35 Burst results for "Manufacturing"

Bob Frantz: The GOP Contract Is for Every American

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:28 min | 1 d ago

Bob Frantz: The GOP Contract Is for Every American

"Of all, yes, I am a mega Republican. In fact, when Donald Trump even announced he was going to run for president before anything else came up, being a person that also ran a business of my own over 30 years manufacturing in that. I figured it's about time we get somebody in there that knows how to run things. All right. I don't want to take a whole lot. I like that. But anyway, I want to go ahead and I want to add on. First, I'm proud to see that the Republicans are at least going ahead and got this contract out. I think that's very important. Now the next thing, and here's the thing that they should add on to that. This is a contract like you sign a contract. He's signing this contract. They are with every American, whether it be Democrats or Republicans or whatever. Every American. That means that we're going to hold them to that contract. It's like a contract. And here's something that people are missing too in this whole system. We are the government. Everybody that walks around and talks about the government. No, that's you and I. If it wasn't for the money, we spend to put them where they are, then what's happening is the fact that they couldn't exist. So here's another thing that we have to keep with Americans first in war. In line with. And that is that being that we are the government, then that means we are giving you money to be able to do the things that we want, not what you want, what we want. So that's number one. Now,

Donald Trump
Stacey Abrams: There Is No Such Thing as a Heartbeat at 6 Weeks

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:35 min | 4 d ago

Stacey Abrams: There Is No Such Thing as a Heartbeat at 6 Weeks

"Prominent powerful Democrats like Stacey Abrams. Asserting that a 6 week old baby in the womb doesn't have a heartbeat, this video has been unearthed. This was said at a an event at the Ray Charles performing arts center in Atlanta. I give you the woman who wants to be governor senator president, maybe co host of the view, here's good old Stacey Abrams. Because he's given a manufactured sample designed to benefit people that have been on the right to take the control of the Woods by the way. I'm sure she got a round of applause. Derek, see if there's an applause after that clip cuts off. And it's a little hard to hear. I'm going to repeat the quote from Stacey Abrams. Who desperately desperately wants to be Georgia's next governor. She still thinks she is George's governor because she never really accepted her defeat the first time. Let me read the quote for you again in case you couldn't hear it. There is no such thing as a heartbeat at 6 weeks. It is a manufactured sound designed to convince people that men have the right to take control of a woman's body.

Stacey Abrams Ray Charles Performing Arts Ce Atlanta Derek Georgia George
Revolver.News' Darren Beattie Discusses Manufactured White Supremacy

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:40 min | Last week

Revolver.News' Darren Beattie Discusses Manufactured White Supremacy

"Joining us now is Darren Beatty from revolver dot news. Darren, welcome back to the program. Excellent to be back as always. So Darren, thank you. So I want to talk to you about this one particular story. Is it true that the federal beer investigation is misrepresenting what might be considered white supremacy arrests or incidents in their reports to make it seem as if there's a bigger problem than they're actually is. Walk us through this story. Well, it certainly seems that way on the basis of whistleblower accounts. And just to contextualize all of this, this alleged national security threat posed by white supremacy dates back to really the Trump presidency where the DHS, the Department of Homeland Security, which is a national security bureaucracy set up in the aftermath of 9 11 to protect us against foreign terrorism, declared that white supremacy was the number one threat and since the DHS declared this a number of other national security institutions have followed suit. Now evidently, the FBI is getting on board. And the problem with white supremacy is there's just not the supply to meet the demand. And so it has to be manufactured. And it can be manufactured the kind of laborious way of actually setting up entrapment schemes like what we see the FBI did in the Michigan Whitmer case. But the easier way to do it is just cook the books and manufacture the numbers and count certain things as white supremacist terror when they really have nothing to do with it to feed into the desired narrative.

Darren Beatty Darren Department Of Homeland Securit FBI Whitmer Michigan
 FDA concedes delays in response to baby formula shortage

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | Last week

FDA concedes delays in response to baby formula shortage

"And Drug Administration has conceded that there were delays in its response to the baby formula shortage I Norman hall the FDA says it's sluggish response to the U.S. infant formula shortage resulted from delays in processing a whistleblower complaint and test samples of the nation's largest formula factory The ongoing shortage has forced the U.S. to airlift millions of pounds of powdered formula from overseas Problems highlighted in a ten page report include outdated data sharing systems inadequate staff and training for food regulators and poor visibility into formula supply chains and manufacturing procedures The FDA says it will seek new authority to compel colonies to turn over a key information

Drug Administration Norman Hall FDA U.S.
Kanye West Cuts Partnership With Adidas

The Officer Tatum Show

00:58 sec | Last week

Kanye West Cuts Partnership With Adidas

"Kanye West says that China manufacture manufacturing was partially behind his decision to cut ties with Adidas. So your boy, Kanye West, the sensitive man himself. You know, I really don't like Kanye West that much, man. I ain't even lie. I don't have respect for men who are unstable. Now, each is on. You can be cool or whatever. I just don't. And maybe it's not his fault. Maybe he's bipolar or something. I don't like men or the unstable. I don't like a man that I go in a room with him and you don't know what he's going to be like today. He and his feelings so he would flip out on somebody. He go do some erratic stuff because he's in his feelings. To me, I like men who are stable. I appreciate men who are stable. I admire men who are stable. And it may not be your fault, but I like what I like. I support what I support. And every time I turn around it's like Kanye is doing something flip, flip it stuff.

Kanye West Adidas China Kanye
Doug Welcomes Jim Serger, Author of '9:11 A Time to Always Remember'

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:08 min | 2 weeks ago

Doug Welcomes Jim Serger, Author of '9:11 A Time to Always Remember'

"Jim sarker's with us. And he has written a book on 9 11. And I'm excited to have him with us to share about that book, but also share just a lot of what's going on around this because I know there's a special emphasis for this book as well and we want to get to that. So Jim, welcome to the Doug Collins podcast. Yes, sir, Doug, thank you for having me on today. I really, really, really appreciate it. I really understand we're coming to that special time and I say special time and I mean that in a solemn way. I mean in a positive way, but also in not a way of flippantly saying that. I think we look at it in many ways, what happened on that date changed a generation in many ways. And it changed not only a generation of my age because I was at that point. You know, in my 30s, you know, generations, you know, and you've gotten to know my producer. He was in, you know, before age ten, you know, my kids, my wife, your family's as well. Talk to us about your new book. Tell us what, you know, emphasize from it and, you know, who it's helping and then we'll just get into some specifics about it. Absolutely, sir. So the time is 9 11. So we see 9 11 at 9 11 a.m.. We see the time again at 9 11 p.m.. So for about four or 5 years leading up to me manufacturing or coming up with this concept, I kept seeing the time 9 11. So when I was an operations manager at the Indianapolis airport, I was searching an aircraft and when you're at an airport, you always want to know what time it is. For some reason, you have to know what time it is. And it seemed like in the morning when I was doing it, I would look, it would be 9 11. And then when I worked the late shift at night, two times a week, I would look in to be 9 11 p.m.. And I kept saying to my wife, there's got to be a rhyme or reason because when I see the time 9 11, I automatically think of that day of where I was and what we went through as a country in 2001. So about a year ago, I was watching a documentary on World War II, very compelling, very heartfelt, very powerful. And as soon as it was over, it was 9 11 p.m. and I looked at my wife, I say it's 9 11, and she said, Jimmy, you better get started on that book.

Jim Sarker Doug Collins Doug JIM Indianapolis Airport Jimmy
How Drug Companies Stand to Make Billions by Preying on Children

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:28 min | 2 weeks ago

How Drug Companies Stand to Make Billions by Preying on Children

"Can you talk about how Pfizer and these major companies stand to make billions? Off of children that are being preyed on by weak parents and these predatory doctors and institutions. Talk about lupron. Yeah, so lupron is manufactured by a company called AbbVie. And AbbVie recommends lupron for precocious puberty endometriosis as well as prostate cancer, which is what I believe it was developed to treat. They say that it should only be used for three months. The FDA also doesn't recommend this for gender dysphoria. However, the drug between 2020 and 2021, I believe, increased in sales by some $30 million. And lupron does sell for this purpose. It is the main puberty blocker that I believe is used in the U.S., although there are others. So AbbVie does stand to make a lot of money from this. It was interesting because you were Laura Ingraham Ingram's show the other night, talking about this and I was watching your segment and as I was watching, there was an advertisement for AbbVie, pharmaceuticals, and I thought now isn't that interesting. That they're on TV right now talking about how dangerous this is. And here's this company buying ad time with Fox to talk about how amazing their products are that are actually farming children.

