35 Burst results for "Managing Partner"

interview With Meagan Crawford

Main Engine Cut Off

04:11 min | 6 d ago

interview With Meagan Crawford

"Well. Megan welcome to manage and cut off. This has been a year overdue at this point. An entire pandemic overdue. Maybe i'm happy that you're here talking to us. I'm really thrilled to be here. Thank you for having me anything so to start. I want everyone to meet you. Because you're awesome So you are a member of space fund. You also have this podcast mission eve. That is fantastic. Can you tell everyone a little bit about you sure. Yeah co founder and managing partner of space fund Where venture capital firm investing exclusively in the new space ecosystem so very kind of targeted fund And then i also have my podcast mission eve which I interview the most amazing women in the space industry. It's just been a thrill and just so much fun to do. And in the hopes of inspiring more women to join us here in the space industry So that's that's a project that's near and dear to my heart I'm also on. The board of several nonprofits needs to do a quick shout out the space frontier foundation. The center for space commerce finance mars initiative and the earth light foundation Spend an inordinate amount of my time helping those at nonprofits. So i think that's probably about it so we're gonna talk about a bunch of different angles on the finance side of stuff which i occasionally touch on but probably not as deeply as i should in many cases there's some fundraising that has happened. In the past year that has been particularly notable for the size specifically spacex relativity. Been getting gargantuan amounts of money there's some acquisitions that have happened recently. And then There's a whole trend of holding companies. That i find quite interesting as well as a trend that i find interesting and more shady. Which is this whole special purpose acquisition friend. Those are the things. I want to pick your brain about. Is there an order. would you like to start with fundraising and then get into what happens after. You've gotten a bunch of funding and actually accomplish things. What's the right order there. Yeah well I think i'd like to start with this kind of startling statistic that that i i like to I like to bring up a lot. Is that One and it's it's one of the reasons that spaceman was founded. Actually is you know. Currently launched comprises less than two percents of the global space economy yet has received seven percent of the venture capital. Today right sounds crazy but it. It makes such intuitive sense to like you know somebody watches the markets but exactly crazy. Yeah that's crazy. Yeah i like it when you hear that you're like oh yeah that seems right but holy crap. That's crazy just hear those numbers right and now the one question i would have is. Does that. include any space x funding as launch. Yes that includes spacex funding and includes the you know that big relativity rounded includes all of that. So i guess that's my that would be. My stipulation is like how. How do you separate out. What of that is going to starlink. zach satellites. Then does that skew it or is it not big enough to actually skew. Anything no matter how you classify either couple billion. Yeah so you know the regardless. It's it's a huge number even if he were to try and take starlink out of the kind of the space x portion of that. They're going to be forty percent of the venture right number exactly exactly and so you know when When my partner. Rick tomlinson and i were contemplating a founding space fund. You know this was one of the things that was really bothering us. We were kind of looking around the industry at all of our our friends and colleagues. Who are these brilliant entrepreneurs going and down sandhill road and couldn't get any funding and meanwhile while all these other. Vc's are just pouring good money. After bad into launch company after launch company because all ilan has launched company and basil's has launched company and jared. Leto is invested in in relativity space so i need a launch company. Right and base fund is currently tracking a hundred and sixty two active launch companies around the world.

Space Fund Where Venture Capit Space Frontier Foundation Center For Space Commerce Fina Megan Spacex Spaceman Zach Satellites Rick Tomlinson Ilan Leto Basil Jared
"managing partner" Discussed on Behind The Numbers

Behind The Numbers

08:27 min | 2 months ago

"managing partner" Discussed on Behind The Numbers

"Welcome back to behind the numbers. I'm dave bookbinder and today we're talking with brett tremblay who's the managing partner of law and also the founder of get staffed up brett. You mentioned that you were recently the recipient of an five thousand word and that's cool stuff but i a springboard from that like to call the journey of entrepreneurship. So obviously you mentioned that you've grown your law firm but you also have another business. You've taken entrepreneurship to kind of a different level. Why don't you share your story with the audience. Absolutely i love to. And i. I just want to mention you know a lot of a lot of attorneys serve. Don't wanna practice anymore or or they find running a law firm. You know just too daunting or two difficult to they. Sort of become. I dunno consultants obey dive into something else. I did it where i put so much time and effort into building a business that still growing no despite corona virus trembling albro about ten percent this year. And that's way down for us but but that's still very good now. I'm still very very active. Running that business but growing the law firm provided me with an opportunity to do more than just help entrepreneurs and business owners under the law so the mission of the law firm is to protect the economy. One business at a time but through the staffing company that that mean in a co founders started. I learned that i could help business. Owners in additional ways because staffing hr and compliance is so difficult. And there's so many pitfalls that you can run into as a business owner when when employing people having employees god bless them. I mean i love my teams that we work really hard at providing a great atmosphere and and paying as best as we can but they will always be our number one headache as as as entrepreneurs and business owners because we're humans we have issues and so what we did as we started a staffing company. Where where business owners can staff up and at a lot of bandwidth and wherewithal at the entry level positions. You're talking administrative level positions personal assistant executive assistance secretaries receptionists. So that you don't have to go spend thirty thousand dollars plus plus because when you employ someone here in the us being in a behind the numbers. There's a one point four multiplier. Whatever you pay in salary you have to do one point four and that's what it costs us business owner sir. You're looking at at forty five to fifty thousand. Just you know no fence but for somebody answering the phones or or someone helping around the office if you will so what we did as we said. Why don't we take the option model and do fulltime only and help business owners staff up quickly with all the things that they're doing themselves that they know they should have been doing and we'll take the cost component out of it now. The the mental side behind it is is. I love helping people learn that it's okay to hire and take risks because back in the day that was. That was my big hang-up before i learned how to sort of grow but the staffing company has been phenomenal and You know i can tell you a little bit more about the model. If i didn't explain that quite clearly. No that's good stuff and look. There are a lot of firms where they're not ready to bring on fulltime employees and they need some kind of an alternative. I guess one of the questions somebody watching. You're listening maybe thinking would be something to affect. What's your secret sauce. What makes your staffing firm a little bit different than maybe some other options speak to that cher so most staffing companies two things one they get people in like india or the philippines and they pack them into a building like sardines and now they're selling time walks and saying you think you need ten hours per week of and assistant good. I just had ten hours open up because someone else left. So your assistant if you will is is really working for a lot of different people and you're only keeping you know using them for about ten hours a week so that's the first thing second on again it's it's the language barrier is much greater in those regions in the world. So we did is. We said we're here to fulltime only. We're gonna come in at a price point that it it's just a no brainer. Which the the. The metal price is eighteen fifty a month. So that's about twenty thousand per year you pay us monthly and and we pay your employees and so there's no with folding taxes etc and our biggest advantage those were out of latin america so mexico central and south america so the culture is very similar. The english phenomenal and the time zones match so we have people that are answering phones in mexico and people have no idea. The phone is being answered somewhere else. But because it's not an outsource reception service. They know how to pronounce the names and they get familiar with the people because your customers know when you have an outsource phone answering services as good as as some of them are these days And talk about a lot of bandwidth you can add by giving your top team personal or executive assistance in adding in those those secretary level positions with somebody who again is highly educated motivated energetic but the economic arbitrage as they say the con- savings just so great. It's it's really a no brainer. So they become part of your team speaking of team building morale. You want to treat these fulltime team members as if they're in your office you just can't see him so you want them on your morning huddles you want them on your team meetings via zoom and you want to continue to build the culture. You're just doing a little smarter than your competition interesting brett anybody who wants to learn more about that or about the law firm. How can they reach you. Well not not surprisingly very similarly Go to get staffed up. Dot com forward slash. Vip and same thing. You just drop in a little line and and We have a very large team already. Ready to to reach out and see what you need in your business and one of our catch phrases delegate. Your way to freedom they too. Many people are just their own assistant. And if you don't have an assist than you are an assistant and people have to learn how to get rid of those small nagging tasks that prevent us from having more on the big picture because we all have things that we want to get too big projects and we simply never create the time you have a difference between working in the business and working on the business for of folks in the production studio. I think you have graphic in the back. We're going to see that up. Give bread a chance to talk about a book that you've authored there it is. It's on the screen right now. If you can see it prep but the danger zones want you. Tell us about that. I would love to thank you so much. So we have a book. Launching within the next few weeks is called the danger zones. It's the five risk areas that business owners need to watch out for that can put them out of business so what we did is we took all the lawsuits. That over ten years our clients have been in you know on one side or another and and in addition to Miami dade has the fourth busiest Circuit court in the entire country. So we we gather data and we categorize all the lawsuits into five areas. And when we said you know these are the five areas that if we can focus on and help our clients you know mitigate the risk than we can do what what our mission is in that is to keep our clients out of the courtroom so the book is anecdotal. it tells stories. You know kinda like. I did earlier with the brewery and and it kind of gives you a little bit of a you know. Oh shoot. I need to make sure i haven't looked to my operating agreements awhile Or haven't really thought about that. Of course it covers trademarks But it's a very short book. And i hope it's a fun read in it's going to be available for download you know very soon and hardcopy sounds good so amazon. I imagine we'll be amazon. Okay great well. Congratulations on that. I think you mentioned something about a quiz to yeah trembling dot com slash danger zones. Set up where you can take a less than two minute quiz and just some you know some some. Yes or no answers. And we'll send you your results in in terms of you know kinda what your exposure areas are in. How serious that you.

