35 Burst results for "Manitoba"

5 Canadian provinces see record increases in COVID-19

Hidden Brain

00:51 sec | 2 weeks ago

5 Canadian provinces see record increases in COVID-19

"And Canada and the number of coronavirus cases continues to climb rapidly. On Saturday, five provinces broke their old records for daily cases. And carpet. Chuck reports that the country's chief public health official is now boarding that hospitals could soon be swamped. Ontario, Quebec, Alberta, Saskatchewan in Manitoba all broke their previous daily case counts on Saturday as covert 19 infections continue to soar. Dr Teresa Time. The country's top doctor says that the current rate, the country could see 10,000 new cases a day by mid December, and other experts warn that Canada isn't prepared for those numbers. Sam says hospitals across the country are already being forced to make difficult decisions about canceling elective surgeries. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau also pushed provincial leaders to bring in tougher measures to curb the spread of the pandemic. Not to be deterred by the economic costs of shutting down

Dr Teresa Time Canada Chuck Saskatchewan Manitoba Quebec Alberta Ontario Prime Minister Justin Trudeau SAM
A Conversation With Thomas Ranville Metis

The Storyteller

05:23 min | 3 weeks ago

A Conversation With Thomas Ranville Metis

"Style. Good day welcome my friends to the storyteller where you'll find first nations people from across native north america who are following jesus christ without reservation today will hear the rest of thomas ranville story. Thomas was a fighter. In a gang. Enforcer who was trapped in anger and bitterness. But as we'll here today it doesn't matter who you are or what you've done. God could set you free. Lord bless mutual. turn it into a global gang. Mcgruther knew about it any us as posture pretty for me. In from aerial. God started doing work within mart new years of do those four law of booze. I was drinking stone drunk to an above pills drinking water whisky you know. I couldn't get drunk one. The lord showed me. He assured me the the wickedness in people the wickedness the when he get the influence of alcohol is just like puppets used by the enemy. You know in the blood on the walls. Seino's young people on the after they beat up the drake toolroom and then you go left there until he came back and beat on them. Some more. That happened all night long about thirty listener. Forty until you know that They run recognizable. Someone who thinks that. I've seen in there. That really made me think gang life. That could have been me in all leaner their all busted up by another another if i walked in to another gang. Globals coulda mimi city nerd because is a gang member who was being beaten and tortured and the police came in. They broke the door down rested. Some gang members at night we kept on drinking the next morning. Cups game there again. Because one guy scapegoat. He jumped through the window minus thirty five and very cold at night. Wind was going on hoy survive revive if somebody form lean in the snowbank in the phone is blood truly than the globals and cops came to the door coming with a warrant. Though you know these came in on those young people took them all novel stretcher. One clubs that if he would have been laying there another outfielder who'd been dead the hook them up to a machine in winnipeg manitoba and was brain dead nose bleed from years. These are going to plug the machine. We're gonna come pick us all up to the drunk tank because he couldn't charge because we really steadman. Earning but you. There was so much evidence that they could put. Is we for a long time. I went back home cleaning. The blood busted beer bottle. You know a revelation of the thief only comes to steal kill and destroy and seen it everything that god is given to me annoyed. I took it for granted and inaudible to lose it all me five or six hours to clean up a lead blood. Busted bugles and blood on the wall. And i still couldn't clean blow off the wall. Was you know just so sick. Sick man loose so sick and tired of life. Be something better he see. There's no way out of gang issue. Be tortured kill. I with club. I accepted the lord accepted. Jesus in mark traded many things. I tried many religions many things but nothing would give me that peace. Nothing you give me joy. Nothing could release me. My heart was in prison of misery.

Thomas Ranville Mcgruther Seino Mimi City Mart North America Thomas HOY Steadman Winnipeg Manitoba Jesus
"manitoba" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

White Coat, Black Art

05:35 min | 3 weeks ago

"manitoba" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

"Would be most useful and impactful some of the people. We spoke to said that that there is reluctance on reserves to to get tested for covid nineteen. Because there's a stigma attached to to getting the diagnosis. How much of that is contributing to a reluctance to get tested. We have observed in some cases in some communities. That reluctance stigma is certainly something that we were you about. We ensure that were practising all of the privacy legislation out. There are individuals very few though that are also reluctant to get tested because they don't want to self isolate or they feel like they are perhaps even an essential worker or service provider and need to report to work. But unfortunately somewhere are doing slow. And there's been some transmission With regard about as well how much of that reluctance to get tested Has to do with people who have prior bad experiences in hospitals. And they're fearful that that they might have to be hospitalized. Should they become sick with covid. I don't have a lot of experience observing that situation. But i have word of some encounters but the healthcare system from individuals that were quite concerning in relation to racism or discrimination and stereotyping and so i totally understand that reluctance on again. We try to advocate for those individuals when we know about them or when they come forward. I've been on the the health. Beat for many years. And i remember h one n one and i remember that indigenous people were significantly over represented among the canadians who had severe h one n one infections back in two thousand nine particularly in manitoba flu. Pandemic exposed large gaps in care on reserves in particular. How much did h one n one impact your planning for this pandemic. Certainly we looked at the experience and they're responsive h one n one it mobilized all of our efforts as first nations in manitoba. We knew that we were not wind. That same experience this time around and we knew that we needed to work together to build a bridge so our federal interprovincial health systems will work together. We know exactly what we need in our communities and i think our shared and collaborative at leadership efforts are demonstrating to our provincial and federal parties. That we know what we're doing and so let us do it. I guess no one wants to see a repeat of that of that awful image during a h one n one of bodybags being sent during the pandemic instead of assistance. Absolutely absolutely not. Collaboration is what's playing to contain kobe. certainly in this province i think other provinces can learn from that effort as well. None of us can do this work by ourselves or as asylum system. It is very much all hands on deck across multiple jurisdictions and maximizing responsibilities in scopes. Melanie mckinnon thank you so much for speaking with me. Thank thank you for having me the ingredients for a sudden surge in covid nineteen a summer. Reprieve a bit of complacency some gatherings without precautions. Those have happened all across canada..

Melanie mckinnon covid manitoba canada kobe.
"manitoba" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

White Coat, Black Art

01:43 min | 3 weeks ago

"manitoba" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

"Why did you want to do that. My friend from punt gase which is a reserve. That's just a few miles from here. She said can you make a video and just share it. She said because people are thinking. This is not real. That's why i made the video and it did get a lot of Did get a lot of us. And then i got a lot of people Emailing me while texting me and telling me no. Thank you for for this. We never thought we'd know anybody that had so i think that brought some awareness to instead of politicians and doctors and nurses talking about it. A lot has changed in your community. Because it's still under lockdown. Tell me what that's like. Now people are staying in their homes. There's nobody walking around is nobody visiting. You can go to our local store but you need to wear a mask. They're only letting so many people in at a time. You have to sanitize your hands when you go in but Like even the chief and council there being so diligent in keeping sewri in keeping people safe is so like even the rcmp. Here if they see you walking and you don't have a mask on they tell you. Go home looking back. What do you think when you consider what happened to your community with covid. Nineteen you know. What ifs buts should have are not going to change that. We just have to do today. What we can and be diligent in wearing a mask. Sanitizing prevention for tomorrow gathers can wait. Birthday party can wait. The wedding could wait. Let's just keep us safe right now. Let's keep our children.

rcmp
Names erased: How Indigenous people are reclaiming what was lost

Unreserved

05:50 min | Last month

Names erased: How Indigenous people are reclaiming what was lost

"You don't have to look very far to find Examples York region Ontario was named after your can the UK Regina is named after Queen Victoria Regina being the Latin for Queen and well British Columbia obviously. For Christina. Gray reclaiming those place names is vital and it's personal. The Simpson and Denny lawyer is one of two researchers behind reclaiming indigenous place names. The policy report was released in October of two thousand nineteen by the Yellow had institute at Ryerson University in Toronto. I've reached her at her home in Prince Rupert BBC. Welcome to unreserved thanks for having me. So you are a CO researcher with Daniel Ruck and you looked into naming practices and the erasure of indigenous place names. What did you find? We really wanted to do a cross section of the history of settler colonial renaming practices from indigenous place names to places that are an English or in French, or there's also note anglicised version as well and none look at what is the practice of reclaiming indigenous place names that is happening in various places are ranging from like the Northwest Territories, Quebec B. C. Saskatchewan Manitoba to give. People a different idea of what's going on across these places and territories, and so how do original place names get changed? You know from from the original indigenous words into you know the things that they become how does that happen? Basically what's happening as a result of mostly white people or settlers who were? Changing the names to suit their whims, our desires or values when places were being changed from indigenous place names, saedtler place names like we have to remember the population of Canada at that time was a lot lower than it is now yes. There were indigenous peoples on these lands and territories, but there is also a different perspective by settlers at that time as well, and so they I think they wanted the the places to reflect. What was going on in their life for different ideas that were important to them. I can think that Greek in Vancouver I was looking into the two sisters, which is now called the lions and a lot of people go heikal lions in in Vancouver, and they kind of overlook how sound and you can see them pretty much any point in Vancouver. But before they were called the lions, they recalled the two sisters and it relates to an oral history. Of The squamish nation and it's an oral history that also relates to northerners like myself because the oral history it's it's about making peace offerings between the northern and the southern people's. used to war with each other and so that has much significance to me as a simpson person who used to live in Vancouver the two sisters in Vancouver is definitely one that I've heard about Are there any other striking examples of renamed places that you found y'all like almost makes me want to cry actually there's a place that was called Lake Squat Kit. It's like near Kenmore, but the word squad specifically, Drago Tori term to refer to indigenous women and. Terrible. Stereotypes associated with it as well, and those are based off of how some settlers song about indigenous. and so you can just think about like it's a Grayson, deeply misogynistic but. People like had such a personal connection to the place name of squash it and like didn't want it to be renamed and. But like that I think has such a affect the way that you call places. And think about there are so many missing murdered indigenous woman in Canada and how you referred to that something that. So awfully in calling squad like those have affects real-life affects on people it's not just about placing. And is renaming more. Can it be more than just a symbolic gesture you know on how is renaming more than just a symbolic gesture i? Guess I think we always hope that naming practices or the revitalization of indigenous place names will go beyond just symbolic gestures who also have substantial effects as well and sue. Enrich policy really wanted to also look at like what are some of the mechanisms. In which indigenous people are. Using policy and Law to revitalize indigenous place names and so we looked up land use planning conservation co-management. Events and also modern day treaties and self government agreements in which indigenous peoples are using these different mechanisms available to on to re attribute and revitalize indigenous placing you know this work is being done by indigenous people. So think it's really important to attribute that recognition to them.

Vancouver Lions Simpson Queen Victoria Regina Canada Prince Rupert Bbc Christina Examples York Uk Regina Quebec B. C. Saskatchewan Mani Ontario Daniel Ruck British Columbia Toronto Researcher Lake Squat Kit Ryerson University Drago Tori Yellow Had Institute Kenmore
How Indigenous skateboarders use their boards for creative expression and land reclamation

Unreserved

04:50 min | Last month

How Indigenous skateboarders use their boards for creative expression and land reclamation

"Neighbor down the street was like, what do you like skateboarding? So much I was like Yo, check this out kick flipped I try and I was like see that that's like magic to me. That's a magic trick that just happened in like I get to do that over and over and again, and I get to do other magistrates to been like. So that's why I love it. That was Blakey White Cloud. He has spent a lot of time at skate parks whether he skateboarding or making documentaries about indigenous skateboarding for both CBC and a t N.. Here's a bit from the dock he produced for CBC arts called how the art of Skateboarding can also be an act of empowerment. Me skateboarding gave me the voice of community. You can stay when you're sad you're mad depressed and at the end of the day to day mind. So clear. PARTICI-. Relaxing it's almost meditation. Gave me pretty much everything down to like personal confidence. gave me a wave. Accomplished something I never thought I could do we concentrate so hard on town nail one trick and determined that you want it I went to have it feels awesome but you build up to your bruise you blood for the phone for A. Thank. God. That was a clip from how the art of skateboarding can also be an active empowerment a documentary by Khawaga Blakey. White cloud. So, Khawaga. What is it about skateboarding that you love the most the thing I love skateboarding the most is the visceral reaction when you lend something that you thought of that, you self actualized that you were like, I wonder if I could do this or your friend was like I wonder if you could do this and then you're like I don't know if I do this and then you know you try it and you might not make it and you're like Oh. Maybe if I shift my feet a little bit differently and then Lo and behold, you make it and you're just like like your hair stands up on ends you just like. People might. Be Cheering for unions. And so like that's what I love most about it is that kind of visceral passionate? Yes. Did it. So, what would you say is the relationship between indigenous people and skateboarding that's like an interesting one because I think it's unique to every person. But in my case, it was definitely the getting kicked out of private property and like having a discussion about like, oh, like let's have a discussion about treaties, Mike and Private property right and then some people just refuse to do it and then other listen they're like, Whoa, like you have a really good point. Right. So there's that and then also the kind of spiritual aspect of being out on the land like hanging out like outside all day and. Doing something that's leading to a good life, right like that like your emotional health like you're getting all that out your physical mental, your occupational like just the way you're spending your time. You know you're you're doing something really good with your life, your environmental rate you're hanging outside and your intellectual being challenged all the time to break because sometimes a trick isn't working out like you're just like Oh. Maybe just move my feet like just a little bit back and then like. It happens and you're just like Oh my God that was the key right. So yeah. So all these things like all of them are challenged. All get amplified and you just feel like a way healthier. Person Afterwards and I think like that's kind of pushed through in like we talk about health from an indigenous perspective like it's not just like your physical health rate and it's like all these other aspects of it that we don't necessarily talk about but that that comes to you and skateboarding And you said it's. Like reconciliation in reality. What do you? What do you mean by that? There's a long history like along colonial history that we've never. Really. been taught through the regular education system nor in the media and it's missing from a lot of the discussions around what does it mean to be indigenous into Canadian society when we start talking about like oh You know skating on your private property, but this is actually true one and like the best example was getting kicked out of the Manitoba Hydro Building by an employee he was like Oh like you should get out of here and I was like we will in five minutes. All respect and he's like, no, you need to get out of here. Now they don't you know who paid for all this and I was like well, like no Manitoba Hydro derived a lot of its profits from like indigenous lands. Expropriated and then they really properly compensated them. So as indigenous person like I think the right to be here and like he had no clue to say to that right like he was just like he just put up his hands and he turned around left and I was like that's right like you're talking to somebody who's like who has an idea of what the history is and I know that deep down inside you know what the history is and so. Like let's acknowledge that but to some people like they don't want knowledge it right like just like him. He didn't want acknowledged he just wants to run and go grab the security but I think like the more we have these discussions the more we come to a clarity of like what's actually happened and what needs to happen in order to move forward for justice for indigenous peoples in Canadian society.

