17 Burst results for "Manifold Productions"

"manifold productions" Discussed on Your Online Coffee Break

Your Online Coffee Break

04:58 min | 2 months ago

"manifold productions" Discussed on Your Online Coffee Break

"Huge test of his of his of his character at many levels and while most of us who can remember I don't quite remember at least I didn't that the first part of the hearings was like a week-long more traditional but vicious confirmation hearings sort of like the board hearing that had been a fairly recent centers really quizzed him on his views on abortion and abortion was really the driving force of that part of the confirmation battle to try to get him to say something about row. And after 5 days of that the committee voted seven to seven split but that was enough to send his name up to the full senate for a vote Justice. I was his lips and he finally relaxed they went off to talk to the country to kind of get away. And then just then Anita Hill's allegations were leaked to NPR and and the Senate decided not to read have the Judiciary can be reconvened whole new hearings. So just as Thomas said it's like you finished one Marathon you relax then you're told you got to run another one and this time as his wife says he was spent there was nothing left of him. They felt at this time. It was spiritual warfare because of the nature of the charges and she said the demons were loose and they had to rely on their faith took them through a day. They had prayer Partners come to the house. It was it was a very different process from them internally something that we viewers may not see And I I think family's very important there and it remains important Justice Thomas says a prayer for humility. I think dearly and it is a and that is a virtue in short supply here in the nation's capital gains. Absolutely. I tell you I do think back to the confirmation hearings and you're right when I think about Justice Thomas, I I do. I remember the confirmation hearings not as well detail as you just explained but there were so many aspects so many aspects of his life that I just had no idea about and we mentioned some of this also when he mentioned some other I think surprises I guess our audience will be a see this documentary. Well, I think there are two kinds of surprises. First of all, I think people who are closely following the court may have a lot of misapprehension about Justice Thomas, right? It doesn't speak in oral argument. He doesn't give a lot of interviews because of being burned by the media during his confirmation battle. And so the the people who have defined a story have Chrome An impression that he is not smart that he is misanthropic. He doesn't like to speak and I think anyone watches this movie whatever their politics kind of Come Away with that but those myths in in mind, but but I think the thing that to me is most surprising about the story is his resilience his ability to come back time and again from setbacks and his unwillingness to Define himself as a victim he could he was born in real poverty few people today or maybe none experience that at least in America like he was a victim of Jim Crow of real segregation, but he does not define himself that way and we all at different levels can make this similar choice and and I find that inspiring. Absolutely Michael again created equal Clarence Thomas's and words. Fantastic. May I congratulate you on your team on that if a gas what next for you? Well, we had a documentary that we produced before this on the bat biggest battles in the Iraq War Fallujah and the Jeff and we want to get that movie in two years too. And it really tells the stories in the words of the people who fought there and it tries to tell the story as if it were Gettysburg, Iwo Jima as a battle story without politics. We're going to ask the young men and women of our Armed Forces to fight and die for us. We need to understand what why they did what they did. How can they find out more about that? They are go to our website, which is manifold Productions. Com manifold productions.com. We're all that is listed, but first, they should go to Just As Time as movie.com. It's too many websites. Absolutely and I'll put links to all these been shown us for this episode Michael again. I would just thank you for taking time out of your schedule joints. They really do appreciate it. Thank you very much was good talking to you online coffee break. Why I really enjoy my conversation with Michael and I'm loving the new documentary created equal is streaming now on your favorite platforms, including Amazon Apple TV and YouTube for more information. Visit is Justice Thomas movie.com. I want to thank Michael for joining me today want to thank you for joining us as well. Again. We'd appreciate it. If you'd share this episode with a friend. Also, if you're watching Youtube, if you can give us a thumbs-up or if you're suggesting just give us a 5-star rating on your favorite podcast application, by the way. Thanks so much for joining us. We'll see you next time. God bless..

Justice Thomas Michael Youtube senate Anita Hill Iwo Jima Fallujah Iraq manifold Productions Judiciary NPR Jim Crow America Jeff
"manifold productions" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

08:21 min | 11 months ago

"manifold productions" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Bucks sixteen and we have had plenty of gloom and doom in today's episode talked at length about congresswoman L. Han Omar and I believe that a person who is the perfect corrective or foil tail on Omar in many respects is the Supreme Court justice that I most admire I think a generational Supreme Court justice and thats justice Clarence Thomas and I am so pleased to be joined today by someone who I think agree is Michael pack he's the president of manifold productions an independent film and television production company and the producer of the new documentary exceptional documentary created equal Clarence Thomas in his own words which you can find out all about it justice Thomas movie dot com Mr packs they so much for joining us thank you for having me on the ship and so let's jump right in justice Thomas as I noted is in my view the greatest jurist of this generation and one of the ways the last two likes to savage him is to harp on the fact that it doesn't typically ask questions of those presenting arguments at the Supreme Court so I think your documentary created equal Clarence Thomas in his own words is an interesting response to that was that intentional well that's right they say that is because it is institutional argument that he's acting court he's smart he's not articulate the opposite is true he's very active in the court and has been since the beginning specialties written number six hundred opinions thirty percent more than any other Supreme Court justices including justice Ginsburg said he's very active and he has a he's a great storyteller and so in fact we fashion a documentary so that he can look right at the audience and tell them what is a very dramatic a man falls and I think inspiring life is life without filters really and I think that's another way that he's minimized by the lessons enemies is to is downplaying the drama of the story for us to to do that correct and you documented ways vivid imagery and as you noted storytelling without giving away too much of the plot our listeners may well know that justice Thomas grew up poor in many ways filled with anger but also imbued with many of the traits the stone upon him more inculcated in him by his grandfather traits that we probably today ascribe to conservatism even though back then they were just traditional it seems like autumn away those character traits short of the sort of shine through and were reflected in justice Thomas's politics but before he got to that the justice that we see today he was sort of a leftist radical what changed him well that's right I mean it's important to them back to the part clearly a part of the story that you alluded to to understand what changed and as you say he he grew up first in dire poverty he was born in can point a girls speaking area outside of Savannah and his father left before he could remember sent his mother brought him and his brother when he was about six to Savannah and he they're experienced dire poverty in the Jim crow south something it's harder for parts pressed almost imagine today didn't have enough of the cold in the winter and after each couple of years and this is another realizing she couldn't take care of her two boys brought them to her father his grandfather raise and as you said that was where he got his values his grandfather believed hardware working consensus on skis is he had converted to Catholicism and Sanchez's Thompson's brother to Catholic schools and segregated by run by Irish nuns who verbalizing gave them a good education and solid values and then he did a project that it would be for or rather before he did he succeeded in that environment and deciding when to become a priest and when to the seminary and and the seminary's unlike his earlier schooling had been all light and we just desegregating and it was there that he first experienced racism really and it reached a peak for him in nineteen sixty eight when he was watching TV the day that Martin Luther king junior was shot and when the white seminarian said I hope that son of a **** dies and then shopping and capped off justice times his feeling that the church wasn't doing enough to civil rights and then he just flicked he became angry black man he said I didn't want to be a priest he told his grandson who kicked him out of the house financial began his radical period and he had to go wherever he could and he had a full scholarship to Holy Cross and his radicalism continued there he obstruct the black student union invited black Panthers to speak he supported as he says anyone who is in your face from Stokely Carmichael to Malcolm X. and it it will only buy for hitting the bottom that he started to come back to get back to your your question that he participated in an anti war rally in nearby Cambridge this descent became in your riot and he felt himself getting swept up in the madness of the crowd the hysteria of the crowd and he was scared by what he'd be coming when you return to Holy Cross well after midnight he went in front of the chapel then closed and he never had in a long time and he's been he prayed and asked god if you will take anger out of my heart I will never hate again and that was his beginnings is coming back to his spiritual values and what he thought it was the political that use as well as his grandfather that is you say we may think of today's Chris as conservative but we're really continental kind of common sense I use of his grandmother and a lot of people in that period but he did have a series of instances both through college and law school and later it is made it is that were the milestones in his political journey back and he's finally his first book publishing that info was Ronald Reagan in nineteen eighty and then went to work in the Reagan administration so it's probably worth noting that the sense that he turns on his fellow radicals is probably one of the reasons he's most reviled today by the predominant American will last what did you discover in making this documentary about justice Clarence Thomas that you never knew about him or that our audience might not know about him I didn't know that much before I began but I think the thing that stands out to me most is his resilience through his life it's not surviving and overcoming many obstacles in including one that later in the story then we simply says so far unity attacks on him they do need a cell part of his confirmation battle but also growing up in a difficult way he did he had great resilience and he refused to define himself as a victim and that's what stands out to me most he collided he has a very good basis to call himself a victim he grew up in poverty this is the single and raised by a single mother in the Jim crow south semi actual real racism but he won't define himself as a victim and I think that has allowed him to succeed in spite of all those difficulties and I think that's what makes his story inspiring and memorable what in your view are the one or two most pivotal lessons from justice Clarence Thomas's wife that you would like viewers and listeners here to take away not to find yourself as a victim is a day while we all are tempted that way we who are considered as always accuse Alaska doing but we can fall into a tail and it's in a way human trapped in one that we should avoid true or not it's it's suffocating your life so that's one big lesson and the other lesson is a gene justice Thomas and stood up for his principles against opposition and I also found that that inspiring I appeal to your listeners to go see the movie as you said in your intro they can find.