business owner executive mexico brett tremblay amazon dave bookbinder personal assistant us managing partner Miami dade cher founder Dot america Circuit court secretary india
"managing partner" Discussed on Behind The Numbers

Behind The Numbers

08:18 min | 2 months ago

"managing partner" Discussed on Behind The Numbers

"Everyone and welcome to behind the numbers. Dave bookbinder and welcome to the program where we dig deeper to understand what really matters most business as you know. I'm senior director at cf gi. And if you'd like to learn more about me or get in touch with me please reach out on linked in facebook and twitter. Today i'm pleased to welcome guest. Whose remolding in all the way from miami florida brett trembling managing partner of law firm and the founder of get staffed up brett numbers. They thank you so much happened me. I'm very honored to be here this morning. That's a pleasure to have you here. Why don't you tell the audience a little bit about your on your firm and then we'll jump in sure so as you mentioned i am the proprietor. Trimbe law firm in miami florida where a business and litigation and franchise law firm so Talking about behind the numbers. We've gone from one attorney just me nine years a few weeks ago to ten attorneys and twenty five team members and just hit the inc. Five thousand so were really making an impact in need south florida business community. Dave helping business owners stay out of court. That's our claim to fame. It's easy to sit back and hope people get in trouble and then go to court where only the lawyers went so we still litigated now. And we do it very well. But our main goal is to work with entrepreneurs and business owners and help them proactively. Stay out of the courtroom. Stay out of trouble in. Stay in business yet. Good stuff and and you mentioned that your clients are not just in the florida area. Serving clients all over the place right. We have clients all over the california new york down to florida exactly. So congratulations on making five thousand. That's quite an achievement. Thank you it's We've been shooting for few years in came up just short in in twenty nine thousand nine hundred twenty twenty was nice. Good for you guys Well-deserved wanted start off our conversation by talking about concept that i think we're all dealing with right now. It's getting back to work getting back into the office. I don't know when that's going to happen for different. Parts of the country in different parts of the world. It's there's a different timeline of course but embedded in this return to work piece. Our employee safety issues and then of course legal matters for employers. So i'd like to talk to you about first and foremost what you're seeing in this realm of the getting back to work process when we start with the safety component. Sure dave there's so much uncertainty right now. Because we're in uncharted territory. Were you know. We're helping our clients figure out. What are the amount of precautions to take. If you're opening your place of business backup so let's say you know you've got you've got it doesn't matter how many employees but you let them all back in or you require them to come back in the office and you say all right november fifteenth were reopening. Everyone's gotta come back. What happens if somebody doesn't wanna come back. You fire them. And if so is that you're gonna get hit with a discrimination claim Do you make exceptions where some people work at home and some people come into the office. Do you get waiver. Signed and and other waivers even enforceable. Where i mean by waiver is if if your employer and you have people come back the office and someone gets nineteen. I mean god forbid you know think well thankfully the death rates are extremely low right now but obviously the amount of people still getting in his very high. And so what happens. Can you get sued. are you liable. The employee. prove that they got it from someone in the office. And what are you required to do. The lot of follows a reasonable person standard. So what would a reasonable business owner do. We know require masks. Can't sanitizer social distancing. You know more than one person in an office take turns going to the restroom in the kitchen of the break room. Do you have to have a cleaning crew. Come in and clean you know once per day once per month every five minutes i mean i. I know everyone's going to have a different opinion on this. So really trying to strategize and in holding webinars and in creating waivers that we think are hopefully going to be enforceable helping our clients. Look this is about doing only protecting the business owner. Were trying to educate our clients on what you need to do to protect people. 'cause obviously we all want to protect our employees as well. But how far do you have to go. Yeah and it's so easy to to get all used the term complacent as we revert back to previous norms. If you walk into an office. I've been in a few over the last couple of weeks and months and it's interesting phenomenon. Despite best laid plans and intentions where companies may have protocols in place for mask wearing you walk in and somebody sees you and they walk up to greet you. And they're not wearing a mask talk to me if you would brett about the firms that believe completely that the only way that you're gonna get productivity out of your team or even just to build more morale is to have everybody back into the office or have as many people back as you can What are they risking from the employees who feel almost as if it's a coercion thing rather than a voluntary thing that that's a tough one dave so you know you could argue that you're gonna alienate people. That still are quarantining. and i. i still have a lot of friends and a lot of people who maybe not quite as much. They're not wiping down the groceries and only stepping outside and in a hazmat suit or something pretty wild like that. But but for the most arthur staying at home and only dealing with family who Quarantining are not interacting with people nocco grocery store not going to eat and and there's still a lot of people that are under of those feelings. You need to continue to sort of isolate yourself. And and that we've seen some our clients have had some interesting situations where they've had to have meetings over zoom bringing. Hr team and talk through the pros and cons of returning in and at least here out employees. Because you never know. Maybe they're predisposed. Maybe they have other conditions certainly Existing conditions play a huge factor. In how your buddy deals with coronavirus. I'm not a doctor. Obviously we're just using the best data we can and it. It can be traumatizing and cause a lot of angst at the office between the team under so the way to handle this david a lot of communication. Here's what's coming up. here's a time line. Let you know team meetings. One on one meetings listened to people because if their fears are real in the real to them. And you don't want to dismiss those fears because that's gonna communicate to the rest of your team that you know as a lot of people say you know the man you know Like the man is holding us down. That's kind of how we're viewing. You can't forget that you see the means you know. Business owners only care about themselves not employees. And you don't wanna fall into that category. If you're truly trying to be a great organization with great people good advice the optics of that are horrible for sure and then ask you an unfair question. I i don't know that you have the answer. And i'm sure the even vary across jurisdictions but for those who were listening and wondering can your employer force you to come back into the office yet that that depends You you can. An employer can now require their employees. Come back to the office The question is if the employee refuses what happens if they get laid off. Do they have a discrimination claim in. That really varies by jurisdiction. That depends so for anybody who's watching or listening the program right now and they want to learn more about that or any other topics brett. How can they contact you at the fastest. And easiest way dave is is tremblay law dot com forward slash. Vip we set up a really easy page for people to contact us. Where you just go to our website from the dot com and you just type in for slash vip. It takes you to a landing page. Just asked name number email in how you heard about us and somebody will reach out to you within you. Know five fifteen twenty minutes usually and and try to set up a phone call for a consultation so that you can address these issues that you're asking me and there's just so many more so many more.