Abbvie Lupron Pfizer Laura Ingraham Ingram Prostate Cancer FDA U.S. FOX
Texas buses 75 migrants to Chicago in political battle

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 3 weeks ago

Texas buses 75 migrants to Chicago in political battle

"75 immigrants bust from Texas by governor Greg Abbott are now in Chicago Abbott has also bust immigrants to New York in Washington D.C. cities with democratic mayors in Chicago mayor Lori Lightfoot welcomed the 75 most of them from Venezuela She says the governor of Texas is manufacturing a crisis With these continued political stunts governor Abbott has confirmed what unfortunately many of us had already known That he is a man without any morals humanity or shame One of the immigrants spoke to WLS TV The worst kind of people in the world and we don't understand why but that's the way that they consider us They will be getting help trying to connect with family elsewhere or settle in Chicago I'm Ed Donahue

Washington D.C. Lori Lightfoot Abbott Greg Abbott Chicago Texas Venezuela New York Ed Donahue
"manufacturing" Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

Dennis Prager Podcasts

04:20 min | 3 weeks ago

"manufacturing" Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

"What a sick irony. We're going to be back with more on what makes America exceptional in the list is long. I'm Julie Hartman. The Dennis prager show. Julie Hartman here, in for Dennis prager, I'm talking about some specific things about the design of our country and our history that is made America exceptional. I would love for you all to call in. We have some callers now that I'm going to take, and tell me what you think. Do you agree with me that America's exceptional? Do you disagree? Do you like the points that I'm bringing up? I have some more. If you would like to hear that, I guess you have no choice if you're listening to this radio program. Except you could turn me off, but please don't, because this is a very important subject. Okay, I'd like to take a caller. Oh no, it looks like this call or dropped off. We had a caller that said that something along the lines of there's no such thing as American exceptionalism. I was really looking forward to taking that call. Sean, do we have him back? No, we don't have him back. Okay, well, that's okay. Why don't you guys call in one 8 prager 7 7 6 and let me know what you think. We do have some other callers here on this subject, but first I want to tell you, something pertaining to our history that I think makes America exceptional. You know, I was just talking about the design of our country. Our economic system, our system of federalism, how people can self segregate. But I want to tell you about some moments in history where we have behaved like no other nations have behaved. The way that we treat our enemies, I think, is one of the principal things that makes this country exceptional. And of course, the biggest example of that, to me, is World War II. I don't need to tell you how horrible World War II was and how terribly Germany and Japan behaved in that war. And when we won, in 1945, we really honestly could have had the right to impose a Carthaginian peace onto both Germany and Japan. Now when I say Carthaginian peace, I'm referring to when Rome plundered Carthage after they defeated Carthage in the I believe is the third Punic War. They destroyed Carthage, they put salt in the earth so that nothing could grow their Carthaginian peace means when you defeat someone and you totally obliterate the enemy. Honestly, again, given how Germany and Japan behaved in World War II, we probably would have had a right to impose a Carthaginian peace onto them. Certainly on to German and Japanese leaders. But instead what America did is that we help to rebuild these countries. We help to rebuild Europe with the Marshall plan. Hundreds and hundreds of millions of dollars was given to Germany and other European countries to help rebuild after the devastation of the Nazis. We also sent in many of our American advisers to Germany and help them redraft a constitution and put in American soldiers to try to make things become stable again in the aftermath of Hitler. And in Japan, many of you probably know that general Douglas MacArthur, who I believe in the 1940s was rightfully on the cover of Time Magazine as the man of the year. That's back when Time Magazine wasn't awoke left wing publication. Douglas MacArthur went into Japan and he also helped them redraw to constitution and rebuild their economy. That is really remarkable. Now let me ask you this. Let's say Germany won World War II, or Japan won World War II. Do you think they would have treated us that way? It really is a uniquely American thing how well we treat our enemies. Have we always treated our enemies well? No. I'm not saying America is perfect. But these are some pretty astounding examples. Another one I'll give you is the Vietnam War. When we pulled out of Vietnam in 1975, there were all of these boat people, these poor Vietnamese who were fleeing persecution. And we had American warships come and American planes come and take them to America. In fact, my hairstylist who I think is listening right now was one of those boat people who was rescued..

Julie Hartman Dennis prager America Germany Carthage Japan prager Sean Douglas MacArthur Time Magazine Rome Hitler Europe Vietnam
"manufacturing" Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

Dennis Prager Podcasts

07:20 min | 3 weeks ago

"manufacturing" Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

"Speaking of unique, this hour I am attempting to answer the question, what has made America exceptional? Now I opened this hour by saying that we conservatives really need to beef up on the subject. A, because half of this country doesn't think it's exceptional. And B, we just kind of take it for granted, and we don't always get specific. So I am trying to arm you with some facts today that you can use in a debate on why America is exceptional, because a lot of the times the left will say, well, what about Europe? Well, what about Scandinavian countries? I'm trying to tell you things that make us different from those countries. Just different in general because America truly is exceptional. I was just talking about the colonial period and I was discussing our economic system that is so unique. We had a system of self governing small landowners, which stood in stark contrast to England's system of having a small class of very large landowners that passed their land onto their kids. And I was saying that our system allowed for so much more social mobility because people could own their own land and also they were thinking in terms of being owners and thinking about things in terms of their economic viability, which of course impelled our modern day form of capitalism where people can be part owners of companies without even knowing about the day to day happenings in that company. So again, this is really unique to America and it's an important point to stress and debates. Another thing I want to bring up, and by the way, there are just so many. I'm going to try to go through them in the hours as fast as possible because I want you to know about all of them. America was and is uniquely a religiously pluralistic society. You know, reading Paul Johnson's book of history of the American people. I think it just went over my head in high school and in college that the 13 colonies were really each of them were distinct religiously. Maryland, for instance, was Catholic, Massachusetts as we probably all know was puritan, Pennsylvania was Quaker, Rhode Island was founded by roger Williams, who is an antinomian, and he made Rhode Island into a hub of religious toleration. I mean, that's pretty incredible that many of the 13 colonies had distinct religions. And the benefit of this system is that I think it's the benefit of our system of federalism, that is the divide between the federal government and having a bunch of states. Is that people can really self segregate. You know, we hear the term segregation a lot today and obviously it goes without saying that the segregation back during the time of Jim Crow was bad. But that doesn't mean segregation as an idea writ large is bad. There are actually a lot of benefits to it, and part again of having these 13 colonies with different religions is that people could go where they wanted to go. And a great reason that the states exist today is that again, people can kind of self segregate. We obviously know that roe V wade was just overturned. And a lot of people think that's a bad thing. And I actually think it's a good thing because if a state wants to practice it, they can. And if a state doesn't want to practice it, they can. And people who are really against abortion can live in states where there are restrictions on it. And people who are for abortion can go to states where there aren't. Now, of course, I'm sure I'm going to get callers in. I would love callers, by the way. Our number is one 8 prager 7 7 6. I'm sure people are going to point out to me while Julie, a lot of people don't have the luxury just to be able to move to another state. If they don't like the policies and I understand that, okay? But no system is perfect. And I really think it is beneficial to have places where people can go where there are different policies. Again, people can self segregate and it also allows these states to be hubs of ingenuity. For instance, one of the benefits about our system of states and having states kind of experiment with things first. You should point to this example actually when you're debating with the leftist. They will kind of be blown away by this. There is no way. Absolutely no way that gay marriage would have been legalized on the federal level, had it not been first legalized in Massachusetts. Massachusetts first legalized it, I believe, in what was a Shaw in 2002 or 2003, early in the 2000s. And because of our federal system, because of the Tenth Amendment, which says any powers that are not delegated to the federal government or prohibited by the Bill of Rights are reserved to the states. Because of that, states again can be hubs of ingenuity and entrepreneurship, and when gay marriage was passed in Massachusetts in the early 2000s, a lot of states saw, hey, okay, maybe this isn't so bad. You know, having gay people get married. My state should adopt that. And then it got adopted on the federal level. Again, that would not have happened without the system of federalism, which is very unique to the United States. Tell the liberals to put that one in their pipe and smoke it. They'll love that example. It was May of 2004, okay, when Massachusetts passed gay marriage. But I'm trying to draw a link here. I hope perhaps I'm not doing it too eloquently, but I'm trying to draw a link here between the way that our country was organized during the colonial period and now. During the colonial period, each of the colonies could have their own religion. And they did have their own religion and allowed people to self segregate and try different things and find their own people. And that is mirrored in the design of our state system now. And again, that is what makes America really different and exceptional. Now, of course, Germany and Switzerland, they do have a system of federalism. That is, they have a federal government and then they have states that are bound by the rules of the federal government, but do their own thing. But I think that America, first of all, it's the preeminent example of federalism. And second of all, their systems of federalism were modeled off of ours. So many of us don't have an appreciation for how intricate and delicate and well thought out our system is. And the many benefits it affords to liberals and conservatives alike. And the thing that I just can't get over is that the left is trying to undermine the system that they benefited from. Those who disparage states rights, you have to tell them the gay marriage example. They are undermining the system that they benefited from..