Skateboarding Blakey White Cloud Manitoba Hydro CBC Khawaga Blakey Manitoba Hydro Building Khawaga A. Thank LO Mike
Cree author David A. Robertson on writing everything from graphic novels to a memoir

Unreserved

06:29 min | 2 months ago

Cree author David A. Robertson on writing everything from graphic novels to a memoir

"I want to go to my trap line one last time he says. I cannot breathe. I know he hasn't been to his trap line for almost seven decades. We've been on a journey as father and son for thirty years, and for the first time, it feels like we've found our destination. And I think maybe we've been headed there all this time. Whatever choose exists between us. The end of our journeys in front of us. That's David Robertson reading from Blackwater, family legacy and blood memory. One of three books he has coming out this fall. To say, he's prolific is a bit of an understatement. The cree writer based in Winnipeg started writing in two thousand and nine and has already published more than twenty titles from the Governor General Award Winning Picture Book when we were alone to his graphic novel series the reckoner to his first novel, the evolution of Alice published in two thousand fourteen it seems like he can write in any genre for any age group. David Robertson is my guest on the show today. Thanks so much for being here, David All. Thanks for having me. It's a pleasure. So this month you published your most personal book to date a memoir called Blackwater family legacy and blood memory, which we just heard a bit from. And it chronicles the story of Your Dad's returned to the family trap line Norway House creed nation in northern. Manitoba. So first off most people wait until they're a lot older to write a memoir So why did you want to write now? Yeah. That's a great question and there's there's probably a bunch that goes into that answer. One of them is that you know I've been talking about my dad and I for the last eleven years ever since I was a published writer I found that when I was public speaking all of my talk somehow came back to my father and I and and he's played such a big role in. My own development my understanding of you know who I am as cree person. There's one time I was giving this lecture at University of Manitoba couple years ago where I was the same thing talking about my life in my father and our relationship, and then a professor came up to me after and said, you really have to write this down and so. Money as a writer I'd never thought about writing actually my own story and that really kind of jog something me were. I decided that that was something I. needed to do. The other part of it is that you know my father at the time was declining I mean he was still himself and he was still my dad but he we knew that our time with him a short it was getting shorter and I really wanted to start working on this because it was something I always wanted to do I wanted. To document his life and and our relationship the teachings he gave me for myself and for my family and so all of this kind of came together and made me feel this agency to write the story now, and certainly when we went to the trap line together two years ago, it felt like the framing for the story had happened because I think it was where we were journeying to. All these years together. That's that's where we were going to and so when we got there, it felt like the right time to document everything that had happened between us and in our own lives and teams like such a special trip to be able to go on. Yeah I mean it was I I. Don't know if I could even put it into words. I. Tried my best in the book but it was blackberries in the title of the book and I really did feel that blood member was something that played a big role into why Blackwater why this trap line my dad grew up on felt home to me as soon as I stepped off the boat onto the land. I just felt like I'd come home and I, know that watching dad, you know amble up the inclined towards this big boulder in the middle of this clearing I know he felt like he was home to it was incredibly emotional intensity emotional moment for us and it turned out that it was the only time it could have happened because you know dad passed away just this past December and it made me even more grateful for spending that time with him and being able to write. About that experience through his words in my own and did you learn anything you know anything about yourself while writing a memoir I know that you know when you when you go into material like this, you sort of have to dig back in sort of excavate your own life and sort of reexamine things maybe in a new perspective did you learn anything about yourself? Yeah. I think anytime you revisit your past and learn more about the people who came before you. You're inevitably going to learn more about who you. Are you know I've always said and I've learned from my dad, the process of you know understanding ourselves and who we are that journey starts well, before we were born starts with understanding who came before you and know certainly in this book, it talks about my grandmother and my dad and their lives before I was born and my dad's after I was born and all of that plays into forming a sense of identity. It helps to you to understand more about yourself and there's things in even researching this book that. I learned that kind of. Forced me to re contextualize my life in my identity. No. When I was a kid I, always believed that my parents drew grew up intentionally raising me to be non indigenous to protect me from. You know what they felt would have experienced growing up in the city in. Winnipeg. As a cre- kid and in the process of researching this book and a lot of that research was just sitting down with my dad spending hours with him talking he said that's not true. I. I never wanted to tell you what it meant to be original. But I never told you that I didn't want you to be my goal was to model that for you. But to give you the tools that you need to figure out for yourself and one of the things that always sticks with me as you said, how to teach you how to be crea- you are cre-. So nothing I can say can make you more or less cre-. Your journey is defined what that means. For Self and his role was to kind of guide me in a way to that understanding and I think he did that.

Writer David Robertson Winnipeg University Of Manitoba David All Manitoba Norway House Self Alice Professor
Two residential schools in Canada are named historic sites

Native America Calling

03:56 min | 3 months ago

Two residential schools in Canada are named historic sites

"This is national native news I'm Antonio Gonzalez to former residential schools in Canada have been named national historic sites as down. Carpenter reports the schools which represent a dark history are now being recognized as one of the events that shaped Canada to schools added to the official roster of national historic events are in Nova Scotia and Manitoba. It's the first time a residential school has been named in such a way Canada's environment minister. Jonathan Wilkinson says. Is Not, just about telling the good things. It's also about recalling the more challenging aspects, commemorating and understanding history not celebrating it. Perry Belgarde is the national chief of the assembly of first nations bell. Guard says first nations people still feel today the intergenerational trauma of the residential schools and it's part of our shared history. It's dark history of in terms of our shared history, but Canada and everybody needs to learn from that, and again, we've always said that those who fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it. The residential schools are described as a dark stain on Canada's passed the government funded church run schools were designed to assimilate native children. Into white culture thousands were physically sexually emotionally abused the schools which operated from the mid eighteen hundreds for more than a century for national native news. I'm Dan Carpentry Chuck at top US health official recently visited Minnesota which included meeting with tribal officials. Call Prima with Minnesota Native News has more is August drew to a close the White House's Corona Virus Task Force coordinator Dr Berks visited Minnesota, and met with both state and tribal officials. Dr Burke said she's impressed with how Minnesota has responded to the pandemic using a data driven approach however burks says she's concerned with the rate of positive cases. The state is seeing in the twin cities and surrounding counties. This state has gone from two to five to now nine counties over ten percent. That trend is worrisome this late into the summer to combat rising cases burkes is urging minnesotans to continue wearing masks and socially distance during the pandemic. Even if many may be feeling fatigue to all the guidelines in her visit to Minnesota, burks also stopped Duluth and met with tribal officials with the Fund lack of Lake Superior. Chippewa. Were really terrific I, think across this country being able to meet with a tribal nations has really been extraordinary is impressed by their ability to have institutions that could support isolation within their community and I think really ensuring that they have the resources and the wherewithal to prevent outbreaks. Dr Brooks says fondling efforts and the efforts of tribes across the nation is a good thing to see given that native Americans are disproportionately affected by covid nineteen. Burke. Says Native Americans, who were already suffering from health disparities pre. Pandemic are more likely to suffer life threatening complications due to covid nineteen compared to other racial and ethnic groups nationwide across the United States. Still, the number one group that has the highest fatalities related to this virus are native Americans, and so really ensuring that we have continued to focus resources and meeting their needs you Minnesota about six hundred and twenty covid. Nineteen cases have been confirmed among the native population so far according to recent health data thirty, three of those cases resulted in death I'm co Primo. Former principal chief of the Muskogee. Creek. Nation. George Tiger is expected to report to prison September fourteenth to begin a one year sentence for bribery charges. Muskogee media reports the US Attorney's Office for Oklahoma. Says Tiger accepted bribes of more than sixty thousand dollars during a time period between two thousand, seventeen to two, thousand and nineteen. He was sentenced last month to the prison term two years supervised release and a ten thousand dollar fine. I'm Antonio Gonzales.

Minnesota Canada Pandemic Dr Burke George Tiger Antonio Gonzalez Muskogee Jonathan Wilkinson Burks United States Official Antonio Gonzales Dr Berks Carpenter Perry Belgarde Nova Scotia Manitoba Bribery Dr Brooks
Emergency meeting held in South Korea after North threatens military action

America First

00:36 sec | 6 months ago

Emergency meeting held in South Korea after North threatens military action

"At least half a dozen baseball teams are ready to take the field major league teams and their affiliates may be shut down but but an an independent independent circuit circuit is is set set to to open open on on July July third third with with some some fans fans in in the the seats seats the the American American association association says says six six teams teams will will play play in in three three hubs hubs at at least least at at the the start start of of the the season Minnesota St Paul saints will play home games at Sioux falls stadium along with the South Dakota Sioux falls canaries Manitoba's Winnipeg Goldeyes will be based at Newman outdoor field with north Dakota's Fargo Moorhead redhawks and the Chicago dogs will split play home games at the ballpark Commons with the Milwaukee milkman Rhonda rocks to reporting

South Dakota Sioux Manitoba Winnipeg Goldeyes Newman Outdoor Field North Dakota American American Association Sioux Falls Stadium Fargo Moorhead Chicago Milwaukee
Federal court rules in favor of Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe

Native America Calling

03:46 min | 6 months ago

Federal court rules in favor of Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe

"This is National Native News Antonio. Gonzales the Mashpee womp og tribe, the National Congress of American Indians and the United South and eastern tribes are urging the Department of the Interior to reaffirm the status of the Massachusetts tribes reservation after a federal court, Friday ruled in favor of the tribe. The Interior Department had intended to disestablish the tribes reservation. The US District, court for. For the District of Columbia found the Interior Department's two thousand eighteen decision. The tribe did not qualify under federal jurisdiction was arbitrary, capricious and contrary to law in a statement Chairman Cedric Cromwell said the court righted. What would have been a terrible injustice and committed to fight if necessary to ensure their land remains entrust as the interior department is ordered to reevaluate its decision. Minnesota Department of Health. Officials say they're increasing the amount of COVID, nineteen testing among people who have attended protests over the death of George Floyd Melissa Townsend reports. Thousands of people have been gathering together across Minnesota for nearly two weeks. Floyd was an African American man who died after a white police officer knelt on his neck for nearly nine minutes. Health, officials say these gatherings put many at risk for contracting covid nineteen. Mario and is a at physician and head of the center of American Indian and minority health at the University of Minnesota Medical School in Duluth while I'm really fearful of impact. The protests are going to have on rising rates of Cova and I have to admit. I went down to one of them myself because they just felt like they needed to be there. And also just let African American people in particular. Know about the solitaire. But I do worry Minnesota's Commissioner of Health Jan. Malcolm says her department will step up testing. The coronavirus takes about a week to incubate so Malcolm is encouraging people to get tested about a week after they'd been at large gathering for national. Native News. I'm Melissa Townsend. The Canadian government has delayed its promised National Action Plan to tackle systemic racism, facing the country's indigenous people down carpet has more recently announced the delay in implementing the plan because of the covid nineteen pandemic, the plan followed last year's inquiry into missing and murdered indigenous women and girls. That inquiry presented its final report in June, and it concluded that decades of systemic racism and human rights violations had contributed to hundreds of missing. Missing in murdered indigenous women and girls over the years, Sheila North is a former grand chief of northern Manitoba. She says she's disheartened. By the delay in the action plan against systemic racism, north also takes exception to comments made by at least one Canadian political leader that systemic racism does not exist in Canada as it does in the US I go meet that the mothers and the sisters and family members of the ones. Ones that have been taken a very very sensitive and touchy subject, and for people to be blatant, and to be so dismissive like that is just reminiscent of what they've been dealing with for many generations and very hurtful to here, and it's very concerning to know that this this kind of thinking still persistent Canada North says indigenous people make up just over four percent of the Canadian population, but more than twenty four percent. percent of the country's prison population. She says there are parallels in what's happening to black Americans and indigenous Canadians. Especially in their interactions with police, she says the biggest difference between the two countries is that the death of George? Floyd was caught on camera. She adds racially motivated. Incidents take place daily to Canada's indigenous people, but out of the public's eye for national native news. I'm Dan Kerpen. Chuck and Damian Tonio Gonzales.

George Floyd Melissa Townsend Interior Department Mashpee Womp Og Tribe Sheila North Damian Tonio Gonzales Minnesota Minnesota Department Of Health Canada National Congress Of American Us District Melissa Townsend Cedric Cromwell Malcolm Canadian Government District Of Columbia Massachusetts University Of Minnesota Medica United South Duluth Dan Kerpen
"manitoba" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:53 min | 7 months ago

"manitoba" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Mask was the nature of the phone calls or did they just look where they just looking to spy on the incoming administration Manitoba questions here is your forecast a slow moving system in the nation's heartland continues to drop heavy amounts of precipitation and thunderstorms and we'll see that throughout the day today for areas most east of the Mississippi and right along the Mississippi River could see some flooding as a result later in the week for some areas of the Deep South we will be dry today there's that tropical depression lingering off Florida so we'll see some potential showers and cloudiness across the eastern seaboard of Florida the Gulf side looking to be clear as well as a good portion of the Deep South but from Louisiana into southern Texas will pick up showers and that'll extend northward all the way up to Detroit out on the west coast we'll see heavy amounts of rain for northern California Washington and Oregon today for the most part the interior of the nation with the northern central and southern plains will be dry the desert southwest is clear to a look at the national forecast from red eye radio I'm meteorologist John trout are you suffering with arthritis or joint pain do you have an annoying me or hip shoulder neck or back pain if you stop doing the things you love to do these problems.

Mississippi Mississippi River depression Florida Louisiana Texas Detroit John trout Manitoba California Washington Oregon
Will a Universal Basic Income finally get a real shot?

The Big Story

14:46 min | 7 months ago

Will a Universal Basic Income finally get a real shot?

