19 Burst results for "Mao Zedong"

Who Was Karl Marx, and What Were His Philosophies?

BrainStuff

08:55 min | 6 months ago

Who Was Karl Marx, and What Were His Philosophies?

"With glance at Karl. Marx's curriculum vitae says a lot economist philosopher journalist sociologist political theorist historian. Add to that socialist communist in the original meaning of the word and revolutionary and. That's just a start. Karl Heinrich Marx was one of the most respected minds of the nineteenth century. His meditations on how societies work and how they should work have informed and challenged humans for more than one hundred and fifty years. Yet to the uninitiated marks may be only a bushy mugged symbol of revolution the father of communism the hater of capitalism. He's considered by many especially in the West as the man whose ideas spurred authoritarian communist regimes in Russia China and beyond that again is selling the man short. Because it's not entirely right in his book Karl Marx. A nineteenth century life author. Jonathan Sperber wrote viewed positively. Marks is a far seeing profit social and economic developments an advocate of the emancipatory transformation of state and society from a negative point. Marks is one of those most responsible for the pernicious and features of the modern world. If nothing else marks was a keen observer of the human condition he was deep finger with bold ideas about how to make life better we spoke with Lawrence Talmon who teaches a course on marks and philosophy at the University of Chicago and is the CO author of a chapter on Marx and Marxism in the rootlets. Handbook of philosophy and Relativism domine said Marx himself was first and foremost kind of scientist. He was a student of reality but he himself struggled throughout the course of his career. How exactly to put his ideas to politics. It's important to note that despite his one time lofty standing in what was then the Soviet Union marks was born in tier in the Kingdom of Prussia in eighteen eighteen. That's what's now known. As the Rheinland area of western Germany. After the failed German Revolution of Eighteen. Forty eight marks fled to London where he eventually died in eighteen eighty three. He's buried beneath a large tomb in London's highgate cemetery. Inscribed with the words workers of all lands unite but marks grew up privileged the son of well off and liberal parents in an ancient town that had been racked for decades before his birth by Warren Revolution that upheaval cultural religious and political shaped his parents and was a big part of young. Marx's upbringing later marks attended universities studying law and philosophy where he became engaged to and later married a Prussian baroness it was well studied philosophy and law that marks introduced the works of German Philosopher Yard Ville Helm Friedrich. Hegel whose ideas he used to later. Form his take on Communism Marx began a career. As journalists early twenties writing for radical newspapers in Cologne and Paris the route he consorted with other liberal minded philosophers and by his mid twenties met and collaborated with one of the major influences in his life. Friedrich Engels it was angles who convinced marks that societies working class would be the instrument to fuel revolutions and bring about a more fair and just society in eighteen forty eight the to published a pamphlet. That would be the basis for a new political movement. The communist manifesto in eighteen eighty three after Marx's death engels summed up the main idea in the communist manifesto like this quote that economic production and the structure of society of every stoorikhel epoch necessarily arising therefrom constitute the foundation for the political and intellectual history of that epoch the consequently ever since the dissolution of the primeval communal ownership of land. All history has been a history of class struggles of struggles between exploited and exploiting between dominated and dominating classes at various stages of social evolution. That this struggle however has now reached a stage where the exploited and oppressed class. The proletariat can no longer emancipate itself from the class which exploits and oppresses it. The bourgeoisie without at the same time forever. Freeing the whole of society exploitation oppression and class struggles domine explained marks was always concerned to understand the real underlying causes of social phenomenon the events and institutions that kind of shape the social world marks wanted to kind of dig down beneath the appearances and see what was really going on early on in his career. He thought that the best arena to do that in was philosophy and then as time went on he transitioned more into the social sciences. What's most important about marks is that he very much had a kind of engineering mentality about society he wanted to know. What makes it work? And how if we want to change it do we change it. What are the levers that we have to pull? Marx's eighteen forty seven economics work capital a critique of political economy a takedown of capitalism that decried the exploitation of the working class crystallized debate one that continues today between the West's ruling social and economic theory capitalism and Marx's idea of communism too many. It's a fight that hits rich versus poor bourgeoisie versus proletariate ruling class versus workers. And it's even more than that to those who debate it. It's right versus wrong. An argument about the best path to a perfect society. But that of course is very simplistic and doesn't get Marx's thinking right the Allman said above all else the association the people have with marks is that he some Utopian Pie in the sky dreaming a perfect world that is free of all the nastiness we live in now really that couldn't be further from the truth. Marks had a kind of engineering mindset. He was probably of all the major figures in the history of political thought the most practical the most realistic he was the most concerned with what is really possible. In the real world what marks to find as communism boiled down society that produces goods only for human need not for profit and in which there is no master slave royalty peasants owner worker relationship and therefore no need to overthrow. Anybody certainly clashes with the materialism of capitalism. But it's a long way from what many today see is communism to after the Russian revolution of nineteen seventeen and later under Joseph Stalin's reign some of Marx's ideas along with those of Ladimir Lennon were used to build a new empire. Millions were killed along the way similarly millions died in China under the rule of Mao. Zedong's Communist Party domine acknowledged. It's hard to even talk about what marks out of communism without dragging in all the weight from Soviet Russia and Communist China and obviously a lot of people hold marks responsible for that or -tarian rules like Stalin's and malls were not what Marx had in. Mind it's important to note too. That Marx did not hate capitalism. He actually saw some virtue in the system. He saw it as a necessary precursor to communism and he envisioned some of the technological challenges automation unseating workers for example. That are true today. Domine explained marks was very impressed with the kind of progressive character of capitalism by forcing people from all different walks of life into the same workplaces capitalism. Kind of breaks down. The old divides between communities and so things like race and gender religion. Divide people less. The more people are forced to see each other as equals in the workplace. Marks recognized marveled at the economical and technical growth the capitalism begets and saw it as an improvement from previous societies. Later in life. Domin says mark suggested that a growth capitalism might be a way to move toward communism instead of all out revolution but he still saw communism with no master slave dynamic as the end goal in that way and in others. Marx's idea of communism was far from the atrocities that have been committed in the name of communism elsewhere and his ideas are still perhaps strangely many a beacon and a search for a better way of life in that this practical and deep thinker of the nineteenth century still has relevance in today's world. Dahlman said marks was so committed to giving a kind of rational criticism of everything not just the enemy but to himself in everything he was willing to criticize the old modes of life and show how capitalism kind of improved on them but he was also willing to criticize capitalism and show how we could foresee improvement coming in the future. That is still hopeful vision.