congresswoman L. Han Omar
"manifold productions" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

05:57 min | 11 months ago

"manifold productions" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Movie dot com you can undergo a project like this without a having certain preconceptions and be coming away with a few of them shattered what was the biggest head slapping moment when you walked away saying gosh I didn't know that well I mean as I mentioned I did not know that much about in the beginning but but I think the the amazing things in his life that I didn't know at all where and he seems like he's entered the seminary to study to be a priest he had been a radical in his years in college and he had been a supporter of the black Panthers and an angry black man and very much on the last so there's a lot I didn't know and I think viewers will be surprised about that tell us I think the most surprising thing is that a he's a great storyteller and and and believe that he has a great resilience he's had a lot of the setbacks lot of struggles in his life and he's unwilling to define himself as a victim and that quality is I think is most remarkable polity and and I think viewers will be impressed by that was as I was you could you have described them at all at any point as a militant black radical yeah yes justice Thomas likes to say that he was never a liberal but he was radical yes he was a militant black black radical in college most interesting for him to wind up today as one of the bed rocks of conservative thought the court one assumes that there had to have been samba road to Damascus of massive moment of of revelation that mean that or did this come about gradually well if you have it you know maybe a couple of those things that he would describe I think is read to Damascus moment I mean his his first movement against radicalism I mean he had been raised by his grandfather and and listen to people and programs for the young man where the land by these Irish non segregated cycle and he really feels the values of the nines and his grandfather were his core values but he rebelled against it as many did in the late sixties during his speech is black radical period but he he I think he started to pull away from that when it we have to kind of peak during an anti war riot that he went into a rally rather that he went to in Cambridge that turned into a riot and then he kind of got caught up in the madness of the crowd and the madness of the mom and and he saw what he was becoming and like it and when I got back to college Holy Cross well after midnight he had prayed in many years but he went to the chapel and I think you heard a little bit of this on the clip and they ask god to set to that but if you'll take anger out of my heart I'll never hate again and that was moving faster is sort of the church and the beginning of his political journey but it would take at least another ten years or more before he would become so we would have both for his first Republican Ronald Reagan in nineteen eighty I was still you know if you had a whole bunch of steps in what you might call the education of Clarence Thomas before he actually became a Republican a remarkable evidence yeah one eight six six five oh Jimbo is our number one eight six six five oh five four six two six I gather that a frequent guest on this program economist Thomas soul had quite an impact on the of Clarence Thomas yes that is very true I think Thomas all of that his biggest single intellectual influence by Sarah on myself it was on the left when I was younger and I became concerned I did that in a group with a bunch of other people they Marple frantic about Clarence Thomas's intellectual journey as he largely did it by thinking things throw and one of the ways he thought things were was by reading the works of Thomas all the first time he was given about the promise all during his radical period he said he did he threw in the garbage without even reading it but finally someone gave it to him when he was I don't want to he was already making some of this journey from radicalism to conservatism and he was deeply impressed by cells block and of course they became friends later a significant moment in his life was early in the Reagan years he went to a conference hosted by Thomas all in in San Francisco the Fairmont conference and that's where he came out in public you might say as a Reagan conservative an African American Reagan supporter and it might take him once he was publicly cell identified the attack let him started in those attacks continue the rest of his life but it also contain a list of his life as a deep and strong a personal connection to Thomas all of me began as an intellectual connection and it became a personal one the Utah so I've discovered is easy person to get to know at least from a from a distance if you will isn't as an interview subject I've I've never socialized with him because I've never been in the same room with him but I have the survey talked as we're talking with him over the years we're going to come back and learn some more about Clarence Thomas he's been around for a long time he's a name that is well known and yet somehow we have never really learned that much about it well we're about to all you have to do is avail yourself of this documentary created equal produced by our guest Michael pack the president of manifold productions one eight six six five oh Jimbo is our number we'll be back on the job had a show in just a moment you saw a twenty eight ninety nine point five FM HD two W..

"manifold productions" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

05:56 min | 11 months ago

"manifold productions" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"You can undergo a project like this without a having certain preconceptions and be coming away with a few of them shattered what was the biggest head slapping moment when you walked away saying gosh I didn't know that well I mean as I mentioned I did not know that much about in the beginning but I think the amazing things in his life but I didn't know at all we're able to keep things like my attitude is that married to study to be a priest he had been a radical it is here in college and he had been a supporter of the black Panthers and an angry black man and very much on the last that is a lot I didn't know and I will be surprised about that tale I think the most surprising thing is that a he's a great storyteller and and and believe that he has a great resilience he's had a lot of the set back a lot of struggles of his life and he's unwilling to define himself as a victim and that quality is I think is most remarkable quality and and I think viewers will be impressed by that was as I was could you have described them at all at any point as a militant black radical yeah yeah it's just kind of likes to say that he was never a liberal but he was a radical yes he was a militant black black radical in college most interesting for him to wind up today as one of the bed rocks of conservative thought the court one assumes that there had to have been samba road to Damascus of massive moment of of revelation of a note or did this come about gradually well if you have it you know maybe a couple of those things that he would describe I think is gross Damascus moment I mean his his first movement against radicalism and he'd been raised by his grandfather and and was sent to the school of program goals young man where the land by these Irish non segregated cycle and he really feels the values of the nines and his grandfather were his core values but he rebelled against it as many did in the late sixties during his pants black radical but he he I think he started to pull away from that when a reason to kind of peak during an anti war right that he went into a rally rather that he went to in Cambridge that turned into a riot and then he kind of got caught up in the madness of the crowd and the madness of the moment and he thought he was becoming and you know I get and when I got back to college Holy Cross well after midnight he had created many years but he went to the chapel and I think you heard a little bit of this on the cleft Anne as god is said to that but if you'll take anger out of my heart I'll never hate again and that was moving fast because of the church and the beginning of his political journey but we pay at least another ten years or more before he would become president both for his first Republican Ronald Reagan in nineteen eighty I was still you know if you had a whole bunch of gaps in what you might call the education of Clarence Thomas before he actually became a Republican we require a lot of yeah one eight six six five oh Jimbo is our number one eight six six five oh five four six two six I gather that a frequent guest on this program economist Thomas soul had quite an impact on the Clarence Thomas yes that is very true I think all of that is the biggest single intellectual influence back on my cell it went on the left when I was younger and I became is that in a group with a bunch of other people lose their marbles and I think about how to handle his intellectual journey as he largely did it by taking her out and one of the ways he thought things through is by reading the works of Thomas all the first time he was given about the prom all during his radical he said he did he threw in the garbage without even reading it but finally someone gave it to him when he was I don't want to he was already making some of this journey from radicalism conservatism and he was deeply impressed by cells block and of course they became friends later get my man in in his life was early in the Reagan years he went to a conference hosted by Thomas all in in San Francisco the Fairmont conference and that's where he came out in public you might say as a Reagan conservative an African American Reagan supporter and it it might he went he was publicly identified the attack started in those attacks continue the rest of his life but all the continuing left this life with a deep and strong the personal connection to Thomas all of maybe Canada intellectual connection and it became a personal one tell a soul I've discovered is easy person to get to know at least a from a from a distance if you will isn't as an interview subject I've I've never socialized with him because I've never been in the same room with me but I have the survey talked as we're talking with him over the years welcome to come back and learn some more about Clarence Thomas he's been around for a long time he's a native that is well known and yet somehow we have never really learned that much about it well we're about to all you have to do is avail yourself of this documentary created equal produced by our guest Michael pack the president of manifold productions one eight six six five oh Jimbo is our number we'll be back on the job ahead of show it just a moment while you're navigating the roads as quickly.