America Massachusetts roe V wade Paul Johnson federal government roger Williams Quaker Jim Crow Rhode Island Europe England Maryland Pennsylvania Julie Shaw Switzerland Germany
"manufacturing" Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

Dennis Prager Podcasts

03:24 min | 3 weeks ago

"manufacturing" Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

"For modern investment capitalism, we had all of these people who were thinking like owners were thinking about things in terms of their economic attractiveness or their economic viability. And so we, in America, I mean, we did benefit from Britain's example of private companies, for instance, Britain had the Virginia company, which was a private company where people invested to settle in Virginia. Actually, it's astounding one of, I mean, America is born off of capitalism. The reason why people came here is because of private companies. So we did benefit from that example of Britain. But what made our form of capitalism different is that we had a class of people that could invest in private companies, could be owners of things without having any direct connection to the day today happenings of the company. Okay? We kind of take this for granted in America. We just think it's so common, but it's really an astounding thing. If you think about Apple, for instance, most people who hold shares of Apple, they don't work at Apple. They've never been to apple's headquarters. They've never even probably, I mean, some of them have probably not ever used Apple products. But it is this capitalist system in America that we were inspired from Britain to adopt and what we made our own. I mean, it is just so unique. And when you have people that are able to invest in companies, be owners of things that they really don't have any day to day connection to, that allows for enormous social mobility because if you are shrewd enough and you think in terms of economic profitability and viability, you can really make a lot of money off of investment. And it also benefits the people who are creating the company because even if they have to sell parts of their company, if they're getting a lot of investors, they're going to make a pretty penny. So again, this is really specific to America in England, there were private companies, but you had to get charters from kings and a lot of the times you had to be aristocratic to participate. It was our small land owning population that allowed people to be owners in this form of capitalism to flourish. That's what makes America an exceptional will be back. Hello, everybody. Julie Hartman here. It's a third hour of the Dennis prager show. It is a joy to be with you today. I think I mentioned this in the last hour, perhaps before, but I want to remind you that you can find out more about me on my website, Julie dash, Hartman dot com, and you can email me at Julie at Julie Hartman dot com. That's a bit of a tongue twister, but you can find that email on my website. I really love reading emails. I can not promise that I can respond to all of you, but I can promise that I read each and every one and they are very touching and helpful to me. The good, the bad and the ugly, I read all of it. So please do let me know how you think the show is going. And if you'd like to hear me talk about anything else and check out the Dennis and Julie podcast, I'm telling you, it's unique stuff..

Britain America Apple Virginia Julie Hartman Julie dash Dennis prager England Hartman Julie Dennis
"manufacturing" Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

Dennis Prager Podcasts

03:02 min | 3 weeks ago

"manufacturing" Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

"Period. And I remember when I opened the book, I just thought, okay, Julie, you got to kind of slog through this part, you know, it's really something that you should beef up on and know pretty well if you're going to be a conservative commentator who proclaims that they are a history buff. And I have to tell you, I think that colonial period was the most fascinating part of the book to me so far because I think it says so much about our exceptionalism and the way that we took such great things from Britain, but also made those things our own is truly extraordinary. And so one of the things I want to highlight, and this is something that you can really bring up in a debate. This is what I want to do for my listeners. I want to give you, I want to arm you with facts to put in your ammunition for a debate. With a leftist with that leftist sister of yours or that your classmate, I really want to arm you with facts. And one of the things is that it's so unique that America was founded on the model of a population of self governing small landowners. Now this I learned from Paul Johnson's book, this is very different from the European model of a small concentrated class of hereditary owners of large land. England was really, I mean, a brutally aristocratic system where if you had land, you gave it to your kids. If you didn't have land, you were essentially destitute. America from the beginning was so different. Because there was all of this space in the new world. People could come here and everyday people, people of modest means, of course, not everyone owned land, but a far greater percentage of everyday people than in Britain in America could own land. And that is huge. That is huge for social mobility. So that on its own is unique, and then the thing that makes America doubly unique. Is that because America had all of these small landowners. These individuals by necessity had to think like owners. They were the managers and the operators of their own land. They oversaw everything. They weren't serfs. They weren't employees or I mean, some of them were indentured servants, but a lot of people weren't indentured servants. When you're a surf or an indentured servant, you have no idea of the basic economics underlying what you're doing. When you're a landowner, you start to think like an owner, and you do understand the economics of what you're doing. And I believe, and I would argue that Paul Johnson's point, although he doesn't say it as explicitly as I'm saying support this, I believe that this is what made the U.S. a particularly fertile environment..

America Britain Paul Johnson Julie England
"manufacturing" Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

Dennis Prager Podcasts

05:03 min | 3 weeks ago

"manufacturing" Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

"Continue. We'll be back with Heather McDonald. Hey, everybody, this is about as easy and intro as I've ever done. Julie Hartman. Is there no what? It's not easy. 'cause I'm afraid you'll think I'm sort of exaggerating. It's very, very young woman is a phenomenon. I thank God I found her. She means the world to me, and you will understand why. You know, we do a podcast together every week, Dennis and Julie, you can watch it on YouTube and it's worth it. Anyway, now just sit back and enjoy Julie Hartman sitting in for me today. Hello, everybody. It is the third hour of the program. I am Julie Hartman as Dennis just said, guest hosting for Dennis today as he is in Denver. I love this job. I love this job. I love this job. It is just so much fun to do this to talk about these ideas. Look who I just interviewed Heather McDonald. She was one of my heroes. She helped me become a conservative, and now I get to sit here and interview her. And hear from all of you listeners who call in, please know that it is not lost on me how fortunate I am to be in this position. And I really do know that I have a responsibility to use that good fortune. To that point, I would like to spend this hour discussing what has made America so extraordinary in different from other countries. As I mentioned at the start of the show, I have guest hosted. This is my fourth time actually guest hosting national radio. It's my third time hosting for Dennis, and then one other time I did a show for Mike Gallagher. And I love history, as I've said, probably 5 or 6 times on this program. And I really want to try when I guest host to dedicate every third hour of the program to something pertaining to history. And today I want to talk about what American exceptionalism is and some examples of it. And this is inspired by a debate I actually had with a leftist about 6 months ago. On this very topic of American exceptionalism needless to say, I was supporting the idea that America is an aberration. And this person who I was debating with, he was saying that America is not exceptional. And so of course, obviously, he was asking me to identify some of the things that I believe makes America exceptional. And I would say, well, look at our freedoms. Look at freedom of speech in the free exercise of religion and the rights that are given to people who are accused of committing a crime. Look at how unique that is, most other countries don't have that. And he would respond, well, Europe has that. Many countries in Europe have many of those freedoms. So America is in exactly unique. Sure, maybe not the entire world has the luxury of having those freedoms, but it happens in Europe. In some countries, and then I would go on to my next Fortnite, I would say, well, look at our transfer of power. Look how every four years we get a new president or new presidential election, and the people elect their representatives. I mean, a lot of nations around the world have dictatorial regimes, and the same thing. The guy would say to me, well, look at Europe. There are elections in Europe. People get to choose their leaders in most countries in Europe. And the point is, I realized that I really had to beef up on this subject because it was harder to argue than I had anticipated. I think we conservatives just, it's so obvious to us that America is exceptional, that we kind of get lazy sometimes with our arguments. We just sort of refer to American exceptionalism like it's a given. And you know, it's not a venture to say that half of this country does not think America is exceptional. So we've really got to get specific here. And that is the goal of this hour. I want to identify some things about the structure of this country, the way that it has been designed and the way that we have behaved in history that truly sets us apart. The first thing that I want to talk about actually pertains to the pre founding of our nation, the colonial period. And I know what some of you are probably thinking or going boring and to be honest, I can understand that sentiment. I mentioned that right now I'm in the middle of a masterful a thousand page book written by the brilliant British historian Paul Johnson. It's called a history of the American people. And at the beginning of the book, the first a hundred pages pertain to the colonial.

