they graduate to retire so imagine the journey of someone. They graduate college the first job as a designer than become a design manager than they transitioned. Finding new. job isn't a product manager than they want to to build an audience by starting very successful clubhouse show like they wanna start a company angel investing the idea that they'll be programs for every step of their path by we haven't made any money from our columbus paul. If you're happy to send us a check etiquette. I'm excited because i think there's something which if you have thoughts on i taking a step back. I'm very curious to hear your thoughts as spoiler alert munich a prep On just education in general right. I think you know. twitter Up fuse perspective. You'll see the rise of bottles like lambda. I'm just just jesse. Us obie awards happening education. What do you think is dead And welcoming will we have. We don't have ten hours tonight. So i'll we'll have to the summarized there's so many mark jump jumping i'll the quick punch lines here are basically the Higher education basically. It's too expensive. It's too monopolistic preventing competitors from bending that cost curve making it cheaper. It doesn't prepare people for jobs as well as a good and it's not serving as a good filter for employers so just to walk through those really quickly on the jobs front. We too many people going to college and not jobs. Not job probably graduates. Only fifty percent of employed college graduates. Got jobs require a degree and only thirty seven percent. Take jobs requiring a high school diploma. Just paint visual in two thousand ten there. One hundred thousand people with bachelor's degree who became janitors and five thousand with masters became janitors. You don't need to go to college to become a janitor. No disrespect degenerates On filter side you start. Ups used to give services zoom out personality. Iq tests directly but then it became sort of a politically correct to do. So so they all outsource of those colleges and colleges where you proved iq via via the sat and sort of broader conscientiousness via completing the for your program and and now the colleges are sort of starting to eliminate sat programs or many graduate exams. There pretending that eliminating the the these tests won't dilute the credential but if you combine that with great inflation across the board what does it really mean to get into college anymore. What does it mean to graduate. So that's the filter on the expensive side in college. That is now over trillion dollars. Our government spends three percent of gdp on it and that that number keeps rising while also the cost your costs increase three hundred percent since nineteen eight. And this is what happens. When government restricts supply price escalates quality remains stagnant. And not only that. Our government also subsidizes demand with taxpayer. Funding causes prices to rise even higher and the last thing i'll say is on the competition side. You'd think we'd all these problems there'd all these emerging competitors you know a call. Google facebook napoli's often but they get disrupted every every few decades in education. The top universities have remained the same. For centuries without new entrance you posing much of a threatening stanford with over a hundred years ago. That's the latest new entrance and it's because basically universities are of cartels they benefit from tax exemption at the company level. They federal funding federal funding for research subsidies for student loans. And unless you're rented you don't get those benefits and they oversee the accreditation and so we're not. It's very hard to to to compete. So all this explains the lack of innovation. Why disrupt yourselves when no one else can disrupt you. I don't know markelle that anything to that. Yeah mark before. I think my question for bible eric. That was the highest number of spicy sentences. Were you'll be had on the show right village. Probably gonna go blow up and i wanna come back to eloquent. Mark a bunch of thoughts on the eddie. But i'm julius with marc andreessen in.

marc andreessen Marc andreessen five thousand three percent facebook Google twitter abigail bible three hundred percent two thousand tonight One hundred thousand people mark fifty percent arthur julius twenty two over trillion dollars first time
"marc andreessen" Discussed on This is Product Management

This is Product Management

07:28 min | 9 months ago

"marc andreessen" Discussed on This is Product Management

"Recovery kind of issues is tied to one machine. Now, obviously, if you think about like what happened to Sony and that kind of breach, you can literally be put out of business by a single person who's clever enough to take you down right. So I think the risk has changed quite a bit over the years in the complexity of the techniques attackers using has followed suit. Can you talk a little bit more about how you go about process that you take full converting once into needs? I give me an example. So if you think about smart home devices is just a really good sort of domain to talk this through I think that's an area where there isn't a broad understanding their FBI warnings. The week sometimes about critical `vulnerability is in IOT devices or a manufacturer that nobody would know by name is there ultimately supplier of technology to a third party who has the brand recognition? So you know there might be well publicized wonder abilities in some of that back in technology but to consumers, it doesn't mean anything. One of the things that we've sort of focused on is, how do you raise awareness with sort of a vulnerability scanning approach? In Enterprise, for example, just to give you the context in vulnerability scanning software. So you put these solutions out in the enterprise. It's scans the network, it finds vulnerable devices, and then it kind of gives the IT team a hit list of where we need to go what do we need to patch? That whole notion doesn't exist in the consumer space right and even if it did, it would be too complicated. If you were to uncover a vulnerability in that toaster in the remediation steps might be go to this website use FTP download this firmware go to a dos prompt uploaded over here. Blah Blah Blah is way too complicated for consumer. One of the ideas that we use the sort of these game fixation tunnel how could you essentially give a simplified view? Let's take a mobile APP. For example, it scans the home comes up with a list of vulnerabilities, things that they should be concerned about rather than give them the Kinda Geeky ups to try to remediate it. You give them view of what that kind of issue means to them in terms of privacy. Right that thing we talk about this actually emotionally connected and then this gamification. So you give them a score. This is you know how risky your home is. If you do these things, you improve your score right and then you sort of have a rewards program had a notion where the better score you improve the more value you unlock in the product. It's an area in general s just to sort of conceptual example where I think game vacation for things that people want like rewards, right? They want rewards you use that to drive the behavior towards things that they need a really long answer to your question but that's kind of one of the the sort of key mechanisms. ICU. Effective in this way using gamification that trying to tie the two together. The notion of rapid prototyping has been important for us to uncover what the right levers are. There is you've got this idea that for consumers they may not know what they want until they see. So it kind of evolved are thinking beyond kind of the classic qualitative approach, right? Like what keeps you up at night in they don't necessarily know what should be keeping. Track versus a sort of prototype approach where you put something in front of them that you know sort of explains in their language, what the impact of these kinds of things are in a much different response to that stimulus. It's interesting to see the parallels where other industries in how you're using gamification. Something way frequently here in industries like healthcare where a user patient. Might need to eat more healthy or exercise, but that's not necessarily what they want. Sir How do you use rewards and incentives to achieve that? So, there's this whole family spaced. For example that that we're in, there's kind of the classic use case that I mentioned. Where is sort of assumes the Internet is bad. The Internet's a bad thing and we have to protect you from. It does actually the other flipside of that argument, which is that the Internet and technology in general can actually enable safety right? So it's not just a threat vector where we have to provide controls for kids controls for smart home devices to mitigate risk, but it's also an. Right. So as one of our key themes in our vision is to think about how do we actually use these technologies in the home and in what kids are using to make their lives safer right. So there's this whole notion of cyber wellness. Now, how do you take those digital wellness concepts and apply them to cyber domain and I think to your point gamification? Is He lever to us? If you saotome cybersecurity cyber safety, is there a difference between the two? Do you differentiate them in any way or two income interchangeably? I would say that cyber safety is the expansion of in what you would typically ghost as security into all facets of your life. If you remember Marc Andreessen right a famous American entrepreneur, maybe eleven or so years ago. The famous quote you know software is eating the world when I hear that as a security person, my immediate follow up his will so our hackers, right? Wherever, their software automating aspects of life or deeply embedded into sort of what it means to be human. The militia side of that follows and hackers are trying to exploit those things as well. So I think about, what does it mean to be cyber safe it means thinking that way. It's much more than keeping viruses off your computer. Right I've softwares eating the world and the security has to be everywhere has to be pervasive in all aspects of your life as well. Cyber Safety for us I think is a much broader opportunity in in what we're addressing is more about safety in society as relates to technology not just this idea that nobody wants to get viruses on their devices right so expansion of what we're focused on. Early, to my point about the different businesses we have this is essentially product strategy as well to move beyond security of the devices into protection of the individual identities protection of digital exhaust that people leave across the Internet as they browse and and you know for my obviously the protection against smart home where emerging threats from new technology. Just out of curiosity, how exposed are we to side the threat of talked about the home various points that we might be exposed toaster computer how expose alley? Is Pretty bad in probably an answer for that in each of those four domains, right In terms of security and viruses. There is some old statistics about if you put a a fresh computer up on the Internet without updating it, you know it would get compromised within an hour i. think that's still effectively true. On the identity space, the risk of identity theft and what that means to someone is far beyond that idea of replacing the toaster who replaced the toaster.