"manifold productions" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

02:49 min | 11 months ago

"manifold productions" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"That is the trailer from the created equal Michael pack again be president manifold productions put together thank you for being with us tonight thank you for having me on your auto plants here thank you first of all what gave you the idea for doing this they were talking about a a Supreme Court justice who seems to those of us in the media as rather reclusive at times well that's one of the really appeals to do the film you get to it and get him to tell the story to a whole group of people who don't know much about him but the film began when I heard through mutual friends that justice Thomas was tired of having his enemies tell the story and he was tired of the half truths and untruths that were circulating about him so I met with him after meeting with him I learned he had a great story to tell I only really knew about him when I remembered from the contentious confirmation hearing in nineteen ninety one but in fact he has a great story I think you could get us a little sense that even from the trailer going from dire poverty in the segregated south to the highest court in the land for many twists and turns out let's just dive as soon as I met up with this story I knew I wanted to tell did he want to tell it well it was a you know he was interested in it or I wouldn't I wouldn't have the first meeting but it took some time to get him to agree I mean is that the film was called and she said that it created equal Clarence Thomas and words because it's really based on a very long interview with justice Thomas and his wife Jenny and they're the only interviews they spoke to me for over thirty hours over six month period more access than any Supreme Court justices ever given anyone but we we I came to believe and I guess I convinced justice Thomas at the right way to do this was for him to and I would ask questions that he would look right at the camera tell a story what is life like in his own words what it was like to go through everything directly to the dealer directly to the audience directly to the American people and they can make their own judgment and that's what the structure of the film finally turned out to be and he did sign up and I agreed to do it which I am happy and privileged where of working people working people see this documentary well it's been in the limited release the movie theater the thirty first so to find out what Peter tan they need to go to our website justice Thomas movie dot com or Peter is in currently are listed but it's not a theater near you know this place to sign up on the website and there's a big enough group of people in one area we can make a screening happen there so I would encourage people to sign up and I would encourage people to go without me even if they have to drive a half hour I mean a lot of times people who want this kind of movie complain it's not there then added you know go out and see it so I'm hoping that.

Michael president
"manifold productions" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:58 min | 11 months ago

"manifold productions" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"And that is the trailer from the created equal Michael packet Gaby president of manifold productions put together thank you for being with us tonight thank you for having me on your show I have seen here thank you first of all what gave you the idea for doing this we were talking about a a Supreme Court justice who seems to those of us in the media as a rather reclusive at times but I was wondering if he'll sit in the film you get it those and get him to tell the story to a whole group of people who don't know much about him but the film began when I heard through mutual friends that justice Thomas was tired of having it enemies tell the story and he was tired of the half truths and untruths that were circulating about until I met with him after meeting with him I learned he had a great story to tell I only really knew about him when I remembered it from the contentious confirmation hearing in nineteen ninety one but in fact he has a great story I think you could get a little sensor that even from the trailer going from dire poverty in the segregated south to the highest court in the land through many twists and turns out let's just I soon as I met with the store I knew I wanted to tell do you want to tell it well it would be how he was interested in it or I wouldn't I wouldn't have the first meeting but it took some time to get him to agree I mean is that the phone was called he said this is created equal Clarence Thomas and words because it's really based on a very long interview with justice Thomas and his wife candy and they're the only interview they spoke to me for over thirty hours of a six month period more access than any Supreme Court justices ever give anyone but we we I came to believe and I guess I convinced justice Thomas that the right way to do this was for him to and I would ask questions that he would look right at the camera sorry what is life like in his own words what it was like to go through everything directly to the dealer directly to the audience attracted American people and they can make their own judgment and that's what the structure of the film finally turned out to be and he did find out and I agreed to do it which I am happy and privileged where and where can people working people see this documentary well in in the limited release the movie theater the thirty first has to find out what Peter tan they need to go to our website justice Thomas movie dot com or and currently are listed but it's not my theater near you know this place to sign up on the website and there's a big enough group of people in one area we can make a screening happen there so I would encourage people to find out and I would encourage people to go that means even if they have to drive a half hour I mean a lot of times who want this kind of movie complain it's not there then I don't know that yet so I'm hoping that.

president Michael
"manifold productions" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

03:12 min | 11 months ago

"manifold productions" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Alleged attacks so if you weigh what you say happened happened then go out and sending emails continue relationships and your phone number so that's the reason exactly as it is an expert on rape victims testified in the trial that it is common for rape victims to maintain contact with their attackers especially if the man is in a powerful position a few weeks ago over to know dole further into this area during an interview aired on The New York Times podcast the daily it began when journalist Megan to we asked and I actually I had another question which was whether or not you've been sexually assaulted I have not okay thank I would never put myself in that position that led to further questions which resulted in many women criticizing were to know for victim blaming I I've always made choices from college age on where I never drank too much I never went home with someone that I didn't know I never I just never put myself in any vulnerable circumstance many of the more than eighty women who've leveled allegations against Harvey Weinstein claimed that they were called by him or an assistant to have a meeting with him while he was in a hotel room in one city or another and that's how their sexual assaults began Steve casting down New York nineteen till here on American morning Jimbo Hannon's guest is a documentary filmmaker February is black history month and let's talk a bit about a part of that black history with our guest Michael pack he is the president of manifold productions he has produced the documentary on Supreme Court justice Clarence Thomas titled created equal and by the way you can learn more about that documentary at the website justice Thomas movie dot com a first of all I'm surprised that he did this he has been rather reclusive here's what we in the interview a business call a tough death of I've made a couple of attempts over the years to the have you bought and really haven't done so recently I just assume he's not available how did you get it well it's true that he isn't grant a lot of interviews he was burned by the media during his very contentious confirmation hearing but we had heard through mutual friends the justice thomas' finally tired of having a story told by his enemies tired of their circulating half truths and I'm foods about I'm and so I met with him and and after meeting with him I realized he had a great story to tell I mainly knew about him what I remember from those confirmation hearings but after meeting with them and reading about him I realized it was a great important story to tell he came from dire poverty in the segregated south too many twists and turns to a period of black radicalism projecting his his Catholic faith coming back to the states and back to conservative values and it was simply a great story and I swear it has good justice Thomas to let us tell it and that it was important to tell so honored that he has let us you already have you on his program thirty years did I hear him say Clarence Thomas black radical yeah how to.