Dave bookbinder business owner florida miami brett facebook senior director twitter california managing partner founder attorney Quarantining new york arthur
Bridging HUGE Gaps between Consumers, Providers, and Payors with Evan Osborne

Outcomes Rocket

06:03 min | 2 months ago

Bridging HUGE Gaps between Consumers, Providers, and Payors with Evan Osborne

"Welcome back to the outcomes. Rocket saw marquez's here and today. I have the privilege of hosting evan osborne. Evan osborne is the founder and managing partner of diabetics united and also president and ceo of ride salem and healthcare management consultant with a focus and quality initiatives and change management. Evan has over ten years of professional experience in direct patient. care as well as he's he's held leadership roles and both the payer and provider rounds of the industry. Evan has a diverse background and continuous improvement systems building and program management and has earned a bachelor's degree in biology at western oregon. University and in therapeutic radiation oncology from the oregon health and science university. He later earned his master's degree in public health at the university massachusetts amherst and is currently completing a doctor of business administration at california southern university. I'm excited a chat about the work. That evan is doing with diabetics united and really his his contributions to healthcare overall. So evan. such a pleasure to have you here with us. Thanks for joining honor to be on. Your program saw a mouthful that you just read off from my for working through year busy man. You're a busy man. I liked the busy thinks you know so. One of my favorite quotes is an idle. Mind is a workshop of the devil. The right yup. Yup you've done a lot of really great stuff in in healthcare avenue. I definitely want to share with everybody. Listening the work that you guys are up to bat diabetics united but also unite salem. Which is really cool. Cool stuff but before we dive into that just park for second and under better understand. What inspires your work in healthcare. Certainly will it's comes back at the turn of the century when i was pursuing a career opportunities aligned with my education being biology and computer science unique blend of potentially stepping into the healthcare realm and then during that time on a personal level. I had a one of my favorite uncle Called me up. And tell me about their their brain tumor that they just developed and They were working with some health. Professionals called radiation therapists us. I really enjoy His time with them. They're really good at what they do. Such an i never heard of such a field before around the same time. I university Counselor recommended a program oregon. Health and science university radiation oncology. And so having not so close together being told about the program and i looked into it and before i knew it was gonna program wonderful program there in portland oregon And then ten years later after working bedside in oncology taking on leadership roles progressive leadership. I was exposed to bigger picture. Realms healthcare And then on a personal note. I later developed Type one diabetes late in life. So i went from a very rarely going to healthcare. Not really seeing it on the customer's level. More just out of the health. Professional became a frequent flyer. Customer i seen it from end to end. And then my career took me into both sides of the industry and the health insurance industry hostile side and then consulting as well So with my diverse background there and my personal connection with it I continue to strive to to contributes improving yourself to the healthcare system that that's unfortunately a little bit more messed up. And we'd like to net but with all the numbers out there. It's it's easy to see that it needs improvements. And that's what motivates me to continue getting up every day to kalki poker evan That's that's great man. I mean how those two road scott converge to get you in new on the young college field and then you you stayed in and then type one diabetes happens to you and you just like you said this. This is it for a year it contributing in a big way. I appreciate you sharing your story very down and you know what i you know. We don't truly fully understand until you live it and You know having the the steps that that you have to take to manage diabetes. You live it firsthand and inspired you to create diabetics united. So tell us a little bit about diabetics united and what you guys are doing to help the healthcare ecosystem and in particular Think consumers right. Yeah her so. When i first was diagnosed stylish trying to teach myself a green all the information that i could help management as even and what i noticed. Was you know. There's pockets of information throughout the internet to go pretty deep to get what useful and practical you the season diabetics. So you have an enormous amount of information for diabetes one basically so someone that's in the process of developing diabetes or just recently got diagnosed. You're just basically learning alphabet diabetes. That's what's out there But there is no actual central location where it takes it to the next level. More of a practical approach bringing everyone together in the industry so Like a hub. And google is the hub in in essence. There's so many layers to get to where you need to go. It's not filtered out. And it takes a lot of time to get what is pertinent that you're looking for from someone such as myself. A background and diabetes kinda still through a narrow it down to what's practical to diabetics But also the ability to interact with it so diabetes united completely interactive platform on a web based solution. We can say so. Members can get on the website and an add content to sites. It's kind of a fusion of facebook. Amazon and wing thin And we've got some other Services that were hoping to roll out here in august. That'll be practical to this day and age being remotely accessible and coach