Karl Heinrich Marx Marks West London Soviet Union Friedrich Engels Jonathan Sperber Warren Revolution Germany University Of Chicago Cologne Russia Rheinland Lawrence Talmon Scientist Hegel Joseph Stalin Domine China Highgate Cemetery
Exporting Authoritarianism

Why It Matters

05:19 min | 6 months ago

Exporting Authoritarianism

"I will relate that interesting story. The president of Kazakhstan actually visited a company called hike. Vision is another one that provides surveillance technology visit their office in China and he saw how with one. Click on a person's face. You could get that person's school history work history financial situation. Wow and wait for it. How did this person spend his or her leisure time? So where did this person go to have fun? Did you go to the movies? Did you stop by the bank to go to the post office where you hang out with friends? Did you participate in a protest and his reaction after seeing all of this was we need this technology. That's not where I thought the story was going. This is probably not the first time you're hearing about China's surveillance technology and that's because it gets a lot of coverage it's like a Black Mirror episode. It gives us visions of a dystopia in future but this technology and the eagerness of some countries to begin implementing. It is only a small part of a much bigger story about China through its belt and road initiative China's in the process of building and funding infrastructure projects across the globe and loaning vast sums of money in the developing world. Some observers argued that as it does this. China is also exporting its authoritarian model of government and eroding democratic norms. That many of us take for granted others say that China is simply taking business opportunities where it sees them and providing countries with an alternative to a global order that has gone unchallenged for decades. The debate comes down to one question. How will we choose to view China as they pour money into hospitals ports and roads around the World I'm Gabrielle? Sierra and this is why it matters today is China exporting authoritarianism. I think the most important thing to understand about China's foreign policy over the past ten years or so is that it really has been transformed. This is Elizabeth Economy. She's a senior fellow and director for Asia. Studies here at the council. She's also a distinguished visiting fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution beginning in about two thousand and eight with global financial crisis China's hosting the Olympics. These are really moments that defined in the minds of many Chinese leaders that China was rising. Chinese have many goals for these Olympics. One of them was to announce to the world. The China is back after two hundred years. China's economy has grown faster than that of any other major country. The Asian giant has now grown into one of the most important export markets for manufacturers from all over. The world is a period of historic change in China. There haven't been many periods in history as fascinating as this so there was a real sense within China for the first time that they had always expected that at some point China was going to surpass the United States but maybe that time was coming sooner than they anticipated. But what really has changed the game on the ground has been Xi Jinping everything for Xi Jinping is under the mantra of the great rejuvenation of the Chinese nation and it is a call for reclaiming a much greater degree of centrality for China on the global stage. Xi Jinping became China's president in two thousand thirteen some observers have called him the most powerful Chinese leader since Mao Zedong. Look I think there are any number of objectives and we can find them all and Xi Jinping's writings and speeches but fundamentally what I think. Xi Jinping attempting to do is simply to make the world safer authoritarianism. Teaching is a dictator but dictators. Still have to answer to domestic constituents. This is Jessica. Chance Weiss associate professor of government at Cornell and a leading expert on Chinese politics. She has a different take on China's expansion. One that sees it as being less offensive and more defensive. China's concerned about a whole lot of different risks. Some of them domestic others ones. That emanate from abroad sparks. That might start the prairie fire and bring down the Chinese government and might take units overriding purpose is to continue to make the world safe for the Chinese Communist Party to strive at home. So this is a world that safe for autocracy to coexist alongside democracy in the international space. So it's not been as ideological I think and it's foreign policy is some admitted. It out to be so. China is trying to find a way to sort of fit in with a world. That might not be comfortable with its model of government tried to make space for its form of government to be regarded as one that can continue to exist that is legitimate than democracy isn't the only form of government so to speak and so this has made it easier for other authoritarian states to survive

China Chinese Government Xi Jinping Visiting Fellow Chinese Communist Party President Trump Kazakhstan Elizabeth Economy Olympics Mao Zedong Asia United States Jessica Stanford University Hoover Institution Weiss Associate Professor Cornell
"mao zedong" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