FBI Sony Marc Andreessen ICU
India, TikTok, and the U.S.

Exponent

05:45 min | 10 months ago

India, TikTok, and the U.S.

"I James Ben how I. I'm well. Don't want to say how well because. I took over with this week and posted some photos on my instagram stories and got a few response for folks saying that. I was rubbing it in their face I was able to sort of move freely around the country, and they were not able to do so so I stay on the download. It plays into your perpetual guilt because those awesome. Followed out with like an apology about how you'd want to read it, in which I enjoyed both I must confess a. Of. Couple were just joking about the photos, so I put the little bit I apologize for. People advocate that would so everyone wants mid Western guilt absolutely, so we were talking off line and you. Shifted a bit too a little less frequent, but maybe a little more sort of exploratory. You know there's so much that's been happening in the world, but topic has been top of mind for us. Obviously has been China and I know we were talking about Tiktok. That's been in the news this week, but one of the reasons been the news is what's been happening with China India and then we're kind of thought well, actually, there's lots of interesting in India sort of itself, and I thought it might be useful to sort of take. Take a step back today and not talk about whatever I wrote about this week was sort of picture. What's going on with these countries with these social networks? And how if that should sort of impact with the US should do, and I think just to sort of caveat upfront. They were both coming at this with a fair bit of uncertainty, both because we're talking about other countries that we are not citizens ought not part of those cultures, etc, but also it's not totally clear. What's the right thing to do either? Yeah, no I agree. I like this like I m most curious about. The News emerged about Tiktok what to do about it in the United States but I definitely feel this a story where the beginning Israeli mountainous region between China and India yeah, I mean there's been this conflict that is frankly gone for a very very long time between China and India and the disputed line of Control up in the mountains in the Himalayas and And you know there's been occasional flare ups over the decades by starting in May. There was sort of a new one where you know again. It's all sort of fuzzy fuzzy, not just because you know, there's no outside reporters up there and also you know both sides are not really talking about it that much, at least they weren't particularly back in May but. But. Also it's an area of the world. Where like the train is like shifting constantly right? There's earthquakes mudslides. There's avalanches and so when you talk about a unclear border, that border is unclear noxious, because it's never been sell diplomatically, because like the earth is like actually changing under your feet right and probably contributed to the flash point. It sounds like that was. Was a hell of a Malay- up at a whole bunch of Chinese and Indian troops just got into it, and it was not weapons. It sounded like it was hand to hand. Combat and I don't know that the Chinese casualties if that were any were reported, but I think I remember reading the twenty Indian soldiers that were killed as a result of this. Obviously nationalist fervor on both sides of that border, because this is disputed border because these flare ups have happened one of the very wise things that both sides have done is agreed a long time ago. That are soldiers there, but they're not armed. So that's why. When there was a dispute, it ended up being like a fistfight and rocks and shoving and those deaths as I think is understand it. We're actually people over quiz, which is a pretty crappy way to die is to say the least you obviously with weapons. It could have been much worse, but it's sort of that sort of weirdness of. Of the situation I think in this case it was China, sort of pushing in building on their side and pushing into the disputed area, and that India sort of responding to that, but again we're dealing it something. That's very fuzzy, but I think that magnified particularly sort of the nationalistic response on the Indian side one of the things this by far the most interesting in regards to the Indian government's response that just decided to do something that I naturally thought was just not a weapon. You could really reach full but I reached anyway, and that was to ban. All of the social media applications from. From China that were built by Chinese companies in that were made available in India and again kinda surprising. It's also one of those things where wow somebody just did that. And you realize that's now a weapon in people's hospitals. The irony of that is India will fall from the first country to do it as actually a trick that another country poke quite some time ago. Well, let's hold off the to get into that because I think the India market is actually really interesting for a few different reasons I mean you start sort of big picture? China has their own internet giants that have penetrated the majority. Majority of the company. The US has their Internet giants that penetrating WHO's part of the country, and both are looking for growth, and so you look for growth, and the area is sort of Southeast Asia in India are probably the two sort of next sort of markets that the focused on and the India point is particularly interesting. You remember a few years ago. Where facebook wanted to go into with facebook basics and the idea was. There's a lot of people that are in poverty in India and we're going to bring them Internet for the first time and was a huge sort of like grew haw. For for lack of a better term between facebook, and the Indian government and sort of people that were say that facebook was seeking to sort of like colonize the Internet. I think was how it was framed. Obviously, that's a very loaded sort of way to put it in India. Marc Andreessen wave waded into it and did not acquit himself. Well. We'll. And ultimately in the end, physically basics was ruled to be illegal

India China China India Indian Government United States Facebook Tiktok James Ben Instagram Marc Andreessen Southeast Asia
"marc andreessen" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"marc andreessen" Discussed on Recode Decode

"American workers when you look at thirty percent of malls closing driving trucks the most common job in twenty nine states there two and a half million call center workers making fourteen dollars an hour. What do you think the timeframe is on US replacing those call center workers with artificial intelligence? I think it's hard to imagine the idea given right now. We're like the lowest employment that jobs will disappear really quickly. It reminds me a little bit of the farm to manufacturing shrinks shift where it happened over shorter amount of time but it did have these profound effects. I was interviewing Marc Andreessen about this and one of the things he said was. I said he goes well. It's like farming manufacturing. There's so many more jobs manufacturer and everything turned out well I said yeah but what happened to the blacksmith the family of the basements and everything else and he said well who cares about that and so talk about that concept of what happens to these jobs because it seems to me something I always say. Is that every job everything that can be digitized. We'll be digitized. Let me say I'm completely with you in this Camp Cara because when I dug into the numbers of what happened even to the manufacturing workers in the Midwest in the South we automated away four million manufacturing jobs Bob's in Michigan Ohio Pennsylvania Wisconsin Missouri Iowa all the swing states that Donald Trump needed to win not coincidentally and I studied economics and what did my textbook say would happen to those four million manufacturing workers. They get retrained reskill guild move for new opportunities higher productivity jobs all would go well. How many guys learn that in college so then I found the studies as to what happened to the manufacturing workers in the mid West after they lost their jobs in real life almost half of them left the workforce never worked again Dan and all of that group about half disability and then you saw surges in drug overdoses in suicides in those communities to the point where life expectancy is now declined for the last three years society-wide not just in Ohio? I'm talking about in the united the states of America our life expectancy has declined for three straight years because suicides and drug overdoses of now overtaken vehicle deaths is cause of death now. My textbook did not say hey you get rid of these manufacturing jobs. They go home. They get drunk. They kill themselves. They vote for Donald Trump that was not in my textbook but that is exactly what has happened and so when you see what has happened to those workers I spent seven years in these communities. When you see what happened to those workers the exact same thing will happen to the mall workers the call center workers that truck drivers and talk about the truck drivers because they will take this very very poorly? You know you talk about the average trucker forty nine year old man high school education making forty six thousand dollars a year tens of thousands of them are ex military aleatory lot of their own trucks. How would you react if you're that person and there's a robot truck that never stops that you cannot compete against at least some of them are going to react disastrously catastrophically and right now you already have in New York City? Something like twelve tax uber drivers killed themselves last year to in part because of economic exigencies and circumstances one did it outside the city hall just to try and get attention got no attention. No one cares but eventually eventually you're going to have a critical mass of workers who who actually externalize their own the disintegration of their way of life instead of internalizing so it's an Asian crazy I interviewed Buddha judge last week and he talked about the same thing that income inequality is going to lead lead this kind of behavior and dangerous behavior..