Evan Osborne Ride Salem Evan Oregon Health And Science Univ University Massachusetts Amher California Southern University Oregon Diabetes Health And Science University Marquez Brain Tumor Salem Portland Scott Google Amazon Facebook
"managing partner" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

WhyWeWork BrianVee

02:42 min | 3 months ago

"managing partner" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

"Welcome to why we work with your host Brian v as he speaks to people like you from all over the world as we together dive deeper issue. Our motivations struggles Joys seemingly missteps hopes warnings and advice which will be an encouragement to us all off to get up get going and keep on working working is tough but working is good. Now, here's your home to why we work Brian V. I'm Brian. This is why we work today. I have the great pleasure of speaking with palm or Palm or is the founder and managing partner at Wellings Capital where they managed recession-resistant commercial and real estate funds that is way over my head, but I think he can boil it down to where I can understand how they manage storage units mobile homes put these Assets in people's portfolios so they can learn on their investment, but also want to know how people get into these markets but more importantly I want to know what he values in character walk-in work. His own character the work of his colleagues and what it takes to be successful in this industry. Join me today with my conversation with Paul morgue. I'm Brian V and this is why we work today. I have the great pleasure of speaking with Paul more. Good morning. Fine, sir. Hey, good morning Brian. It's great to be here. Thank you very much for joining us. Would you do me a favor? I did a brief introduction to you a moment ago, which is tell us where you are what you're doing in your work at this present moment. And then I'll bring us back. Yeah. I'm in Central Virginia. Thought we moved here. We sold our company about twenty-three years ago. We moved to the Blue Ridge Mountains to start a non-profit organization reaching out to international student studying in the US and home when that didn't work out. So well, I began flipping houses and I got me over twenty years Twenty One years to where I am. Now we run dwellings wage. But and we invest my company allows small to mid-sized investors to put money together in a large fund wage..

Brian V Paul morgue Blue Ridge Mountains founder and managing partner US Wellings Capital Palm Central Virginia
San Francisco's giant Ferris wheel ready to roll

KCBS Radio Overnight News

01:10 min | 3 months ago

San Francisco's giant Ferris wheel ready to roll

"Ferris wheels in America, made its debut in San Francisco as part of the 150th birthday of Golden Gate Park. Hey, CBS and Jeffrey Shab says the Sky Park observation wheel offers dramatic views. The huge Ferris wheel towers between the De Young Museum and the California Academy of Sciences. Todd Schneider is managing partner with Sky Star Wheel, the company that owns it. This guy start observation wheel is the largest movable modern fares will in the world. It's 150 ft. Tall. It has 36 6 passenger climate controlled gondola's. There were already hundreds of people who have made online reservations waiting to board the sky star Susie Tavana brought her three kids. You're the first in line. What does that feel like? Feels pretty good. San Francisco is my favorite place in the entire world. And I want to support awesome. Cool things coming into the city. This is her son. Are you going to fly? Yeah, We're going to see everything up there. You looking forward to it? I can't wait. I'm on the Sky star right now and let me tell you something that views really are terrific. You can see San Francisco Bay of the Pacific Ocean parts of San Francisco, and you can see

San Francisco San Francisco Bay Sky Park De Young Museum Golden Gate Park California Academy Of Sciences Todd Schneider Jeffrey Shab Susie Tavana CBS Managing Partner America Pacific Ocean
Robert Patin On The Business System That Leads to Success

The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

04:37 min | 3 months ago

Robert Patin On The Business System That Leads to Success

"Nice guys community. So get this I'd love to start off this amazing episode in the words of a fan of today's guest. Rebecca. Patent has created an indispensable guide for how to create not only the business you want, but the life you want. So Robert is an authority on financing creative, Services Agency growth. He's the founder and managing partner of patent and associates a Los Angeles based Business Management and consultancy firm through his Council and coaching his clients have generated more. Than get this thirty, million dollars in additional revenue is the author of the number one international bestseller, the agency blueprint, the business system that leads to success I'm excited to have them here today welcome Robert to the Nice guys on business podcast like you so much. So happy to be here. Happy to have you here man appreciate your your level of expertise is I was reading some of the reviews. Unfortunately we do so many interviews they don't have a chance to really. Dive deep into many people's books, and yours was one that I just kept reading the Amazon like until they wouldn't let me let me take anymore pages. I'm like Oh this is good. This is good stuff. So congrats on right Milia a really good book that that means a lot to those that are in your community. Awesome. Thank you so much a so tell me I, WanNa start with this in case somebody realizing I. don't even know what an agency Is Can I want to start with a real one? I'M GONNA approach is a third grader for a moment and then we'll get into a little deeper conversation but what would be considered an agency for those that are listening in our entrepreneurial based community today. Sure. So I defined agency as a marketing agency that handles creative that handles strategy that handles public relations digital agency that a social media management, facebook ADS SEO graphic design, web design, and video production. Excellent excellent and for those that are in our community, how how would they know like what symptoms are they experiencing? If they know that they are running a business that instead of they're running the business, the business is running them 'cause I'm assuming oftentimes that's why they'll they'll come to talk to you if if they need some help with getting their arms around their agency. So typically, you'll see that the agency owner is working more than forty fifty hours a week They're spending the majority of time doing things that are in client service administrative work where they're not working on things that allow the business to grow. So the primary focus that I work with as far as executive coaching is on getting the business owner to be focused on everything to be on business growth. So, how do you get somebody out of their own way? Because oftentimes it is I'm looking at I have a podcast production business and we have give or take eleven or twelve people depending on the time of the time of the year that we we run our business, and I oftentimes find myself working in the business rather than the big pickers picture strategy because sometimes I'm dealing with the selling side of things or getting into the weeds when it comes to marketing or design of you know of a landing page and that's probably a big. No No, I just don't know how to get myself out of that and get out of the way I'm I'm assuming that many of our people in. Our community, our experience that experiencing that too. So what would be your advice other than? Hey, just kind of stopped doing that what's their first step? What do they need to do the? It's a lot of it is a mind shift shift change ride that you need to be thinking about in is the only person in the world that can do. This particular task, and if not, then it should be going through what I refer to as the threes do delegate or discard rights owed is this something that I should be doing because I'm the only person can if if not in someone else can than it should be delegated and if it's not worth being delegated than it's something that should be discarded. So, when did you discover that? This was your gift. When when you come down to it, weren't you where you one of your biggest offenders before you became the biggest advocate for what you do? Absolutely. So I had at one point in my business and I had reached a position of burnout. Right I was working ninety hours a week and had been doing that for multiple years and got to appoint. was starting to feel trapped in my own business and. I decided one weekend, sit down and actually just. Pen to paper, write down what I wanted my business life to look like what I wanted my life to look like and mapped out a plan to redesign my business to function to provide me with the life that I want still being able to grow the business and be able to have an impact, the same value and impact on the community that I have. But not having the level of stress that I was in and sacrificing my personal life and my personal goals for career.