08:04 min | 7 months ago

"mao zedong" Discussed on Throughline

"On June twenty fifth. One thousand. Nine Hundred Fifty Chemo. Sung decided to take matters into his own hands and forcibly reunite north and South Korea. Here's Blaine Harden again. He started the war with Stalin's help and tried become the boss of the Korean Peninsula and he sent nearly seventy five thousand North Korean troops into South Korea. Intense fighting broke out and suddenly the Korea's were in an all out civil war pretty quickly the US decided it had to step been and rallied the United Nations to throw in its support Oreo if the small country thousands of miles away but what is happening there is important to every American president. Truman and other American officials were worried that if they didn't intervene conflict would escalate spreading communism further into Asia and possibly igniting a Third World War. I sing in reese troops. Were on the defensive. Getting beat by the discipline. North Korean army North Korean troops managed to capture South Capitol Seoul the by the end of that summer. We know that the cost of freedom is high game was reset but we are determined to preserve our freedom no matter what the call. South Korean forces backed by the US and the UN recaptured Seoul and then president. Truman ordered American coalition troops to go on the offensive to liberate North Korea. First Marine Air Wing pilots slam their August right into in commies and they began to push the North Korean troops back. Further and further Kim Olson was outmatched was an incompetent military commander and was defeated. routed by the Americans and the South Koreans and would have lost his country. The very existence of North Korea was question without Mao Mao. Zedong Gordon Chairman Mao is off to refer to was the leader of China. The time he decided to intervene on behalf of the North Koreans and the Soviets because the Americans were getting way too close to the Chinese North Korean border. And he didn't want the fighting to spillover into China so he rallied his troops. Babu and sent them into North Korea and they managed to push the Americans back. To the thirty eighth parallel everyone was agreed at that point in Nineteen fifty-three to declare a draw and that's where the war went into suspended animation. It didn't end with a peace treaty. There is still no peace treaty. It's an armistice. You know often lost in the history of who won which battle and who gained more land is the impact of the war on the people of Korea it was devastating for both sides in South Korea. Hundreds of thousands died in the capital of Seoul was nearly destroyed and as bad as the devastation was in South Korea. He was significantly worse in North Korea carpet bombing by the United States on a level that had never been seen before. There was more bombing that took place in. North Korea then was dropped by the United States and all of World War Two Victor Cha professor at Georgetown University and Senior Adviser and Korea Chair at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington. Dc and you might recognize his name because he was under consideration to become the next US ambassador to South Korea but then he got into a public debate with the trump administration over its North Korea policy anyway. What Victor Charles Describing is pretty? Incredible North Korea was essentially reduced to rubble. Some American estimates say that up to twenty percent of the population of North Korea with killed by bombs from American aircraft. I mean you don't easily forget something like that. Yeah everyone in. The country probably knew someone who died in the war and the political consequences were also really massive. We basically leveled the infrastructure on both sides of the winslow and so they were essentially starting from scratch. All over again came out sung. Who had started? The war somehow managed to use the war and its aftermath as a convenient narrative against the Americans. The story basically goes remember those Americans they bombed our country and killed your grandma and they're going to do it again unless you allow us to protect you but protection came at a certain price. They'll won't be much freedom. There won't be much information. There won't be much electricity or food but we will protect you against the Americans. What's so interesting Kinda sad about all this? Is that when we're reading on this war? What'S THE NICKNAME. We kept coming across the forgotten war right. That's often how it's referred to in the US because it was kind of like a blip on the radar but in both north and South Korea. It was obviously not easily forgotten. I mean the North Koreans lost twenty percent of their entire population. That's like if you were to lose the entire population of Texas and California massive that perceived threat of the. Us coming back to kill. Grandma became a central part of the Kim Regime. Propaganda and also fueled its decades long quest to become a nuclear power. You not to protect itself. These are not the jackboots event off. Hitler's Nuremberg this is North Korea a citadel of anti-americanism and home of the world's most regimented society. Okay now we're GONNA pass it through the next few decades to give you a sense of how the war affected the future of North and South Korea. It's set them on completely opposite pats. At first both sides rebuilt slowly. South Korea went through president after president after president while North Korea camel son continued to rule a supreme leader and up until the nineteen eighties. There were kind of in a similar boat but then South Korea started making big changes. That allowed them to be open for business with the rest of the world. Their economy grew rapidly and by the late eighties. Life in South Korea was starting to improve. In contrast North Korea was a completely closed economy. Where food closed jobs. And maybe most importantly information all came from the government. Kimmel son still fearing another attack from the. Us also poured resources into the country's military and with the help of the Soviet Union. He its nuclear program but one moment in one thousand nine hundred ninety one threaten hill songs grip on power the Soviet Union their main source of aid and raw materials collapsed then in nineteen ninety four. Something else happens that shakes North Korea to his core talk. Kim il-sung dies in the official North Korean state TV announcement but the newscasters visibly shaken. He did yes. She can barely speak. Magicians and what is the funeral shows? Thousands and thousands of people crying wailing even as they walked back and forth on the ground screaming in anguish irving talks and then for the first time since its founding. North Korea gets a new leader. Kim Il Sung Son Kim Jong Il in under him. North Korea would see its darkest days since the Korean.

North Korea South Korea United States Senior Adviser and Korea Chair president Seoul Korean Peninsula Truman United Nations Zedong Gordon Chairman Mao Kim il-sung Blaine Harden Asia Kim Olson reese China
"mao zedong" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"mao zedong" Discussed on Here & Now

"Were facing couldn't we or shouldn't we trust them to help their parents make the right decision <hes> about college well. If we think that the financial decision is always the right decision that might help but i think one element that is really important important about this silence is that it protects the middle class identity of parents who feel like they are already faltering. They don't want to allow their kids to <hes> to know just how kind of imperilled their own status is and the irony there is that when they pay for college then they pay their some are asked to it actually ends up then undermining their own and stability in the long run to it just makes me think it makes me think that these parents then are making irrational decisions well. That's the thing is that we are in a situation where we've force parents to choose between the values of financial prudence and the valleys of parenthood and that is an untenable situation. We shouldn't be surprised that parents are choosing their commitments to their children's futures and educations educations. We need a way to support that very american commitment caitlyn's aloom professor new york university and the author of a new book. That's out this week. It's called fault indebted. How families make college work at any cost caitlyn. Thank you thank you <music>. Netflix debuts a new drama today. It's called the spy and it's anchored by someone known for his outlandish comedies. Sasha baron cohen creator and star of edgy satires like borat and t._v. Shows including who is america n._p._r. Tv critic eric duggan's has been watching joins us hi eric hi okay so first of all. How is it <hes>. It's it's interesting to me because i didn't know much about this story so basically sasha baron cohen is playing a figure whose pretty well known to israelis pretty well known to people who know israel's history but he was born in egypt he emigrated to israel and wound up working for the massad israel's the version of the <hes> c._i._a. To go into syria undercover pretending to be a businessman in order a to gain intelligence about that country and this was not too long after israel had been established and so there's a lot of tension between between jewish people in israel and the various peoples that surrounded them and sasha baron cohen's character was dealing dealing not only with wanting to be patriotic and support israel but also feeling that you know some jewish people in israel look down on him because they saw him <unk> as an arab so we've got a we've got a clip of him talking to the handler who is trying to suss out whether or not he would be a good candidate for training the two actually become an agent. Let's check it out. If your country needs you to quit your job. Would you do it to know what if your country. I need you to quit your job. Would you do it. Yes if you're onto need you to lie to your friends your family your wife. Would you do it. Yes if your country is you to risk your life. Would you do it. What are they have now. If you know the history and this is shown in the very first scenes of the first episode the real life person that this was based on he was discovered in nineteen sixty sixty five and he was tortured and executed and so if you know the history you know how the story ends. You don't necessarily know how it got. There and that's what this episode so. It's around netflix are all about and that issue of baron cohen's character being kind of an outsider in israel even though he's jewish. Let's listen to him discussing here. Here's how he feels. People see him to his wife. You know they see when they look good. I see that's the jewish yes just not you might and how does this show explore these contradictions. We'll see that that scene is interesting because it follows a scene where sasha baron cohen's character in his character's wife. They were at a party that was thrown by her employer and her employers husband assumed that he was a waiter because he was wearing a vest and he looked like he might be arab.