Marc Andreessen Donald Trump Michigan Ohio US America New York City Midwest Buddha Bob Dan Iowa Missouri Wisconsin Pennsylvania forty six thousand dollars fourteen dollars forty nine year thirty percent seven years
Hey, Alexa! Sonic Logos are the Next Big Thing

Business Wars Daily

04:24 min | 2 years ago

Hey, Alexa! Sonic Logos are the Next Big Thing

"This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to show a brand new podcast from octa. Every successful entrepreneur follows a different path. Learn how to forge your own by listening two zero two zero wherever you get your podcasts. From wondering, I'm David Brown. And this is business wars daily on this Thursday, April twenty fifth. Hey, alexa. I'd like to buy a motorcycle. And no, I haven't done that. But the day may soon come when we'll all be shopping on our speakers while so far only a small number of some five or six percent of actually bought anything by calling out. Hey, Alexa, or, hey. Google market watchers predict the audio shopping industry will be worth forty billion dollars by twenty twenty two. That's in part because of the explosion of on demand. Audio from our homes to our cars to our mobile devices. We're listening to more and more podcasts and other kinds of streaming media. You could say Audio's having its day for big brands, especially those that don't have a physical product that. You can actually see this means it's time to think about designing logos for the ear. Take a listen. That was the new sound of MasterCard the gigantic payment processor released earlier this year it used what else an audio press. Release to explain why corporate leaders felt it was so important to create a sonic identity. One reason to be ready when the smart speaker shopping revolution takes hold the sound. You heard is just one iteration of a ninety second music anthem MasterCard is localizing the theme all over the world. And also producing sounds and even vibrations that occur when you use your smartphone to shop with MasterCard. The company hopes that like a visual logo, it's sonic logo will create instant recall its way finding for the twenty-first audio storytelling century, or as we put it. It's the process of distilling a multi million dollar brand into a few seconds of sound MasterCard generated a lot of buzz with at sonic logo launch. But it's actual. Really late to the party its fiercest rival visa on its own sonic logo and associated mobile. Sounds and sessions early last year in the absence of old cash. Register clinks customers want to hear something that signifies a successful transaction the company says intervals sonic logo split-second. Tune that plays after you've successfully parted with your purchase cash. And then there's this as smart speaker use grows audio shopping becomes second nature. There's nothing to look at while you shop the obvious problem for brands on a smart speaker visual logo has no place but the audio logo certainly does musicians. Take notice is a whole new market out. There waiting for. You is just that. You're tunes could be awfully short. From wondering this is business wars daily. We'd love to know more about you. And we'd be so grateful if you could answer just a few questions visit wondering dot com slash survey. And thanks so much. I'm David Brown. We'll see you tomorrow. This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to PO a brand new podcast from octa zero IPO gets into the blood, sweat and tears of business growth. What it took for some of the world's most successful entrepreneurs to get to where they are today, and what they learned in the process. The first episode is a candid conversation with venture capitalist, Marc Andreessen. He's incredibly articulate and to the point with his advice to entrepreneurs right now about halfway through episode two which is all about what to do when you get your big idea. I can't get enough of zero to PO find it wherever you get your podcast.

Mastercard Alexa David Brown PO Marc Andreessen Google Twenty Twenty Forty Billion Dollars Million Dollar Ninety Second Twenty Fifth Six Percent
XL Men Demand Fashion: Are You Shaquille ONeals Big, Sexy Model?

Business Wars Daily

03:35 min | 2 years ago

XL Men Demand Fashion: Are You Shaquille ONeals Big, Sexy Model?

"This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to show a brand new podcast from octa. Every successful entrepreneur follows a different path. Learn how to forge your own by listening two zero two zero wherever you get your podcasts. From wondering, I'm David Brown. And this is business daily on this Wednesday, April twenty fourth one reporter Daphne Howland of the industry site, retail dive wrote about the explosion and women's plus size fashion. Something happened that surprised her larger men reached out to or saying they want the same kind of mainstream and high end fashion that plus size women are now finally enjoying about a third of American men are so called big and tall, but such larger sized clothing. Only accounts for ten percent of all menswear sales Forbes reports, but now there is a bit of increased attention to creating good-looking fashion for men who are taller and heavier than the average guy retail dives Jalan reports on a handful of specialty in mainstream companies paying attention, including the clothing box company, stitch fix and men's online retailer Benito's both recently. Attended their men's sizes to be more inclusive stitch fix told retail dive that when it announced an XL offering for men twenty five thousand customers signed up on a waiting list, and blogger called the Kirby fashion Easter lauded bonobos saying that this move is another validation that plus size men belong in mainstream fashion brands. Oh, and if you had noticed there's a walking billboard for fashionable big and tall men, and he's looking for you Shaquille O'Neal who stands seven foot one and weighs about three hundred twenty five pounds has a line of big and tall men's clothing, it JC Penney through Sunday shack is conducting a nationwide search for model his size. He's often called a giant. And there aren't many like him he acknowledges so pennies is working with a modeling agency will Amenas in what they call the biggest and tallest search around looking for shack says big and sexy guys. Like me, maybe the publicity will finally help this miniscule slice to the menswear market grow. A lot bigger. Rum. Wondering this business wars daily, if you find this story fund tweeted, would you word of mouth is how people find thanks so much for listening. I'm David Brown will see tomorrow. This episode of business was daily is brought to you by zero to PO a brand new podcast from octa zero IPO gets into the blood, sweat and tears of business growth. What it took for some of the world's most successful entrepreneurs to get to where they are today, and what they learned in the process. The first episode is a candid conversation with venture capitalist, Marc Andreessen. He's incredibly articulate and to the point with his advice to entrepreneurs right now about halfway through episode two which is all about what to do when you get your big idea. I can't get enough of zeroed IPO find it wherever you get your podcast.