Founder And Managing Partner Business Owner Business Management Milia Rebecca Facebook Amazon Wanna Los Angeles Council Executive
Jennifer Neundorfer of January Ventures

How I Built This

07:58 min | 4 months ago

Jennifer Neundorfer of January Ventures

"And today we're gonNA hear from Jennifer new door for she's the CO founder and managing partner of January ventures. It's an investment firm focused on tech startups founded by women and people of Color Jennifer join me to talk about how her company is approaching investment strategies during this unprecedented moment and how they differ from other firms overall. What we're doing differently is really building a venture firm that is designed around access and transparency. That's not what venture has traditionally been known for, and it's what has really under served winning and underrepresented founders, and so we make it very easy for founders to pitch us and find us in everything that we do is focused on removing friction for those founders at the early stage and what type of startups do you look for? We invest primarily in tech enabled talker businesses. So we are investing in companies that we believe can be high growth scalable companies that are going to be capitol efficient. We are investing the capital early and then are looking for outsized return. So we're looking for companies that can go on to be hundred, million, billion dollar companies, and really be those outliers that generate returns for our fund and. You you invest in the in the seed stage. In the early stages of a business we invested the precede seed stage and what are the reasons that we do. That guy is when we started January, we did some early research and there had been a lot of data talking about how how little venture dollars women receive in two thousand, nineteen female only teams received just three percent of. Venture dollars, and if a woman happened to have male co founder, she received eleven percent of venture dollars. But what we found in our data as we look just at the earliest stage is that there's not only a gender gap, but it really starts early. So for every dollar that a male found raises at the precede or seed stage, a woman raises thirty eight cents and a black. Woman just two cents, and so that is really where we are focused to January. Because as you imagine a dollar versus thirty eight cents on the dollar versus two cents on the dollar, many of those are handicapped from the start, and so our focus is on getting them the capital and resources that they need to really generate momentum for their business and get to that scalable growth curve. How large is your fund right now? Yeah, we're deploying out of the twenty million dollar fund. Were typically writing checks that range up to half a million plus because we're investing stage when founders are raising. Two hundred fifty three hundred up to a million dollars on a really at those earliest ages and often the first capital in. And who who are your investors. Are Investors Range. So many of them are the typical investors that you would expect to see family offices, high net worth individuals, and some institutions and foundations. But from the beginning my partner Marin, I wanted to be very deliberate about who are investors are limited partners were because. So much of the traditional venture model has relied on a very small set of investors or limited partners and has reinforced this flywheel around making that small group very wealthy, and so what we have done in both of our funds is proactively reduce the barriers for nontraditional investors to invest in our funds whether that is a founder who is just beginning to. Capital Wealth and may not have a lot of equity and finding ways for them to participate or pitching LP's who follows height of the the traditional circuit that most funds pitch. You know whether it's by geography ethnicity we've really tried to work hard to diversify our alkies. How do you find startups to to invest in? I mentioned that venture has been so long on really inaccessible to most founders and a lot of that is because many venture capitalists rely on their network to source deals, and that's fine. But most of the people that are in someone's network look or are similar to similar characteristics who that person we hear a lot of talk about the tests Cana found her get a warm intro to them, and if so then they're willing to consider taking meeting. We turn that on her head at January, and so from the day that we launched, we have been open to cold pitches and when we went out with that, many of our peers told us you're crazy. We weren't gonNA see great pitches. There was no way we could handle that certain volume. And we were pretty overwhelmed. When we launched in October two, thousand eighteen, we saw four hundred pitches within the first week and so very quickly we leverage technology to develop a scalable way to review those deals were very generous with the first thirty minute meeting. We want Martin I want to be the first people at our meeting these founders right we want to be the ones who are judging whether they are a fit for a thesis, and then we have a higher bar for. Who we spend time with who we due diligence on and ultimately invest in because the nature of our businesses there's a very wide top of funnel, and in any given fun were making twenty five thirty investment. So there is pretty Winnie in process but were deliberate in the organizations that we work with to make sure that we are reaching founders that really fit that underrepresented mold and telling them that are light is on and we WANNA be fund of choice for them so tummy. Tell me some of the startups in your portfolio. Yeah. This is the part that I love talking about it sort of talking about your kids on. And it's hard to pick just one but I'll you a sense for some of them. We are investing problems that we believe are big and we really care about solving were really focused on investing in companies that are addressing big broad problems that are going to shape the future, and so one of those founders that is really doing this is a founder Julia. Collins, who is the CEO of the Company Up Planet Forward Julius founder who has deep roots in both food and sustainability and great founder market. That's something that we look for a lot and Julia is building a regenerative supply chain for sustainable foods. Just Chris. Quigley you sir. Can You? Can you kind of explain just plain plain language orders a regenerative supply chain me I mean I, I notice supply chain means a note regenerative means. Yeah. That's a great question guy. It's really about the ingredients and wear brands and CPG companies are sourcing the ingredients for their foods and they would basically evaluate the sustainability and on a number of different metrics including the carbon footprint including those ingredients were were actually farmed and then be able to suggest alternate sources and it'll turn it whether it's a different farmer on a different type of ingredient that have the same impact so that I as a brand could make those adjustments and make a more sustainable. And regenerative food product right. So if you were looking for palm oil, for example, this platform could say, Hey, you know this is a better place to source your palm oil from. That's exactly right and they are really the first ones to do that on an what we've seen in the past six months is that consumers union between being at home and suddenly really caring about what food they eat, and then all of the very visible events in the last couple months around climate change and sooners are really starting to There's a there's an acceleration in consumer awareness of climate-friendly foods and being conscious of the choices that they make and wanting to be sustainable.