"You can say one thing for the current crisis. It's given us a chance to try a lot of things that we might never have had the will to do otherwise I amongst those just giving people money okay not everyone but millions and millions of people in Canada and not forever but at least for a few months and this isn't a new idea. It's been around in some form or another for decades. You probably know it as universal basic income and you might associate it with the most progressive voices come the liberal side of the spectrum and you may also associate the opposition to it with complaints of lazy people want free cash instead of working but despite having a long history as a potential way to ease poverty and improve health. This has never been tried on a large scale or for a long time. So the people arguing on either side of it have never had enough evidence to prove their point. So it's been a political football until like with so many things. These days along came the virus and now getting money to people who need it quickly is absolutely essential governments around the world even the most conservative of them have done that and those who support or oppose that kind of policy have mostly agreed on the need for it. It's what happens next. And what we learned from that will determine if we finally give a universal basic income. A real shot. So we'll explain history of the policy small tests that we've seen on it be political behind it and whether or not it will stick around when we get out of this current mass. And we'll do that as soon as Claire gives the details on this current mess cargill is dealing with the outbreak at one of its meat processing plants. This one isn't Schambori Quebec southeast of Montreal. Sixty four workers have tested positive. There cargill had another outbreak a few weeks ago at a beef packing plant in high river. Alberta in that outbreak more than nine hundred workers tested positive. It reopened last week after a two-week shutdown also in Quebec schools in the western part of the province are set to reopen today but attendance is optional. Desks will be spaced apart. And there can be no more than fifteen kids in a classroom at a time. Ontario reported the lowest number of cases of Cova nineteen for the province on Sunday since March. Two hundred ninety four new cases. And this comes. The province reopens Provincial Parks and Conservation Areas. Although camping is still not allowed and things like beaches playgrounds and public washrooms are still off limits. And lastly schedule and is suspending the sale of alcohol in the Northern Community of La Lush to help control the spread of cove in nineteen. The alcohol store will be closed for two weeks. To prevent people from gathering. There will be support for those at risk of alcohol withdrawal as of Sunday evening. Sixty eight thousand eight hundred and forty eight cases of covert nineteen in Canada with four thousand nine hundred and seventy deaths. I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings. This is the big story Max. Faucet is a writer and a reporter for many publications including on this project for the Walrus. Hey Max he joined our. I'm doing as well as can be expected. Which is how everybody should hopefully answer that question. These days you start by defining What is a universal basic income Broad is that term. And what does it mean? Sure so I mean you know this is an idea that's been around for some time now and and there can be competing definitions and I suspect. We'll get into that in a second but the one that I adhere to the one that you know certainly I informed Andrew Yang's campaign in the United States and that has been informing most of the conversation about UBA. Right now is It has three conditions it's automatic. It's unconditional in its non-withdrawal. So basically that means it comes every month doesn't matter who you are you get it. You could be making a lot of money or a little money and you get it. And then it's non withdraw so It's not means tested. So it doesn't get clawed back you know as you as you make more money you know. There's much conversation on you know econ twitter about various amendments and adjustments to that formula. But I think that's a good way to think about it. Can you give me a little history of it? You mentioned it's been around for a long time Has it been tried for real anywhere where to come from that? Depends on your definition of for real right. I think people look at the idea of giving people money from the government. And they think well this must be a left-wing idea but actually the first real experiments with it happened in the nineteen sixties and early nineteen seventies and it was driven by a Richard Nixon and Milton Friedman. Who is the father of supply-side economics? Yeah they saw it as a way to replace the welfare system and so they their idea of a basic income is not quite the way I just defined it. It was something called a negative income tax. And so let me. Just get a tiny bit. Wonka share the way it worked in their conception is basically they would give people a percentage of the difference between their income and defined income cutoff or like the point where they start paying income taxes so if they set the cutoff at let's say forty thousand dollars and the negative income tax percentage was fifty percent. Someone who made twenty thousand dollars a year would get ten thousand dollars from the government. They made thirty five thousand they would get two thousand and from the government so is this sort of sliding scale where topped you up up until a certain point and then it went away right. They cancelled it in one thousand nine hundred and you know the the the Reagan era kind of buried it under under Nixon's legacy in Canada. Did something called the men come experiment? Which was the Manitoba Basic Income Experiment? That was more that was closer to the basic income that that I described earlier in the one that a lot of people are talking about right now so that says that gave thirteen hundred urban and rural families in Winnipeg and don't Fan Manitoba with incomes below. Thirteen thousand dollars a year back then money. But by the time that the data was collected in nineteen seventy eight so they ran up from seventy five to seventy eight. The Canadian government kind of lost interest in and they cancelled the project. So we've had these these aborted attempts to gather a sample and it hasn't really provided any conclusive evidence In the in the American one. There's some evidence that it that it you know Negatively impacted people's willingness to go to work in the Canadian won the data suggested otherwise. But there just wasn't enough data to conclusively determine the impact of giving people money on their both on their willingness to work and on on the outcomes that the government's wanted to test. Which is you know better. Health Outcomes Better Labor outcomes better social outcomes so you know the jury was still out right. Will what kind of a sample size and study length? Would you even need to determine that because again we had one or at least something like one here in Ontario Under Kathleen Wynne. A few years ago and the next government came to power and it was immediately phased out. So you know. I don't think we got more than two or three years out of that either. So what kind of scale are we talking about? Yeah I mean to make it work. You would needs multiple cities multiple tests populations and a long duration of study. This is this is a a bold policy intervention but you need to be able to control for extenuating circumstances and factors the Ontario project. Was it had some really promising results. As it turned out there was a study group at McMaster that basically interviewed the people that participated in the program. Some of the data they had eighty percent of of people reporting better health outcomes. They were using less tobacco drinking. Less eighty-three percent said they had better mental health. They were feeling less stressed. They had a better diet And there was even interesting. Data around better labor market outcomes people were basically using the minimum income the guaranteed income to improve their jobs to look for better job. So it's disappointing that the government scrapped it after basically what amounted to one year and left us in the same spot that we've sort of always been with these things where we just don't have enough data for either side to conclusively prove that their argument is right and you know maybe not maybe now is the opportunity to kind of walk in that that longer sample size but you know the problem here is that. It's always tempting for governments to to start these programs and then abandon them or different governments to come in and cancel them. You'd need some sort of agreement by all parties that they're going to let this run. Its course and we haven't really seen that yet. So you mentioned that it's seen mostly now at least as a left-wing idea might have begun under Nixon. But certainly I think that's how most listeners would frame it as you know Whether or not you support it About the side of the spectrum that it comes from but as we've started to see government's realizing how badly they need to help people as the economy collapses during this pandemic have seen any movement On the other side of the aisle towards this kind of idea I think we've seen much more movement on on the conservative side than we have on the progressive side the beano progressives are are are very wary of guaranteed income proposals because I think you know quite rightly they remember certainly the academics who studied this. They remember that it was originally an idea that was intended to get rid of welfare and other social supports and that is always a concern that if you bring in a guaranteed income. Is it really just an attempt to shrink? The size of the state is an attempt to get rid of targeted support programs that that make people's lives better and I think that's a totally valid concern when I when I posted my article from the wall or something twitter. I got a lot of feedback from economists about that where they basically said you know. Oh here we go again. People people don't realize that this is a an attempt to slip in through the back door reduction in social programs. That's really interesting. Yeah but you know. Over the last few months we've seen a really array of conservatives. Come out and say that this is a good idea. Hugh Seagull. Who is a former senator standing red? Tory I WOULD. I would describe him as a thought leader. He's been he's been banging the drum for for guaranteed income for quite some time now but he was always sort of out there in the wilderness as a conservative suggesting that this was a good idea and he wasn't one of the ones who was saying that it should replace social programs. He was saying it should be an augmentation to them but in the states over a matter of weeks you saw people like Mitt. Romney coup is basically the Avatar of hedge fund capitalism. Coming out and and suggesting that this was a good idea that would support. Americans during the fallout from Cova and ultimately Donald Trump's government. It's not it's not a permanent basic income. But they sent a check to every American and that is sort of one of the hallmarks of a basic income. So it's interesting the degree to which we've seen conservatives rally behind this particular policy flag. I think that it is driven by shorter. Term political objectives American politicians having election. That they're looking at in November and one of the surest ways to get defeated is to be in being government while people are losing their jobs losing their homes losing their livelihood so I think it's more self preservation than a genuine change of heart but in from a policy perspective. You take the support where you can get it and you build on it from there. So you know I think advocates of a U. UB. I should take their support and and leverage it in order to build their movement if you can may be explained to me the thought behind the benefits of this applying to absolutely everyone including people who have job because that's really And we can debate in Canada versus the US for however long. But that's that's like the primary difference between what trump's government has done and what Canada's done with the baby. Yeah that's the tricky part. That's the part that a lot of people struggle with conceptually and intellectually as is the idea of giving people who don't need money more money right. Yeah and Ken Boston cool. Who is is a former adviser to Stephen Harper and Christy Clark? He's been kind of driving the bus in Canada around the need for a UB. I you know he's he is preferred that to the more targeted approach that the government has taken with Serb. You know his idea in the short term is we just need to get money into people's hands right. Now we need we need to stimulate the economy and ultimately will tax it back next year on people's income taxes that's the thing about a guaranteed income in the context of the system. We have here is if you're making sixty seventy thousand dollars a year. This is going to a portion of this. We'll get taxed back right and so it's not. It's not really free money. It's a little bit of free money and I suspect there would be some social programs that would get pulled back a little bit to to make the numbers work but you know at the end of the day. I don't think you can let the weaknesses in the policy that that might impact a few people. Override the benefits that would impact far more people. You know there's there's all sorts of data out there that suggests that a basic income would actually stimulate economic growth. There's all kinds of data that suggested improves. Health outcomes and Lord knows improving. Health outcomes would save taxpayers and the government a lot of money. Because that's where an increasing increasingly large part of our social budget is going and we'll continue to go in the years and months to come so you know it it is It's a tough idea to get past for some people that I find working already. Why should I get more money from the government but that money's going back into the economy and it stimulating economic growth that supporting jobs? It's reducing healthcare costs. You know I think there's a pretty good case for it and and you know it's one that we should be willing to explore. I am I am more than open to criticism about the cost factor that I suppose we can get to that in a second but I think we also need to look at the benefits and look a little a little bigger in terms of where those benefits accrue it. It's not just lifting people out of poverty. Although that's that's an obvious benefit it's improving people's health outcomes improving their labor market outcomes. Let's people who have a

Canada Richard Nixon Ontario Cargill Cova United States Claire Schambori Quebec Provincial Parks Manitoba Mcmaster Twitter Winnipeg Jordan Heath Rawlings Quebec La Lush Alberta Kathleen Wynne
Charlotte Evans Saulteaux

The Storyteller

08:04 min | 7 months ago

Charlotte Evans Saulteaux

"I know I used to be afraid of dying because I didn't know where I was going to go. I hope that I would go to heaven but I didn't have that assurance that I was Gonna go there so I used to be afraid Steig good. Welcome my friends to the storyteller. You'll find first nations people from across native North America who are following Jesus Christ without reservation. Charlotte was afraid to die because she didn't know wish he would go. If you've ever wondered whether you're good enough to get to Heaven Charlotte story may help you. Hello My name is Charlotte Evans and My husband is clea but I grew up allowed people but my background. Soto Indian My mother was Soto and my dad gave Pelley scatcherd and he was meaty. I come from Swan of a Manitoba. Four sisters and one brother we will put a family. My mother and my dad struggled to get by but my dad always worked and always made sure that there was food on the table for US growing up and they thank the Lord that even though I didn't know him then that my mom always made us go to Sunday School We always had every morning. She'd wake us up to go to Sunday school and I said just love going to Sunday school to heal about Jesus and that different miracles that he had that he did and go to Sunday school. I think I liked it because I felt safe there because in our home though as a lot of alcohol and and so when I go to Sunday school I used to just love being there and healing stories about missionaries. Who went to Africa told US stories about both helping the people there and in my heart I had this desire when I was young to be a missionary but I never ever thought that I would be one. I was the oldest one at home growing up my other. Two oldest sisters. They were in foster home and they always had to do everything I had to. Wa- wash always said help. My mom wash clothes and hang them up and I know I missed quite a bit of school to helping at home. I didn't Lake my mom. Very much. Issue was really strict. She wouldn't let us run around. She wouldn't let us go to offense too often to go play but I think the lawyer that she was strict. Because that taught me that. I think that helped me as I got older. When I did start sneaking out it helped me to to sort of understand the difference between right and wrong because I didn't feel that I was a bad person. I didn't do anything that was really bad but God says at every little center's bad no matter what it is whether it's stealing lion or mood too but I always felt that I was good enough and I didn't realize then about having a personal relationship with Jesus. I was a fleet to die because I didn't know where I was going to go. I knew there was a heaven and a hell to go to hell if you go there. It's a place where you're going to burn and fire for the unity. Where if you go to heaven you'll be there with God and it's a beautiful place and I knew that God was God and he had to sudden name in his son's name was Jesus but I didn't have that piece. I guess and my life assurance said if I died I was going to go to heaven. I hoped I would go there but I didn't know if I was going to go there. I just thought I was good enough as I got older. I let away from home when I was sixteen because of all the digging. The my mom drink a lot. My Dad worked. He worked a lot out in the Bhushan and logging and he cooked in logging camps and my mom's Acre Lot and I didn't like being at home whether it was alcohol. I always used to wish that I could put in a foster home so Eilat away hoping that I would be put in one but I never did get put in one. I ended up in sketchy on the Nice stayed with a family there. I lived with a family for about a year before I went back home because I was lonesome so I went back home and then I was only home for probably a year and a half and then I was in Churchill for a while. With one of my oldest sister's my mom had to families who first husband died and then she made my dad and even when I lived in Churchill. I used to want to go to church sometimes but my friends. I had would always make fun of me so I wouldn't go but you know I the Lord I think was already looking in my life but I didn't know it at the time and then after I came back from Churchill and decided to go to school to bring up my upgrading because I didn't finish great twelve when I was at home. That's what I met. My husband fled was one of my instructors at school one of my teachers that I had and I used to notice that he was different different than the other people allowed him. That weren't saved and I don't know something just like drew me to him. And he used to come and set with asset coffee break and and then he used to mention the Loyd once in a while but he never but he didn't like really push it on anybody and then he used to bring these little tract papers to school and he'd had them give the he gave me somewhat in awhile and I take them to read them and then after that and he asked me to go to youth group with him because he used to go to youth group at a place called Big Edie in the paw parties of and so I started going with him when he asked me. And that's when I I met Mr and Mrs mccomb Clifford Aboard McColl and they were talking about the Lord and I used to like going there because I felt at peace. And and then I met Jay Uneven Jennings was staying with them. He was administered apart. That time and I went to a few times for suppler for asthma to go the for supper. And he used to talk about the Loyd and then he asked him on time Charlotte to you know the Lord and I said I said no. I did not understand what he meant to you. Know the Loyd and they said no is him and just talk to me about salvation. Then they asked me one time I wanted to accept the Loyd and I wanted to see yes but I was scared to say yes because I thought well. We'll buy accept the Loyd than I can't can't go out and do things like drink with my friends and that I thought I'd have to change until I have to think about it so every time we went there when I go there with he would just talk to me and then one time that I was in. May and I just felt that the Loyd told me that I should ask Jesus into my heart. So that's when Mr Jennings kneel down with the coach and we played and when he played with me I could tell that there was a change because it felt like something was lifted from me like I felt lighter and I felt different when I asked Jesus to come into my heart.