Shaquille O'neal David Brown Shack Marc Andreessen Daphne Howland Reporter Forbes Jc Penney Benito PO Amenas Three Hundred Twenty Five Poun Ten Percent Seven Foot
Woman CEO to Succeed Best Buys Turnaround Star

Business Wars Daily

04:01 min | 2 years ago

Woman CEO to Succeed Best Buys Turnaround Star

"This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to show a brand new podcast from octa. Every successful entrepreneur follows a different path. Learn how to forge your own by listening two zero two zero wherever you get your podcasts. From wondering, I'm David Brown and this business wars daily on this Tuesday, April twenty third, you know, these days, we're no strangers to reporting on the bankruptcies and closures of big old retail chains. Bad news about legacy companies like Sears, k mart PayLess and Circuit City can make it seem like it's impossible for brick and mortar stores to survive much less thrive. Well, in that context today story is pretty surprising. Electronics retailer best buy is doing better than ever. Thanks in part to CEO. Uber's Ulee best buy finance chief Corey berry will become CEO. A rare appointment for a woman in the fortune five hundred ranks at forty four years old berry will also be one of the youngest big company. Ceos Joe Lee will continue working at best buy his executive chairman and advisory role. When Julie took the reins in twenty twelve best buy was suffering looked as if it could be on its deathbed in. Two thousand thirteen it stock was in the dumps selling for about twenty dollars today after five years of steady growth best buy shares or at a record high over seventy dollars some analysts call the company's trajectory one of the greatest turnaround stories in recent business history. So the question is how exactly did show compete with Amazon and turn best buy around when Circuit City could not in twenty twelve best buy was suffering from so-called showrooming syndrome. That is you'd go there to try out a computer or a pair of headphones than to save money you'd buy on Amazon. So Joe Lee change the game. He matched prices to Amazon and improved service ahead of many retailers. He also allowed customers to order online and pick up at best buys thousand stores if best buy could do it why not Circuit City, which closed in two thousand nine that seems to be the rationale for circuit. City leaders who resurrected the business last year, primarily online radio shack to is attempting some operations but best buy strategy, which looks so common sense is hard to mimic, Circuit City and radio. Shacks still seem like has been with most consumers unaware they're actually open last year the motley fool compared the ailing electric spenders to best buy and didn't spare the snark they may be back from the dead the fool wrote. But that doesn't mean they scare anyone especially best buying. From wondering this business words daily, like our daily analysis share our show with a friend or colleague, why don't you cheer appreciated? I'm David Brown back with you tomorrow. This of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to PO a brand new podcast from octa zero. IPO gets into the blood, sweat and tears of business growth. What it took for some of the world's most successful entrepreneurs to get to where they are today, and what they learned in the process. The first episode is a candid conversation with venture capitalist, Marc Andreessen. He's incredibly articulate and to the point with his advice to entrepreneurs right now. I'm about halfway through episode two which is all about what to do when you get your big idea. I can't get enough of zeroed IPO find it wherever you get your podcast.

Circuit City Joe Lee Amazon CEO David Brown Marc Andreessen Corey Berry Sears Julie Showrooming Syndrome Executive Chairman PO Forty Four Years Seventy Dollars Twenty Dollars Five Years
"marc andreessen" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

03:07 min | 2 years ago

"marc andreessen" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"And it actually turns out the symmetry of risk return fund, something that fails is really not a problem. I don't find something succeeds Iraqis, they problem. Yes. Sure. Right. And so he analyzed his returns. And he concluded after thirty years of venture. He concluded. He would have had better results head. He shredded all the business plans upon receipt and never read them and only worked against the resumes, only work against the resumes. Right there. I guess the people right? Yes. If he had just purely evaluating and the people he would've makes sense that much better. Of course that begs the whole question of how to evaluate the people. But the point is like it may not be a predictive model against I'll give you another one EBay like a lot of people believe they could've they could've found anybody. Well, it's like, okay. You need a picture nineteen ninety-five, right? You've got how about how about we do this? How about somebody? How about somebody wants to buy something on the internet so badly that they go to the post office, and they by money order, which was the only way to pay for things on EBay when it got flooded. And then let's imagine somebody wants to buy something so much that they're going to send the money order to the person who claims to be selling it. Right. And then that person is actually going to send. I remember EBay seemed crazy. I remember being really nervous to use EBay the first time, I used I remember being really nervous about it. Like, wait. I don't underst-. I did then some had something. Maybe I remember being like, this seems nuts. One of the jokes that one of the jokes that the internet industry is basically they're all things at alz always told you not to do like do not get in a car with strangers right right lifting. Uber rice. Do not like state of stranger's house right overnight Airbnb. Right. Do not send people money in the mail right without knowing whether it was on the I crossing app, then we're really going to really gonna kill it. I don't want to date with somebody be online because that's that's a tolerable for it. Right. The point of the back test, basically is like okay it tests. Your on bullshit of like. Okay. Like, I now have all these rules. Okay. So now apply the back the back to it's basically says is like these rules like they're only useful. Right. And there's only so much you can assume and so therefore, but but at the same time, so that's part one at the same time. You can't just then go into motive like okay ambiguous. I don't know. And you just shrug and everything. Right. You you can't have no point of view because then you won't be able to differentiate between anything. And so where we've come out as we we call it as we call it strong views weekly held, and so let's have a very strong point of view, this kind of kind of guide our search kind of through the landscape and tell us what to focus on based on some theory that we've developed, but then let's be really open to the discontinuing evidence that basically says that and then let's be willing to do the complete win. And the other side the people peace, and we can end talking about this is I guess when those companies, what's the term you. When someone starts a company it's supposed to do something. And then they realize it's supposed to be something else. These days it's called the pivot. Right. The pivot in my era. It was called the fuck up, right? Right the pivot. So but like slack was a different business. But you was that an example, we're betting on the person's that one of the things that you've now we were totally wrong about the business. But we were totally right. That guy Stewart Stewart was going to figure it out. That's right. So this is part of the payoff part of the payoff of a betting on the best people. If you can figure out what that new they are brought to the path is they will get you to the promised land, not always. But they'll have a pretty good chance. They will. They're right. They're injecting into the complex adaptive system. It is the world..

EBay Stewart Stewart alz thirty years
"marc andreessen" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"marc andreessen" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"Just a couple more things. You once told me, I think like the first thing that that you love to be proven wrong that one of the things you love is to have a core convinced ideology about something. And then to be able to accept in a flash that can you talk a little bit about that about why that's valuable and about how you either trained yourself or just were we're that way. And what what the gains are of living that way so start with saying, it's aspirational. Yes, sure. I've actually tried to figure out why this is so people treat their ideas like their children, and I've actually try I've actually gone back. I've been reading doing a lot of reading legs ecology neurology. Behavioral sciences about behavioral economics is about this idea that we fall in love with the we get we get wed to this thing. So I think I find I've done enough reading. I think I've finally figured out. Why this is the case I think it literally is it seems like we're treating ideas like children, we I think we're literally treating your ideas like their children. So I think you I think it's never luminary thing. I think in the evolutionary context in which we are genetics were developed right 'cause they're genetics are unchanged over the last fifty thousand years affectively fifty thousand years ago, there weren't really ideas. Just children. Like, you're not sitting around the campfire speculating on like abstract. There's a life. You're like trying to get through the frigging day. And then you've got this infant in your desperately trying to keep the infants alive. And so we've got this like there's something heritz Oriel protective like this is my thing. This is my offspring. This is my legacy. This is my this is everything valuable and important to me is like right here in my hands. And it's going to die without me. And like my God, I have to like emotionally like and after all these rational things, you know, to protect it. Like, somebody said kids like you change your entire priority ordering like neurologically changes when you have kids. So basically, I think literally what happened is. I literally we now. Now, we live in a world of ideas, we weren't like it's weird. Like, the whole concept ideas comes from kind of rationality, which was somehow showed up on our wearing. But like, we're still we still have this kind of legacy wiring and the legacy wiring, basically says okay now, this idea is my kid like this is the thing I believe in I want to protect I wanna foster I wanted nursery. I want to grow part of my passion. And then it's like, and then anytime that challenges you get the threat response with somebody challenging your kid. You know, you get your you get that you feel it you feel it in your limbic system was like your pulse rises, your your back. Gets up your you. Flush people you start to get people get fence defensive you get the defensive reaction. It's like why the why are you defending an abstract idea? Like, nothing's going to happen to you. Right. But you're about what it feels like it. So so what do you go look for that? So here's the problem. So here's the problem is like most your ideas are wrong. Like like, let's say especially say, especially if you're in my business. Let's even say, especially if you're me like mostly ideas are wrong. And so at some point the thing I figured I started doing the back test. Call in financing, call the back test, which is basically, okay, take whatever algorithm system. I have for trying to figure out what's gonna happen. The future whatever set of rules derived on kind of how the world works and how to predict things go back and back test..