"manifold productions" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

08:55 min | 11 months ago

"manifold productions" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"At the justice Thomas movie dot com of the various ways that you could see this off I kind of I I would wonder if there is any person alive who has heard the term uncle Tom aimed at him more than Clarence Thomas well that is a very good point I mean I think one of the most shocking things on the phone for some viewers perhaps more than a liberal for yours and anybody else and I I hope people go through this problem whatever their politics is the amount of racist language hurled it at justice Thomas I think we we mentioned before the break that he became a public server of African American figure yeah after this semi conference in the early eighties and I was in the eighties for instance that Hodding Carter wrote a piece in playboy no less what he called justice Thomas I think was then chairman of the EEOC or or or either that or is it the department education civil rights division and calls him a chicken eating creature gathering problems from the white man's table I mean it's just nakedly which that is just that that that that that I mean I expect I guess a certain level of this but that even appalls me and I I had a very low low threshold of of of being disgusted but that that even hits my threshold I mean in my white seven journalist you know who hi official on the Jimmy Carter administration and how he can do that is is mind boggling and I went on and then we have these cartoons justice Thomas as a one jockey a shoe shine boy I mean people chose to detect coming KKK robes and then they use many of these races tropes that are simply as justice Thomas said movie you could not apply to a liberal African American you just couldn't do it but it's okay with him and uncle Tom is one of those is just another one of those terms with where he eats we had as a sequence which we cut in the final sound that is where a congressman calls in that a a US congressman monopoly I mean it's it's hard to you know it's shocking really yeah now I would have to think that if ever there was a temptation for this man to be bitter it would be this documentary eve safely ensconced on the Supreme Court he's senior in in in seniority of of all serving justices he could serve as long as he wants to or feels like serving if ever he had an excuse to cut loose and be better it would be this documentary did he well he is not better I mean that's another remarkable thing about it he feels his life is blessed he feels it was providential and he yeah that's part of I think his faith we talked about a little bit about how he was brought up Catholic losses dating came back there and and it's part of that I mean he is very much guided by that he has that says a prayer for humility every day which is a virtue in a scant supply here in Washington DC and then he chooses not to be better I mean he and and he doesn't to find himself as the victim I mean as I think I mentioned earlier I mean that's one of the inspiring things that I'm he could look at himself that way your ideas every good excuse to be better his every going to depend on some of their family grew up in the segregated south in dire poverty but he chooses not to see it that way and I think that's an inspiring thing about I'm a man and and and all of us were tempted sometimes to think of ourselves as victims of faded in and unfortunate you know ships are tempted that way but we should resist the temptations and historic spires this not to yeah very much so I mean the the me that's I'll be honest with you that that's almost St like in in response I mean for me to have put up with the temple is put up with I'm not sure that I I have the the the fortitude of character to to not be better and and the lash out I honestly I I I'm I'm rather rather almost shaved at the extent to which he is capable of turning the other cheek I I I confess goodness knows it's high time I mean that we learn more about this guy and and I'm glad that that you did this aside from his his lack of questioning during the oral arguments he is not shall we say exactly been the the easiest interview gaps as we say in yeah that's one of the other statements of the year a did he address that fact I mean he he he stands as a pillar of of a role model and honestly I don't know that you can see had an obligation to be more accessible but it would've been nice I really do believe that the the address that at all it well he he the president in a sense I mean I think his station and of the media grew out of his experiences during the confirmation battle and it is easy to understand I mean he talks about the media during that process be camped out in this door constantly spreading lies and misinformation about and I think that's why he's been reluctant to grant interviews fearing that it would be if he is I mean although he is not bitter about the confirmation process there is no doubt that he considers it a horrible awful thing and it was not pleasant for either justice Thomas or his wife to relive it during the interview as a minute was not even my wife who is there was my business partner was saying it was painful to watch and it was painful to watch so it's not like he completely I wouldn't I would say it's completely forgive and forget the whole thing I I think it's a he sees it as a horrible illegitimate thing I mean it went from that early phase where the focus was on abortion to once the detail charges came and and they say that the first part of the hearing what went wrong it was a a Bork like process of going through virtually a week where he was asked many many questions by the you know all senators on in a democratic controlled Senate and they bought the hearing was over at the the the the subdivision Judiciary Committee voted and they split seven to seven and set his name forward to the full Senate for a vote in justice Thomas as well I thought it was all over they went away to have a vacation for a little bit and relax and it was then that the Anita hill charges were leaked to Newsday and NPR and based on those leaks they see the full Senate decided that to reconvene the Senate Judiciary Committee which they don't think they've ever done before and that the committee had already voted they could never vote again but then I have these new set of hearings about the Anita hill sexual harassment charges and justice Thomas said it's like you have one one marathon and you think the marathon is over and you relax then you're told you've got to run a second marathon and so he he he and his wife talk about how we're at his wife let's say for us to talk about how he was attacked there's nothing left of him and they both felt that it was like a spiritual battle that and she said the demons will this may they spent a lot of time praying they had prayer partners and I really relied on their face to get them through this very difficult moments and that may explain why in the long run they chose not to be better but I think it was an extreme trial then we all remember it but I mean it was a horrible process and and he finally fought back when he called it a high tech lynching it as as you mentioned earlier and he that was against the advice of his handlers is that if you want senators to vote for you you should maybe not attack them personally but he for time for justice Thomas it was about honor and honoring his the memory of his grandfather and these Irish nuns who raised him and it was only about being confirmed and he wanted to fight back and he did fight back and he called it as a side and that accounted for the fact that by the end of the hearing most of America believes him two to one Klay African Americans including women it's only in the years ten when his enemies continue to attack that perhaps that did that the numbers of flip the other way Sam it's time to slip them back I thank you one eight six six five oh Jimbo our number one eight six six five oh five four six two six with Michael pack the president of manifold productions he has produced created equal a.

Tom Clarence Thomas
"manifold productions" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

03:39 min | 11 months ago

"manifold productions" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Thomas R. and the server over the three social hundred justice other stations of the United States Supreme Court that's when all hell broke loose judge Thomas began to use work situations the stuff that we know exactly what's going on this is the wrong line he has to be destroyed you really didn't matter what matters is what they want so you still want to serve on this rather than withdraw from the price and one of the same I lived up to my did my best and that is the trailer from a created equal Michael pack again the president of manifold productions put this together thank you for being with us tonight thank you for having me on your show I have seen here thank you first of all what gave you the idea for doing this they were talking about a a Supreme Court justice who seems to those of us in the media as rather reclusive at times well that was one of the really appeals to do the film he gets a it expose and get him to tell a story to a whole group of people who don't know much about him but the film began when I heard through mutual friends that justice Thomas was tired of having his enemies tell his story and he was tired of the half truths untruths that were circulating about him so I met with him and after meeting with him I learned he had a great story to tell I only really knew about him when I remembered it from the contentious confirmation hearing in nineteen ninety one but in fact he has a great story I think you could get a little sense of that even from the trailer going from dire poverty in the segregated south to the highest court in the land for many twists and turns so hi I'm just I soon as I'm Adam was a story I knew I wanted to tell you the one to tell it well it was the you know he was interested in it or I wouldn't I wouldn't have the first meeting but it took some time to get him to agree I mean the film is called as you said it is created equal Clarence Thomas in his own words because it's really based on a very long interview with justice Thomas and his wife Jenny and they're the only interviews they spoke to me for over thirty hours of a six month period more access than any Supreme Court justices ever given anyone but we we I came to believe and I guess I convinced justice Thomas of the right way to do this was for him to and I would ask questions but he would look right at the camera tell his story what is life like in his own words what it was like to go through everything directly to the viewer directly to the audience directly to the American people and they can make their own judgment and that's with the structure of the film finally turned out to be and he did sign up and I agree to do it which I am happy and privileged to where where can people working people see this documentary well it's been an limited release a movie theater in the thirty first so to find out what theatre ten they need to go to our website justice Thomas movie dot com or the theaters in currently are listed but it's not the theater Nerio this place to sign up on the website and if there's a big enough group of people in one area we can make a screening happen there so I would encourage people to sign up and I would encourage people to go admin even if they have to drive a half hour I mean a lot of times people who want this kind of movie complain it's not there then action on that and see it so.