Loyd Heaven Charlotte Jesus Charlotte Churchill Charlotte Evans United States Steig Soto North America Mrs Mccomb Clifford Aboard Mcc Mr Jennings Eilat Jay Uneven Jennings Manitoba WA Bhushan Pelley
"manitoba" Discussed on T.O.F.U. Talks: #OurNewNormal

T.O.F.U. Talks: #OurNewNormal

07:57 min | 7 months ago

"manitoba" Discussed on T.O.F.U. Talks: #OurNewNormal

"Okay so welcome everybody to another session in the so for limited Tokyo talk series around the global pandemic or trying to give people a snapshot of what everyone's experience has been in different parts of the world Today I have a lovely friend of mine coming from Canada Could you introduce yourself for for the audience one? My name is Amanda Lily. I'm a health coach in personal trainer. I specialize in helping everyday person to eat more pump based and to incorporate more physical activity into a life of find a way to combine those and still be able to address everything else. That's going on whether it's looking for the families or be part of the community and really lane people know. How does it have to be you know a lot of times? People think that you know of you're switching your diet you gotta make more than one stopper or if you're starting exercise program. Now you're taking time from your kids or that kind of thing so I really show people how they combine gone away that fits their lifestyle and also help them meet their Benefit them and meet their goals when it comes to their help so for people watching this where we're even doing all these ambitious activities. Where were you based right now? I'm the Winnipeg Manitoba Canada but I also do some nicer sis as well So obviously things have changed. I think Canada's first case was somewhere in the middle to late January. I'm not sure of Winnipeg But the last few months saw how things changed you within the city of Winnipeg. Maybe the bigger sense candidate or Manitoba. Yeah a lot has changed but I am so grateful for where we live because in Canada we allot precautions. We're taking right away and I think that that's one of the reasons. We don't have as many cases as other countries have we were of the later. Wants to get hit and we also were kind of prepared for it. So as soon as people in Canada started getting As soon as we knew that covid nineteen air we were told to do more social distancing. Wash your hands more. So there's a law campaigns to get people to do those things and it was really surprising. See how much people listened and was starting to keep more distance away from each other even in the grocery stores and places like that but as cases got worse there was encouragement people to not go out as much their restrictions on gathering and those restrictions lilly smaller smaller over time so I was like a hundred people fifty people and now I remember. It's down to ten people that's the most you can have a M- fiscal be a gathering and at the same time within the last. I guess it's been probably almost a month. All non-essential services have been closed down. I guess not quite among some things closed before that so I work at a gym and our Jim was closed even before the non essential services close. Just because you're considered a high risk Leith which I completely understand I think even Without this pandemic cap thing. It's a shared space where people are in close quarters with each other in all touching the same equipment. We were closed. Shut down even before the nonessential services reclosing shutdown. So at this point you can still get groceries. You can still go to the pharmacy. You may have to wait in line for a long time. And they're only letting so many people in once so it's really changed the way that we are approaching our lives in a few different ways so some people have reduced income are laid off The or other emergency benefits of the country is offering so very grateful for that Sir. Income will be changed reduced. And also when you have to wait in line that long to go out or you know that you're increasing your risk of getting or spreading the virus vijay note. It makes me think twice but whether or not you need to go get those items or us of the things we've been doing is kind of planning for example our meals out a little bit more so that we can by several weeks of groceries at one rather than a week's worth of groceries like we used to so think gum mistaken you actually made a video a little while ago And this was sort of your quarantine preparation a grocery order right. I think that you did that was supposed to go for a week or two exactly. Yeah so that. That's a video. I think you'll probably be posting a link to it to take a look at so was a video that I did just kind of last minute when we picked up our groceries because I realized that it's something people would benefit from steen that you can eat hot. Based in a way that you're still have items that can sit indefinitely pretty much in the pantry like dry beans and lentils. What kinds of food you can make those things you can put in the freezer Things that do law slip it long enough ranch or how you can prepare them so they last longer in the fridge and just to get you thinking about how you can still enjoy your food. Be Creative Andy. Even if you are shopping as frequently and I know for us even the pickups the laws stores offer pickup option are now booking a week or tune VAT bill. You can't just wait till you run out of food to book for another pickup or of course can also go to the stores and we in line to get inside so that's an option to but if you've got little ones are looking for other family members you know you can't just leave three three hours to go to. What am I mean in terms of like public transit and everything like talking about going to places I mean is that still running in Winnipeg or is it like limited servicer so right now the middle of April week do still how transit? I haven't been on public transit since this began to be honest. I'm not sure what it looks like on the buses but I do know that that's been talked about quite a bit the media that they're still running and I have seen them running however they are not letting people together and things like that. There is more distant in the people who are riding the bus. We DO SLOW. Public Transportation and the taxes are still runny Is The snow gone? You Defense Day you agonists. I can't days next stop so I mean like for me. I've had a change what my focus is on. 'cause I've been home so much more and we'll probably get into that leader but it also means I'm losing track of the days but dig will be early for us but then we thought it was spraying. Everything was melted muddy upside later. Oh we hit the dump of snow that was like several feet deep within a couple of days and then we waited for that to go away in the meantime away for it to go way. We ended up building a snow fort and having snowball fights and stuff so that was a lot of fun. And because we're all whole more. We get to engage in things like that as a family which I really appreciate And then it went away but now they're still like ice everywhere and sometimes you wake up. It's snowing and it's gone by the end of the day though it depends on what day and what our you asked me if I was looking at the window right now. It's like yeah. There's no snow but there's still chunks of ice around so But in terms of like the delivery and stuff when wind that start with.

Canada Winnipeg Winnipeg Manitoba Canada Amanda Lily Tokyo Manitoba Jim steen Public Transportation
How long can we all follow strict social distancing orders?

The Big Story

09:22 min | 7 months ago

How long can we all follow strict social distancing orders?

"I thought that I could say I'm speaking for everyone in the country. When I say social distancing sucks but I know it's necessary and we will get through it. I thought I could say about for everybody but apparently not we. Have you know a bunch of Yahoos? Open the front Queens Park sitting there protesting that the place has opened. That's breaking the law and putting everyone in jeopardy putting themselves in jeopardy putting the workers in jeopardy and God forbid one of them end up in the hospital down the street now. I'm as mad as Ontario Premier. Doug Fortius at those people who choose to show up for protests and float the rules. But I'm also concerned about the bigger picture about more than a couple of hundred eightieths. I'M WORRIED. The protests like this are evidence of cracks in the dam. Because I know I can feel it that the weather will get warmer and this will get harder and the numbers will go. Down and more people will be receptive to the message. Maybe not the protest message but the idea that it's okay to bend the rules and so they'll ban them and other people will see them do it. And that's how this whole strategy starts to fall apart. Here's the thing though. There's a limit to what people can take and well. Yes fine. Those idiot protesters as much as you want. You also can't tell people but they can't sit on their porches. We chat with their neighbors. When the weather's Nice can't tell them the can't take a walk in the park not forever. So where is the right balance? How much social distancing can we take collectively without cracking and when some of us do cave and break the rules and everyone sees it? What happens to the whole? We're all in this together part of the effort. What message should governments be sending people right now to keep them focused on the task at hand but also give them enough hope to hold on? We'll ask somebody who specializes in human behavior in a crisis as soon as claire brings us up to date on everything. That's happened with cove nineteen in Canada this weekend. We are expecting this week to hear more from provinces including Ontario and Quebec on how they plan to ease restrictions around Kovic nineteen in the coming weeks but Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says. None of the plans involve immunity passports. Because they're still no proof that those who recover from the virus can't become infected again a Manitoba plans on ramping up surgeries that were postponed because of cove in nineteen. This is because the number of cases in the province remains low so some non urgent surgeries including cataract and orthopedic will start taking place this week. In Ontario the Education Minister says all publicly funded schools will remain closed until at least may thirty first is as the online learning will continue and that the province does not see a need right now to extend the school year as of Sunday evening. Forty six thousand eight hundred and ninety five cases of cove nineteen in Canada with two thousand six hundred and seventy three deaths Jordan. He threw in this. Is the Big Story Carolyn? Macdonald harker is a sociologist at Mount. Royal University in Calgary also the director of the Center for Community Disaster Research which is relevant today obviously Dr McDonald Harker. Thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me. My first question is just as somebody who observes behavior. How would you say Canadians in general are doing in terms of compliance with social distancing measures? I think overall as a General Rule Canadians are quite compliant. I know there's a stereotype about Canadians being very polite but along with thought I definitely would say that. We are more conformist. There's more a sense of collectively in Canada and collaboration and so historically and even today during the current pandemic I would definitely say that there is a desire and a willingness to sort of abide by these regulations that were being given by government and health officials. That's interesting would you say that kind of changes nation to nation or by geographic area? How do you find that various absolutely if you look at human behavior it is definitely influenced by culture and social interactions so you look at perhaps some European countries we know when we've seen in the media that they had to implement Stricture enforcement because of the way in which people interact so Italy. For example there was a tendency not to necessarily follow some of the physical distancing regulations and so their government had to move to a much stricter regulations. And sort of you. Know a stricter lockdown You look at you know our neighbors the United States right next to us. You know. There's definitely the sense of independence and individualism and so some regions you know had more difficulty with some of these physical distancing regulations of and you still look at at the climate. You know when you compare Canada the to the US and how we're taking it very seriously here and you know you hear a lot of people in the US saying well. I can't believe so many stores are closed down. It's business as usual here. So there definitely are a cultural differences in the various regions and countries. So in our case then We've been at this for six weeks and we're doing fairly well in terms of compliance. How long Could you usually expect that to continue like even Canada would certainly have a breaking point? Probably right absolutely and that's a great question. Because I think at the beginning we definitely recognized. It was a global health pandemic. We saw that it was affecting other countries and we took it really seriously. We recognize that there are severe implications for older and vulnerable people and that they were very real so we were fortunate enough to see other countries experiences and I think that made a lot of people here in Canada. Take it more seriously You know and there is a lot of of fearfulness and uncertainty out there which has been really tangible. Now in the first few weeks were very compliant. Of course you know. The first week or two there was a bit of hesitation. There was a bit of disbelief. There was some denial But after that people really settled in and recognized that we needed to do this not only for our own health and safety but thought of other individuals especially those who are vulnerable but there is a point where we might start to see. That people aren't taking it as seriously as before and this is often referred to as crisis fatigue and this just refers simply to becoming immune to warnings from government and health officials and oftentimes. It's a result of you know this constant fear that's associated with repeated repeated warnings about the pandemic. And usually you see that start to set in at about you. Know the six seven eight week mark Where people are really starting to think about. Can I do this long term? And more importantly what are the impacts on my mental health? That was going to be. My next question is is there a point where The mental health costs become worse than the risk right. Absolutely and you know we've been talking a lot about the physical health implications and of course that's important right. We want to make sure that people remain healthy and I think everybody understands that but the other side of the coin that we haven't talked a lot about is what are the mental health implications of cutting people off from their interactions with other people and their connections. We are by nature social beings and we cannot survive without contact with other individuals and without Having interactions with them and we found you know many novel ways of communicating people are doing zoom parties or having worked meetings through other means of technology and I think it was new and novel at the beginning and people were excited about it but people are starting to grow weary of sitting at home and not being able to go out and talk with people and connect with them and it is having an impact on their mental health. It is taking a tool and we need to talk about that. We need to take into consideration because we have to look at you. Know what are the lives that were saving by continuing to practice? Isolation versus what are some of those long term impacts and we know in my field that there will be an increase in things like domestic violence child abuse divorce mental health issues like PTSD depression anxiety. So I think it's important to look at it holistically and weighed the benefits versus the risks. And not not necessarily conversations. We've had in the past. Were starting to have those conversations and I think they're definitely important points and issues to discuss when you do that. Research that you mentioned. Did you kind of find a timeline at which I guess maybe explain this wrong but those axes cross and it does become a much worse for long-term mental health to do it versus the danger is there.

Canada United States Ontario Premier Queens Park Doug Fortius Dr Mcdonald Harker Ontario Ptsd Claire Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Manitoba Carolyn Calgary Mount Italy Royal University Kovic Director Quebec
A guide to COVID-19 scams and how to protect yourself

The Big Story

07:53 min | 8 months ago

A guide to COVID-19 scams and how to protect yourself

"So I saw my family over the long weekend in when I say saw. That's all I mean. I hooked a bunch of us up to a teleconference for a little Easter celebration. So yeah I saw them and I guess I heard them to. That's it let sounds Nice. I saw a Lotta that over the weekend. I've been doing zoom calls with my family about once a week. It was my dad's birthday recently and they put the laptop at the dinner table so that I could see them all and it was kind of like I was there. See kind of kind of his good. But this is what. We're supposed to call physical distancing not social distancing because. I guess the point is by video chatting with my family. I am maintaining social connections. Yeah I mean you're still being social. You're just not there physically okay. We'll here's my mini rant about that. It is social distancing. It is literally socializing at a distance and it does feel distant. And I'm bringing this up because there is a bit of a debate around which term is proper and I wanted to quickly use this time to say before we get into the nasty scams and frauds. That are going around now that it doesn't matter what term you use here. They mean the same thing and either way. It sucks so pick your favorite. Yeah definitely You're right about that. I mean we're so fortunate to have this kind of technology right now but it's not the same thing as seeing people in real life. I mean it doesn't matter how many zoom calls you do. You can still feel lonely as soon as you log off and this is where we get into today's topic because guess what it's precisely when we're feeling those things when were scared or were lonely or missing family or even just looking for help and information. It's that time that were most vulnerable to frauds and scam artists. Who are right now looking to profit off of people's misery and fear here in Ontario on this is just one example but this weekend premier Doug Ford vowed to deal with these people as harshly as possible. There's always going to be very very few bad apples disgusting people that WanNa make make a profit off the docks of people that are dying. We ever catch him here in in Ontario Mobile. Come down on them like Like they've never seen before the full extent of the law. But here's the problem with that. It's almost impossible to catch them. And once they've got your money or your information it's almost impossible to get it back. What you can do though is protect yourself. You can know the details of the scams going around. You can know the signs of a fake and you can know how these people will pitch themselves to you and all of that will help so today to kick off week five of self-isolation right after the news. We will give you an extensive guide to keeping yourself and your information safe during all of this but first Claire as another week begins House candidate. Doing Y'all I'm GonNa Start in Quebec today where we know the krona viruses hit hard at police are investigating a long-term care home in the Montreal area. That's where thirty one people have died. Since mid March and nurses have now been speaking of describing unsanitary conditions. They say some residents were completely neglected for over twenty four hours because workers just couldn't handle the conditions and were walking off the job. Quebec's premier is promising a thorough public investigation. We'll province of Manitoba has put out a call to local businesses to make medical masks and this comes after a medical team in Winnipeg came up with a design for a mask that would be just as effective as the end ninety five so they're hoping to find local manufacturers to get on this as soon as possible because the province says. It's about a week or two away from running out of masks and other personal protective equipment well. There was a video making the rounds last week. Showing a man in an elevator in British Columbia spitting on the buttons. That man is now apologizing for what he did. He says it was the result of a momentary fit of anger from an ongoing dispute between him and the Strata Council in the building that he lives in he also says he has no health issues. No Cova nineteenth symptoms and Vancouver. Police say they are not investigating this and lastly Justin. Trudeau is one of many leaders across the country back at work today. After taking a rare day off for Easter Sunday. He did send out a written message though thanking Canadians for staying home especially during the long weekend he said by doing this Canadians or showing the true meaning of loving our neighbors as ourselves as of evening over twenty four thousand cases of Kovic Nineteen in Canada with seven hundred and sixty four deaths. I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings. This is the big story. Sam Cooper is a national investigative journalist with Global News who has looked into just about all of the scams going around. Hello Sam Hi how you doing? I'm doing all right. Where are you right? Now you in a basement An apartment somewhere no. I'm located in Ottawa. Usually I we'd be in a global news studio with a view of Parliament Hill. I'm a little bit further away at home in my home studio today as as we. I think most of us are at this point. Yes well We're all just trying to record from wherever we can But we're GONNA talk about scams today. Yes so how quickly did we start? Seeing Kovic nineteen scams from the day Canada. I had a case will I would track it back even further in my research. I think potentially be original scam as it were was started by China's government unfortunately when This virus started a roll through Wuhan China in November and December. There were some doctors that that we're trying to warn people and they got visits from police in China and said Retract her statements. Or else you'll be in trouble. Chinese state media said any rumor mongers talking about a SARS like virus will face a penalty's and that really created the conditions for a once in a lifetime health crisis to roll out and we started to see more traditional corporate scams appearing worldwide. I would say late January and in February. What did those first ones look like will they? They were very sophisticated and they played on the need. The crucial need for information and also some sort of fear and I think one of the very first engineered widespread scans we saw was sites that mimicked universities like John Johns Hopkins putting out data boards. Where all new corona virus cases were appearing everyone was hungry for that data understandably for these spoofed sites when you clicked on them. It was actually a scheme where the criminals on the other side were fishing for your personal information through your computer and that really sets the table for a a whole world of scams because once criminals have your information any number bad things can happen from there and it can lead to further scams. They're just building up their databases on how to social engineer. As as it's called a scams that work off a good knowledge of who targets are so. Give me an example. Then if you can of of what they would do once. Somebody had clicked on one of those sites and they'd mind some of their data once the criminals have your data. It can go into