fifty thousand years
"marc andreessen" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"marc andreessen" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"Next recommended the Nash recommend of the next or you're looking for the or the two way feedback loop, which we had with the browser and web server computers had this in the old days. The new the the MAC was gonna work when every time somebody bought a MAC it made it more likely somebody would build a piece of software for the MAC every new piece of software made it more likely somebody would by amac. So it's it's called the network effect an operating system, and so and so and you don't set go and talks about a ratchet ratcheting up mentioning exactly virtuous cycle that kind of thing. And so to be fair, they just because you see them really doesn't mean they all get big like that's not that's not how the world works. They don't all get there. But all of the ones that got big started right with that kind of small initial as you say, my microdosing a of the feedback. And so and then in our business, you know, there's asymmetric risk. Return? And so so basically, you wanna find the thing where you do have some evidence of you have early evidence that it's going to have that kind of kind of phenomenon and then everybody laughing at it is awesome. Because that's means it's out of consensus. Right. And that means it's like like people literally do not believe in it. And then and then as a consequence like if it does work if it keeps growing there will be an inversion at some point. And all of a sudden the entire world will go. Oh, yes. Right. And at that point, it becomes like immediately gigantically valuable this one of my favorite Hollywood quotes ever. Do you know the Jack Nicholson quote when the he saw the this this agent? Do you do, you know, where they they said to them, we might not need you. But when we need you we're going to need you really badly. We're really in Egypt like you're going to be completely not hire -able. And then suddenly you're going to be the biggest movie star in the world. And that I must repeat itself Arctic. Let's do a little ZipRecruiter business, which is fun to do. Hiring is challenging I know it because I'm always hiring people for the show. I'm hiring writers. And there is not the equivalent of ZipRecruiter to hire writers to work in your writer's room..

Jack Nicholson Nash writer Hollywood Egypt
"marc andreessen" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"marc andreessen" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"And so we try to start a company to do that. We actually that took us kind of in contact with the market within went out and kind of did a market survey of like, okay, how many interactive TV systems are actually alive. How many of them are actually working answer zero? So we're like, okay. Wait like hold on a second like this. This is not actually we actually Peter Thiel talks about the concept of a secret of the thing that you believe that's correct that nobody else believes unlike like the secret actually turned out to be interactive TV was not a thing is an ocean of Martin that Tony Gilroy talks about the secret thing to in my side of the street that yeah. Having a special secret. And you have it when you know, your ideas worth doing. It's what it feels like it's the special secret that you have and it was gonna freak out when it shows up he talks about that. Yeah. And it's often it's often it's not even so much. You're right about somebody something everybody else is wrong about it's more like. Can't even possibly believe. Like, it's inconceivable that it could be true. A lot of these things are actually sitting there in plain site. It's just the conventional wisdom becomes so strong. It's bucking the conventional wisdom and kind of the right way. So so we concluded like that wasn't going to happen. Then we basically had the idea of we're not the only ones that we had the idea for what today might be called XBox live or PlayStation network sort of interactive gaming and intendo was coming out with this. Great new Nintendo sixty four which is like a real computer for gaming council for the first time. And so we said, let's build a gaming interactive gaming network and online service for Nintendo sixty four then we looked at that. And then in ten sixty four wasn't gonna come out for two years. And then who even if it was gonna work, and so that was not going to be a thing. And so we actually we actually process of elimination of work our way back to like, I guess it's going to have to be the internet like. Like there is the only thing is actually working like it's the only thing is actually working. It's the only thing that actually has people using it. It's the only thing that actually is growing. It's the only thing that actually has people building content for it. And it's been completely dismissed by the establishment, but it's actually working, and that's actually one of the great themes of our time and venture capital, which is like the best case scenario for us is the thing that's working that everybody's laughing at like, that's that's our catnip. Right. And even if it's a small, and I'm I'm thinking when thinking you. when you were saying is is so the industry's saying, no. But if you get little blips, you can take your encouragement in very micro doses. Well, an input. Yes. That's correct. And in particular, what you're looking for is in that case, you're looking for the feedback loop. Yes, engagement engagement. So you're looking one users recommending to the.

Tony Gilroy Nintendo Peter Thiel two years
"marc andreessen" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"marc andreessen" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"Get customers to test your product or buy your products. They they're busy. They have other stuff going on most of them tell you know, you're trying to raise money most of the VC's tell you know, like generally is just generally all day long Zetec hunters. No, no, no. No. No. No. No. And to tell yourself, what do you tell yourself? Eventually they'll see that. I am contributing. Yeah. Yeah. Basically. Yeah. They're wrong. Well, it's actually an interesting thing number one. There has to be a part. This is the chip on the shoulder comes in handy. There has to be a thing of like, basically, screw them. Like, I know I'm right? And I know they're wrong, or at least I have. Wrong idea in that direction. And I'm I'm willing to fight my way through it. And by the way, it's like, you know, it's like, it's something you realize the nose aren't killing you, right? Yes. Right. And that's that's like a big, you know, this is kind of it's also why by the way, it's really good for engineers to and sales. Just because sales people here know for a living, right? Like, a friend of mine wants is now, but he's fearless kind of sales oriented personality. And I guess you figured out. What happened? He got a job in high school selling stick knives door to door, and he did that for two years. And then the best that ever is is second prize is, you know, exactly, but it's like ninety nine hundred hundred times it gets the door slammed his face because he wants to buy steak knives. The middle of the afternoon from like sixteen year old kid, but you know, every once in a while he would sell us any other challenge he put in front of himself as Israel, easy because it doesn't have that level of rejection. And so at some point you get comfortable with rejection, so that that's like an attitudinal thing. And then the other thing is look you do get feedback. Like, sometimes you are not, you know, sometimes it isn't quite right, right. And there's because there's two sides to the customer didn't answer MacIntosh. But once they got their hands on a MacIntosh. They had lots of feedback like the slow is too expensive. It's this staff the screen or you can take that feedback. The feedback. Right. And again, it's the spirit of generosity. Like, if they're giving you the if they're giving you the feedback on the spirit of okay, this is very promising. But it's not quite right for me yet because of Z like that's generosity on their part. Did you train yourself to handle the criticism or use naturally? Good at processing it because some people crumble like, I know if I had to train myself. I think it was it was literally it was it was the way the weird thing. It was it was so it was so universally accepted. It was even when I actually even even got out here even in ninety four it was so university, so universally accepted that the internet was not going to be a thing that I kind of had gotten used to it. So I come out here. I, you know, my what am I great kinda strokes of like in my life was meeting my partner Jim Clark in. So he was legendary founder at the time. And so he and I decided to start a company and so became Netscape. And you might think, oh, it's obvious idea browser company like most obvious thing in the world is like no that wasn't what happened at all. Because we knew the internet was not going to be a big deal because this is like not just wire magazine says time magazine, and this is the New York Times, and it's the endless litany of experts and politicians and everybody and big company executives and Microsoft, Microsoft. Off yourself and oracle. And all these companies are just like this things joke like this thing is absurd, and it's going to be these these other things, and so we actually tried to start a at the at the time version one we tried to start an interactive TV software company because everybody all the experts said that was going to be the thing and Jim's previous company was actually building a lot of these interactive TV systems..