Sasha baron cohen israel Netflix eric duggan borat caitlyn new york university america Tv critic egypt professor syria
"mao zedong" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"mao zedong" Discussed on Here & Now

"For many parents paying for college as a sacrifice graphite. They're willing to make even when it takes an enormous toll on their own finances. Caitlyn's aloom is professor of social and cultural analysis at new york university versity and she wanted to understand why parents are sacrificing so much so she talked to them. Her new book is out this week. It's called indebted. How families make college work at any cost caitlyn. Welcome you say that parents face several moral traps when they decide whether to pay for their kid's college and we're going to go through a few of them but first. Why do you see this as a moral issue in the first place. It's a moral issue because there's a very strong sense of obligation that parents have to raise their children in a certain way and in the united states for middle class parents that idea is that they want their children to be educated and they want their children to be able to go off in directions that are not hampered by their parents owned situations. College is a really important commitment within that parental value so parents put a very strong and beyond financial value on what education can give their thank children okay so the first moral trap that you point out is this tradeoff between pain for what a kid will need when they're little when they're growing up and then saving money for college describe describe the parents are asked to save for college in order to ensure this possibility for their child eighteen years in the future at at the same time that they're also needing to pay for everyday expenses middleclass parents that oftentimes has to do you with the very kind of readiness they will need to go off to college for instance renting or buying a home in a school district correct where the education is considered to be really good or whether they should participate in the hockey team <hes> and you maybe have to buy pads or hockey sticks you know as an important because your child loves music to buy or rent them a cello all of without money which is about trying to establish a life for them that is rich and will eventually reward them. I'm not only with the skills of say music sports and art but which also deliver the lessons of discipline and a kind of self reliance <hes> that comes with practice that will serve them well in the long run then you write about the second moral trap this idea of the right college as is opposed to the affordable college. That's right all parents think about both the finances and the fed and of course there are parents <unk> who make decisions solely on the finances but the parents that i spoke with are trying to find a balance between the cost of the colleges they have the choice to <hes> to send their kid to and also the possibilities that each one of those is places will open distinctively and more often than not what i heard from parents without they preferred to think about fit first before they considered the ultimate finance which means you might end up at a place like yale or an expensive private school as opposed to the more formal state school that could be just as good <hes> as as fancy college <hes> that last trap that you described is a wager that college is going to pay off and that it will afford these kids a a place in the middle class down the road from your conversations with parents. Did you get the sense that they felt like that. Wager was worth it. I think that the parents that i spoke with felt like the wager was worth it. I sure because it was the best way they fell to give their kids shot. They wanted their children to be able to go out in the world old and make themselves into the people that they wanted to be in college was an important stop. Maybe the most important step in doing that. It's the moment that hat children leave their parents house and decide what direction they are going to take so they feel like that is worth it to put the the money in town. Even if that means they put their own futures at risk they worry about that very intensely at the end of many of my interviews parents. I would kind of laugh.

professor Caitlyn hockey united states new york university yale eighteen years
"mao zedong" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

04:30 min | 1 year ago

"mao zedong" Discussed on Here & Now

"He told me the soviet union could go wrong again again. Diverging from stalin mao told revolution is to take their struggle out to the cities and to fight guerrilla wars in the countryside and he also preached something volunteerism awesome that as long as they believe they could the chinese and any other people could transform their country so revolutionary zeal enthusiasm not weaponry oriole wealth was the decisive factor and the final thing. I i'd like to draw your attention to a paradox of these ideas so like lenin like stalin. Maui was determined to build a militarized one party state that worshiped it's depressing leader himself but he also championed championed kind of rebelliousness inaki insubordination so he told the chinese people that it's right to rebel annually in chinese and so during the culture ultra revolution <hes> after nine hundred sixty six he used his own autocracy his own colt to mobilize millions of chinese people to rebel all against his own party so you say that you see evidence of maoism all over the world and that we're not actually paying enough attention into how far it has spread that is one of the arguments of the book yes because after the inception of is is <hes> <hes> in china in the nineteen forties these ideas these practices spread to practically every continent so the global impact of maoism took off in the late nineteen forties. I'm in asia malaysia. Korea vietnam in states mainly on china's border orders that were breaking european and japanese empires and mouse ideas were very important in the first hawks complex of the cold war <hes> travelling into africa states and insurgencies in that continent borrowed mouth ideas also benefited from lavish chinese aid programs coming close to a home for me to europe. The rebellious rhetoric of the cultural revolution also inspired the counterculture movement and the protests of nine hundred sixty eight across western in europe and the u._s. If we hop over now to latin america a left-wing politicians their acclaimed mouths revolution solution as the path that they should follow in their continent and there was one individual ankle every mile goose man who in nineteen eighty launched a maoist civil war the shining path <hes> against the proven state which seemed almost seventy thousand lives through the one thousand nine hundred and then we come back to asia at the end in india and nepal maoz. How's revolution has inspired parties and insurgencies that are still with us today now. The current chinese president xi jinping is the son of of one of those revolutionary comrades <hes> and while of course present day china is completely different than china in mouse time you write that she has mounted a selective revival level of maoism. How is he doing that. So xi jinping came to power in twenty twelve and after taking power <hes> he quite quickly revived pots of the maoist political repertoire <hes> he's revived something cooled the mass line which was one of our big ideas about funneling criticism of officials from the grassroots <hes> and most conspicuously the <hes> xi jinping has revived the personality cult <hes> and at the end of february twenty eighteen xi jinping and and his central committee abolish the nine hundred to constitutional restriction that limited presidents to two consecutive terms in office so like mao. She could be president for life <hes> but you're also absolutely right. This revival of maoist political strategies is very much selective as you say. China is transformed <hes> practically beyond recognition from a mouse day and of course citizens are too well read too well traveled for single the old style ideological message <hes> to persuade them so you know that really was one.