Thomas R.
"manifold productions" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

08:52 min | 11 months ago

"manifold productions" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"The justice Thomas movie dot com on the various ways that you could see this I can my I would wonder if there is any person alive who has heard the term uncle Tom aimed at him more than Clarence Thomas that is a very good point I mean is it I think one of the most shocking things on the phone for some viewers perhaps more than a liberal for yours and anybody outside I hope people go see this problem whatever their politics is the amount of racist language hurled at justice Thomas I think we we mentioned before the break that he became a public zero five African Americans think here yeah after this conference in the early eighties and it was in the eighties for instance that Carter wrote a piece in playboy no less what he called justice Thomas I think was named chairman of the EEOC or or or either that or is it the department education civil rights division and calls him a chicken eating preacher gathering problems from the white man's table I mean it's just nakedly that is just that that that that that the I mean I expect I guess a certain level of this about that even appalls me and I I have a very low low threshold of of of being disgusted but that the that even hits my threshold from a white seven journalist you know who hi fishing on the Jimmy Carter administration and how he can do that is is mind boggling and I went on I mean we have these cartoons of justice Thomas as a one jockey a shoe shine boy I mean people who chose to depend coming KKK robes I mean they use many of these races tropes that are simply justice Thomas said movie you hi to liberal African American we just couldn't do it but it's okay with him and I'll call Tom is one of those it's just another one of those terms with where he we had as a sequence which we've had in the final song for the is where a congressman told him that I a US congressman monopoly I mean it's it's hard to you know it's shocking really DO now I would have to think that if ever there was a temptation for this man to be bitter it would be this documentary he's safely ensconced on the Supreme Court he's senior in the in in seniority of of all serving justices he could serve as long as he wants to or feels like serving if ever he had an excuse to cut loose and be better and it would be this documentary did he well I mean that's another remarkable thing about it he feels like his blasters he feels it was providential and he yeah that's part of I think it's safe we talked about a little bit about how he was brought up half the cost is dating came back there and and it's part of that I mean he is very much guided by that he has that says a prayer for humility every day which is a virtue and scant supply here in Washington DC and if he chooses not to be better I mean he and he and he doesn't find himself as a victim I mean as I think I mentioned earlier I mean that's one of the inspiring things about him he could look at himself that way you ideas every good excuse to be better his every control over their family grew up in the segregated south in dire poverty but he chooses not to see it that way and I think that's an inspiring thing about I'm a man and and and all of us were tempted sometimes to think of ourselves as victims of faded and and unfortunate you know **** are tempted that way but we should resist the temptations and his story inspires us not to yeah very much so I mean the me that's I'll be honest with you there that's almost say it like in in response I mean for me to have put up with a tenth of what he's put up with I'm not sure that I I have the the the fortitude of character to to not be better and and to lash out I honestly I I'm I'm rather rather almost shaved at the extent to which he is capable of turning the other cheek I I I confess goodness knows it's high time I mean that we learn more about this guy and I'm glad that you did this aside from his his lack of questioning during the oral arguments he is not shall we say exactly been the easiest interview gaps as we say in yeah that's one of the other statements of the year a did he address that fact to me he stands as a pillar of of a role model and honestly I don't know that you can see at an obligation to be more accessible but it would've been nice I really do believe that the the address that at all it well he he the president and I have and I think his station and media grew out of his experiences during the confirmation about all and it is easy to understand I mean he talks about the media during that process being campaign is due or constantly staying lies and misinformation about and I think that's why he's been reluctant to grant interviews the fearing that it would be if he is I mean although he is not bitter about the confirmation process there's no doubt that he considers it a horrible awful thing and it was not pleasant for either justice Thomas or his wife to relive it during the interview as I mean it was not even my my wife who is there was my business partner was saying it was painful to watch and it was painful to watch so it's not like he completely I wouldn't I would say it's completely forgive and forget the whole thing I I think it's a he sees it as a horrible illegitimate thing I mean it went from that early phase where the focus was on abortion to one female charges came and and they say that the first part of the hearing what went wrong it was a Bork like process of going through virtually a week where he was asked how many many questions by the all senators on and the democratic controlled Senate and they thought the hearing was over at the the the the subdivision Judiciary Committee voted in a split seven to seven and set his name forward to the full Senate for a vote in justice Thomas and I thought it was all over they went away to have a vacation for a little bit and relax and it was a man that the medial charges were leaked to news today and NPR and based on those leaks they see the full Senate decided that to reconvene the Senate Judiciary Committee which I don't think they've ever done before and that the committee had already voted second ever vote again but then I have these new set of hearings about the Anita hill sexual harassment charges and justice Thomas said it's like you have one one marathon and you think a marathon is over and you relax when you're told you've got around a second marathon and so he he he and his wife talk about how we're at his wife let's say for us to talk about how he was that nothing left of him and they both felt that it was like a spiritual battle that and she said the demons were loose and they have a lot of time praying they had prayer partners and they really relied on their face gets him through this very difficult moments and that may explain why in the long run they chose not to be better but I think it was an extreme trial I mean we all remember it but I mean it was a horrible process and and he finally fought back when he called it a high tech lynching and as as you mentioned earlier and he and I was against the advice of his handlers he said if you want senators to vote for you you should maybe not attack them personally but he for time for justice Thomas it was about honor and honoring his memory of his grandfather and these Irish nuns who HM and I was only about being confirmed and he wanted to fight back and he did fight back and he called it is a slide and that accounted for the fact that by the end of the hearing most of America believes him two to one including African Americans including women it's only in the years ten when his enemies continue to attack and that perhaps that did that the numbers of flip the other way it's time to slip them back I thank you one eight six six five oh Jimbo our number one eight six six five oh five four six two six with Michael pack the president of manifold production C..

Tom Clarence Thomas
"manifold productions" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

03:02 min | 11 months ago

"manifold productions" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"That is the trailer from a created equal Michael pack again the president of manifold productions put together thank you for being with us tonight thank you for having me on your show and see here thank you first of all what gave you the idea for doing this so you were talking about a a Supreme Court justice who seems to those of us in the media as rather reclusive at times well that was one of the really appeals to do the film he gets to it those and get him to tell a story to a whole group of people who don't know much about him the film began when I heard through mutual friends that justice Thomas was tired of having his enemies talent dory and he was tired of the half truths and untruths that were circulating about until I met with him after meeting with him I learned he had a great story to tell I only really knew about him when I remembered it from the contentious confirmation hearing in nineteen ninety one but in fact he has a great story I think you could get it we'll censor that even from the trailer going from dire poverty in the segregated south to the highest court in the land through many twists and turns so hi I'm just I was soon as an Adam was a story I knew I wanted to tell do you want to tell it well it was the how he was interested in I wouldn't I wouldn't have the first meeting but it took some time to get him to agree I mean Hey there the film is called as you said it is created equal Clarence Thomas in and words because it's really based on a very long interview with justice Thomas and his wife Jenny and they're the only interviews they spoke to me for over thirty hours over a six month period more access than any Supreme Court justices ever given anyone but we I came to believe and I guess I convinced justice Thomas at the right way to do this was for him to and I would ask questions that he would look right at the camera tell a story what is life is like in his own words what it was like to go through everything directly to the dealer directly to the audience directly to the American people and they can make their own judgment and that's with the structure of the film finally turned out to be and he did sign up and I agree to do it which I am happy and privileged where where can people working people see this documentary well in in limited release movie theater the thirty first to find out what Peter ten may need to go to our website justice Thomas movie dot com or the theatre indocin currently are listed but it's not in a theater near you know this place to sign up on the website and if there's a big enough group of people in one area we can make a screening happen there so I would encourage people to sign up and I would encourage people gal without me even if they have to drive for half hour I mean a lot of times people who want this kind of movie complain it's not there then you know that and see it so I am hoping that your listeners will go and how to make it a success which is been.