Jim Clark Israel Microsoft Netscape wire magazine partner New York Times time magazine sixteen year two years
"marc andreessen" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"marc andreessen" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"And so so anyway, the point being like it's just what I find with a lot of people. It's not that. There's nothing to the ideas. Just with a lot of people. It leads to if they exercise passionate the world is not automatically reshaped. They're passionate least at least a bitterness, and resentment and envy, and anger, and it just leads people. It's it's very sabotaging and philosophically I would say, of course, this advertising because it self Centric because we're not we're not islands. Like, we're not the world is not just a bunch of disassociated individuals. Like, we we our society. No, it is a loop. Right. Writing billions made me incredibly happy, and I do say in the writing is in the writing alone or with Dave. But in the writing that isn't a way the happiest that it gets other than, but then that's the one sort of that's just purely Senator sort of pure emotion. And you're right. That is if it selfish, but but the fact that it's then I get the feedback that it's it's making. People happy. We'll watch yielding. In the numbers. Yeah. It's like it's like and then by the way, by the way, then that's how you get the money and the money is what you used to do more of what you've yes. I mean, honestly, there's not only there's nothing wrong with that. There's something really right about that. But I do encourage people to chase the passion. 'cause I think if they don't they becomes also become bitter. But again, these things are all like, what has Farris called minimum effective dose. And so the minimum effective dose might be keep your job do your thing. And you work a half hour a day to figure out if you're passionate is going to lead to this contribution since I think, I think I I always find it natural. Maybe I'm just maybe this is the mid western me. I was found national say like look Mike read about like it is right and appropriate. Improper for it to be evaluated by other people. Right. Like, I would like to know that other people wanted to people think of it. I would like to know that they appreciate it. I would like to see that they use it. I would like to see that. It has had that square with your with the fact that you hold like how does that square with willingness to make bets that go against what the majority also talk about those right because you're actually not ceding power to those right about that. The opposite. We talked about this a lot. So this is the old Steve Jobs thing nobody ever asked for a MacIntosh. Right. So this is this is the thing this is actually another kind of dysfunction, you see among some started founder some big big companies often have this as function which is actually saw this. When I was at IBM, they they had this problem in the in the nineties. It was we're going to do what the customer wants Ray customer Centric organization because that's not what you're saying. Right now, it's not what I'm saying at all right because because the customers don't know what they want the custom nobody ever asked her a MacIntosh would restaurant car. I mean people were on horses. And they thought they were fine. Nobody asks for an automobile, nobody else I can tell you what he for the internet. Like, nobody like, they didn't know they didn't know why didn't they know? It's not their job to know, this assay, people are busy like is very much a human nature thing. People are busy people have their own lives. They got their own priorities. They got their own things. They're not sitting around dreaming up new product ideas that they hope somebody else builds there's not doing it. And so you have to do have to you have to invent it, and you have to bring it to them. But without the attitude of, you know, I get to dictate to you. Right. How you receive it? Right. So how does that square with this idea of people valuating it like, how do you know? No, right. Because I guess it's easier language for somebody internally. I have a feeling and and and an exercise my passion than it is to have the belief in a contra in their ability to contribute. Sure. So how do you square contribute is just like, okay? It's almost like a spirited generosity can envision that. There are peninsula, right? Who are otherwise busy?.

MacIntosh Mike Farris Ray customer Centric organizat Steve Jobs Senator Dave founder IBM
"marc andreessen" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"marc andreessen" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"So he's a question you can answer this as how you thought or what you've noticed in entrepreneurs. Because it ties into the way an inverse small way. How I think what I've experienced is a storyteller. And that is what does it feel like to have hold two versions of the world in your head at the same time. That is the way the world is in the way that it's going to be your your kind of living in two different worlds at the same time. How have you seen that manifest, and how did it manifest for you? Yeah. So this is the the line uses the the difference between a vision and a hallucination. Yes. What what's the different? What's it? What's the difference between a vision, hallucinations, other people can see the vision when no well, that's the question. Right. So what's the time horizon? Well, that's the thing. And so the way we think about this the abstract way, we think about this is the best entrepreneurs they really do live in the future. I think a little bit like the best artist. The best entrepreneurs live in the future. They actually can already envision at some point. Maybe don't have it at the very very beginning. Because you're often starting to scratch your own inched to start. But like at some point, you're like, okay. Like, I'm gonna put this thing that everybody's gonna everybody's going to like it. Everybody's gonna everybody's into everybody's and use it like at some point. It's going to take and I can I can sort I can start to and we didn't start to develop this over timing start to feel like okay this. This could be something that could really matter. This could this could be really big and you start to kind of live in the world in which it's sort of already happened. Yes. That's what about him. You're living in to yell at the same time. But then you have to come back to you wake up every morning in the world in which it hasn't yet happened. You You got to. to put your pants on. Did you find it distracting inspiring inspiring? I mean, I think for I think for the for the for the good. It's almost always. Well, let's put it this way. It's it's inspiring when it works. Yes. And it's very frustrating when it doesn't. Yes. Because then it's almost like a whole world has died. Yeah. You know, whistle future that you were able to envision and by the way, every entrepreneur views like they're doing something the world better. Like you. Don't people don't go through the effort. And usually we're building the web breath decided you did some party, you thought, nobody does a creative endeavor. Nobody nobody does a creative thinking boy this the world worse. I can't wait to see how bad I can make the world. Can you talk about the difference between having a dream and having like chasing a personal passion?.