Canada China John Johns Hopkins Doug Ford Jordan Heath Rawlings Engineer Ontario Mobile Ottawa Quebec Sars Winnipeg Parliament Hill Ontario Strata Council Sam Cooper Trudeau Cova Vancouver
Connecting in isolation: Indigenous people create, find and share community online

Unreserved

07:48 min | 8 months ago

Connecting in isolation: Indigenous people create, find and share community online

"Did the idea to have online sharing in singing circles? Come from well. I was inspired by witnessing on social media some of the responses to Cova Nineteen. I saw that there were people that were rushing out and buying up all the toilet paper and all the meat in the grocery store and things like that and when I I was surprised when I saw that but what it said to me was that this is what you do when you're afraid and it's what you do when you're used to competing with other people is you want to get their first and get it all and then some people turn around and wanted to sell it and make some money off of it so. I thought to myself well. That's one response to what's happening. But maybe we can have a different response. And I just asked myself well my husband and I are. We're on that harvest group that everybody is talking about end. We need to not have be around people And what we do to support our community from the safety of our own home and that's when that idea came up. Oh maybe we can do it somehow online. So the past year we've been having sharing circles with our son dancers once a month through zoom because we have dancers from all over the country and so we started to use. This people could connect in have a way to talk to each other and see each other and it worked really well and so that was almost like we. We had a little bit of training for now. So you held your first Singing circle on Wednesday. How did it go on? Will there was some technical glitches for sure as we try to figure out how? How does everybody sing at the same time using kind of a technology but eventually we figured it out and I said what do you think they said it was fun? It was good. It's good to connect with each other and those kinds of things so I think it's going to work. We're GONNA do it at every week and some day when these this Crisis is over. And we're gathering together will know these songs really well because we will have been learning and practicing them all along so Pahar after you held the circle technical glitches aside. How did you feel about Sharing the space and sharing the singing with community. I felt wonderful so me too. I've found it difficult. We recently had a funeral just before everybody stops stopped being around each other. And so we've been going through something here not our home and I was looking forward to being able to see family in that way and coming together singing together praying together and laughing together. I felt so better at the end of the evening and I woke up this morning with a different sense of hope and connectedness Why do you think it is important to offer this kind of online community to people at this time? I think that our strength is in coming together. Our strength is in supporting each other and our strength is in approaching the crisis from a place. That's not sitting in a place of fear and I think that when we come together we can give each other that and you know whenever you share. Whatever you're going through with someone it's you reduce they carry a little bit of it for you and you carry less and we need each other and there's many ways of us to be able to be together and we have to utilize them right now. Yeah so I had mentioned that. Normally you'd be holding a ceremony at this time and understand that you've heard from many people that are are asking you to hold private singular ceremony in your home. What are you hearing from people at this time? Well that's true so usually what we do is every couple. Every second Friday. We have a pipe ceremony. In people from the community are ceremonial family will come and we do that in the winter months and then soon when it starts to warm up we go to our ceremonial grounds on this property. And we have a purification lodge and When I heard that we would not be able to do that and yet I knew we. This is a time where we really need prayer. None and so I remember that when we were living in northwest territories that some people from this our home territory here in Manitoba would call him every once in a while with their troubles in they they asked him to make prayers for them and he would say well. We're having a ceremony tomorrow night at six o'clock why don't you get some tobacco and just sit quietly in you make prayers at that time and over here? We'll be making for you as well then and they would do that and I could see. That was really comforting. It was a way of being able to participate in ceremony in a on a spiritual level. Even if you weren't there physically so that was one of my first. Thoughts is okay. We could still do this. We're we need to have ceremony in fact we're going to have one every Friday now and we just need to have some trust and some faith that there's something that we need to learn from this experience and if we're open and that we can we can receive the teaching that's coming to us. Are you hearing that people are afraid? Or they're feeling anxious there yes. I am hearing that. The people are afraid. They're afraid for loved ones who have compromised immune systems. They're afraid for our elders people who are living in close quarters sometimes. That's in our homes in first nation communities that might be in nursing homes other things like that. That's what they I've been hearing and other things. There's so many things to worry about right now So whenever we get stuck in that place of fear it's it's just an awful place to be in. It's sometimes hard to see that. There's an opportunity for something good so it's good for us to be able to move out of that in and go back to what's always helped us to get through difficult times in indigenous community and that's our culture. Our prayers are ceremonies are songs are practices. we've been seeing a lot of indigenous people offering up space for conversation beating even dancing through social media. What do you think that says about us as indigenous people? Well I love it. It's wonderful. It's it says that we still are able to practice the teachings of our culture kindness generosity sharing taking care of each other and of course humor. That's one that's we're good at that and and that's what we need when we're going through something like this so all of those different things and each of us having gifts and being willing to contribute whatever that gift is. I not surprised. That's what our communities are like. Yeah how long will you be holding this space for people online as long as we need it wonderful? Well thank you so much for joining us and sharing that with us. Thank you for having me on the

Cova Pahar Manitoba
William Prince on 'borrowing from future happiness' to write new album

Unreserved

09:54 min | 9 months ago

William Prince on 'borrowing from future happiness' to write new album

"Is voice is like the low rumble of thunder storm on the prairie. His songs a glimpse into the heart of a man who's lived through the broken to come out hole on the other side. William Prince is an initial based singer and songwriter from PEGUIS FIRST NATION IN MANITOBA. His just released the much anticipated. Follow up to his Juno. Winning debut album earthly days. His trajectory is taken him from small stages two major concerts and tours all over turtle island and abroad including opening for the legendary Neil young an icon. Buffy Sainte Marie his new album reliever was recorded in Winnipeg in Nashville and is out now. I'm so pleased to welcome. William Prints back to unreserved for an extended conversation today. Hello My friend Rosanna. How are you? You look a little travel where you good. Oh yeah is it The friendly way of saying how terrible I think it's just the hat I lucked out and I found a half that fits my head and I wear it everywhere now. So that's that's the big change. You look fantastic. No thank you thank you. So let's start with the new record. What inspired you most on this album? Oh boy that That starts the conversation years ago You know Reliever was was born in in stages it was written at so many different times. It was written in real time panic. I say for some part of it. It was written halfway through reflection and then finally at the point of revelation. There there's so many different points Throughout this album that I'm really proud of making it through and being here where we are today on the other side and reliever was really just about collecting and documenting the songs. I was writing while I was going through. You know one of the harder times in my life so far so you were going through some stuff the loss of your father the end of your relationship finding your place as a father to your son. Wyatt what does the name Reliever mean to you? Reliever really stems from the idea of course of treatment. Almost an anti an antibiotic in a sense. You Know I. I think of the songs What they've done for me over time dealing with those those things like grief and separation and total change in one eighty of environment from this point of is this working. Is this something I'm going to be able to do? Is there a place here for me? to now being at a place where. I find myself doing this all the time. My responsibility is become to to be a good dad and be good to my family and make art and it's it's really An incredible thing so that was the faith. I was Kinda holding onto borrowing from your future. Happiness is what I say. You know. Having that faith for win the time would come now. And we'd have this record. I'd be passed the things I was working through and Able to celebrate them rather than live in a state of grief reliever was was born in the concept of love to I. I was thinking about how the greatest Major League. Baseball pitchers in the world will throw a few innings until they're retired for the game and the relief pitcher takes over and says I I got this. I thought you know on those days. When we're with our significant others those we care about say we're not throwing the best game and then that other person can kind of take over so is really borne inside baseball? Metaphor that That grew in complexity and I found the title track itself kind of in the middle of everything and it really started to tie the two halves together. The part where I was living in real time making a diary to my son showing him and letting him know where I was during this time. His infancy And then ultimately showing him that though I was going through this really difficult time Your your dad stayed steadfast and resilient and made it through and I hope that's the kind of man Human BEING HE TURNS OUT TO BE IN THE END William the beauty of your lyrics or that you are so vulnerable you give so much of yourself in your music. Why do you share so much with people? WanNa I think it's what we're most in need of Today is the willingness to be vulnerable insincere. You know more than ever. There's more to consume and more to get over faster than it's ever been. I think the things that still exist amongst the human condition are those themes of love and you know making it through the everyday life and Going through those challenges that we will encounter over the course of our individual lives. I came into the term Saunder over the past few years where you sit and imagine that the complexities of every other individual in the world has a whole history just as long just as an in detail just as thorough just as grand as your own and I think that's a lot that's a lot of hard drive space. You know a lot of files out there to pick through and you know there are a lot of them that are similar from person to person and the ones that are easier to deal with me are speaking about my family and I have no problem because this was my way of coping. This was my chance to deal with these things face on was to write about them in real time and do my future self a favor that I knew that I've survived everything up until this moment and I will continue to survive and thrive in the environment that I've created for myself now and I'm that's a huge privilege. That's that's really something so I chose that while I'm here while people are listening. I'm going to give the most honest and forefront representation of what I feel what I what I'm living through and hopes that it. Will you know? Bring US pass this more superficial more artificial age and get us back in touch with with vinyl records and phone calls and and things like that slowing the pace to appreciate. Just how beautiful human condition actually is now earlier? You had said that in creating this album you had to borrow from your future happiness. What did you mean by that? Well it's really all that faith is I think is I. I was going through like you said the the loss of my dad and Estrangement and not really feeling like I was In a place to ever really even have a relationship again. I thought I'd just be an artist and a great dad now just travel and in a low point truth truthfully. I. I don't want to understate. Just how tough things were I went back to to Peguis are? I lived with my mom for a year. You know I I. I worked on the PEGUIS radio to keep my mind from going crazy and the slower days and drove to the city. Every day to see my son is very opposite. A glamorous was quite testing. It's like what have you done? You derailed yourself from A Post Secondary Education to pursue this dream and so borrowing from future happiness. Was this idea that I would look to the future when the darkness breaks knowing that. I think there's going to be a time when I get to play music all the time to be a recording artist and share my story with you know auditoriums Or even town halls even fifty people at a time. I knew that there was part of me. That wouldn't let go over this dream that I was chasing to be here to to do this for a living so I I with the good faith that it'll probably work out. I think it will work out. I believe enough that it will work out. I'll just watch it unfold so that now when we're here when you're here opening for the Neil Young's of the world and and travelling in. It's not normal to be applauded by thousands of people a Week. You know not everybody gets to to have that and it's really sending the message that my music belongs here. My voice is being heard. And that's everything you hoped for as a songwriter. So I'm as happy as I imagined if not more for certain. This home actually sounds Fairly optimistic you seem more rooted. You've gained some wisdom in the last few years. What do you attribute to that confidence like the the difference? Now I I I was joking that When I made earthly days it was like I hope nobody minds that I'm doing this. You Know Jade Bird says the last thing. The world needs is another narcissist so going from that I wonder if anyone will even hear these songs other than my family and myself and I'll drive around with a CD in my car. And finally feel like I did it. I got an album and I was hoping to to make it outside of Manitoba now. It feels like you know we're GonNa go everywhere but the time it's it's all said and done and to have that in my heart to know that there there's a humble audience waiting for a follow up. It gave me the peace of mind to go into the studio with Scott again and Dave and be in Nashville being when pig. Bring these two pieces of the project together and Believe in my songs from the start not waiting for them to be validated. After I I trusted I knew I'm aware of my abilities. And I record songs and play shows. I was trying to prove that so hard for so long and show that I'm you know Just as valid a songwriter artist as anybody else. And now that we're here. I can just focus on bringing about the Best Art. I can create

Manitoba Nashville Baseball Turtle Island William Prints William Prince Juno Sainte Marie Winnipeg Neil Young Best Art Wyatt William Major League Peguis Jade Bird Scott Dave
Photographing Lake Baikal of Siberia