Julie Hartman Heather McDonald Dennis America Dennis just Europe Mike Gallagher Julie Denver YouTube Paul Johnson
Racial Preferences in Health Care

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:51 min | 3 weeks ago

Racial Preferences in Health Care

"I mean, needless to say, this is astounding. The question I have for you is when did this really start and where do you think it's coming from? You open the city journal article by talking about the earthquake caused, excuse me, by George Floyd's death. Do you think it really started with that? Or did a lot of these changes predate George Floyd? Julie, you're absolutely right in your suggestions. They predated the mass hysteria on the part of the elite about phantom racism was certainly amplified exponentially by the George Floyd grace riots, but these trends have been a long time coming. And a bunch of us have been warning about it in Americans have just turned their eyes away and said, oh, those silly schools, nothing matters. But the efforts to. Kind of pretend that the academic skills gap does not exist through the widespread use of racial preferences, has been going on for decades. I mean, the original case, after all, that affirmed the constitutionality of racial preferences was bakke, that was the medical school. And a white guy Allen bakke sued because he wasn't admitted even though he had much higher grades and test scores than the black average applicant to the University of California Davis medical school. And to the eternal destruction of any hope of racial equality and colorblind policy in the United States, justice Powell came up with this ridiculous justification for outright racial preferences, which is, oh, it helps white students learn if they can be around black students. That's the diversity rationale. So this has been going on since at least the 1970s. Right.

George Floyd City Journal Earthquake Allen Bakke Julie University Of California Davis Bakke Powell United States
"manufacturing" Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

Dennis Prager Podcasts

03:14 min | 3 weeks ago

"manufacturing" Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

"Yeah, don't expect any recognition from your Alma mater believe me. They will not be devoting a little article about you in the alumni magazine. I can speak from experience. Wow. Oh yes, you went to Yale, right? So Yale just has completely gotten you away from their system. Have they just wiped you off of the grid? Yeah, me and a bunch of others. I mean, I'm not claiming any particular dessert there, but far more prestigious colleagues have also just wiped out. That's when it goes. Well, you know what? I wear it as a badge of honor if awoke institution says that they want to somehow get rid of me from their record. And I'm sure that you feel the same way. So today I want to talk to, I mean, so many things I want to ask you about. Again, you're one of my heroes, and I know that sounds corny to say, but it's true. But specifically, I want to discuss your recent city journal article that just captivated me. For those of you who haven't read it, miss McDonald published this article called the corruption of medicine, just about a week or two ago. And in it, she talks about how this boogeyman of white supremacy that the left says supposedly exists in systemic racism in all of these things that we hear from the Democrats how those ideas have infected medicine and the practice of medicine, not just, again, the practice itself, but medical school admissions, the tests that people have to take to get into medical school. I was reading that article and highlighting things in my jaw was on the floor when I was reading it. So miss McDonald, I want to ask you if you would be willing to synopsize for our readers, some of the things that you pause it in that article and some of the evidence that you found. Well, the main leaders of the medical profession have decided that the main characteristic of medicine is white privilege and white supremacy and racism. And they have made it their mission to purge doctors of their racism. They believe that if there's not proportional representation of so called underrepresented minorities that is blacks and Hispanic students and medical school, it's because somehow medical school admissions committees must be discriminating if there is not proportional representation of black and Hispanic researchers in cancer and Alzheimer's labs. It must be because doctors are discriminating against qualified blacks and Hispanics. Those propositions Julie are completely false, the problem, the reason we don't have exact proportional representation in medicine or any other marriage or democratic field is because there is a massive academic skills gap. Explanations scores, sadly, and this is uncomfortable for many Americans to hear about or talk about, but if they're going to accuse us of a country of racism, we have to fight back with the facts that explain this alleged unfair lack of proportional representation, there is a massive skills gap and that's why there isn't proportional representation. So what the schools have done is say, we are going to admit black and Hispanic students with medical schools right there, miss McDonald..

city journal McDonald Alzheimer Julie cancer
"manufacturing" Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

Dennis Prager Podcasts

03:31 min | 3 weeks ago

"manufacturing" Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

"It's xenophobic. It's racist. It's not going to do the job. Okay, well, you guys voted for it. Ten years ago. How do you answer that? They change their position because they knew his politically advantageous to do so because of the everyday left has gotten so woke that they don't like border walls. So now the Democrats are against border walls, okay? Actually, they're kind of not because President Biden just resumed building Trump's border wall, which is endlessly hilarious to me. Democrats were also anti gay marriage, they flipped, okay? Joe Biden in the past was pro crime. And so not pro crime, excuse me. Pro punishment for crime and now he flipped. And you know what? When the Democrats flip this much, more than it shows the contempt they have for everyday Americans. I actually think it more so shows the contempt that they have for their supporters. They know that their supporters, many of them, are so corrupt and so weak and so under their spell that they can literally one moment push the vaccine on you in the next moment say that it was rolled out too fast and the left will still follow in lockstep with them. That's the Democrats for you. Oh, we're ending again with Elton John. I love it. We'll be back. Calling the blues time on my hands, let me talk back with you I'm breaks in the world of space. I say it a bright red summer search out there a family hello, everybody. Welcome back to the Dennis prager show. We are here in the second hour of the program. I'm Julie Hartman. The lucky 22 year old recent college graduate who gets to guest host for Dennis today. It is an honor. It is also an honor to interview my next guest. Here on the line, we have Heather McDonald, who is a prolific American conservative author. She is a Thomas W Smith fellow at the Manhattan institute and a contributing editor to the city journal. She has written several books, including the war on cops and the burden of bad ideas. I would just like to say that when I was quote unquote discovering conservative ideas two years ago during the summer of 2020, one of the first videos that I watched was Heather McDonald's PragerU video. I think it was called are the police racist and it totally changed the way that I viewed policing and crime and it really started my journey to become a conservative. So I owe a huge debt of gratitude to our guest here, Heather McDonald, hello, miss McDonald. Thank you very much for your time today. Julie, thank you so much for having me on, and I guess you're a failure of the educational system if you were able to have your mind changed by facts. Something went wrong. So you deserve your a 100,200 $1000 in tuition back. You're funny. Well, thank you for saying that. I will just say really quickly, there are some conservatives at Harvard. I clung to the few conservative professors, one of them was Harvey Mansfield, but you're right that I'm probably a failure by Harvard standards, maybe they're going to revoke my diploma. I don't know. We have yet to see, but I think it's funny that you said that. And thank you again for coming on..

Heather McDonald President Biden Julie Hartman Thomas W Smith Joe Biden Trump Dennis prager Elton John Manhattan institute city journal Dennis McDonald Julie Harvey Mansfield Harvard
The Democrats' Shifting Positions

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:05 min | 3 weeks ago

The Democrats' Shifting Positions

"It really is remarkable to me, I think about this all the time, how much the Democrats flip on issues. I think that they, in their minds, justify it. And I know every day leftists justify it because they're progressive. Look at it in the very name, progressive, it means you can change. You can progress away from things. But we need to hold people to principles. There's nothing wrong with changing your stance. And when you have new information, maybe modifying what you said or supported before. But what we see with the Democrats is that they will unrelentingly take a position and then change it if it benefits them, okay? So now they're doing this on COVID, we I'm sure many of you know that senators Clinton and Obama voted for a border wall back in 2006. And then of course, when president Trump ran in 2016 and was talking about a border wall, it's horrible. It's xenophobic. It's racist. It's not going to do the job. Okay, well, you guys voted for it. Ten years ago. How do you answer that?

President Trump Clinton Barack Obama
The Audacity of the House Majority Whip

Dennis Prager Podcasts

00:48 sec | 3 weeks ago

The Audacity of the House Majority Whip

"Sure some of you know about this report that the House Democrats just published a few days ago saying that the Trump administration pushed the vaccine too fast. But I want to talk about it again because it is just so astounding, I mean the audacity. Okay, so this we have here, I'm quoting House majority whip, Jim Clyburn. The select subcommittees findings that the Trump White House officials deliberately and repeatedly sought to bend, the FDA scientific work on coronavirus treatments and vaccines to The White House's political will are yet another example of how the prior administration prioritized politics over public health.