Founder January Ventures Co Founder Jennifer Managing Partner Partner Cana Julia Marin Quigley Martin Chris Collins CEO
Germany promises Elon Musk full support to get Tesla's Berlin plant ready

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

04:58 min | 5 months ago

Germany promises Elon Musk full support to get Tesla's Berlin plant ready

"Moving onto the stock, then volatile day for the Nasdaq and for Tesla Tesla finished down five point eight percent on the day to four hundred and forty seven dollars thirty seven cents. So just a bit above where the split happened at around four forty two but that did compared to the Nasdaq finishing up one percent today. So this provides a good illustration of the potential downsides of the at the market structure that Tesla has employed for this potential up to five. Billion, dollar capillaries that we had talked about yesterday. The stock is now down about ten percent from when that agreement was put in place, which demonstrates the risk of not just raising at that fixed price at the time. Of course, with the structure, you have to be comfortable with that risk and presumably not wanting to raise that money badly enough to do it at a lower price and status giving yourself the option if the price stays at that level or goes. Hi. I'm not sure currently on whether we get any sort of updates or when we get updates on whether or not Tesla has issued new shares as a part of that equity distribution agreement. So I'll try to do a little bit more digging on that but if anyone has the insight on that, please let me know for now though because the stock has fallen would be surprised if they have acted on that and issued any new shares we did have just. A couple of pieces of news specifically related to the stock today one is from significant Tesla investor Baillie Gifford. An investment firm that has for a long time held greater than five percent of the outstanding shares up Tesla stock that five percent level requires additional disclosures around trades with the SEC. So in an SEC, filing baillie Gifford has disclosed that their ownership stake in. Tesla has dropped below five percent of the company. I would assume the selling has been happening for. As has been dramatically rising, of course. So for firms that already had a significant portion of their portfolios in Tesla, it just becomes too overweight and they end up trimming it back to add more diversification to their portfolio. See the same sort of stuff from our best Baillie differed managing partner James Anderson said quote. The substantial increase in share price means that we needed to reduce our holding in order to reflect concentration guidelines which restrict the weight of a single stock in clans portfolios. However, we intend to remain significant shareholders for many years. Ahead, we remain very optimistic. About the future of the company, Tesla no longer faces any difficulty in raising capital at scale from outside sources, but should there be serious setbacks and share price. We would welcome the opportunity to once again increase our shareholding. We are privileged to have been decimals largest external shareholder over a period for the development of the company. We are mentally grateful for the extraordinary efforts and achievements of Tesla and driving forward a transportation and energy revolution in the face of persistent skepticism and often downright hostility without tussles efforts. The possibility of hurting climate disaster would have been significantly reduced and. So pretty strong statement there from Anderson I think safe to say that Baillie Gifford is not reducing their position Tesla due to any perceived weakness in the company rather just their funds management structure. In other news on the SOX Today Bank of America analyst Jon Murphy has increased his price target from three hundred, fifty dollars per share to five hundred and fifty dollars per share I believe that the second highest now on the street in terms of a base case Murphy noted the strength into the underlying business that the high stock price affords. Tesla. Saying that it creates A. Positive feedback loop due to the low cost of capital that Tesla has available to it. Through follow on offerings I would definitely agree with that positive feedback loop that helps Tesla not only raise capital, but it should help them get better terms on debt perceived strength of the business by the market can help desolate negotiations with suppliers. Again, especially, help confidence in customers Tesla's can exist going. Forward to service their vehicles, if they do decide to purchase and hey, it's probably helped a lot of investors be able to afford the product, which is also not a bad thing i. think the downside is that with a high stock price, there's potentially less upside available. So it can be a little bit more difficult to acquire talented recruit talent because you don't really have that one. Hundred X upside in the stock anymore like you might add twenty billion or thirty billion. There are offsets to that too though of course, some of that reduced upside comes alongside reduced risk, which is also important in making career decisions anyway back to the Bank of America note, despite the two hundred dollar price target increased to five fifty Murphy does maintain a neutral rating on the stock. Last thing today's quick update on a musk being in Germany. As we said earlier this week he's there for Giga Berlin meetings as well as with cure vac and Bloomberg has shared a couple updates from those Giga Berlin meetings according to Bloomberg. Meyer who is the German? Federal Minister for Economic Affairs and Energy told musk quote. We are very proud of your car plant and Brandenburg and we wish you good luck with that. You'll have every assistance you need and. Bloomberg also notes that construction thus far has progressed relatively smoothly I think we're all pretty aware of that and they write quote a summer twenty, twenty, one production start is still the goal Brandenburg's premier Dima Vodka said in an email statement and.

Tesla Tesla Tesla Baillie Gifford Jon Murphy Bank Of America Brandenburg James Anderson Baillie Giga Berlin SEC Bloomberg Musk Meyer Economic Affairs Dima Vodka Germany Managing Partner
"managing partner" Discussed on The Playbook

The Playbook

05:43 min | 6 months ago

"managing partner" Discussed on The Playbook

"On this episode of the playbook, I have Elizabeth Zucker she is the Y. P. O. Chairman and managing partner at Interior investments.

Food for Medicine with Afsaneh Naimollah

Outcomes Rocket

05:25 min | 6 months ago

Food for Medicine with Afsaneh Naimollah

"Welcome back to the outcomes racket Sal Marquez is here and today I have the privilege of hosting of San ant- name Mola she's an accomplished healthcare executive and investment banker shows currently an executive in residence at plug and play the world's largest early stage, VC Fund and corporate accelerator. She's also the managing partner of Zen partners an investment banking firm based in Palo, Alto and New York covering the next generation of health TECH COMPANIES OF WE'RE GONNA be diving into innovation and healthcare. Venture. Capital and I'm so privileged to have of Santa here with us of sonnet. Thanks so much for joining pleasure so Asana. You know you do some fascinating work in in healthcare and will dive into that the venture front, but before we do, would love to hear more about what inspires your work and healthcare, you know I've been on investment banker on a strategy advisor for over thirty years on I started my career in technology, so I come to healthcare with A. Fairly deep knowledge of what I call Horizontal Technology on about twenty years ago. Honestly I fell into healthcare. Just doing couple of deals, I'm then longside got you know the dynamics of the industry? was you know no looking back and I got heavily involved. On really started focusing on on the industry, and really for three three main reasons one is. You know, it is the largest industry in our economy. It's eighteen percent of our economy. It's the only industry that directly impacts every human being in our country. I'm probably most him personally an industry that despite his side. Is Social Impact. Is! Probably still to this day way behind. For example Fintech on some other technology, so it's an industry that. Really need. In my opinion innovation and it was really true technology bad. We can bend the cost curve so I said well. I have some good tech background. I love the industry. And it was almost like a calling I said that's how I'm going to get involved with this How Technology and make sure that I focused on. Sectors of the. Industry that could bend the cost curve. I love it. I love it, you you sort of just accidentally through a couple deals guide involved. Then strategically said. This is a good fit and the impacts big. So, let's let's roll up our sleeves. Yeah. I love it, and and so and so now you know your your role as managing partner of Zen Partners and executive in residence at logging play, you're seeing a lot of main stage work happening and so companies coming up with new ideas and businesses succeeding businesses failing you know. What would you say you? Guys are up to and really I. Guess, where should we focus you know? Should we focus on fly, play or Zen partners or more? I can't. We can touch base on both really there come with interchangeable so you know as an Investment Bank banker I've done about fifteen mergers and acquisitions transactions I was raised over twelve billion dollars or capital two. I feel private placement. Offering equity offering. You know when you do so many deals on you. You know I've met fell thousands of CEO's on thousands of companies over my thirty some year career. You've developed what I call an experiential intuition You know a pattern recognition, so what the reason when I moved to Silicon Valley three years ago from New York. Play. Invited me to become an E. R. and I was like okay. I don't have a lot of early stage experience, but I know a lot about healthcare and I know a lot about. Next Generation Technologies, and the opportunity afforded me listening to pitches like twenty thirty pitchers month. Of different companies, addressing different parts of healthcare, and then you know, it's been three and a half years now and when I wouldn't yards do the plug and play. We do really two things one is we help the five different venture funds that we have pick investment. And more importantly we take some of those mid stage for me. It's most of the early to mid stage company. We take it under our wing Ers. We work with founding teams on. From product strategy go to market strategy channel strategy and help them. We articulate their value proposition because especially the first time founders. They are sitting on a great technology, but I would say a good eighty percent of them. Do Not Know How to articulate the value.