hallucinations
"marc andreessen" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"marc andreessen" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"Illinois and go to the corner store to get something you'd like to in the morning. And, you know, check the newsstand check it out in his there's you know, the first issue of wired magazine. Right. And so I'm like, oh, this is. Wow. This is like finally somebody made a magazine for me like somebody made a magazine that takes computer seriously, like how about how about that as an idea for a magazine. Right. So it's like nineteen Ninety-three. So I'm like, okay. Great a by it. And I'm like, okay. It's pretty good at up by my food. I go back to my my my little office in the basement in the in the lab, and I am reading the magazine a minimum it's going on. And on about interactive TV and information superhighway, and this and that and digital NAMI, and this and that and the whole manifesto, the whole thing did Mitch didn't mention the internet. There was no mention of the internet, and there was all virtual reality. Lawnmower, man. And it was I remember the beginning of wire. You don't know. It wasn't even the internet. Did not even a mention, but and so was around in ninety four right? Ninety eight. How did they will work back? It was entirely self is the so-called walled garden. It was a self contained. You would get on the internet to reach. If I was at home, and I my modem you would was my modem dialing in. Just a oh, well only their office like their their servers their content. Everything happened within with. So even if we thought that was the internet, it wasn't you didn't have access you would know. So you would not have thought it was internet because he would not have thought I've thought thought you're on AOL. Right. So was an advanced version of what was called a bulletin boards. Yes. But I remember the BBS Israel self contained. You didn't you remember on the BBS as he would love into each BBS separately? I remember there was no there was no kind of tippety between the BBC's. There was. No. So so you had all the time at AOL CompuServe and product big ones, and you couldn't even interconnect between between those? So that that's where you were. Then when when you were working middle of the night, I had this question to ask you so glad you said that what kind of like, how a dream allies were you when you were building mosaic. I'm talking about the creative this. How would you realize where you when this was happening not re-? Well, is this is the thing is the conventional wisdom is so against it was a little bit. I'm fascinated tell the story of the magazine. It's just like just like I read the magazine, and it was like, okay. My work doesn't. I mean, not my who I was. But like, no, he doesn't domain in which I'm operating does not matter does not even merit a mention like it's just like, okay. And I'm just like, I don't know. I'm just a kid. Like, I don't know. What else? I just go back to work. Like, I can't do any of this other stuff. I'm not at Time Warner building. You know, the interactive TV, I'm not at Viacom building or whatever earth thing they were doing like, I've just I'm working on this internet thing. And even though they don't respect it. It's the thing I can work on. So I'll just work on it. And so we we just went back. We just went back to work. It didn't really start. We didn't really start to get positive feedback until sort of spring ninety three the feedback cycles we got so we did get as we did get a positive feedback cycle going quickly and the positive feedback cycle. Basically was not surprising. But like the more people who had browsers than the more people who would put up web pages, the more people who put up with pages, the more people would want to have browsers..

wired magazine Mitch AOL Time Warner building Illinois Viacom BBC
"marc andreessen" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"marc andreessen" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"And so I literally got to the page where it was like for people with bachelor's degrees. Kind of American universities because I didn't want to stay school longer than I had to. What was the what was the salary ranking top salary on down for the degrees in the top one was was doubly. And I was like, okay. W sounds good. Then I went to the w page, and I was like, okay. What are the top w schools, and it was like Mitee Stanford. Well, those are obviously out of reach for people where I come from. You mean, you just decided that that was where I come from goes to Stanford MIT. You didn't think you could? Of course, not no, no chance amazing. No, no, no possibility whatsoever. And nobody ever has is not it's not it's not a possibility. So number three was university of Illinois, which I was like, oh interesting. Like, I was in Wisconsin. And so actually it's actually like it's across the border. It's about six hours away. And it's a it's a state school. So I'd have to I'd have to pay out of state tuition. Yeah. But it was it was much cheaper than the sort of the private schools. Those like number is number three in the country. Right for double was like, this is great. So I went to Biden they love out of school out of state students because they full load. Right. So then I showed up and got a job and the job. I got was. I was I was in enjoy coding. So I got I got a job in a software lab. And I just I absolutely loved it. As my kind of first time, I was getting like actually paid like write code and work on things in the physics department in Illinois. And then that that ultimately led to an internship at IBM. And then that ultimately led to a job at NCSA, which was the the the center where we did all the work of mosaic. And so part, you know, there's a there's a big I don't know locker timing or whatever component to it. Which is like it so happened that when I got Illinois. There was this environment right with all this with by the way with all this all of central funding to be able to do, you know, we had we basically had the modern internet at Eleanor there were four universities that have got there were four universities in the US that had gotten funded in the eighties to basically effectively build they were supercomputer centers. It was when supercomputers cost twenty five million dollars. So there was that. And then they basically built what they call the NSF net, which was basically the internet. And so there was it was Cornell, San Diego, Illinois, and Pittsburgh, they will stay there actually all three of the former state schools, and so we basically had on campus. We had actually the modern the web. Yeah. But we had like the modern internet like we had high speed broadband, including even some of the dorms, you know, there were supercomputers there were all these graphical workstations, which at the time was it was a big deal. And so there there was a part of that. It was an. It was seen. It was the scene. Yes. Sure. It was saying it was a fertile environment. Where people who are interested in this. And there was some sort of resources if you have the notion in your head that you were going to change the world. Of course, not you really didn't envision this important for for like, I think people who want to do creative work like the the sort of how grand can the thoughts be like for real. We've trying to solve a specific problem. Or did you have a sense that if we do this work, we might actually be able to influence the world? So it's a it was like I didn't have the vocabulary then, but I haven't now so it was a complex at after system problem. And and it was as follows which is because of all this federal funding for the supercomputer centers. We had a lot of the modern internet running at Eleanor the students could use the faculty used at the researchers use it. My my my work..

Illinois university of Illinois Mitee Stanford Stanford MIT NCSA Eleanor Wisconsin US NSF IBM Biden San Diego Pittsburgh Cornell twenty five million dollars six hours
"marc andreessen" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"marc andreessen" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"Yeah. For sure right. And part of what you're taking into account is the messianic abilities that the personnel. They have to carry out the as I say the world is busy there seven billion people on planet earth whose time has already fully allocated. Right. And so there has to be something about the workhouse to speak for itself. We'll talk more about that. But then somebody has got to pick up the flag and carry them to the world. We'll talk about the word Stanford self we'll send then there's the other side of this. Which is the work. Does this is none of this as an excuse for having the work? Not be good. Right. Yes. Right. And so in that the the best the best the line, I use all the time the book, I was recommended. Steve Martin's book born standing out its spectacular, which is one of the best books I've ever read, and it's thin little book, basically. So how does he burned succeeding comedy looks pretty interesting topic because he was people nobody like he was a gigantic success. I in San up, and then later later in film, and and other things and the things that very straightforward. The book is be so good. They can't ignore you. Right. I often say right and undermined when people complain to me on Twitter, I often say, well, this is unfair. So this this is where you, and I have a lot of similarity in this one. I it is one of the areas which as I say, it's unfair. If you're a woman of. Color wanting to make it as a screenwriter. It's really hard the deck is stacked against you. Because who the buyers are however once it's unfair once we acknowledged that all you can do is right on undeniable script, that's the only thing you can do is write something undeniable that breaks now that's unfair. While I would say, that's one thing. You can do the other thing you can do as you can get yourself into a scene. Sure. So find great right perfect. Those are the those are the two things I'm thinking what I like about. This is this is a new perspective on the on this podcast because I partially because of my own life experience, which is Dave. And I wrote this thing in a basement is, you know, as we just talked about on your podcast, but the idea that you should consciously get into you should consciously get into a scene is a, and I know you said it's Brian thought, but it is really as you're saying to me it is it is smart. It makes a lot of sense another way to think about is big big to be a big fish in a small pond, right or or you have to write this small fish big pond. And then the small fish has the best product anybody's ever saying that's the formula. Have you read just kids the Patti Smith book? Oh. Oh, you'd love it. It's great audiobook, but punishment come to New York and meets Robert Mapplethorpe the first day that she's in New York. And then the two of them end up in more like in the world that Warhol those people were all in and it they're just lived at the Chelsea hotel, and they bounced around with those people Patty had to do the genius work. But then when she did people were there to appreciate it. And he's like most people who are like in this most most people who love the art of what they do want there to be more, great art. And they want to be more great artists. They want to be the kind of person who's able to go. Find other great artists to talk to the great artist. And then most people, by the way, the financing business. Like, we're we're dying to finance the nice grade start off like if people talk about like raising venture venture capital. It's gotta run on these gauntlets to do it or like it. So whatever there they this. You know, they won't find in. It's like per dying to fund the next Google like we're we can't wait, right? Just for God's sake..