House Democrats Trump Administration Jim Clyburn Trump White House House FDA White House
The Joys of Good Music

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:31 min | 3 weeks ago

The Joys of Good Music

"You know, as I mentioned, I'm 22 years old. And Dennis and I talk a lot about the generational differences between his and mine. And one of the ones that I've really been focusing on lately is the kind of music that we listen to. And I said in our last podcast, so many of us listen to the same type of music. Drake, Rihanna, Kanye West, Taylor Swift, and what's similar about all of these kinds of music is that number one, it's very energetic. Number two, a lot of the times it's violent, and number three, in most importantly, itself a grand iing music. The kind of music that my generation writ large listens to. And by the way, I'm not saying everyone, okay? I'm not trying to make a sweeping generalization. But I'm trying to highlight a theme here. We mostly listen to this kind of self aggrandizing music that makes you feel like you are walking into a stadium and everyone is screaming your name. And I posit that the reason that we listen to this music is because many of us lack the emotional sophistication to be able to listen to a song like the ones that Dennis listens to or my parents listen to, songs that maybe have a slower tempo that are sad that make you think about things like your own death or your parents deaths or your children or for us when we're going to have children and just life in general.

Dennis Taylor Swift Kanye West Rihanna Drake
Woman Banned From Local YMCA

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:49 min | 3 weeks ago

Woman Banned From Local YMCA

"Last segment I was telling you that I really believe that right now, and that is crucial right now in American history. I believe second to disabled people conservatives are the most discriminated against group in the country. Now this story that I'm about to report on proves my point very well. Some of you may have heard this, it barely made national news which really upset me because I think it should have been on the front page of all of these newspapers. There was an 80 year old Washington state woman who was banned from her local YMCA. She has been a member of that lie. For ready for this, 35 years. She was banned from that lie a few weeks ago. Because she saw a transgender individual in the women's locker room, she says, watching four and 5 little girls pulling down their suits in order to use the toilet. This woman, her name is Julie, actually, so automatically I have a proclivity to like her. She's got a good name. Her name is Julie jamon. But I like her on top of that because she's a hero. Again, she says that after she was done swimming in the pool that she's been going to for 35 years, she went into the locker room and saw an employee with a man's voice, and who looked like a man, watching these little kids changing. And ready for this, she told the man get out of here. I'm coding her. I asked if he had a penis, and he said, it was none of my business. I told that man to get out right now. Julie, if you are listening, you are my hero.

Julie Jamon Ymca Washington Julie Swimming
"manufacturing" Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:29 min | 3 weeks ago

"manufacturing" Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

"And he also says that he sees regular beatings. In fact, one of the other January sixers in there had had one of his eyes gouged out during a confrontation by a racist correctional officer. Meanwhile, I would like to remind all of you that our vice president Kamala Harris encouraged people during the Black Lives Matter summer when billions of dollars were lost. Due to rioting. Businesses were shattered, 25 people were killed during these Black Lives Matter riots. Okay, that is twice as many unarmed blacks that were killed the year before in 2019, and 5 times as many people that were killed on January 6th. Kamala Harris tweeted to have people chip into the Minnesota freedom fund to post bail for those protesting in Minnesota. In so many people chipped in that all of those rioters. Those Black Lives Matter rioters in the summer of 2020 were able to get out of jail. Actually, many of them weren't even arrested, they were just let go, but those who were arrested were let out. Okay, in addition to that, there were so much money raised by this Minnesota freedom fund that not only were they able to bail out the Black Lives Matter rioters, but the rest of the money went to those accused ready for this, of rape, murder, and other violent felonies. One of the women, in prison, got $100,000 cash bail. And she was charged for stabbing a friend to death. That is discrimination of conservatives. We have political prisoners, the January 6th people are treated vastly differently from Black Lives Matter rioters. Another example of this discrimination is the suppression of information. Look at what has come out about the Hunter Biden story. Twitter outright suppressed the Hunter Biden story in anticipation of the 2020 election. Another example is that mothers and fathers are taken away from their children in custody battles if they do not abide by their children's pronouns, we do have blatant discrimination in this country, the left talks about discrimination all the time. But the supreme irony is that they are fighting against discrimination that in many cases doesn't exist..

Kamala Harris Minnesota freedom fund Hunter Biden Minnesota Twitter
The Abortion Issue Isn't Over

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:40 min | 3 weeks ago

The Abortion Issue Isn't Over

"We're going to go straight into a news story here that, you know, so many of these news stories are both surprising and unsurprising to me. They're surprising because they're so absurd and they're unsurprising because they're so absurd. Google, just announced that Google Maps will only produce options for abortion clinics. I'm reading here from a daily wire article that was published a few days ago. Google Maps will only produce options for abortion clinics when users search for abortion related services. However, crisis pregnancy centers nonprofits that offer financial and medical assistance to mothers attempting to keep their babies. Will no longer appear in queries regarding abortion. Okay? Look, I have said many times on this program and on the podcast with Dennis, I am very conflicted about the issue of abortion. I'm pretty clear on what I think on most issues, but this one I really do go back and forth. But the point here is whether or not you support abortion. This is not okay. We here have a tech giant that essentially has a monopoly in the market, okay? Very few people use sites other than Google. So when people are going to search for locations, they're going to use Google more likely than not. We here have a tech giant that is actively trying to suppress services that would allow people who are pregnant to seek other options besides aborting the child.

Google Dennis
"manufacturing" Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:09 min | 3 weeks ago

"manufacturing" Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

"Where he says, if you could go back to one of the imperial capitals of Europe, on January 1st, 1900, and you were to walk up to one of the citizens on the street and say, do you know that in 20 years from right now, the German Empire would not exist? The Russian Empire would not exist? And the austro-hungarian empire would not exist. They would look at you and tell you that you were crazy. In other words, no one could have predicted what was to come, not just in the next 20 years, but my God in the next 40 or 50. And I think it would behoove Americans to remember. That things can go wrong really fast. There are so many problems in the world, so many things that are out of people's control. Look at the Polish who were invaded, what is it 82 years ago today. They had no control over that. But what is so discouraging to me about our problems in this country? Is that so many of them are manufactured, they're contrived. They're contrived to make certain groups of people feel better about themselves and their contrived to suppress political opposition. Police brutality is probably the most salient example. 12 on our blacks were killed in 2019 by police. You are more likely to get struck by lightning than be killed by police. In 2019. And look at what's happened with the defund the police movement in skyrocketing crime. Another manufactured problem is this notion of white supremacy, which is apparently so rampant, President Biden says it is the number one problem facing our nation, Heather McDonald is actually going to join me next hour to talk about how this white supremacy hysteria has infiltrated into medicine. You know, people think America will survive. As much as the left hates America, there's a part of them, I believe, that thinks it will always take care of them. And we better be careful. Because if we continue down this route, it won't..

Europe President Biden Heather McDonald America
"manufacturing" Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

Dennis Prager Podcasts

04:20 min | 3 weeks ago

"manufacturing" Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

"So to make a long story short, we developed a personal and professional relationship, which again has changed my life. Now we have a podcast together last summer. I was a weekly guest every Thursday on his radio show, and now I am a guest host. In fact, and this is a, I don't know, Sean, if I've announced this before on air on national radio that is, I've announced it on the podcast, but starting in two weeks, I will actually be a full-time employee here at Salem. I'm very excited about that. I'll be continuing with the dentist and Julie podcast. I'll also be doing a podcast of my own. Which will be a live YouTube show. And I will also host a weekend show on the Salem news channel. And on top of that, I will be standing guest host for Dennis and some other of the incredible Salem talent. So anytime any of them are out sick, on vacation giving a speech or just want to relax, they'll call me and I am going to sit in. So again, boy, what an honor it is to do this at any age, but especially a 22. And I thank you all for listening to me. Those of you who have listened to me before know that I am a history buff. A self proclaimed history nerd. I actually majored in history in college and I am in the middle of a thousand page American history book by Paul Johnson called the history of the American people. And I want to alert you all to two historical events that occurred on this day, September 1st. They're pretty remarkable. The first historical event occurred on September 1st, 17 excuse me 52 that's 270 years ago. And it was that the liberty bell was brought from England to Pennsylvania. Now just a little bit of historical fact here. When the liberty bell was brought over, I think it was wrong for the first time in England, and there was a crack in it. And then when it came to America, then of course it was in America, it was the 13 colonies, but when it was brought here to the new world, they patched up the crack, and then once America was officially founded, they rang the bell again, and it cracked again. And I don't think it has ever been wrong since. You know, I'm just thinking now how symbolic that the liberty bell has a crack in it. I actually like that imagery more of our liberty bell having a crack in it than being fully intact. Because I hope it reminds us that liberty is fragile. I know that we are certainly seeing that today. It's a shame what's going on in this country. You know, Dennis asks me all the time if I am happier as a result of becoming a conservative and the answer is undoubtedly yes. I feel more grateful. I feel more like myself. But I have to say a downside to it is the now I lay awake at night worrying about America. So that's the first event I wanted to alert you to. The liberty bell came to this country 270 years ago today. In the second event, which is pretty remarkable and some of you history buffs may know it because it's pretty famous. World War II started in Europe on this day. In 1939, when Hitler invaded Poland. Now, of course, World War II was already underway in Asia. The Japanese were trying to colonize China and fact they invaded manchuria, which is one of the northern parts of China as early as 1931. But on this day was the day that Hitler invaded Poland really setting off World War II in Europe. Now I think these two events to me show the range of occurrences that can happen in history. I was recently reading a book called the next 100 years by George Friedman. I highly recommend it to all of you. It's a riveting book. And he has this great line in it or series of lines..