Photography Tips From the Top Floor

05:38 min | 10 months ago

Photographing Lake Baikal of Siberia

"We have left Moscow. We have come to lake. Baikal Cyberia What's your first impression? Here city of her cuts was much bigger than expected. People very nice very impressed by the mixed culture. Lot Lake I spent some time in Winnipeg Manitoba Canada and Romo Brandon me. A lot of that. What do you think of the lake itself? We're on top of the Nick Right now. as I said before it's a surreal experience. I've been out on frozen lakes and northern New York and I've seen some pressure cracks in my day but nothing compared to what I'm looking at right now so it's too bad Microphone doesn't really pick up. The sounds the is makes because as we speak in the background. Cracks are forming in the distance. So now we're here in the afternoon and the Sun's coming through these cracks angle and it's just a their shapes in reflections that Unlike anything I've ever seen and I haven't seen that many photographers dropped to their bellies on purpose. This quickly because everyone wants to get close into the action. Every turn you see something unique in the In an ice formation crack something. It never ends all right. Thank you andy so Let's continue explore some of this office beauty of the lake. Thank you you're welcome. I recorded this with any Just a couple of days ago when we first went on the is for the very first time is really very fresh impression and Yes now we have a couple days On the ice already and I I'M GONNA try to get some more impressions from some of the others on the tour because For the last two days we've had smiling faces left and right because look yeah. It is very diverse. Diverse is is is so different from what everyone expected and I've tried to capture some of that. It's eight o'clock in the morning. I'm out on the League. Getting up at seven is is hard but Yeah we were doing a bit of a sunrise shoot. Well we as in everyone on the group On their own. Because we didn't know who wanted to sleep in and who didn't but yes and is coming up around eight eight. Oh five right now. So it's up to you okay. I mean I've been to other places where the sun was up so much earlier but Here the sunrises great and We are staying in the Frigate Hotel at all island which is like the series of bungalows. And it's this little tip of the island is so where we stay is surrounded by the lake so you walk out two minutes down to the lake and then you're on the lake and here is some really nice. Black is with Some methane bubble. I would try to capture some of those in the foreground but the Sun rising behind also snow on the ice you can you can hear that So it's the mixture between that and now on the ice right next to the snow. So there's this amazing variety of textures and Yeah I'm do my best to to catch some that still tired though I am. I am smiling so such a big smile just with my head into an ice cave you right now. There's or Horn island. Which is the biggest island on Lake Baikal or in Lake Baikal and we just drove over here and on the way we stopped at different ice caves and this ice case. Okay so they come into existence when when everything freezes but it's not quite frozen so the rockets very cold and then storms whip the water against the rocks. And this is this. This creates these caves of different sizes that you can kind of slide into that are like I. We're talking thousands and thousands of ICICLES hanging from above you pointing donuts different sizes and it's it's pretty safe so worried about anything and it just looking out of these caves I will. I will definitely have to share a few photos of this because it is mind blowing beautiful and to standing here looking at it. The words do not make it justice. This is yeah. It's hard to describe. Even a photo can't really give you the full the full feeling of what this feels like. When you stand here in the elements with these ICICLES. Yeah let me take a few photos and put them somewhere. I think they'll probably be a link in the show notes. We can take a look

Lake Baikal Lake I Romo Brandon Moscow Horn Island Frigate Hotel New York League Winnipeg Manitoba Canada Andy
Blackhawks Fall To Minnesota Wild In Overtime

Steve Cochran

00:31 sec | 10 months ago

Blackhawks Fall To Minnesota Wild In Overtime

"Bank now with WGN sports here's Dave and I not exactly what the Blackhawks handed my last night in Minnesota they were shut out for two periods but they did pick up a point they scored twice in the third before losing to the wild in overtime three due to our Xfinity X. five Blackhawks sport Manitoba got the game winner for the wild after third period goals madam bow question only Mada Corey Crawford thirty one saves for the hawks who are still three points out of a playoff spot they host the Bruins tonight right here at WGN beginning at six

Dave Blackhawks Minnesota Mada Corey Crawford Bruins WGN Blackhawks Sport Manitoba
Death and dying: how Indigenous communities grieve, survive and thrive

Unreserved

09:27 min | 10 months ago

Death and dying: how Indigenous communities grieve, survive and thrive

"Life expectancy for indigenous people in Canada is lower than the rest of the country's population and part of the reason is the higher rates of sudden deaths in indigenous communities. Jeffrey and sluice has worked to try to understand the issues behind that statistic Jeffries cree and is an assistant professor at the University of Toronto. He's here to talk about some of his research into death and dying within indigenous communities. Hello Jeffrey thanks for having me. So how is grieving and death in indigenous communities different than others. Well I think death and dying in any community can look different to begin with every family Every person has different traditions additions and different ways of expressing grief. And it's certainly true that culture shapes our sense of what normal grieving is And so for as much diversity. As there is within indigenous communities across the country there are as many expressions of grief that surround issues of death and dying. What are some of the issues that indigenous communities are dealing with well? There's often this sort of a typical things that go along with an experience of loss of a family member or loved one but for many indigenous communities as complicated by the nature of how people have died For a lot of families experiencing thing sudden loss in particular unexpected loss through homicides or suicides it can be particularly difficult to to think Abo- what grieving might look like in that context. So Jeffrey what are some of the things that indigenous communities do as part of their grieving process. I mean for example in my community community. there's a four day grieving process before We we send that person often in a number of different ceremonies and things that are rooted in culture. What what have you seen? There's a often grieving process between the point when a person passes And when they pass onto ords a spirit world And that can be kind of mitigated by a number of different ceremonies in my community. That's often the lighting of a fire that stays lit for the entire period of those days. in other communities that might mean We speak of that person during that time but then after that period has ended we may not actually speak of or use that person's name for a period of time other communities have specific medicines. That are used to help. Ease that transition between death and the spirit spirit world. There are a lot of different traditions. But those are just a few that come to mind So how is the grieving process changed in indigenous communities. That's an interesting question I would say you know it's changed substantially over the course of the experience of colonization If you look at this from a historical lens our communities and our cultures had intact practices around death and dying that predate sort of the Ways in which. We approach these issues today throughout Canada. And and so you know. Those things changed in large part due to the impact of colonization And the effects of largely missionary movements throughout indigenous communities and then more recently residential schools. And I think the other the thing that's also true is there's other factors that are causing Destroy Dishes to change one being. We have to think about how to create and how to respond onto the unexpected and unprecedented loss of life due to unexpected death. Things like homicide and suicide The ways that murders or missing people or the loss of young ones in our community we may not have had a script for how to deal with those things and so in those senses as we have to create new new traditions and protocols to take care of people in new contexts the other things that a lot of people live far from their communities and I live in Toronto in my home communities in Fisher River Manitoba and so thinking about how do you take care. How do you create great ceremonies to support grieving? How do you create community connection? When a lot of people live in substantial distance from their communities and from the context by which they might be informed by traditional practices around death and dying now I understand that in many communities that often As you said there are a lot of sudden death issues whether that's suicide or whether that is homicide or When somebody goes missing and you so you don't have that opportunity to grieve over over a body per se What is this this cycle do? How does that affect a community munity? When you know you've just finished grieving somebody and then somebody else passes or is it gets? It's profoundly painful for a community and a community is often in never not in a season of grieving. I don't WanNa give the impression that every community every indigenous community is the same in that regard but there are communities there are communities entities throughout Canada where indigenous people are never living outside of the shadow of that type of loss and I think that creates tremendously difficult circumstances where people are often confronted by their own their own pain on a daily basis whether it's never reprieve from that type of loss you you know. The impacts of that can be really detrimental on people's sense of wellbeing their health and certainly has other impacts in communities as well. You know people's ability ready to be engaged in school or work or other other impacts are really felt that can be quite systemic for for community. Certainly now you've said that media India Government and people in general often conflate sudden deaths in in our communities to mental health issues which in a seems very simplistic. But you think it's more deep brewed than that. How so yeah? I think you know. It's certainly true that You know if you look at issues like suicide There's no debate that there are aspects of health that are intertwined with that experience. But I do think it's more complicated than that. And I think that the way in which is treated as often quite simplistic the fact is is that to live a good life. You need conditions that are conducive to living And when we look at the context across Canada where suicides for example are most prominent these are often contexts where there has been ongoing diminishment of the quality of life for indigenous people. So it shouldn't surprise us. That communities that experienced the highest degrees of economic disparity are often the same types of contexts contexts where suicide is more prevalent And so in that sense. There's there's all these other factors that kind of surround a person that are not just about them as people people in their particular vulnerability or risks towards. Let's say something like depression. But also it's to take into consideration the host of factors that exist around onto person in their environment. These different points of of of contact that shape whether something like suicide makes sense now in in in your work talk about Promoting vibrant indigenous life. What does that mean and what does it look like well? I think that it's one one thing to save people from death but I think that You know to a certain degree if that's the limit of our vision or if that's the the end of what we hope for or I think it's a pretty low bar. I think we have to answer the question of why is life worth sticking around for if we can begin to answer that question in with young people in our communities I think we shift towards things that create conditions for a good life You know every community has different talking about this But I think a good life you know in our community is certainly one where you can experience joy where your basic needs are met on the the big picture. We need our Federal Government in collaboration with provincial and municipal and territorial and first nations governments. I'm mm to really begin to think about suicide prevention in a completely different way one that is not entirely preoccupied with crisis response. Wants you know this sort of revolving door of social workers or psychiatric nurses into communities after a crisis has already happened but to really make good on the commitment to you to to really do justice by indigenous people By ensuring that their conditions for living are at a at at the very minimum equal to that of other Canadians But but a higher bar than that that are conducive for good life I think that means that communities is where you know. where there's chronic underfunding for infrastructure or under funding for education or underfunding for healthcare. Really has to be taken seriously as part of the constellation of issues that shape Young People's desires to want to live So that's on the big picture. I think that's where we I need to start

Canada Jeffrey Toronto Assistant Professor Federal Government Jeffries University Of Toronto Depression Fisher River Manitoba India Government
Chris Urmson: Aurora CEO - Autonomous Driving

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

07:17 min | 10 months ago

Chris Urmson: Aurora CEO - Autonomous Driving

"Hello and welcome to our first episode of behind. Find The tech in twenty twenty. I'm Christina Warren. Senior cloud advocate at Microsoft. And I'm Kevin Scott all right so Kevin. It is twenty twenty which Shh is both the new year and I guess a new decade although people will get weird technicalities and it's always a great Chance to kind of look back at what's happened over the last ten years and reflect on new opportunities. Yeah I mean I it. Is I think in their industry and for human beings in general really easy to get completely used to new innovations that in our lives. But like when you think back ten years ago the world looked like a very different place than it looks right now so smartphones were just catching on. They were nowhere near as ubiquitous as they are all right now and the things that you could do on them were far far more constrained than they are right. Now I mean for. For God's sake people were renting movies from blockbuster In two thousand ten right very blockbuster was actually still a thing and instagram hadn't even been invented yet. Coley different world you know I do now that we've hit twenty twenty. Do you have any forecasts about what the next year intact might bring her even the next decade. Well well I think one of the themes that we spent a bunch of time chatting about last year on the podcast was artificial intelligence machine learning and I think we are are certainly going to see the trends that that had started in the prior year's continue to accelerate as one of the reason why I'm really interested in chatting with our guest today So autonomous vehicles. For instance. I believe are going to make AK- ton of progress over the next couple of years in particular and I'm really looking forward to seeing some of that stuff. Play out yes I couldn't agree more. It's funny I don't have a driver's license But I've actually been on a few self driving car panels over the years and I I think the technology she behind it is so fascinating. Which is why? I'm really really excited about your conversation with today's guest. Chris Armstrong and Chris is an engineer. Who's known for his work in pioneering self driving car technology? Yeah and you know one of the reasons that I'm especially interested in self driving cars and I'm looking forward to this conversation that we're about to have Chris is that There's so many ways that the world is going to change for the good once we we are able to put this technology into the hands of lots of different companies so One of the things that will hear about Aurora's. They are a company building the self off driving car technology as a platform for other companies to use to build autonomous applications. And so you know one of the things that I'm sorta hopeful for that will come into the world in the not-too-distant future is some technologies. That may help my grandmother. So I'm I'm lucky enough to have a grandma that's still still alive. She's eighty nine years old and lives in a very rural place in Virginia And she can still drive which is awesome but the day is coming where she's not going to be able to To drive her car car in the same way that she is right now and Like then it begs the question of how she has access to all of the things that she needs in order to help her live and independent life. So how does she get her prescription medicines. Like how does she get her groceries and You know just just sort of the staple things that she needs to exist. And one of the things that I think could be really incredibly beneficial with these self driving thing. Technologies is Like the possibility that you'll be able to have autonomous deliveries for people like my grandmother. I think you're absolutely right. I think the potential for the stuff is really fantastic. So let's hear more about some of the potential for this technology from Chris Aronson Guest today is Chris. Samson Christie's the CO founder and CEO Vera accompanied the bill self driving vehicle technology before founding Aurora he was CTO. Google self driving car program prior to that. Chris was a faculty member of the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University where he was the technical director of the Darpa urban and grand challenge teams. I'm really excited to hear what he's up to these days. Hey Chris the the show. Thanks for having me so I love to start by learning how you got interested in technology in the first place as a kid. Were you taking engineering classes or programming classes when you were in high school. So are you discover that in college back. When I was in high school there wasn't really computer science at high school And so I Bought Oughta some kind of Tandy x eighty six clone or whatever Back when I was in probably ninth or tenth grade from money for my paper route A- and you know tried to learn to program at first where you go you know you don't if you recall this but you go to the bookstore and you'd buy You know this paperback for Back Book. That was program whatever it was and it was just the source code listing and this before C. D. Roms even pete which people probably don't even remember that that's right we Before that actually bought a commodore sixty four and of course that was exciting. Because it didn't have tape drive right right or it didn't have a floppy drive floppy yeah and five and a quarter inch. Discs that's what had YEP YEP so anyway so we was doing that and then this language C. Plus plus which seemed to be the hot new thing And so started. Actually the first programs I really learned with C. Plus plus. Wow that's rough. Yeah yeah it was a little crazy. A I mean I guess on some some level like CPS was challenging lodging first language. But the good thing is after you've mastered as downhill it's all downhill And so did. Did you know from all of this experience in high school that you wanted to get a computer science and engineering. Gary you know up in Canada so apply to you you know variety of schools got into into a couple of them And then in my senior here I met a girl Turns out now. She's my wife. And decided I wanted to stay at the University of Manitoba which is right in central Canada and Manitoba and got into the computer engineering? School computer. Seem like you know they had a future.