Zen Partners Managing Partner Investment Banker Executive In Residence E. R. New York Horizontal Technology Sal Marquez Santa SAN Executive Fintech Palo Silicon Valley Advisor CEO Generation Technologies
Build Your Own Peer Leadership Community

Accelerate Your Business Growth

03:56 min | 6 months ago

Build Your Own Peer Leadership Community

"My guest today is blind. Roberts McKay. Climbed named one of Canada's top women entrepreneurs at the twenty eighteen rb see Canadian Women Entrepreneur Awards is the founder and president of the roundtable, an award winning company or leaders cultivate their leadership together. A self professed leadership Junkie Glenn has written for publications including the Globe and Mail hr edge and Canadian manager, and is a popular speaker to audiences across Canada, the US and Europe. She's the author of the Grassroots Leadership Revolution. which published in May of twenty twenty. Thanks so much for joining me today blind. And so happy to be here Diane. Thank you for having me. I. Am thrilled to have you here. We're going to be talking about. Here leadership communities which is just such an incredible concept and so. I I WANNA. Jump right in. I am curious why you think creating a community of support is. So important for leaders today. Ya and I mean really for me. And this started when I I had a job in my early thirties where I was managing partner for a consulting firm here in Toronto and the owner affirm was a member of appear community. Maybe than some of your listeners are familiar with a group called the young presidents. Organization or why Peo- and at the time I had never heard of these kinds of groups. You know before and got really curious about peer groups in general and was working with leaders who were categorized by their organizations. As high potential. You know that I always think it's you know you're you're a players. Those are the people that you know when you go to sleep at night. You think Oh, please don't quit. Please don't quit. If we all have those and it's usually my own experience has been. It's about twenty percent of your group, usually right twenty percent and so I. I. my practice is managing partner. We all in the firm. All had to have a little. You know practice delivery practice. My Specialty was coaching derailing high potential, so I would work with these people who you know had been superstars and then. Then suddenly. You know the company was going Gee. Can you help them? Get back on track and what? I noticed about a lot of them was that they were just in over their heads I. mean the thing with your best people is. What do we do to them? We kind of we see them out. They're treading water, and then we go. Here's an anchor. You can handle it. Not Right, and so I started getting curious about bat in and the power of. Kind of connecting these people with other leaders that were having similar experiences, because I think one of the things that were told in leadership, and that's whether you're You know an entrepreneur running your own business, or you're working within an organization as you're told, leadership is lonely, and the further you go up the ladder, the lonelier gets, and I think for me. I'm always one of those people. The more you tell me something, the more Mike, Contrary and brain kicks in and I think. Think well. Why does it have to be? And that was kind of the the experience I had at that time? Mike Riley ended up getting into my own peer group and working with some other people, and just found it so useful and powerful, and was just another resource for me to be able to tap into his leader, so that's where that's kind of the roots of the passion and the story behind dumb. My really got my arms deep into this. Peer Coaching Space.

Mike Riley Managing Partner Founder And President Canada Diane Roberts Mckay Europe Glenn Toronto United States
Retail Bankruptcy Filings Keep Coming

Bloomberg Businessweek

04:48 min | 7 months ago

Retail Bankruptcy Filings Keep Coming

"These interviews as news is happening and crossing the Bloomberg terminal kind of fast and furiously. And that was true for the retail industry, Brooks brothers, and so the tabla filing bankruptcy bed Bath and beyond announcing plans to cut about 20% of its stores, So it's been very tough on the retail front just this week alone. Alan Ehlinger is someone who has worked with in the retail industry for some 40 years. He is co founder, senior managing partner of the investment bank MMG Advisors, and he says this time is unlike any other. As a firm. We've been working remotely, um, office closed on March 12th on and on in our office manager. Nobody's been back. We've managed to be in touch with every one of our clients. Right now We're handling three bankruptcies. In a matter of fact, we're missing three bankruptcies. So our world continues, but just continued remotely. I'm quite busy. I might have. Yeah, and so so busy. It sounds like on sort of bankruptcy restructuring side. But presumably and you know, this is what I hear. And I'm sure Carol here is from Investors that we know. I mean, these are the times when maybe there's some values to be had from a partnering up perspective from an acquisition perspective. What are you seeing, or is it too early to tell? But it's very It's a really good question. What we're seeing what we're experiencing. Or in an enormous amount of inbound phone calls. From opportunistic buyers. People who know that there's going to be bargains out there and they're just they've got a lot of dry powder. These are both both strategic as well as private equity. Who are sitting there sitting on the sidelines right now, just waiting to pounce on the right opportunities. I just wantto do a commercial banker this morning and the word that they used was the other shoe hasn't dropped yet. What was I saying? What? While there are a lot of bankruptcies in process at the moment, There are a lot of companies who really haven't um Acknowledge the fact that they're gonna have to make some pretty hard decision in the next couple of months. The PPP money has enabled companies to last a little longer. People wanted to see company owners who want to see what would happen when retail. We opened it. It would be a positive impact on this or not, but you know, we're living through a period of time at the moment where for the first time ever Both the supply side and the demand side have been impacted simultaneously. We've never seen him like that before. Part of which On top of which, when this happened, it happened suddenly. All of a sudden doors were locked and people could not shop in stores and consequent cash flow just dried up. We've never experienced that. You know, in the past when companies Skating, I use the word are skating on thin ice. And they're considering bankruptcy. You planet plant up sometimes weeks, sometimes months in advance, and you're able to come up with a plan of volume and because you kind of know what you're What you're proud of your sales were in the similar dates and you could come up with the financial plan all that fall apart. Because there's been there's been no traffic. So you don't know Del. Filed for Chapter 11 in March, I think was March 11th right? They couldn't. They couldn't even run and going out of business sale because the startled look They're just now reopening, so would be different. We've never experienced anything like this. We also experienced the volume of bankruptcy each that were that were living through right now. And I gotta tell you, I think it's just beginning. No, we're going to see a lot more bankruptcy his time that during the balance of this year, maybe early next year. I will also tell you that we're over stored the country. Yeah, we're over in wine also over inventoried as a country. So the fact that Retail organizations as an example, are using I'm using the term the cover of Cove. It They're using their using this period of time to clean up their balance sheets to get out of unproductive leases. You look like companies like J. C Penny or who had More stores across America. And, you know, a lot of those stores are unproductive. They're in C A D malls. So you know, they don't those air, not money making stores. This gives him an opportunity to clean up their balance sheet. Get up, get out of unproductive leases. And because it's under the under the cover of Kobe, they won't have the stigma. Once they come out of it, they were able to rebuild their