Salem news channel Salem America Dennis Paul Johnson Sean Julie England YouTube Pennsylvania Hitler Poland Europe manchuria China Asia George Friedman
"manufacturing" Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

Dennis Prager Podcasts

04:15 min | 3 weeks ago

"manufacturing" Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

"Dennis prager here, thanks for listening to the daily Dennis prager podcast to hear the entire three hours of my radio show commercial free every single day become a member of prager topia. You'll also get access to 15 years worth of archives, as well as The Daily Show prep, subscribe, and prager topia dot com. Hey everybody, this is about as easy and intro as I've ever done. And the one that's not easy. Exaggerating. Very, very young woman is a phenomenon. I thank God I found her. She means the world to me, and you will understand why. You know, we do a podcast together every week, Dennis and Julie, you can watch it. YouTube and its worth it. Anyway, now just sit back and enjoy me. Julie Hartley. That's just the kind of things she hello, everyone. If you hear Billy Joel playing at the start of the hour, you know who's guest hosting. As Dennis just said in his lovely introduction, thank you so much for that Dennis. My name is Julie Hartman. I am 22 years old. I'm a recent college graduate. Many of you have heard me host this program before. This is actually my third time hosting the Dennis prager show. It's my fourth time hosting national radio, so I did two for Dennis, and then I did one for Mike Gallagher. And you know, I was driving to work today and I was just bouncing in my seat, listening to music. It was super early in the morning, and I was just so excited because I can not emphasize to you enough what an honor it is to do this job. I love it. It is really a privilege to be with you and it is especially an honor to sit in for someone like Dennis prager, who has changed my life in more ways than just the political. Those of you who listen to Dennis and Julie, Dennis just mentioned that we have this podcast together premieres every Tuesday and you can listen to it on Apple music or Spotify or watch it on YouTube. Those of you who have listened to it before know that Dennis and I have really become close friends. He's like an uncle and a grandfather figure and a boss and a co host and a best friend and he says he thanks God every day that he found me. Well, I thank God every day I found him. Many of you are aware of how I did find Dennis prager. I won't repeat the story at length because again, I imagine most of you know it, but for those of you who don't, you can go on to my website, which is Julie dash Hartman dot com. And you can find out that story. Or you can go back and see the other times I've guest hosted for Dennis, the dates are August 10th, 2021, and July 14th. Oh, excuse me. August 10th, oh yes, August 10th, 2021, yes. And then July 14th, 2022. See, I love guest hosting that much that I actually have the dates memorized. So please go back and you can watch the introduction to that to see my story. But just to give a 15 second synopsis, I'm actually sitting in this chair today because of an email. I had encountered Dennis's work during the summer of 2020 back then, dear lord, I was a Democrat, but during the Black Lives Matter riots and during the time I was sent home from college due to COVID, I really became disillusioned with the left. I found Dennis prager through his organization, PragerU, and I emailed him. And it is really miraculous that he saw my email because last summer, when I worked for him, one of my responsibilities was actually to read his mail for him in respond to people and it really is just unbelievable that he saw it because the sheer volume of mail he gets is crazy..

Dennis prager Dennis prager topia Julie Hartley Julie Hartman Julie The Daily Show Mike Gallagher YouTube Billy Joel Julie dash Hartman Apple
Jared Kushner on What It Was Like Working on Trump's Trade Policy

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:17 min | Last month

Jared Kushner on What It Was Like Working on Trump's Trade Policy

"We didn't work directly. However, I was placed on the trade policy council as an observer, and I watched you co chair it with Gary Cohen. And what was it? Every Tuesday morning, is that right? I remembering right? And I saw, I watched you there. I didn't throw my money in my voice into often, except when it was about China. But what I saw was a young, very intelligent man trying to make his father in law's administration and the America first vision a success. From the outside, you'd hear all these stories about, oh my gosh, there are subversives and camps and it's Steve versus Jared. Will you tell us the truth about what it was like inside The White House and how the misconceptions lasted this very day? So first of all, it was one of the most wild experiences you could ever have, especially in those early days. I think that when president Trump ran for office in 2016, there was an article in The New York Times, which I've now come to understand what that actually is worth, but it basically talked about how his trade policies were upending a hundred years of orthodoxy in terms of trade thinking. And when we got into power, it was one thing to say what president Trump said on the campaign, which is we need to stop our manufacturing jobs from going overseas. I want to see car plans starting to be built here in America, not in Mexico. I don't want to be hostage to China for all the different things that we are. And what he had as a people with a different set of experience. So we had on one end, Peter Navarro and on one end, Gary Cohn, and then we had in the middle. We had Wilbur Ross. We had bob lighthizer. We had myself and Steve Bannon. We were more trying to get the agreements, get people to come together to figure out what is a cohesive trade policy for an America first agenda looks like. And ultimately, bob lighthizer ended up emerging as the tip of the spear took him a while to get confirmed, I think Congress was very nervous that he actually was going to be able to do the things that Trump wanted to do. But once he took leadership of that, he really became a mentor of mine and somebody who really taught me a lot about not only why Trump's trade policy and instincts were correct, but also how do you implement them?

President Trump Steve Versus Jared Gary Cohen Bob Lighthizer America China Peter Navarro Gary Cohn Wilbur Ross White House Steve Bannon The New York Times Mexico Donald Trump Congress
Texas Congressman Dan Crenshaw Sounds Off on Congress and the FBI

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:48 min | Last month

Texas Congressman Dan Crenshaw Sounds Off on Congress and the FBI

"Looks like we're going to have, if everything goes right, the conservative majority Republican majority in the House, coming up next firm. You're going to be in there. We're going to have some McCarthy, more than likely in leadership. We're also going to have people that probably are more on that train of defund the FBI and break this thing open and what do we do with it? So where do you come between how do you work with people like that? Where do you actually go so that we can make money as a movement and as a country to get past this kind of stuff? Yeah, look, I mean, even the people who are like, do you fuck the FBI? And then you ask them, wait, really? Like, just abolish the whole thing. They're like, no, why don't you want to hold it accountable down? Like, I do want to hold it accountable, but you just said the fun the FBI. And so you start talking past each other. And in the end, you're like, wait, do we disagree? Or do we actually agree? Because we're all on the same page here, but on the right, what tends to happen is these manufactured divisions and these manufactured fights. And I think that's really silly. We need to get on the same page here. There's going to be some heavy oversight. Jim Jordan will likely be the chairman of judiciary, which has direct oversight over the DoJ and FBI. So we're going to fight this battle. And then you have to actually have some hard questions. Okay, so what legislatively needs to be done and pass through that committee. So that proper oversight occurs. And there's probably a lot of options for that. Can I get them out the next minute while we're here? No. And they need to be lifted. To conduct hearings, you need to ask those questions. You need to hear from whistleblowers in these institutions that are willing to come forward and say, look, this is what we've seen from our leadership is wrong and biased. And in fact, grassley senator grassley has done this report and indeed did find bias. And explain to us that to the FBI director, that's going to happen times a hundred on steroids when the house is retaken by Republicans. In November. I think that's what you can expect.