Michael
"manifold productions" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"manifold productions" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Never cry uncle and I'm not going to cry uncle today whether I want to be on the Supreme Court or not the man who made that incredible film possible is Michael pack of manifold productions director and producer of created equal Michael welcome to the studio thank you Sir good to be here and I was surprised before you arrived before we started I also how long did this film take to make it was but I don't know off too as long it was three years it takes a long time yes I am let me start by saying I am an absolute documentary addict I like science fiction and documentary if you look at my you to feed it this two things science fiction from the eighties and documentaries that if I had a preference I going to watch documentaries you have raised the bar that you've done many documentaries you've done an incredible documentaries in the past this is the mosque the club this is how this is how you should be taught to make documentaries so I have to get that out there for so congratulations kudos and and Bravo first tell our listeners why this documentary and why this subject what transforms well it began when I heard from some mutual friends that justice Thomas is getting tired of having the left in his enemies to find his life and his legacy he was tired of the half truths and for those that were circulating about him so I met with him at that time I really only had limited knowledge of him I had only my memories of a very contentious hearings that used from that like the clip you showed but in a meeting with him and then research is live it's a great story it's just a classic American story I mean at at at one level he's someone who went from really dire poverty of a kind now rare or nonexistent in America in the segregated south to the highest court in the land I mean it's a great American success story the film is is is a stimulus you walk out of it re emboldened to fight for the values of this country but the real novelty is the story that you tell of his early life I had no idea of firstly that he grew up in a very poor family in the rural south then he has to move with his mother to the urban poverty all the ghetto where where the affluent the toilet waste is running down the street in front of the shack and he said how we have to put bowled over the waste water to get to the street I mean it just this is this is an associate justice of the Supreme Court incredible it's amazing I mean I right he even talked in the interview which I check out was to do the interview full I interviewed him for over thirty hours have a six month period he mentioned what you can imagine that when he stepped on the board you heard it this is Wells routing as it hit that particular affluent as you call that rightly but I do a certain for thirty hours and he and the as you know from having seen the film he speaks directly to camera he tells his story this is the way to frame it if I may I I I'm not of didn't go to film school but most of the movie with with this incredible footage of the south of the hearings Clarence Thomas most of it is Clarence Thomas sitting on a desk you know what close up of Clarence Thomas looking straight into the camera and you really connect with that subject you really connect with the man you have to repair a lot of attention to making sure he made eye contact with the viewer yes is that at and it's a beautiful shot I had a great cameraman and and but I think the key thing is they have a the viewer feels they're talking to Clarence Thomas getting his sense out it's the way he experienced everything including the hearing yeah and and and it's an incredible you get is a motion whatever I sum it up I feel I never do justice to it the the the the the incredible additional thing that one learns is how this man off to going to seminary at the age of what fourteen will something yes joint icicle in high school he joins a Catholic seminary and then off the vet becomes a left wing radical well that's right he he credible he was is gonna seminary to be and he had he had been raised by his grandfather after this month period of dire poverty his mother took him to his grandfather Verizon that changed his life his grandfather was a Catholic and sent them to parochial schools all black parochial schools in the segregated south but when he entered seminary is the only black kid in the server that is right surrounded by white that's right so that's a different thing for him and there he starts to experience of racism I think it rose to a peak in the scene where he's watching I've been a TV when Martin Luther king that and and one of the seminary says I hope that son of a **** die it was a fellow seminarian turns out to be a race yes that's right on the day of Kay's assassinated and that triggers something in the future just this and then he becomes a radical he becomes a left as he becomes that you know that people with familiar with from the the rights in the colleges across America but then we will continue the disk the film is cold created equal transformers in his own words you have to see it friends these guys are not advertising with me then all sponsors it's just a film you have to see go to justice Thomas movie dot com justice Thomas movie dot com find out where it's playing because it's a life change it will open your I see it right now back with the man.

Supreme Court
"manifold productions" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

05:53 min | 1 year ago

"manifold productions" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Supreme Court or not the man who made that incredible film possible is Michael pack of manifold productions director and producer of created equal Michael welcome to the studio thank you Sir good to be here now I was surprised before you arrived the before we started I also how long did this film take to make it was about a half two hours long it was three years it takes a long time yes let me start by saying I am an absolute documentary addict I like science fiction and documentary if you look at my you to feed it this to fix a science fiction from the eighties a documentary that if I had a preference I going to watch documentaries you have raised the bar that you've done many documentaries you've done an incredible documentaries in the past this is the mosque the club this is how this is how you should be taught to make documentaries so I have to get that out the first look congratulations kudos and and Bravo first tell our listeners why this documentary and why this subject what Clarence Thomas well it began when I heard from some mutual friends that justice Thomas is getting tired of having the left in his enemies to find his life and his legacy he was tired of the half truths and and for those that were circulating about him so I met with him at that time I really only had limited knowledge of him I had only my memories of the very contentious hearings that used from that like the clip you showed but in a meeting with him and then research is live it's a great story it's just a classic American story I mean at at at at one level he's someone who went from really dire poverty of a kind now rare or nonexistent in America in the segregated south to the highest court in the land I mean it's a great American success story the film is is this a stimulus you walk out of it re emboldened to fight for the values of this country but the real novelty is the story that you tell of his early life I had no idea of firstly that he grew up in a very poor family in the rural south van he has to move with his mother to the urban poverty all the ghetto where where the affluent the toilet waste is running down the street in front of the shack and he said how we have to put bowled over the waste water to get to the street I mean it just this is this is an associate justice of the Supreme Court incredible it's amazing I mean I right he even talked in the interview which I check out was to do the full I interviewed him for over thirty hours have a six month period he mentioned what you can imagine that when he stepped on the board you heard it this is Wells routing and as it hit that particular affluent as you call that rightly but I do a certain for thirty hours and he and the as you know from having seen the film he speaks directly to camera he tells his story this is the way to frame it if I may I I I'm not of didn't go to film school but most of the movie with with this incredible footage of the south of the hearings Clarence Thomas most of it is Clarence Thomas sitting on a desk you know what close up of Clarence Thomas looking straight into the camera and you really connect with that subject you really connect with the man you have to repair a lot of attention to making sure he made eye contact with the viewer yes is that at and it's a beautiful shot I had a great cameraman and and but I think the key thing is they have a the viewer feels they're talking to Clarence Thomas getting his sense so it's the way he experienced everything including the hearing yeah and and and it's an incredible you get is a motion whatever I sum it up I feel I never do justice to it the the the the the incredible additional thing that one learns is how this man off to going to seminary at the age of what fourteen will something short I. school in high school he joins a Catholic seminary and then off the vets becomes a left wing radical well that's right he he credible as is gonna seminary to be and he had he had been raised by his grandfather after this month period of dire poverty his mother took him to his grandfather Verizon that changed his life his grandfather was a Catholic and sent them to procure schools all black parochial schools in the segregated south but when he entered seminary was the only black kid in the so that's right surrounded by white that's right so that's a different thing for him and there he starts to experience some racism I think it rose to a peak in the scene where he's watching in the TV when Martin Luther king that and and one of the seminary says I hope that son of a **** die it was a fellow seminarian turns out to be a race yes that's right on the day yeah well Kay's assassinated and that triggers something in the future justice and then he becomes a radical he becomes a left as he becomes that you know that people with familiar with from the the riots in the colleges across America but then we will continue the discussion of film is cold created equal transformers in his own words you have to see it friends these guys up not advertising with me then all sponsors it's just a film you have to see go to justice Thomas movie dot com justice Thomas movie dot com find out where it's playing because it's a life change it will open your eyes see it right now back with the man behind the movie director producer Michael pack on America first on the Salem radio network coast to coast broadcasting forty factor dot com studios just outside.