Chris High School Aurora Twenty Twenty Kevin Scott Microsoft Christina Warren Chris Armstrong Instagram Chris Aronson Canada University Of Manitoba Virginia Google Gary C. Plus Samson Christie Manitoba
"manitoba" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

10:53 min | 1 year ago

"manitoba" Discussed on The Big Story

"Who who may be facing crisis or dealing with addiction and really get them the help that they need before something happens before they turn to to a gang or before addiction take hold before they're kicked off an apartment and that model according to to the air calling smoke has been working fairly well. They did a pilot projects for two years. And this is the first year that they've been full-on officially working with the hub model. But everyone I spoke to said that it's working well that doesn't mean there's no detractors. There are concerns about privacy with this model because a lot of information is shared with police behind the scenes for for noncriminal issue And the other concern. Is that ten this model keep up with the influx of people. Yes the models designed for city of you know maybe fourteen thousand. But again it's fifty five thousand people that they're servicing so. Maybe you help three you one day and then you know five more youth come into the community with the same issues so the mayor said the system is working and and everyone I spoke to the rcmp seem positive about it Social workers seem positive about it but at the same time It's a numbers game. There are so many people who come into the community. That's the challenge for programs like hub to keep up with it knowing good news. AH Yesterday the provincial. Government made an announcement about one of the programs that the mayor calling from referenced and that is street reached now st reaches aimed aimed at protecting vulnerable youth particularly preventing them from the exploited but the benefit factors that are also sees a significant drop off in youth crime when St Reaches in perfect and how it works. People go out in the community. At night we make contacts with kids on. They follow up on tips. They they become really ingrained into that youth community that they can identify problems. Help people and also make sure that you know people are on probation. Curfews are enforced and all of of those things so right after this story was published. Actually the provincial government announced two point one million dollars in funding for that program to permanently establish in in Thomson so I think people are GonNa go limb and say they're going to be pretty happy with that because it did seem like one of the programs. They tried over the years and lost funding for previously. That did have an impact I spoke with grand chief garrison city of MKO as well and not short for Manitoba Kuwait. Now mackinac Inc uh-huh until political advocacy advocacy group representing first nations signatories to treaties. Four or five six and ten grand chief that he said that he would. I'd like to see more cultural programs for indigenous youth. And that's something that that hasn't really come to fruition yet so I think people there will be watching and the other programming programming people would like to see a and they point to the solution is of course. First nation from cells need more resources for housing for addiction for mental health infrastructure. Clean Water and she said he definitely said that would would help. Lessen the burden on Thomson by allowing people to to stay in their home communities where frankly uh-huh most of them want to be able to continue to live and often can't for one reason or another. You mentioned the legacy of colonialism and I wonder how much the civic civic officials are willing to grapple with that as a problem You talked about some of the things that that first nation people say they could use is that acknowledgement there from the people people running the city. And what's that relationship like. Everyone I spoke to you said the relationship. Between 'em -Ko city officials was very very good and and that seemed seem to play out the RCMP also seem to have a very good relationship with MKO and and that was in some ways surprising. I mean I think when we love Nope we often talked about as a historic issue In reality it's the present day issue and I don't want to gloss over you. The fact that racism still exists in Thompson and I definitely heard people in the community make extremely racist comments targeting indigenous people while while I was there however on the civic level particularly with the the city councillors I spoke to and the mayor. There was a really solid understanding and acknowledgement Schmidt that reconciliation had to be part of how Thompson move forward and the best example of that And this that didn't make it into the story but I think is worth sharing is Red Bush plane. That's on the outskirts of town. I noticed this driving around. It's an lions park. It's a static display of Bush plane and it didn't really strike me as anything Special at first when I spoke to the mayor Calling smook she. She talked talked about the the controversy playing created and it was. It was envisioned as a monument to aviation. I mean in northern Canada Northern Manitoba Ovation so important to get into remote communities to to mining prospecting to the economy so Restored Bush plane was put up. Ah The monument to aviation and the people who put it up weren't indigenous and their their intentions were on are one thing but what was missed. was that this was the same. Bush claim the same. Make the same model that that came to take conditions kids away from their families and put them in residential school so for Survivors Karez essential school. This Bush monument was really you know a very traumatic thing to see when they're driving in and out of the community and it was really it was a great example of how some things weren't considered but how the city was willing to to move forward so what happened in the end and not everyone in the town was on board with it. The mayor was very strong and councils very strong that they needed to to amend the monument to include this history so garden of contemplation with added and Stone Monument was added to the display explaining. You know how how this this plane was used during the sixties scoop and during during the time of residential schools and that's you know whether real active of tangible reconciliation that that people seem to deal with a good step forward it and I thought it really to- both sides of the story. Yes there are times when people don't really understand the issue but there is a willingness to to find a way. Hey to be genuine and to bridge that gap so it's complicated but I do think civic officials in Thompson have come strong understanding of this now. That doesn't the solutions are easy but it does mean that. There's some common ground but I think they're moving forward from lastly. I just want to ask you about your experience with just the the the ordinary citizens of the town because I'm always curious about how conversations go When you kind of introduce yourself as a journalist who's there because your community leads the list for violent crimes? And what do you have to say about that you know how do they grapple with The state of their city. And what did they say to you about. Let me Ask someone about it. I I got like mostly I rose. And of course this isn't a surprise to us No one was shocked with it. And you you know. The interesting thing was a lot of times reporter. You do have to go and you have to go up with your notebook and say sorry to bother you I'm so and so from such and such But in Pumpkin S. soon as I stepped out and I look lost or standing there. People approach me so there was a real friendliness. And I can't understand that. Got Enough like there there. Is You know the license plates Manitoba Say Friendly Manitoba and it is true. People are really outgoing and curious. Yes so any time I was on the street Thompson. People came up to to ask me what I was doing. And and the conversation came really really naturally. Now what what. People in Thomson thought about violent crime. There was a lot of emphasis on what was visible and that was of course homelessness and Addiction. And I think it can't let me stress enough and this is something the article really gets to the heart of. I feel that the the homeless Population Thompson is often victims of these violent crimes. So they're not the perpetrators Yes there there's pond for public intoxication mischief but they really are generally speaking on the receiving end of the violence So I don't know if everyone I spoke to was really aware of aware the the violence was coming from in that terms where those crime numbers were But people are definitely open to to speak about it on the streets and They were hopeful that more attention being drawn to it. You know. It wasn't the best thing that they were there. Air But if more attention was drawn to it maybe it would draw more resources and more attention and more discussion and no one seems to think that was a bad thing. and that was really refreshing You want to add to the homeless population and transients Population were extremely. Ah Going When I spoke to them I mean standing with a notebook immediately? I got questioned from people and They were really forthcoming and genuine win. And I it's difficult when people open up to you and you spend in some cases you know an hour or more talking to them. And you know you have to distill. They're really intense and nuanced wants thoughts on their home city into a sentence or two. It can be daunting. But I feel like the the people I spoke to in Thomson were really receptive. And and very insightful. So it was a very interesting experience and challenging experience but when I was rewarding and I hope the story reflects some some of the depth most Canadians will get the opportunity to ever ever visit Thomson but It's an interesting place and it. It definitely has a a very rich story. Even if it's not always a positive one thanks for taking us there. A Little Bit Shannon Jannine van raise visited Thompson. Manitoba for Maclean's. That was the big story. If you'd like more including the story we did about another community like this last year you can head to the big story. PODCASTS DOT C.. You can also find us on twitter at the store. Espn you can find us in all of your podcast applications. Pick your favorite head. Get in there. Find US on Apple. Google stitcher spotify any of them. You can also find all of our podcasts on the frequency network at Frequency PODCAST NETWORK DOT COM. Thanks thanks for listening. I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings. We'll talk tomorrow.

Thomson Thompson rcmp Bush Manitoba Say Friendly Manitoba Stone Monument twitter MKO Apple Canada Espn Survivors Karez essential scho Jordan Heath Rawlings mackinac Inc Manitoba Google public intoxication
"manitoba" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

09:10 min | 1 year ago

"manitoba" Discussed on The Big Story

"I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings. This is the big story. Shannon van raise is a freelance writer based in Manitoba and she spent time in Thompson for this story his Shannon hydrate. Why don't can you start by telling me Just because it's terrifying about the machete kids of Thompson Manitoba. Well the machete. Kids are exactly what it sounds like. Like their kids that have Mercedes that their weapon of choice and they use them You know in Salt and machete are pretty easy to get. You can buy them at almost any hardware store Manitoba for ten dollars. Sharpen them on your own So they're they're quite popular and in Thompson Manitoba they've been used a number of attacks Over the last year and in previous years as well to be fair One included the hockey of a dog to death during a home invasion others. You know people found themselves chased by machete-wielding kids and this is something that is clearly weighing on the minds of people who live in Thompson not surprisingly and and Machete kids is something. That's the is a symptom of a bigger problem and that's youth crime and of course overall crime in that city. How bad is the overall overall crime problem in the violent Crime Problem Thompson Manitoba? Well like everything. It depends who you ask. No small town wants to be known as a crime capital. Oh and there's a lot of good things going on Thompson that people are proud of it's located in the boreal forest is beautiful But they're definitely issues is issues if you're living poor area of of the city if you're low income particularly if you don't have a car in your walking places and then crime is is a much bigger problem for you because you're susceptible you're out there and if you're going to encounter someone who who's armed or has ill-intention you know it's going to be well. You're on foot so so people in low income areas probably expressed the most concern about crime And particularly violent crime. Now people all over the city expressed concern concern about property crime and some of those issues And people who frequent in the downtown area also expressed concern about assaults now when it comes to civic officials they were pretty up friends. I guess we do have a problem is not great but but it could be worse so it really ran the gamut a an independent who you spoke to how bad they thought the problem was. Do we have any idea what's contributed to this problem and sort of you know. Cities don't turn into quote unquote crime capitals overnight and like is there a root cause here. That's an interesting question and probably the hardest to to answer Thomson has a complicated history for a city but it's not a long history. It was founded in nineteen fifty six as a mining town. So it's an unusual the beginning everyone who's in Thomson Away And he's not indigenous came from somewhere else and people will tell you. Mining towns are always a little rougher. You get people to come in. They they wanNA earn money and then they often want to go back to other communities So so the history is a little unusual. Some people do say that contributes to it but the other factor. That's that's cited as to why crime is so high in Thomson is that it serves of very large regional population. So yes it's about. Fourteen thousand people live in Thompson but recently it serves fifty five thousand people and most people live in very remote communities either northern affairs community or first nations communities often that are only accessible by air. What am I to road There there are fuming. Can drive to you. And those communities really suffer from a lack of infrastructure. They may have high crime themselves. There may be a lack of unemployment's and and as a result the people who live there. WanNa come somewhere better and often. That place is Thomson and Thompson is always equipped to deal with that. Inflexible individuals who have very high needs many people also spoke you know. One of the underlying root causes of crime and Thompson is a legacy of coil. If I'm an residential schools in particular there's a lot of family breakdown that contributed to youth crime and people. I spoke to directly. Link that to you know the history she residential schools and the sixty scoop and of course. Today's child and family services which many people say still take too many indigenous children out of family settings and in and put the puts them in care for those are all You know underlying causes that people point to when we talk about why Thompson has such So much crime compared to other CDs of comparable size although it's probably worth noting that many of the the housing crime in I'm mcleans Annual rankings are northern communities on the prairies so with issues are commonplace to to a lot of these remote more northern. Kennedy's that CDs problem. I'm often struck by the difference in stories like these because we do. We do a lot of stories On on rankings of best places to live or most dangerous places to live van stuff in Canada and kind of one of the differences that we see a lot is the story that the stats tell you and then the stories you hear an experience when you actually go oh and visit these places so you spent some time in Thompson tell me about it. I did the first. Part of the Thomson is an important to say is getting Thompson. It's about eight hours. North of Winnipeg. So you're looking at a an eight hour drive if the weather is good and just give you an idea of how remote that is. It is You know as you're driving there's not people there's not a lot of other cars it's mostly boreal forest and signed warning you about how many hundreds of kilometers it's going to be to To the next gas station When when you get to someplace like Thomson You know these people. They've stuck okay out and I am not the most you know hospitable. Climate that the country has to offer. And there's a scratchiness that people I think really are proud of that. Ah they've made it work through boom and bust cycles And and I understand. They want to showcase dots and CDs. Like Thomson want to showcase you know what they have in terms of tourism and natural beauty. There's a joke Thompson likes to promote that. It has ski hill called Mystery Mountain but locals will say the joke. Is You know the mystery where the mountainous So it's more like a ski bump 'n people really want to promote this and and you can understand it you mean you get there are you drive in and there's a lot of things going for it but I was there for three days in the end and as soon as you come in from the boreal forest and you make your way to downtown town Thomson you. You can see that. There's you know there's issues. Addiction is really on full display in the open in downtown Tulsa. Him You you don't go to see the you know for almost fourteen thousand people. It has a homeless shelter and the homeless shelters full to capacity. So you see these people during the day and it's evidence you know that they're suffering. The people are struggling to make a go of it in Thomson. It's almost formulas -scribed as divided community. And if you were to Thomson you see it pretty pretty immediately that there's a divide between people who are doing well in Thompson and those who are not uh-huh and anytime you have addiction you have homelessness. I mean all these problems are out in the open if you have money And you have. There's issues are struggling with these struggle with them in your house uh-huh these are people who really do live their lives in public and it's unavoidable. I I spoke to one person. Didn't WANNA go on. The record. Gave a lot of background information and they they were really upset. The Thompson is often judged on the three. You Know City blocks in downtown and not for the whole of it but at the same time it's impossible to to ignore the fact if you go to Thompson that they're they're social issues and they're easy to see what do Town officials I guess the Mayor Erin Police Officers and social workers who are on the front lines of this. What are they doing and what do they think is needed? I think that most of the civic officials and and the RCMP Who I spoke to are really realistic about the the problem And they're very aware that the root causes go ooh that their deep And that just tackling crime isn't going to solve the deeper issues. I mean no one's going to rest their way out would've problem in Thomson so some of the things they've initiated is a hub policing model And that originated. I think in Glasgow Scotland but it brings together social service. It's like Mental health our high school. Guidance Counselor's Anyone who works with the homeless or transient housing as well as the RCMP. And you know Municipal officials anyone who deals with the public to try and identify people who who are in trouble.

Thompson Thomson Thompson Manitoba Manitoba property crime Jordan Heath Rawlings RCMP Shannon van hockey Canada Winnipeg Tulsa Mystery Mountain Glasgow Scotland Kennedy
"manitoba" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"manitoba" Discussed on The Big Story

"It's not fair to judge a city by its headlines. It's the worst stuff that makes headlines and they can give you a false sense that a town is more dangerous more violent than it really is. Unfortunately though at least for the town were visiting today headlines Lines are one thing and comprehensive data journalism is another see every year. Mcclain's put together a list of the most dangerous places in Canada. They calculate it using statistics candidate to reveal where incidence of serious crime per capita are the most frequent and whether things are getting better or worse over time and Thompson Manitoba is often right near the top of that index and for the past four years running it it his held and honored that no community wants this town of fourteen thousand six at the very top of the violent crime severity index. And that means things well. There might occasionally be places in Canada with higher crime rates. Crimes and Thomson are more likely to be violent. What's what's happening here? Why has nothing seemed to work? What has the town tried? And what would it like to try. What would it need to do it and to be fair? What about the rest of the people in Thomson because there's a real community under those statistics? No matter what kind of ugly picture the numbers paint.