FBI Mccarthy Jim Jordan House DOJ Grassley Senator Grassley
The 4th Amendment Is There to Protect You

Mark Levin

01:47 min | Last month

The 4th Amendment Is There to Protect You

"So we're talking about the Fourth Amendment which applies to you too Permitting agents they write in this motion To seize boxes of documents merely because they are physically found together with boxes of other items But partly within the scope of the warrant it's clearly over broad And they cite to both circuit and Supreme Court precedents of which there's a ton So remember this is here to protect you The Fourth Amendment is there to protect you Boxes of personal documents photographs items such as clothing or by definition not contraband They must not be lawfully seized In fact the search warrants broad scope was in violation of the Fourth Amendment's particularity requirement Where'd you hear that first And that's the warrant permitted a general search prohibited his unconstitutional Since red coated soldiers created the need for the requirement in the first place The investigation regarding president Trump's return to the 15 archives boxes involved a referral to the Department of Justice based on questions relating to documents falling within the president's records act But the PRA accords the president virtually complete control over his records during his term of office There is no criminal enforcement mechanism or penalty The Department of Justice national security division recognized that deficiency and the decide to recategorize this case is relating to national security materials This is a brilliant point Simply to manufacture a basis to seek a search warrant

President Trump Supreme Court Department Of Justice Department Of Justice National PRA
"manufacturing" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

05:49 min | Last month

"manufacturing" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"My minivan, according to this pedometer, can hit a top speed of a 110 miles an hour. Not that I've tried or even come close, but apparently I could if I wanted to, but should I have the option? New York City has put high-tech speed governors on some of its city owned vehicles, devices that govern how fast those vehicles can go, the local speed limit one assumes. It's part of a growing movement to put speed limiters on new cars, a movement that we should say, the auto industry ain't none too thrilled with. Marketplace is met Levin has this one. American pop culture does not respect speed limits. On green, I'm going for it. There's a reason that movie is called the fast and the furious and not the slow and the circumspect, equating speeding with fun as part of the reason speed limiters aren't on every car already. Says Leah sham with the transportation safety group vision zero network. The advertising of cars is just ingrained in our brain that this is some natural step of freedom. Speed limiters have been around since the early 1900s. The sham says the idea is gaining momentum now because of a spike in traffic deaths during the pandemic, while the number of cars on the road declined. What that seemed to do though is give people who were on the road this space, literally, to go a lot faster. Speed limiting tech has gotten better too. Systems now can use geolocation to change how fast the car can go in different places. But having only new cars on the road with that tech won't solve speeding overnight says Thomas with the auto website, the auto. Let's say drop of the hat every vehicle 2023 model year in later needs a speed limiter. Okay, well, the average vehicle age in the United States is I want to say a shade over 13 years old. Some speed limiter skeptics say mixing slower driving new cars with faster old ones can make traffic more dangerous. Last month, the new European rule went into effect mandating speed limiters on new cars. Although the limiters are pretty limited, drivers can override them easily. I'm Matt Levin for marketplace. Rounding out our retail regulars today dispatch here from Irene kesselman. She runs alley cat toys and car bro, North Carolina. Our business right now is up and holding its own. Our inventory is we're pretty full right now and selling and filling in as we receive holiday items. I am still dealing with products being late. We ordered some beautiful wrapping paper and we are trying to get some ribbon to correspond with the paper. And we are having a time and a half trying to get ribbon shipped to us from different locations and we are a little bit behind on making bows. We

Leah sham vision zero network Levin New York City Matt Levin Irene kesselman Thomas United States North Carolina
J. D. Vance: The Two Issues GOP Voters Care About

The Dan Bongino Show

01:27 min | Last month

J. D. Vance: The Two Issues GOP Voters Care About

"Katie it's like the media that was reserved a special degree of animosity for anyone who had the strong backing of president Trump You were one of them You got the endorsement You won you won pretty handily You Blake masters Herschel and Georgia Anyone who's been supported by Trump it seems they really really hate you I would take that as a badge of honor And I'm sure you already know that but are you saying that too It's just like once you're attached to president Trump But anyway the an endorsement or even if you said anything nice about him that's it Like you're finished Oh that's absolutely right I mean and by the way if people are interested in helping us fight back against all the medialized they can go to GD Vance dot com because they are coming after us in a special way And I think it's really about the substance of what the president represented and departing from a host of bad policies You and I have talked about trade before but especially on immigration Those are sort of the two big issues kind of the third rail of GOP establishment politics like this crazy idea that we shouldn't let the Chinese with our tail in the manufacturing rates and this crazy idea that we shouldn't let drugs that kill our people flow across the southern border Those two things they don't like it when you talk so much about them but our voters really care about those issues Obviously the president really cares about those issues And I think if we run on them if we ignore the media lies we're going to be just fine

President Trump Herschel Katie Donald Trump Blake Georgia GOP
"manufacturing" Discussed on Beauty IQ Uncensored

Beauty IQ Uncensored

04:34 min | 10 months ago

"manufacturing" Discussed on Beauty IQ Uncensored

"So let's look at focusing on the packaging, the formulation, the experience as well, because whilst that clients, the ones you pay us, the consumers are the ones who buy the product that creates the whole economic chain. So it's really important to focus on that consumer experience. Well, there's brands like Kevin Murphy, who have completely switched over to using a 100% of packaging made from ocean plastics, which is just, I feel like an amazing fate to go after something like that. I imagine that process to develop eco friendly packaging would be really expensive. All of the ocean plastics area is phenomenal expensive because it's not just obviously about making that packaging. It's the sourcing of it as well. And I think that's fantastic. Let's take all the Weiss we have and use it for a really good purpose. On the other side, I'd love to see more brands start at sustainable packaging. So look at materials that are going to decompose over time because not everything we buy ever gets recycled. So let's look at things potentially that might be bioplastics or corn starch based. And have them degrade quite rapidly when they're exposed to UV. And I think that's an area that needs to be explored a lot more. Ocean plastic's great. Once we've solved that problem of clean that up, hopefully that might happen within a couple of decades of the current rate. Let's look at the next level and start doing it now and develop the technologies that are going to be affordable. So recycling is one thing, but eventually something is going to end up in landfill. We want to see that decompose very fast. Yeah. That's a really good point. Well, this has been a really interesting chat. I feel like we could have now that we've know what your expertise is of like, I've got all these other questions. So if we get any questions from our audience off the back of this chat will definitely make a time to chat to you again. But thank you so much for sharing all of your expertise on manufacturing with us. Pleasure, thank you for the opportunity. What's your product in 1980 today, Hannah? Mine is a pack. So I'm actually three products in one. Rotating. Number three, four and 8 repair pack. It's valued at a 150, but it's a 135, and it's got three of my I'm obsessed with all the plex at the moment. Isn't for the shampoo, so number three is the treatment. Number four is the bond poo. And number 8, the moisture mask. Okay. And that I am absolutely un obsessed with olaplex, one of the reasons I love all plexus because it's really good for dry damaged hair. But it doesn't go oily or way ahead down. Your hair just feels like soft and stronger. I'm obsessed with all the plex at the moment. So the number three is the treatment..