Supreme Court Michael pack director producer
"manifold productions" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

1170 The Answer

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"manifold productions" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

"Man who made that incredible film possible is Michael pack of manifold productions director and producer of created equal Michael welcome to the studio thank you Sir good to be here now I was surprised before you arrived before we started I asked you how long did this film take to make it was but I don't know off too as long it was three years it takes a long time yes I am let me start by saying I am an absolute documentary addict I like science fiction and documentary if you look at my you to feed it to fix a science fiction from the eighties a documentary that if I had a preference I going to watch documentaries you have raised the bar that you've done many documentaries you've done an incredible documentaries in the past this is the mosque the club this is how this is how you should be taught to make documentaries so I have to get that out there for so congratulations kudos and and Bravo first tell our listeners why this documentary and why this subject what transforms well it began when I have heard from some mutual friends that justice Thomas was getting tired of having the left of his enemies to find his life and his legacy he was tired of the half truths and for those that were circulating about him so I met with him at that time I really only had limited knowledge of him I had only my memories of the very contentious hearings that used from that like the clip you showed but in a meeting with him and then research is live it's a great story it's just a classic American story I mean at at at one level he's someone who went from really dire poverty the kind now rare or nonexistent in America in the segregated south to the highest court in the land I mean it's a great American success story the film is is is a stimulus you walk out of it re emboldened to fight for the values of this country but the real novelty is the story that you tell of his early life I have no idea of firstly that he grew up in a very poor family in the rural south then he has to move with his mother to the urban poverty all the ghetto where where the affluent the toilet waste is running down the street in front of the shack and he said how we have to put bold's over the waste water to get to the street I mean it just this is this is an associate justice of the Supreme Court incredible it's amazing I mean I right he even talked in the interview which I check out I was to do the interview full I interviewed him for over thirty hours have a six month period he mentioned what you mentioned that when he stepped on the board you heard it this is Wells routing and as it hit that particular affluent as you call that rightly but I've done a certain for thirty hours and he and the the as you know from having seen the film he speaks directly to camera he tells his story of the waste stream if I may I I I'm not of didn't go to film school but most of the movie with with this incredible footage of the south of the hearings Clarence Thomas most of it is times Thomas sitting on the desk you know why close up of Clarence Thomas looking straight into the camera and you really connect with that subject you really connect with the man you have to repair a lot of attention to making for he made eye contact with the viewer yes is that at and it's a beautiful shot I had a great cameraman and and but I think the key thing is they have a the viewer feels they're talking to Clarence Thomas getting his sense so it's the way he experienced everything including the hearing yeah and and and it's an incredible you get is a motion whatever I sum it up I feel I never do justice to it the the the the the incredible additional thing that one learns is how this man off to going to seminary at the age of what fourteen will something yes joint I school in high school he joins a Catholic seminary he then very often that becomes a left wing radical well that's right he he credible he wears is gonna seminary to be and he had he had been raised by his grandfather after this month period of dire poverty his mother took him to his grandfather Verizon that changed his life is grandfather was a Catholic and sent them to procure schools all black parochial schools in the segregated south but when he entered seminary was the only black kid in the so that's right surrounded by white that's right so that's a different thing for him and there he starts to experience some racism I think it rose to a peak in the scene where he's watching I've been a TV when not with the claim that and and one of the seminary says I hope that son of a **** die as a fellow seminarian turns out to be a ray sis that's right on the day yeah well Kay's assassinated and that triggers something in the future just this and then he becomes a radical he becomes a left as he becomes that you know that people with familiar with from the the riots in the colleges across America but then we will continue the disk well is cold created equal transformers in his own words you have to see it friends these guys are not advertising with me then all sponsors it's just a film you have to see go to justice.

Michael pack director producer
"manifold productions" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"manifold productions" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Man who made that incredible film possible is Michael pack of manifold productions director and producer of created equal Michael welcome to the studio thank you Sir good to be here I was surprised before you arrived the before we started I asked you how long did this film take to make it was about a half two hours long it was three years it takes a long time yes let me start by saying I am an absolute documentary addict I like science fiction and documentary if you look at my you to feed it this two things science fiction from the eighties and documentaries that if I had a preference I going to watch documentaries you have raised the bar that you've done many documentaries you've done an incredible documentaries in the past this is the mosque the club this is how this is how you should be taught to make documentaries so I have to get that out there for so congratulations kudos and and Bravo first tell our listeners why this documentary and why this subject what Clarence Thomas well it began when I heard from some mutual friends that justice Thomas was getting tired of having the left of his enemies to fight his life and his legacy he was tired of the half truths it on foods that were circulating about him so I met with him at that time I really only had limited knowledge of him I had only my memories of the very contentious hearings that used from that like the clip you showed but in a meeting with him and then research is live it's a great story it's just a classic American story I mean at at at one level he's someone who went from really dire poverty of a kind now rare or nonexistent in America in the segregated south to the highest court in the land I mean it's a great American success story the film it is his business Dana Lewis you walk out of it re emboldened to fight for the values of this country but the real novelty is the story that you tell of his early life I have no idea of firstly that he grew up in a very poor family in the rural south then he has to move with his mother to the urban poverty all the ghetto where where the affluent the toilet waste is running down the street in front of the shack and he said how we have to put bold's over the waste water to get to the street I mean it just this is this is an associate justice of the Supreme Court incredible it's amazing I mean I right he even talked in the interview which I check out was to do the full I interviewed him for over thirty hours have a six month period he mentioned what you can imagine that when he stepped on board you heard it this is Wells routing and has a hit that particular affluent as you call that rightly but I do a certain for thirty hours and he and the as you know from having seen the film he speaks directly to camera he tells his story this is the way we frame if I may I I I'm not of didn't go to film school but most of the movie with with this incredible footage of the south of the hearings Clarence Thomas most of it is Clarence Thomas sitting on a desk you know why close up of Clarence Thomas looking straight into the camera and you really connect with that subject you really connect with the man you have to repair a lot of attention to making sure he made eye contact with the viewer yes is that at and it's a beautiful shot I had a great camera man and and but I think the key thing is they have a the viewer feels they're talking to Clarence Thomas getting his sense so it's the way he experienced everything including the hearing yeah and and and it's an incredible you get is a motion whatever I sum it up I feel I never do justice to it the the the the the incredible additional thing that one learns is how this man off to going to seminary at the age of what fourteen or something yes joined I school in high school he joins a Catholic seminary and then off the vet becomes a left wing radical well that's right he he credible he wears is gonna seminary to be and he had he had been raised by his grandfather after this month period of dire poverty his mother took him to his grandfather Verizon that changed his life his grandfather was a Catholic and sent them to procure schools all black parochial schools in the segregated south but when he entered seminary is the only back to the server that is right surrounded by white that's right so that's a different thing for him and there he starts to experience some racism I think it rose to a peak in the scene where he's watching I've been a TV when Martin Luther king that and and one of the seminary says I hope that son of a **** die it was a fellow seminarian turns out to be a race yes that's right on the day yeah well Kay's assassinated in that triggers something in the future justice and then he becomes a radical he becomes a left as he becomes that you know that people with familiar with from the the riots in the colleges across America but then we will continue the disk the film is cold created equal transformers is bone with you half to see it friends these guys up not advertising with me then all sponsors it's just a film you have to see go.