Thomson Canada Thompson Manitoba Mcclain
"manitoba" Discussed on The Feast

The Feast

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"manitoba" Discussed on The Feast

"And it was just really I felt I was fascinated with just for folks that might not know what defines oral history. Maybe I know it might be a tweet question to kind of narrow it down. But maybe just a brief description of oral history may be includes. History is a method and movement it provides the ability for those who don't necessarily leave the kinds of records that historically been greatest interest to historians. The opportunity to share their history's even when a co even though there's been a movement towards social history for many decades. Now, the focus still has too often been on on documentary evidence as the real in the true, and those are always records that are maintained by those who have the power to actually produce in control at narrative. So oral history gets us gives us an opportunity to share the stories of those who who are excluded from records or whose voices are distorted in those records. But oral history is also way of respecting the fact that most of human history hasn't been recorded in. Writing in those stories are meaningful as well. And that was a fantastic description because I think it touches on what when I first heard about the project, I found such an innovative and inspiring take on food history. Because I think when a lot of folks may be think of history, you do think of those documentary sources, you think of recipe books, you think of recipes themselves cookbooks a lot of written sources, but I think that oral history component that the project focuses on is a really important way of chronicalling not just a recipe as a collection of measurements and procedures. But how these recipes are actually living items and away and go towards both families communities on a much more, vibrant scale. So I was wondering if maybe you could talk about how you envisioned the project physically of. Food history to to really draw on those elements of oral history that you were just mentioning we're not interested in documenting. I mean, obviously, we are documenting facts, but the prime interest is in the meaning that those facts have for people. So we're not interested in food history that tries to find the original recipe for a particular food item. Or what is the most authentic? Those are all kind of pointless questions. You know, even if you knew the answers to them what have you gained? So rather it's a matter of what does this particular food mean for you? Or how does food allow us to better understand broader processes like in political history or migration history were labor history? I would love to know, maybe then as you are defining the project, you know, it is the Manitoba food history project. So maybe you could talk a little bit about. Out either. What's what defines maybe or what has been done regarding the food history of Manitoba, or maybe speaks to some of those things that you were just mentioning of Manitoba vis-a-vis kind of business stories social history political history that you really wanted to dig into this project where the beginning of western Canada. There sound interesting and troubling historical events regarding the interactions of the state with indigenous populations year end with settlers populations that on an ongoing basis not merely at the point of Manitoba joining confederation. And now a short overview of Canadian history brought to you by the feast Canadian confederation refers to eighteen sixty seven which is the date more or less considered the start of Canada as a more or less cohesive country. Basically when lots of the British colonies up here in the north that is what became on -tario Quebec. And. Few of the others got together and decided they were going to be considered a unit..

Manitoba Canada Quebec
"manitoba" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"manitoba" Discussed on KOMO

"Manitoba when his mother was in the hospital around Christmas impact, that's kind of how why we do the first time because we didn't really want to approach Christmas. My mom was so into Christmas, and she was going to miss it, though, we figured well. We can't do Christmas without her. So we'll have something for the rest of Marx family, doesn't do Meatloaf. Andy says the beauty of festivus is you can do anything. It doesn't have to be extensive. If it's something from Seinfeld. Then that makes it all the better, you know, things like pretzels, and shrimp and junior and even a marble rye hanging from the end of a fishing pole. We get into the house we cast it from the street into the. Jerry Seinfeld themed restaurant into coma owner. Anthony, valid Dez says instead of Meatloaf, they serve the festivus sandwich. Thanksgiving sandwiches, Turkey and gravy and a corn bread stuffing, Patty and cranberry on cuts. Our don't tells me he puts up an aluminum pole. He says is popular with his regulars easy. Remind me if I waited too long. Right around thanksgiving time, I got to put it up, and I don't put it up that week. I hear about it. Then little Jerry's. Festivus pole is also how they do the airing of grievances. People can write on hosted Circe the aluminum pole. Political or sports teams or anything their kids whatever grievances. They happen in every week through November December we've host our favorite ones up on Facebook and Instagram and Twitter hand, they get some good ones. Like, my wife's cat has it out for me. People can't park. My husband thinks it's okay to pee in our yard at night and one with which I have to disagree. Festivus isn't a national holiday. So get your pole start prepping that Meatloaf, and remember festivus is your heritage..

Meatloaf Jerry Seinfeld Manitoba Patty Marx coma Andy Facebook Anthony Twitter Dez Instagram
"manitoba" Discussed on Conversations with Phil

Conversations with Phil

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"manitoba" Discussed on Conversations with Phil

"You could do this or you did do this or unit play this role or you were in sales. You went to marketing, but you really love operations. So it's really a questioning process, and and it's almost like a therapy session fill in many ways where you have to kinda sort through lots of stuff, and there's always something that lights people up about their business or the way they've worked with clients or their individual capabilities. So I tend to focus as a mechanism. Tell me stories, and as they tell stories I just ask why why was that so cool or what made that particular client encounter? Great. But this one was awful or why did you thrive in this environment? But not in this one in once you just sort of dig through those basic y questions it just begins to come into focus. You you've got glasses. So you've into the eye doctor now, they click the little things it's like that you ask more and more questions than all of a sudden it begins airs the twenty Twen perfect. That's great yet questions in stories certainly helped. But knowing our superpower loan. I I would argue probably isn't enough. Right. We have to we have to figure out. Well, who do we serve it? And what do we do for them? So how do we how do we get there? See how do we figure that out because you know, I might say, okay. Well, I'm really good at you know, helping people sell more. Right. But then how do I know, you know, who do I serve and how do I serve them how to put that together? So let's say let's say you're greater sales than than that. You you've identified it. So what that means is that given that you could be great at helping somebody sell library books. You could be great helping somebody sell cars, you could be selling pipelines and Manitoba we could go through six thousand possible things and you're not going to specialize in those so somewhere in your background. And in your skill set is going to be an avenue of sales that you either have experienced in or your particularly great ad or you can learn real quickly. That's going to be the place where you.

Manitoba
"manitoba" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

WGR 550 Sports Radio

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"manitoba" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

"In Winnipeg Manitoba with face off at eight pm. The sabers have won their last three games and are looking to win four in a row for the first time since December two thousand fourteen Patrick Bergelin looks like he is going to make his return to the buffalo lineup tonight. Which means Evan Rodriguez is going to be sitting out the jets coming into this game are eight two and one at home this year. So the Stabers could have a tough task on the road in Winnipeg last night in the NFL Seattle getting a last minute win over the Green Bay Packers twenty seven twenty four Russell Wilson. And Aaron Rodgers with both two touchdowns in that one. Seattle improves to five and five on the year while Green Bay drops to four five and one tonight in the NHL some other games around the league. Besides the sabers in the. Jets. Boston will be in Dallas to take on the stars at eight PM. She's the Chicago Blackhawks will take on the kings at eight thirty the Washington Capitals are in Colorado to take on the avalanche. Saint Louis is in Vegas to take on the Golden Knights and the Toronto Maple Leafs are in Anaheim to take on the ducks last night in baseball more awards given out Mookie bats at the Boston Red Sox taking home his first career American League MVP and brewers outfielder Christian yelich taking home the National League MVP for the first time in his career as well. Syracuse basketball suffered a tough loss to uconn last night, eighty three to seventy six and in the NFL some bad news for bandits fans. The first two weeks of the national lacrosse league season is officially cancelled as the players and ownership have failed to reach an agreement on knee league's collective bargaining agreement. I'm John Simon for WGN sports radio. Five fifty for all breaking news and updates. Download the radio. Oh dot com app and enable push notifications. Paul hamilton. Welcome back, Jodi Biasio.

Winnipeg jets NFL Seattle MVP Patrick Bergelin Chicago Blackhawks Green Bay Packers National League Evan Rodriguez American League Aaron Rodgers Boston Red Sox Green Bay Jodi Biasio Russell Wilson WGN Manitoba Boston Toronto Maple Leafs
"manitoba" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"manitoba" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Salute their fans more than eighteen thousand plus yelling and full throat waving white towels as the golden knights are on their way down the tunnel and off to winnipeg ville go where they will play game five and a chance to wrap it up in manitoba spins school is huge what ties it up momentum everything going then that one quick break it's almost like it fits what the identity of vegas and that is counterpunching smith had to counterpunch he was actually outnumbered on the play was one against two he had some room on the shot back to that because it looked like winnipeg was gonna take over period number three but that pressure defense five men defensemen man defense by vegas gets the job done well how about this for winnipeg sixteen shots in period to engage in three sixteen shots in period three in game three fifteen shots and period to in game four sixteen shots in period three in game four and yet they've lost three straight games they out shoot vegas sixteen to four in the third period but they trade goals and riley smith's game winner is all that vegas needs to go up three one in the series this is as we speak this is this is making skits once vegas regained that one goal lead after the smith goal the only thing they were trying to do was clear the zone they did not even think about making play to chip it out hoisted out lifted out zone but what's going to mention back to the last two minutes vegas was on top of their game.

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"manitoba" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"manitoba" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Camera yes are you i'm great nice to see you know nice to see you too early when i was talking about how me and me and my friends are talking about that song this is how you're gonna play right now do you know i also know you're not someone for social media too often like you're not someone who's you're not getting credibly online person you probably online is anybody are you are you aware of when people are talking about this song like that yeah sometimes sometimes i if if people say it and they and they tag me instead of the weather channel i'm aware i'm also aware of when people take me instead of the weather channel and they tell it's constant you'll get like a tweeter they'll be like what's it gonna is it gonna rain a manitoba tomorrow mostly just people send me pictures like they wanna be on i don't know they wanna be re tweeted by the weather channel and they're like here's this cool cloud i saw it's always americans jazzmen is a song about them but that's a that's actually kind of beautiful bunch of clouds i really enjoy it so you feel that you feel when we when when people get excited about this it's really yeah it's really interesting because when i made this record it was kind of the first time in my life with anything that i was like you know what tamra i think you did a good job like i i did my best and i felt good about that it's a rare feeling we all know it's a rare feeling and it's just it's even more rare that you sometimes you walk off stage and you've given like you feel like that's the best show i've ever done i gave so much of myself and then you go stem by the merge table nobody buys anything and they're like you reminded me of jewel and you're like what.

manitoba
"manitoba" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"manitoba" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"The board members were all appointed by manitoba's conservative government so it was surprising and unprecedented to see the provinces hydro board resign on mass this week nine of the ten board members walked out after premier brian pallister vetoed a multi million dollar payment to the manitoba may t federation the payment was almost seventy million dollars for the construction of transmission lines that would run through mateen land premier pallister said the payment would set an unfair precedent but the manitoba hydro board had approved the payment so ninety percent of its members resigned david shaw tron is glad they did he's the president of the manitoba may t federation today though we reached him in penticton british columbia mr chartrand what does it tell you that manitoba hydro's more of directors resigned on mass this week well firstly i think manitoba's we should all be concerned it's never been done in history the largest corporation would have everyone resigned especially when great fanfare was displayed in two thousand sixteen because these were very high ranking people very well respected in not only in manitoba canada lot of these individuals that that decided to put their voice to the process to see they can help out and dealing with the challenges that meant to baio face but to be treated and such disrespect by the premium out until he would not even give them the time of day not even getting thirty minutes of meeting last year in fact he decided to punish them in which he's done now premier brian pallister has called the payment to the may t federation the payment of sixty seven million dollars which is at the center of this dispute he's called it her suasion money.

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"manitoba" Discussed on CBC Radio - Spark

CBC Radio - Spark

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"manitoba" Discussed on CBC Radio - Spark

"So what happens at a watching rocks party well watching rocks iroele the first official iroele watching rocks party a was inspired by experience i had in brand in manitoba with episode to of watching rocks that was filmed there where a community came together around the rock i had i had assistance from people in the community in in locating the rock and then in in accessing the um the needed wi fi and people brought sandwiches and we had one chairs and it was a very kind of organic party that occurred and i really liked that real life experience of sitting around together for no other reason than to spend time with a bolder so i took uh this recent episode i took the opportunity to create a more formal informal formal party and drank cider and uh huddled under a tent in the rain was it fun i think it was really fun i think it's funny and it's fine and and that that is really the first layer to this project is that it is it is silly and it's engaging i think it's engaging through humor um but then upon you know further engagement with a little bit more time i think a viewer hopefully starts to think about what it means to have a bolder being streamed live so it's i find arresting to come across such a static object that we know to be unmoving and unchanging using you know this timescale delivered through the medium of of streaming technology hum you mean this is interesting because as well as being online an at parties it also has a gallery presence there's a projection on display at a gallery in saskatoon as i understand it so how do you think.

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"manitoba" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

The World of Phil Hendrie

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"manitoba" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

"You said canada and india minute amendments he's from oh manitoba dolphin manitoba where those state now that's not a state where you made it a states manitoba what is there and like an animal something it's a province in canada man as state blowout don't you know the fifty states yeah go ahead lame on me alaska alabama ameh bama or are you know other kick your s i started at alaska never mind nobody knows you all fifty states phil alaska alabama arkansas birmingham i'm just kidding i'm kidding the i don't think anyone can actually name all fifty states will our people get mock point we are the point is see your leaders here's an otherwise ignore this conversation or wait a minute cancel all right so what was that was that one of those of virus sir no it wasn't there was some bullshit so yeah that's brady adams he's the head of misery slim's we hearing their music tonight when play another track or so from the sea levies and kind of you'll give these kids give these these aspiring musicians to the extent that we can the exposure that they need thank you worldfamous phil emery sean philemon should combat until we can do that until we are able until we have all of our our ducks in a row until we have all of our ducks quail hendry sean traffic traffic right now what their tomorrow begium free with your album crime they're looked to be a driving ban short dark gilibert governatori a day of covering up at birmingham.

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"manitoba" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"manitoba" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"Puzzle now you have your geography in your mind i don't but reading your charts i see that the highest percentages of deaths are in manitoba new brunswick nova scotia and the next down saskatchwan are those considered rural provinces where there's where where where there is poor authority what what explains why they have more percentage deaths i think it noticed kushner brands like they're much smaller products here for that could explain partly why manitoba he's got to in our prairie provinces there's a high number of of indigenous people are you know first nation can make people in their jails there get over disproportionately represented two way i can in some case native americans might be income american jailed and in manitoba specifically fairway at spate of gaps in its three men center and its pretrial detention center last year so it is a known problem that people are dying in these jails and what we have found is that the overwhelming majority in those two provinces of the people dying are legally and i'm so that's something that uh that we'd hoped to draw two two draw attention to is this a national problem because you go to the national government and they say it's not our problem it's it's a puzzle i mean don't we all isn't it this one great big canadian tragedy we had thought i mean yeah we we had thought they might have something to say um the provincial jailed are you know i'm a provincial jurisdiction their in that but but yeah they were saying that it's not uh it's not really in that we all have fake out and that is not adequate to the scale of these numbers because there is no explanation for this unless you're talking about peace well not paying attention to suicides natural causes which means that people are ill when they come into jail drug or alcohol related that shouldn't lead to death one sharon jail you should get immediate medical attention four homicides that's not good none of these things are positive now i don't have comparable numbers for.

manitoba native americans sharon