china stalin mao president asia europe soviet union chinese Maui Korea lenin africa india
"mao zedong" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

03:07 min | 1 year ago

"mao zedong" Discussed on Here & Now

"Part because it shows something about the oval office something about how the president operates it when reality doesn't seem to line itself up with what he's already said rather than moving on on or backing down or you know changing course the president doubles down and he tries to bend reality into his favor <hes> we've seen it with a number of different issues and this is just the latest example example of the president trying to <hes> double down on an issue where the facts don't necessarily line up with his point of view but he takes some of the media criticism personally smelly and wants to prove that he was right all along and it goes it turns a potential one day story into a five or six days story as as we've seen with this hurricane chad can gentlemen we've had presidents <hes> you know be accused of being the economist in chief for this chief for that and chief. This is the first time i've ever heard the president being accused of being the cartographer in in-chief but and with the severity of the storm a lot of people think that <hes> you know maybe they're putting too fine a point on this frankly. It's distracting from other other things also ah he's spending so much time tweeting about this rather than you know ham managing the response in the bahamas in even along the coast of the united states which is like the comments about <hes> jerome powell. You know it's not my fault. You know you know it was on that track one point. That's the problem here and this is something we see consistently distantly from this administration that <hes> you know they can do no wrong or somebody else screwed up or whatever else i mean that's just part and parcel how they will totally why does the president over and over again and seemed to have so much trouble getting through natural disaster without controversy well part of it is this is a president who likes to make the headlines about himself and that's sort of not a natural atra place for these types of natural disasters. Usually you're supposed to be talking about the victims <hes> expressing remorse and condolences to people who are struggling and really not focusing focusing on the personal grievances and this is the president and it feels much more comfortable talking about his personal grievances being on the attack against his foil who he likes to put the the the media in that position and natural disasters aren't really made for that kind of behavior in that kind of politicking <hes> so the president hasn't really adjusted did to to that and we've seen that <hes> with the hurricane in puerto rico the president making that about him and how he felt aggrieved at the puerto ricans were not adequately thankful to him and and the media coverage of his trip to puerto rico was skewed against him <hes> so the president likes to make a lot of things about him and when it comes to natural disasters most presidents in the a passive tried to make it about the victims and try to make it about the hurricane and the disaster response not about their personal grievances chad. I don't think i'm going out on a limb to say that you know just about everything everything. That's going on on capitol hill so i wanna ask you this congress coming back in next week. What's gonna happen on guns probably very little <hes> the house majority leader steny hoyer sonata memo yesterday and in terms of you know when something would be on the house schedule. There's nothing there yet probably until later in the month they were supposed to have what we call here on capitol hill a markup where they prepare some other secondary and tertiary gun related legislation.

president jerome powell puerto rico in-chief steny hoyer puerto ricans bahamas united states congress six days one day
"mao zedong" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:27 min | 2 years ago

"mao zedong" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Made me smarter and George Friedman can chew at. George Friedman one of our most popular guests working out of a bunker in Austin is encyclopedic on our political economics in how it, folds into our defense and our offense in George John Farrow just made me smarter by. Mentioning the tensions within China, your lead, is circled wagons in, China what do you mean. By that In deep trouble in the. Western you know all of China China's. Reached the point where it cannot export. Competitively with other countries US sanctions make that even more difficult that means there's tremendous pressure and trying to try to support country, about a billion people live in pretty much third world poverty and he desperately trying to, hold all these factions together as he flies very painful solutions and there is tension within China and whether or not it can possibly hold together for a. Hundred years before Mao Zedong China was a, highly fragmented country so the Chinese are. Playing with existential problems but we still think of China it it was, five or, ten years ago So what's changed. George is this gonna materialize coming months Well what change basically was that try? To build industrial? Plan far too large for domestic consumption And foreign consumption declined after two thousand eight and, competing countries like Vietnam and others we're. Taking away the, Chinese work it how this. Plays out basically has little to do, with economics at this point the economic reality is sit it's now a social and political problem which is how does the Chinese regime and the Chinese public and. Various interest react to the fact that, China's not only over it is now in a period extreme stringency such is, an important question and I imagine how the anybody would speak to would say? Yes to this but do you actually see existential? Risk, to the communist party at this point or at least you see an existential risk evolving Well the communist party, is not monolithic it has it's a. Competitive interests or, the interests of the coastal. Cities and party committees there and their, interest is basically to maintain good relations with the west there's the interior interior parties they haven't benefited from it the major bluer and they wanna see resources diverted. From the coastal areas to their interests, this is a huge country it's a very diverse it has a very diverse, interests obviously growing fantastically you could cover up these things the now in the? Question how do we distribute the pain is different George one of, the great realities of are you is how wrong we got Russian and Soviet Union intelligence. Before their collapse do we. Have a knowledge of. Chinese intelligence Chinese society the dynamic. Of their politics, or as we are we flying blind as we were in, one thousand nine hundred eighty six eighty eight Americans have this strange tendency to overestimate its amenities And underestimate others we underestimated Vietnamese we underestimated Taliban we vastly overestimated the Russian capability and. We're doing the same thing with. Trying it out we don't look at their weaknesses we don't look. At the problems that they have at a buffalo we don't look at, the fact that what they. Were a decade goes not what they are now we tend to see them as. A kind of static monolithic entity that stand anything so George on the on the issue of. Overestimating also an issue of our estimating political rivalries we saw this with Japan in the nineteen. Hundred s and we saw how that turned out if we think about why the sanctions pushes coming through this tariffs push to, be more precise from the US administration on China you think it's born. Out of overestimating the economic level Riva China poses are you saying they are weaker the some people think? They're going to be in the next ten years it has much more to do with the fact that the United. States has a reality didn't have ten years ago Which is a declining industrial flash and that may not be a macro? Economic problem but it's a massive political problem and the question that we're doing how do we take care of him George this came up yesterday on rip up the script here but with your abilities, it's, a timely question we had the, great interview of David Rubenstein in his peer, to peer we did that last night folks on? Bloomberg, radio with a gentleman is a chief executive. Officer Boeing and a gentleman emailed, in instead, would somebody ask how we do defense contracts and this. Came back to something called the Casey forty six was j. Norma's billion dollar, airplane deal and there's cost overruns, and Boeing I guess has to pay the US, government a gazillion million dollars do. You George Freeman have any clue, how we spend money at the Pentagon Well the first thing, is what is our strategy and. How do we. Set, it and it's a very conventional understanding I mean look, the US navy wants, their two entities they. Wanna make sure looks super powerful what is China together is the US. Navy because the US lady is able to say that the Chinese or major threat they're going, to get funded heavily so the vision, of the world of what the threats are, what the dangers are these are essential they drive? The, economy I mean one of the we talked. About this Soviet Union overestimating it, was a, major overestimation by the Pentagon other intelligence sources had different. Views but the Pentagon? View and that's how we fund them we identify threats It takes. It takes ten fifteen twenty years, to build weapons system, and at that time we hold. That stretch steady I? I sell, end up reading more about the Casey Forty-six which I don't know what do we know China's technology, military. I mean all the interviews we? Do and they've got a submarine base hanging off Vietnam there on. That island etc do we actually know their technology I'm pretty sure. That the military intelligence people know what they're capable of but, again the question is not what they're capable of that how? It's projected, so yes they've got an island they built so what that island will disappear but fifteen minutes into, a. War that's not a strategic capability Chinese are blocked by string of islands they. Can't get out of it because they have the military strength? One final question George will let you go I was in Helsinki a. Few weeks, back John wasn't and I was having a beverage, of my choice. Down by, the harbor and I thought I. Saw periscope stick up the water are there really submarines floating around the Baltic drinks at you He was like tendering.