Michael pack director producer
"manifold productions" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

08:43 min | 1 year ago

"manifold productions" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Is incredible and you look back historically what's happening in this is been going on for decades you know even before Brett Kavanaugh we saw what happened there you know how things are brought out in the course here we are dealing with an impeachment and it's more the same I mean the weaponization of this whole I aspect of guilt by accusation on full display and you wonder jusco while that's happening to them what what happens when it starts happening to us in in their course already has but you know when you don't have the where with all you're not an Alan Dershowitz so you're not attorneys to defend yourself it gets rather costly in a David allied we're gonna talk with Tom ridge again next week and what's happening with David I mean David was guilty of getting Planned Parenthood officials on AT and manning to the sale of baby baby parts and what happens he goes to jail it's against the law to sell baby parts but Hey look at he's guilty because they say so that's that's what's happening well let's rewind all the way back to nineteen ninety one and you'll remember at the hearing for those of us that were around at the time the hearing for justice Clarence Thomas and what occurred there and again this was kind of a preamble of you know what his consistently been exercised almost since then since nineteen ninety one when you think about it what they did to the justice and to justice Thomas at and that there is a documentary that is coming out and Michael pack is joining us now is the president of manifold productions in independent film and TV production company which he founded in nineteen ninety nine and through manifold productions Michael's written directed and produced numerous award winning nationally broadcast documentaries as well as corporate and educational films Michael welcome to the show good to have you with us thank you good to be here thank you congratulations on this documentary that we're gonna be able to say Hey and limited release and of course you're adding movie theaters almost every day is so you know we expect hundreds of movies to be showing I mean hundreds of theaters to be showing this documentary my work I think starting January thirty first is that correct stress can only for thirty first people can be yours listeners can go to our website justice Thomas movie dot com you check if there's a theater near there near them and if there isn't and there's a group of them they can request a showing in a distributor the Rangers showing it so that this way is on the website to sign up for that you are right we're adding theaters all the time of the people this is a show of support and people come here on as will be encouraged to do it to ship out in more theaters we're hoping your your listeners will will support us we kind of think about coming away as the anti or the opposite in some ways to RPG that was better Ginsburg and fans showed up and drove the seven people were injured in class Thomas let's hope they show up and throws him well this is this is historical and I'm and I'm really pleased that you did this so how did you come to the decision to do this documentary on justice Thomas well yes we had some mutual friends with justice Thomas and we have heard through the grapevine that he was getting tired of having his legacy and his his story in his biography defined by his enemies and people who who disagreed with and some in some cases spread lies about him so he what he wanted to get the truth out and we began a series of discussions with them and we found out how extraordinary his story was and we were really move to tell the story an incredible story you know from childhood his background and this is a story told in his own words and with which is very compelling it is I mean we we found that you know we were going to do a traditional documentary talked a bunch of people but it turns out he is the best tailor their own story really he and has a lesser extent his wife and he only interviews in the film we interview justice Thomas for over thirty hours over a six month period he let his entire life and including the in the impeachment hearings and I'm in the kitchen is the confirmation hearing right and it was very moving and and we and we really south this gives the viewer a chance to hear him directly he speaks right to camera here how he saw things his way what it meant to him and and his emotional response and here is find it very very moving well what you're doing you know for all Americans here a I mean this is the scarlet letter all over again personified you think of as a modern day version of the new in this to president trump as well as Nancy Pelosi gleefully exclaimed everyone that he will be for ever impeached really I mean this is what we want to do we just want to degrade somebody's humanity and contribution to our culture with something like that and you know was they said they always wanted an Asterix after Brett Kavanaugh I I mean this kind of thinking in this kind of any of this this doesn't contribute to the goodness of American higher calling of our country does it certainly does not and and and that is what I think what justice Thomas wanted us to make the sound his whole life is extraordinary I also think he didn't want to be defined by his confirmation hearing only yesterday that that is what his enemies would like to do but his intellect as of tonight he's come from from dire poverty Mister good headed south and from that all the way to the Supreme Court itself it's basically a classic Horatio Alger American success story and there are lots of twists and turns to me he has a black radical pit area and he goes through many tragedies and it's a story of great resilience that intellectual spring and it is inspiring and I think it will be even to people who do not agree with justice Thomas exactly I've been saying repeat I mean I've said this my children of her decide nauseam I've always told them experience defines preference and for some reason it's cycling back in the last couple weeks as things they could be coming up and what in in saying this documentary you will see for yourself that the experience of justice Thomas like all of us I mean you know who was like we are all brilliantly hello does that mean were brilliantly designed by me as far as weight living living our lives in that we didn't always make brilliant decisions it's some of these bad decisions that allowed us to get on the other side and to to better serve our families and our fellow man and so the eighty as you say I I think this is a proper perspective the in this in this documentary as well you know justice Thomas addresses a vice president Joe Biden and his participation and how how Joe Biden and even the Democrats have tried to re write a little bit of that whole program right I think they have I mean I think that they do not look good in retrospect when you look at the ninety one hearing and I think that's present time does not look good either in his treatment of justice Thomas or his treatment of the need to hell he's been forced to but he's he's apologized to me to hell under a certain amount of pressure but I think it would be welcome to apologize to justice Thomas to you can see his treatment of justice Thomas during the first part of the hearing in the documentary and and you know that you know is that it does not look good to you it's it's not so easy to rewrite that history when the documentary record is there and I agree with your point to that we earlier point that tragedies and struggle or what defines us enables us to have compassion and empathy and although we don't wish it on our children it is in fact something that that that makes us better and and and justice Thomas is really had way a lot of his planned more than a share that including the treatment by the media during his confirmation and in his history and now as a judge I mean his legacy it it it's sad I think this is a great opportunity as you say to maybe you know clarifying clean up that lands at that is maintained at a bit from since nineteen ninety one and to be able to look at justice Thomas with clear eyes and you know twenty twenty it's it's the year of vision maybe it's a time for us to clear up but the sec clouded.

Brett Kavanaugh
"manifold productions" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"manifold productions" Discussed on 790 KABC

"And there he hung out with mark says he helped form the black student union he invited black pampas to speak he supported as he says everyone was in your face from Angela Davis to Huey Newton and and and then that yet we still kind of crescendo and then he began to see the failure of those programs and those ideas especially busing in nearby Boston affirmative action and many other things and that began his journey back from from from conservative the back to the values of his grandfather and the values that that he was raised with movies and equal Clarence Thomas in his own words Michael pack present manifold productions the documentary director really appreciate your time Michael thanks it was important to tell you is if they want to see if they got to that or website justice Thomas movie dot com it's in fifteen theaters starting January thirty first it's not in your area and there are enough of you want to see it we can make this grainy happen but that in the movie justice Thomas movie dot com and as you now and is Andrew Breitbart constantly said I I our side of the of the political spectrum we do not go to movies enough to complain about culture and we don't show up I hope you're listening show up absolutely go check it out right now and justice Thomas movie dot com Michael really appreciate time thank you very much back well coming up we'll be taking your calls at eight five five two three six thirty two twenty eight at eight five five two three six thirty two twenty eight this is the bench seven million date ABC news at four.

mark Angela Davis Huey Newton Clarence Thomas Michael director Andrew Breitbart Boston ABC