Steve Martin Robert Mapplethorpe Stanford Twitter Patti Smith Google Dave New York Patty Chelsea hotel Brian Warhol
"marc andreessen" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

03:04 min | 2 years ago

"marc andreessen" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"But to is. Reverse it. That's the second one. The first one is when should a creator an idea to begin thinking of all of those potential impediments or how to flip those impediments to a strength. And when should they be trying just to idiot? Right. So you may know, there's actually been a lot of work done on actually analyzing the source in causes an effective of creative achievement greater success, and a whole bunch of interesting sort of things that have come out of that sort of a sub field of psychology and sociology. And there was just a study that just was on Twitter in the last week. The claim of the study number of the claim of the study was and this is final. It says like paint painting yet what kind of in a very pure version of art. Let's say, but even for like paintings as creative achievement and creative success greatest success of great of work is it caused more by the quality of the work itself. Or by the social network of the artists. I saw study is that right? The friends of the artist, and what you find is a lot of pure creatives will will think about that question. And they'll find it offensive because. Because the whole point of being creative a creator is. I have a vision I create and it's sort of a, you know, it's sort of a it just seems kind of self evident. Obviously the world is going to appreciate what what I create like, it's it's you know, if it's sufficient quality level. It's the world is not appreciate it. It's the world's fault. The more pragmatic view is that art is are even just pure art. Art is in the mind of both creator and the viewer. Like, what is the creative value of a painting, if nobody sees it or if when people see it, they don't like it. And so the pure creative would like to believe that's the viewers fault. Right. That's the audiences fault and adventure, you know, people like this or the timing is wrong. Well, the timing is a gigantic complex complex a fire to Jewish Ephesus favorite, right? Yes. The timing is a giant x factor. We should talk about timing because that's a giant x factor in the in the way these systems work. Yes. But fundamentally, it's this thing is I just I've you when I was a creator in the form of when I was building software or now that I'm more in the role of funding and supporting creators, I just as creativity is a collaborative exercise between the creator and the and the audience, and I think that's very natural. I think it's a it's a system since the human system. Right. And so, and so therefore, it's a responsibility in my view of the artist we willing to engage in that and willing to be practical about that and willing to think hard about that and willing to do things required to get work in front of people. And and so it's easier for me to have an opinion about that for painters, and I that's not my field. And so I'm just just kind of random opinion. And we'll tell you in tech. This is a really big difference between success and failure right for what we do. It's like the entrepreneur who expects the market to just automatically appreciate the product. And but it's the classic. If I build a better mousetrap the world will beat a path to my door, zeal Cochet. It's like well. No, they won't like the world is busy, right? People already have stuff going on people. Don't. Wake up in the morning and say God, I can't wait until I find out what this person I've never heard of in California has invented like that's not how the world works. You have to inject yourself into the world. And so in our world is successful. People are the ones who are able to do the creating and are able to kinda push into the world. Steve Jobs, put a ding in the universe..

Twitter Steve Jobs California
"marc andreessen" Discussed on Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Mirum

Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Mirum

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"marc andreessen" Discussed on Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Mirum

"Um in there are people in silicon valley i mean pizzas deal is the obvious example may be marc andreessen who see any kind of regulation as a socialist but i think the majority of responsible people coming round to recognizing that regulation is inevitable it's down the road and they need to figure out compromises where bake him maintain that businesses but at the same time calibrate them to the public nate when when i think about people like soccer berg or serbian larry i often wonder if what it is was anything close to what they wanted it to be and it in my mind i don't think it is i don't think either any of those people would say yet this is exactly what we thought this technology would be your how would impacting in fact if anything i think we're seeing zuckerberg takes many steps back and be more afflicted especially if a if anything of what i'm reading this facebook newsroom is to be believed and and and what makes me wonder is then how do we deal with innovation how do we deal with technology how do we manage of moving forward if this is the result of an unintended consequence and i say that because i don't think any of these were intended consequences unless you you feel otherwise now absolutely not anything it was an and i've always written about the unintended consequences i'm in dealing with the e each of those um you know i think zuckerberg was or is an idealist they must be utopian in the way in which he believes that communication consult the world sales and i think of all the tech billion as a multibillion as he's the one who has been most criticized because i think he's most vulnerable in outing as sergejs kind of checked out and is enjoying the life of the multibillion and why should nee i think larry pages slightly different in the he's just an incredibly ambitious cuss in in the sense not to make money but he believes enduring the impossible and he went on i think the global story is amazing he went from the impossible of downloading the entire internet and essentially turning it into google in 1997 '98 and turning himself into a multibillion naronha the dominant player on the internet to now switch of driving a are which is i think w.

marc andreessen nate zuckerberg google facebook larry
"marc andreessen" Discussed on The Meb Faber Show

The Meb Faber Show

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"marc andreessen" Discussed on The Meb Faber Show

"We're going to get back to that when talking about private margaret's in general but but it's it's interesting to have some one the thinks about both of them well let me just interrupters or get it off my chest showed came close to private birth control you great white shark the great white sharks in my business burqa jason treadwell soon you know are use their names 'cause they rate and share so frequently marc andreessen not so much anymore on twitter but for a while there it was just like having inside information when you're following great white sharks and they're giving away free information and they're in the history of the incorrect and they are generally really adopt here since smarter at technology and other things we're not talking about things they don't know about and you're not pass following behind the beer and saying like how there is no use your way to make money in my opinion then you using our network admits applies to private market so perfect example is the coin i was i you know travel alatas newsreel investing our best in this company called eat toro two thousand ten now remember investing them yanni the coo it was like how it i know you're gonna give me money but i'm still bullish on pick quite a bit clinton that that sounds was twelve sets and i was like you're insane and making the best meet your company new alone you wanna buy bitcoin you'd like to quit and even though three years later fred wilson on his blog where the as investment in quaint dais and equate was no two hundred dollars to talk about something went from twelve cents to two hundred dollars and that's when i finally decided okay listen if it's early enough for fred wilson you know we need to be in the twelve cents per those in front of the great venture capitalist in the world he's publicly declaring a physician at two hundred dollars which means using missing for seven to ten years yes of course there's missed it goes to zero and then the other in the spectrum we got warmer for calling it you know fake j p murdering uh jenny dying calling it fake there is a big trend between when fred wilson declares it's time to put bc money to work in the time were warren buffett takes it seriously or jamie diving so the me that's trend park right.

margaret birth control twitter coo clinton fred wilson venture capitalist warren buffett jason treadwell marc andreessen jamie two hundred dollars three years ten years