China George US China China George John Farrow George Friedman Mao Zedong China Pentagon Soviet Union Vietnam Riva China communist party Casey George Freeman Boeing Austin Japan Bloomberg
"mao zedong" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"mao zedong" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"So she she really kind of only communicated with me in mandarin and to the point where even if i responded in english she wouldn't respond and would just kind of look at me or tell me to respond in chinese until i actually did which is why i am still fluent in the language even if only one of my parents spoke the language so i'm really thankful for it but but it's true i was only able to speak to her for the first two three years of my life i didn't really speak english until maybe the middle of preschool i walked up to my preschool teacher and started speaking chinese because i didn't know the difference between the two languages and it was i was a lot better at mandarin at that time and how is taiwan different than mainland china the in terms of the languages on and is the government different yeah so the current time when he has government is the government that left mainland china when mao zedong took over in china so the communist government in china or they're not gonna call themselves out now but the communist government in china is new and all of the old culture and the old language and the old government literally picked up and moved to taiwan so a lot of ancient chinese artifacts traditional chinese the written language are traditional mandarin i suppose is written in taiwan and the nationalist government of china is currently residing in taiwan so they are separate countries although china definitely ways claim to taiwan and taiwan is too small to retaliate really like taiwan enters the olympics as.

preschool teacher china mao zedong communist government taiwan olympics two three years
"mao zedong" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"mao zedong" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"Keeping you informed throughout the day stay tuned it could be answered newshour with hawaii news now again freddie everybody of i'm at the blades they'll put a supermarket circus circus over my shoulder the act is underway and they'll be doing is active throughout the weekend you've got people from all around the globe performing gained is also circus land is going on i the another show later tonight as well as out over the weekend soldiers come check it out is going to be awesome now what's a good be belied as far the weather for tonight while you're out the door forecast is looking like yours should be wearing a jacket it's going to be cool with a dry air mass we on expecting all lot of rain and low temperatures dropping again in pretty mid 60s whipple's with grit uh breezy at foot ten the morning by mao zedong across the state were saint quezon conditions a little cloudy a little damn i'll put a win would side dry for the leeward side as a pool tantrum wind speeds us dope grizz gan brief beefy they're writing nifty the 25 mouthed it all pretty much all the goalkicking quoting over in on the political that means good air quality but adds up we are expecting some stormy weather up blondin wars towards sao will impact the state's starting monday night we could get some heavy downpours maybe some thunderstorms and that's going to linger a true wednesday seoul be careful about that must be if you live in a floodprone area foyer don't forget you can see the trade windows though that remain brisk and breezy not much rain through the next couple of days but both winslow laying on through the.

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"mao zedong" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"mao zedong" Discussed on WTMA

"In a position any longer to network with the other nations as if it was a leader in global politics i think but i'm not sure does washington to adjust to that that they'll be a hesitance in europe that they'll be a hesitance in asia because of this inherent weakness of a mortal of a mortal government i i don't think they're going to see that for quite some time john i think that they're looking at a relatively young man i don't know how old in the in his early early 60s are yes he's in his sixties yes but but the fact of the matter is liable last no the twenty years and in regard to that fact before remember back to the last days of mao zedong he died nineteen seventy six the last couple of years of his life or tremendous instability in china and the chinese influence around the world so you know at this point i don't see you're going it think you're gonna have a lot of reaction in terms of looking forward to the cheese demise i think people are going to have to look in a shorter term to try to deal with him and try to answer the threat emanated from china right now both military and economic what do we want from the leadership in washington with regard to this change uh we see added awan dictator in turn turkey although he does go through the ceremony of elections we seem a potent as a strongman dictator in moscow although he does go through the ceremonies of elections what does washington due to adjust to the fact that at least two of our competitors rivals adversaries have have broken with the 20th century and gone towards a strongman rule well i i could give you talk of washington in terms of federal agencies in the bureaucracy i think there will be small adjustments i think you will see in terms of congress not much under us when it all some probably yet of very loud public jarring the trump administration from the white house but while the white house that's really what i was going to.