Kevin Murphy Weiss Hannah un
"manufacturing" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"manufacturing" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"I'm going to get a call from it now. I know it coming up teaching behind. The scenes is really hard hard in front of the scenes to bet. but first. Let's do the numbers industrials down. One hundred ninety two points today about a half percent thirty five thousand thirteen. The nasdaq dropped ninety. Six points about six tenths percent. Fourteen thousand nine forty five s and p five hundred twenty six about a half percent there as well. Forty four and seventy cloud based software companies salesforce floated up and six tenths percent today on better-than-expected second-quarter earnings and forward guidance cloud storage for net app through four point seven percent. Ibm just plain old. Ibm drifted down about seven. Tenths of one percent discount. Retailer dollar tree tumbled twelve percent today second quarter earnings beat estimates but revenue went the other way dollar general drop three and seven tenths percent day bond prices down just bit the yield on the ten year treasury note remains at one point three four percents. You're listening to marketplace this marketplace. Podcast is supported by biz. Incher finding business insurance can be long and confusing process biz. Insure has made it easier. For professionals to find and compare multiple quotes for general liability and professional liability insurance online in minutes no paperwork necessary and with competitive pricing you can be saving time and money visit biz. Insure dot com to find business insurance. That's right for you. Hey it's why we know you're going to stay on top of the day's important business and economic news. The chances are the kids in your life. Have some questions about money as well. The marketplace is here for you with our show million bazillion entering the questions. Your kids have about the financial world around them and making those important money lessons fun. Our second season just wrapped so now is the perfect time to binge. Listen to all fourteen episodes million brazilian. Wherever you get your podcasts. This is marketplace. I'm kai ryssdal there. Some data out from the census bureau this week that shows a recent decrease in both hunger and poverty for households in this economy with kids that matches up neatly with families that are getting those expanded. An advanced child tax credit payments as much as three hundred dollars per child that started in july. Remember that and they are by the way. Set to expire at the end of the year as marketplace's amanda peach reports some households have felt the difference those payments make more than others. Half the american rescue plan which passed in march expanded the child tax credit and allowed families to receive direct cash deposits and not influx of cash has been especially helpful for very low income black and latino families. Eric rodriguez is with nonprofit unidos. Us we could see significant poverty reduction in the lots unity as much. As forty percent of latino kids susannah salgado's children could be among those she and her husband work but still struggle to make ends meet for their family of four in chicago. Her husband works at a restaurant and his hours were cut recently because of the delta variant salgado put the monthly deposit toward back to school expenses on member it after sewer buying backpacks uniforms school supplies and also paying for the registration for programs that our children want to participate in that sometimes are not free and we have to pay back the benefactor white families to in denver heidi larssen as a single mom who works in the hotel industry. The credit helter pay for childcare for eight year old. It couldn't have come at a better time. Larsen hopes the cash payments and increased credit will become permanent. This child tax credit takes some of that stress. I was feeling about how mclean to do this. How am i going to keep going extending. The direct cash payments for households with kids is part of the democrats three point five trillion dollar budget. Bill making its way through congress and once people experience these kinds of benefits. They're more likely to become permanent. Says katherine mitchell. More public policy professor at the university of michigan. Once these changes happen in the tax code. They tend to stick because they tend to be fairly popular among the populations but whether the program continues depends on whether it's also popular with lawmakers on the hill. I'm.

Ibm kai ryssdal salesforce amanda peach Eric rodriguez susannah salgado treasury heidi larssen salgado chicago Larsen denver katherine mitchell mclean
"manufacturing" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"manufacturing" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"Talk yesterday about the biden. Administration's plan to hire more people in cybersecurity. Good reason for that too because there has been a lot a lot of news of hacks and a tax on businesses and industries. Many of them what are known as supply chain attacks so we got dr chitale becky on the phone. She's from the university of richmond where she studies among other things risk management. Welcome to the program thank you. I'm happy to be here. I would. I think we need to start with the definition of terms when we say supply chain attacks. It's not things in trucks getting delivered right. That's not what we're talking about right. We're not necessarily talking about items. That are moving across the country. But we're talking generally about the cybersecurity end. The information systems that fuel these supply chains. Give me an example because there have been many of them lately. Yeah so a supply chain attack ken. basically turn the information technology for example the the computers in the software. They can be disrupted and when the computer software when they don't work than we can't move items from coast to coast on those trucks. Solar winds right that was that was a supply chain attack. Yes it was and in particular because it affected the ability for not only goods and services to move but also for transactions to happen so for the sale of services right. Now why are they becoming or have they long been a preferred method of entry of victor. If you will for these for these cybercriminals well it's becoming more and more prevalent today because systems are becoming increasingly interdependent on one another so what that means a disruption on one system or one piece of software can have a disruptions across all interconnected softwares ones that Basically share data or communicate with one another. Am i right in in remembering that that. At least in the recent ones they go undetected for quite a while yes absolutely. What attackers do is. They tend to burrow into the system gain information and choose to attack or choose to become visible when they are ready often on their terms often in cases when they are ready to for example. Ask for ransom. So if i'm run your company. And i'm the head of it. What do i do well. There is a lot. It can do a lot. It cannot do so for example When there are potential entryways into a cyber system. Those are called. Vulnerabilities and vulnerabilities often become known. And when they are known they can be patched so a company can patch the vulnerability and ensure at least to some extent that they have sealed the entry way into their system but the company may not be aware of the vulnerability and that is is one of the most dangerous situations that is really coming into play more recently okay so not the personalized this at all. But i'm smack in the middle of what seems like interminable. It security training here at marketplace. Is this an individual level thing. It absolutely can be so you as a user of email may often get phishing emails in which maybe you get an email with a suspicious lincoln. It and in an organization and accompany those types of emails may go out to hundreds thousands of employees and it may take just a single employee clicking a bad link to create an entry way for attackers to get into the information systems. Your professional you have to do this stuff too. Absolutely absolutely might. My university just started a system in which external emails get a yellow band across. Email telling me that it came from an external party. We we just got that here as well. I guess it's everybody.

dr chitale becky university of richmond biden ken victor lincoln
"manufacturing" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"manufacturing" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"Here's today's non-economic economic indicator according to the us drought monitor which is from the us department of agriculture. And a couple of other agencies ninety eight percent of the american west is officially in drought sixty percent of it in extreme drought and that's why members of congress and governors of ten western states are asking president biden to issue a major disaster declaration out here marketplace's smithfield's reports in thirty years of ranching in the sierra foothills in california. Dan making says he's never it this dry as a consequence. We have a lot higher expensive in terms of feed purchases and hauling water livestock and those types of things a lot of ranchers making works with through the university of california cooperative. Extension are selling cattle and sheep because it didn't rain or snow much this winter and now there's not enough grass for them to eat or water for them to drink. This is happening. All across the west and as far east as north dakota is certain agricultural disaster daniel sumner as a professor of agricultural economics at the university of california davis he says a federal disaster declaration could free up funds to help ranchers ship cattle further east where there is grass for them to graze on or it may be the case. Here's the funds. You need to bring in loads of alfalfa. Hay from somewhere where they don't have a drought and ship it in and that's not something that ranch could seriously consider. They just don't have the money for it but with climate. Change making drought. More common and more extreme. There were band aid is very apropos here. Melissa ho focuses on fresh water and food issues at the world wildlife fund. Us she says a federal disaster declaration is critical right now. We really have to think of how we stabilize the short term situation so that we can really understand how to address the more systemic issues given this new future and the fact that the new future is now the infrastructure package currently making its way through congress includes.

us department of agriculture president biden daniel sumner american west sierra foothills university of california congress Dan north dakota california Melissa ho Us davis world wildlife fund
"manufacturing" Discussed on Cell Culture Dish Podcast

Cell Culture Dish Podcast

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"manufacturing" Discussed on Cell Culture Dish Podcast

"What are some of the challenges to developing the non animal origin supplements? The biggest challenge is to fear out loud if you're really have complete visibility on action process off a non animal origin component so We rely on Simul sucking men's awesome at eight eight said Clea Year Analysis Salon off His as the thoroughness you have audited is supply or in to the degree to which you ended sand on the of Camakers US or e facility. Whatever they use in the process that that comes together host the basis for your assessment off. What DEGREE OFF NOT So in general when we come any. Oh we have this. Definition for instance their enemy components in in our science were US or in India or amicus. A is new era of animal origin components in the manufacturing process and or in the facility at this notion treatment Orgeon materials hand club. It there is no contact with any components that come into facility is unnecessary is operatives. Thank you for that description. I think that's really helpful. Do you have anything else that either of you would like to add for our listeners. Today I really appreciate your time and I think this has been really interesting discussion and I wanted to just see if there's anything else that you would like Chad via I keep your eyes open. Sometimes I feel like keeble are too easy when they're eaten animal origin. Non Animal origin is not a reason to not thoroughly understand the process of your main doors into what you are doing with that material. It always you should always apply the precautionary principle. That's pretty much where I had to say. Essences so many definitions or free. Our annual component free or blood FREEBIE. Or whatever you have out there it is really important to understand what fire. East Asians undestands by the definition TIKI. You can find out by asking a supply. Give you a thorough. You define in a large fear editor component free if you want to include such an agent in your process you wise to do a thorough audit at the manufacturing site why to at least do a thorough audit convinced yourself pad their definition of non animal version occurs with what you had in mind. Thank you so much for that. Thanks so much for your time today. I really appreciate. It was wonderful to talk to both of you. Thank you thank you for joining us for this edition of the cell culture dish podcast to learn more about this and other stem cell bio manufacturing related topics. Please visit us at. Www DOT cell culture dish dot com or for downstream bio manufacturing topics www dot downstream column dot.

US Simul Chad editor India