washington europe asia mao zedong china congress white house moscow twenty years
"mao zedong" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"mao zedong" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"Saying hey guys we either start dealing with this stuff because it's been overtake us pretty soon a dictator for life means that the governance of china is exceedingly fragile because it's mortal there is no successor plan therefore there is nothing bought a lot of lieutenant dreaming of being the successor than the daggers the route jed i'm i'm i'm just repeating something we've seen in palace intrigue from rome roman times on therefore china is not in a position any longer to network with the other nations as if it was a leader in global politics i think but i'm not sure does washington new adjust to that that they'll be a hesitance in europe that they'll be a hesitance in asia because of this inherent weakness of a mortal of immortal government i i don't think they're going to see that for quite some time john i think that they're looking at a relatively young man i don't know how old you should be early early 60s are yes he's in his sixties yes but but the fact of the matter is liable last no twenty years and in regard to that fact if we remember back to the last days of mao zedong he died nineteen seventy six the last couple of years of his life were tremendous instability in china and on the chinese influence around the world so you know at this point i don't see you're going think you're gonna have a lot of reaction in terms of looking forward to accuse demise i think people are going to have to look in the shorter term to try to deal with him and try to answer the threats their emanating from trying to right now both military and economic what do we want from of the leadership in washington with regard to this change uh we see adwan dictator in turkey although he does go through the ceremony of elections we seem a potent era as a strongman dictator in moscow although he does go through the ceremonies of elections what does washington due to adjust to the fact that at least two of our competitors rivals adversaries have have broken with the 20th century and going towards a strongman rule well i could give you talk of washington in terms of federal agencies to the bureaucracy i think there will be small adjustments i think you'll see in terms of congress not much.

china europe asia mao zedong washington turkey congress moscow twenty years
"mao zedong" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"mao zedong" Discussed on Here & Now

"Two two fiveyear terms basically every leader of china rules for a decade but the thing to remember is that the president is not the highest office in the land it's actually the head of the communist party in the head of the military and those have no term limits so now none of the top jobs have any term limits and as it happens xi jinping holds all three top positions and these term limits by the way i've been in place for decades why were they put in place to begin with right they were written into the constitution in 1982 china's previous ruler chairman mao zedong had died in nineteen seventy six after decades of violent political struggles in revolution and famine and the country decided it was time to make politics more regular and more stable and more predictable and for centuries before chinese leaders had basically board until they died even though they may have sort of retired in name they tended to pull strings behind the curtain and kept on running things until they just couldn't in so this was one of a whole bunch of reforms you know the past forty years has been a reform era and along with it came legal reforms the courts got some power to deal with injustices the media were allowed to do a little bit of sort of watchdog journalism all to constrain the power of the top leadership and make politics more stable so why make this change to the rules now is the timing important it is interesting that they're actually changing the constitution to allow this arrangement they could have just ignored this thing because in many ways it's just a piece of paper what said in the chinese constitution as often not observed like you know the right to free speech freedom of assembly and all these ing but they are going to change it in that requires some doing so what happens is the communist party's central committee the top two hundred people in the ruling party proposed these changes and then next week the annual session of the legislature.

president communist party china mao zedong chairman Two two fiveyear forty years
"mao zedong" Discussed on Bitcoin Crypto Mastermind

Bitcoin Crypto Mastermind

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"mao zedong" Discussed on Bitcoin Crypto Mastermind

"It's locked and it's on an open ledger that everybody can see the consensus i bet you we wouldn't have gone to war i bet you wound gone to the vietnam war i bet you we would have gone to war to in world war one we wouldn't have gone to korea i doubt it we probably wouldn't have been involved in a lot of the actions and there'd prybe yanhao your uncle would still be alive your great uncle your your and people got blown away people got no arms no lays its war is necessary but it should be centralised all the wars in history that have been a whole riff iq experience for the people who lived on that there was a war if you read there was wars and of course people don't know history anymore because we go through the public school system but there was 100 years wars disaster because of centralise all these wars stalin and mao zedong combined killed one hundred million people because it was sad centralized power even the communist party it's funny communism have you ever red karl marx ben i'm not a communism a capitalist in some ways but karl marx was us more do i mean when you read his stuff i can see why half the world became communist the guy was made a compelling case but being forgot one thing communism would have worked on the block chain it does this ever work centralized the second mao zedong got all the power and china guess what happened he stormed his own people fifty million people died he killed all the teachers and engineers thing though stalin same damn way stalin goes out there it is saying if there's ten and this is not as exact words but something like this he would have a quota on a city kill or imprison ten thousand people and one of the mayors or the rulers of that small town wrote back call back to stalin and said i don't think there's ten thousand people here who did anything wrong song said i don't care if you get ten thousand you'll find that 10 who did something wrong he was a madman.

vietnam war world war korea communist party karl marx zedong stalin mao zedong china 100 years
"mao zedong" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"mao zedong" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Black bear pictures with the new film suburban con starring matt damon julianne moore and oscar isaac directed by george clooney super become rated r in theaters everywhere at over twenty seven from npr news this is all things considered i'm ari shapiro and i'm robert siegel in china today the political victory for president xi jinping the communist party congress the gathering of china his political elite voted to enshrine she's name and ideas in the party constitution so the words xi jinping thought on socialism with chinese characteristics in a new era will sit in the constitution alongside mao zedong thought and deng xiaoping's theory to understand she's ideas you were going to stay with a look at the corner of his legacy show fire an anti corruption campaign npr's rob schmitz reports it was august two thousand twelve china's 18th party congress was weeks away an event where a politician name xi jinping would be annoyed china's next leader suddenly she went missing for three weeks to this day nobody outside key members of china's top leadership knows why there is a fairly common speculation arthur crct as managing director of cavaco reaganomics 2012 says gruber was a tumultuous year for china's communist party a top politician name bo she lie was under investigation after his wife was convicted of murdering a foreigner and corruption within party ranks with spiraling out of control one popular story is that she went to the party elders and said look we've got a serious problem here this requires a very serious measures to rain and corruption and impose more discipline i'll do that but you need to give me cart rush to do what i want and the story goes if party elders weren't prepared to give she these powers he wasn't interested in the job this of course is a rumor but if true would help explain how relatively unknown bureaucrat became one of the world's strongest leaders woman pa sorry choosing men in key in.

julianne moore oscar isaac ari shapiro robert siegel china communist party rob schmitz arthur crct managing director gruber george clooney npr president mao zedong deng xiaoping jinping three weeks
"mao zedong" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"mao zedong" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Even are far more fun articles one soldier endar shusha that we must lead by example we must reform and improve ourselves in line with the general requirements for party building the new era we must devote ourselves the socialism with chinese characteristics and contribute our wisdom and strength to the cause of the party and the country away from dealer within minutes and following his example the massed ranks of the communist party faithful at that national congress voted as one to enshrine his vision for china's future now officially designated xi jinping thought in the party constitution firing tremble guzzler me rare shoushan bombay triggering numbers are front over half the votes on environmental stay for chinese communism is the bbc's china editor carry gracie it is a big deal and more than two thousand delegates to that closing session of congress voted unanimously full xi jinping thought it puts cdm paying on a par with chairman mao to get his ideology into the party constitution during his lifetime on what it means is that no other party leader in that close set at the top can really challenge him without at the same time undermining all threatening the legitimacy of the communist party itself i certainly wouldn't go so far as to say that he intends to go on and on formally at the head of the chinese communist party but i think it's pretty clear now that he intends from both from what you said in the opening session of congress in terms of that three and a half hours speech setting out his vision for the next.

china bombay bbc editor gracie congress cdm mao chinese communist party chairman
"mao zedong" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"mao zedong" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"I was exiting the stage and do you think actually that the that will not happen we will continue to see a as sort of to speed europe with fair core coming increasingly together and the fringes increase it he just seeking to play bit parts i think give the i would say to speed baby threespeed you this is a very complicated exercise you to twenty eight members twenty seven if the brits finally leave him i still wonder if we can do that in such a births and the so at the end of the day i think multiplespeed europe is absolutely unavoidable okay quentin pale here in london ryan heath in brussels thank you both for joining us on today's globalist here's what else we're keeping an eye on today john is president she has been honoured by the communist party after it voted to add his ideology known as changing pink thought to the country's constitution over the party's founder mao zedong and one other leader deng xiaoping have enjoyed a similar privilege the iraqi prime minister hydrogel abidi has defend is the role of iranianbacked two paramilitaries at a meeting with the us secretary of state rex tillerson baghdad has rejected american kohl's to send the popular mobilization forced home after they held to defeat islamic state and recapture the northern city of kirkuk from the kurds let's singapore's an answer limit on the number of vehicles it will allow within its territory saying there's not enough space there are six hundred thousand cars within the seven hundred twenty square kilometres of singapore and wall strict growth limits already apply it will now become even harder for citizens to secure the right to own a car this is the globalists' stay tuned.

kohl baghdad secretary of state us prime minister deng xiaoping founder london kirkuk europe mao zedong communist party president john brussels ryan heath quentin seven hundred twenty square ki
"mao zedong" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"mao zedong" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"Our team returning to the new york times editorial put out under the headline on twitter for all its flaws the communist revolution chinese women to dream big i would be remiss if i did not point out the china has a one has had a one child policy for a long time that china has waged truly which a war on women as a function of national policy and that has led to her are horrific horrific consequences for women in china for decades but i'm i'm also now focussing our oh i want to focus back on the famine which affected women men fact that everybody at the period that they're talking about dreaming big oh let's regulatory about people were dreaming big and communist china uh in in this period of time the under the reign of mao on when mao zedong is calling the shots and if you want the best book on this the that i know of his is frank to qatar which with malice great famine this is what they won't tell you this is what they even if you're look you look this up here and there may be some people will know all while you're 45 million people died and this is based on access to the archives that have just recently been opened up here they won't tell you though vow three million of them were actively were murdered through state repression through state violence many of them tortured to death the uh at the level of various provinces in china there were records kept by the communist parties communist entities in charge and the local commissars and they did horrific things to people because once starvation starts to set in people become desperate when someone can't feed themselves feed himself or herself when they can't feed their family they start to do things that break party doctrine once everyone sees that there is not going to be enough food they don't want to be told to that they have to show up at the collective farm anymore they don't want to be told they at the do what the government tells them to do so what does the government do then while in the case of china that if they don't change it's not representative to the people the.

twitter china mao zedong new york times frank qatar representative
"mao zedong" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"mao zedong" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Lot more important unthinking right now the top of my head unthinking of the famous ping pong diplomacy when you had some ping pong players from the united states visit beijing i believe it was before we saw the wreck nation of beijing by president nixon back in the early 70s so the s symbolically very fluffy but also important in terms of of what they might mean in issuing in preceding something that much more important i'm not quite sure that might be in this case it's a symbolic fluffy it's also quite literally fluffy isn't it now what does she jinping just looking ahead to the g twenty talks in humbug what do you think that xi jinping wants to get out of that summit he wants to walk away from that stomach with his leadership enhance the midwest stage that's something that his started to do and dove us when he addressed the people in davos and he spoke very much about china's role in being a protection a protector of the free trade in the global institutions that have risen up in the post world war two era his this is an extremely important thing for xi jinping because we you have the 19 th party congress coming up in the fourth quarter of this year date yet to be set and at that conference it is expected that he will be anointed as a leader of the same stucture of mao zedong and also cia of deng xiaoping and we will looking for him to be a given another a fiveyear term as as china's leader so yeah his importance as a global leader is paramount for him yet he's got the slight problem going on with north korea amendment which was an urgent plea thanks david tweed thank you so much for joining us on the g twenty from hong kong and we'll speak get more about on north korean irritant when we look at the day break news that's coming up this is build with a bloomberg business up sports reporter michael barr an obscure nba lowcost houston center mena four million dollars on his new contract is thirty four years old be reportedly agreed to resign with the rockets on a year thirteen million dollar deal but there was a little well no role in the nba's collective bargaining agreement gold be over thirty eight rule remains had restructuring the deal and resign on a threeyear eleven million dollar agreement uber through.

nba mena michael barr bloomberg north korean north korea deng xiaoping jinping nixon the deal united states reporter hong kong david tweed world war free trade china davos president beijing thirteen million dollar eleven million dollar four million dollars thirty four years threeyear fiveyear