Co Founder Bloomberg Brooks Brothers Office Manager Alan Ehlinger Tabla Mmg Advisors Carol Kobe J. C Penny Managing Partner America
Uber to Buy Postmates for $2.65 Billion

Bloomberg Surveillance

01:17 min | 7 months ago

Uber to Buy Postmates for $2.65 Billion

"Trying to tee that long awaited elusive profitability. They're announcing plans so far. The food delivery rival Postmates for about $2.65 billion summer. Welcoming the consolidation is the means to limit losses, while others expected Uber Postmates merger too now draw some antitrust scrutiny. Joining us now is Steve John. He's the founder, managing partner of Kindred adventures, and he was an early investor in both uber and Postmates. So, Steve Great to get your perspective on this, and I'm really curious. This market was desperate for consolidation. Is this the right deal? Even though Postmates maybe wasn't a big competitor. I guess you just want to take out a competitor and consolidate in any way you can. I think the important thing to know here is that These two companies have competed against each other for better part of a decade. Post me started out as a courier FBI. In fact, and I wasn't food focused. You were eat came into the market. Well after uber right sharing that and you know, there were early acquisition talks actually about merging the two companies about four years ago. And I think at that time over each was seeing hypergrowth hasn't has a new business subsidiary within uber on the platform here

Uber Postmates Steve John Postmates Steve Great FBI Managing Partner Hypergrowth
"managing partner" Discussed on Behind The Numbers

Behind The Numbers

03:15 min | 7 months ago

"managing partner" Discussed on Behind The Numbers

"About you or the firm shore, so my phone number that you can reach me at is two, one, five, six, zero, seven, three, six, seven six, and then by email you can reach me at sue. Dear, DOT condescend -I at RSM US dot com great I think we have about three minutes to go in the program. Time always flies here. I! WanNa just kind of conclude the conversation with maybe some of your advice for the middle market companies that you serve day-to-day challenges and opportunities as you look down the road in your crystal ball yeah. I think. You know that. Don't overlook the war on town that you mentioned earlier is we find that there are still opportunities for high-performance out there. And even if things are slower now, you have to keep your focus on employee. Because what you do now, they will remember. When things pickup. Opportunities Open Up. They're going to reflect on how they were treated and the compassion they were shown and. It's going to go a long way because I. Warren Town isn't GonNa. Go anywhere. It maybe just a lull. Smiling because not only does that resonate but I actually think I wrote words very similar to that. Published at the beginning of the pandemic so that that really touches home here. The other area to focus on his technology right and We have seen that the busiest group in our in our firm that has not slowed down as our technology consulting practice, helping companies move things to the cloud. It could be standard office applications like Web. Mail your intranet. things like that or it could be our system. No, I think you're going to see that. Continue to happen. And you need to do it in a smart way. There's a lot of technology groups out there make and software vendors who make promises right and really understanding. There's two. Different versions of the cloud different versions of support different service level agreements out there. You Really WanNa. Make sure you're a. you're making the right choices, and while this is accelerated. It when this all comes down. You WanNa rethink what you did. Because the decisions you make in haste in Russia in an emergency, you want to reflect on that and see okay this the best vendor or a situation. We want going forward. Good advice, thank you so much for joining us today. And sharing your insights with the audience very much appreciated it. Thank you Dave I. Love, the opportunity to speak here and had a lot of fun and. Good luck to everyone out there and hopefully we'll have you back again sometime in the near. We've been talking today with city or condescending. WHO'S THE MANAGING PARTNER OF PHILADELPHIA? Office at RSM and very interesting insights here today on business, continuity and leadership in the normal. My name is Dave bookbinder. If you've enjoyed the program, please hit the subscribe button or whatever you're watching or listening, so you stay up to date on all that we're doing here behind the numbers until then take everybody stay.

cloud Dave bookbinder Warren Town MANAGING PARTNER Wan Dave I. Love Russia PHILADELPHIA
"managing partner" Discussed on Behind The Numbers

Behind The Numbers

09:13 min | 7 months ago

"managing partner" Discussed on Behind The Numbers

"Everyone welcome back to behind the numbers I'm Dave bookbinder and today we're talking about business, continuity and leadership in the new normal with sadier condescending. WHO'S A managing partner in Philadelphia Office at RSM. Great conversation the first segment about business continuity. Sit here. Shifted a little bit now and talk about the leadership component. As I alluded to. So you mentioned your board member for the firm, and you've got roughly about eleven, thousand employees and in we'll call them normal times that got to be a daunting task to begin with what's changed for you as someone who is responsible for eleven thousand employees since we've been in this covert experience. You know what's funny is know as I, said I, mean my second year as a board member, and after the first year. Where you learn a lot of people would ask me. How does it feel to be a board? Member said it's easy. You know the firms doing well. Everything's going great. There aren't any issues and I said it's probably going to get a lot harder if their challenges out there, but right now there are many challenges with the firm. And I probably spoke a little too quickly because we got hit with the virus and economic slowdown, and then you know unrest in the streets see so so I. Think you know one of the things you learn in this position is. Life is not static right. Life is dynamic and. There are only. Some things that you can foresee and plan for right. I don't think anybody plan for all three of these things to him. Yeah I, think we were thinking well. We're maybe overdue for a recession and let's plan for that nothing this severe We have an economist on staff. And we read his research, and he provides information, so we felt we were well city for that. But The last few months everything is you know been thrown into a tizzy and I both our leadership credit. Executive leadership and the rest of the board as well that we have been very flexible and I think that is the key is is being flexible understanding. Okay here. We're our plans, but we're GONNA put them aside and reshift right and I would say even apart from the virus. The where I'm really impressed is with. Our. Reaction. To The Black Lives Matter Movement and understand and realizing that there was a need. An request for our employees to address these matters and the firm as quickly move to have a town hall where the CEO and other leaders spoke to this. We long had a diversity initiative within the firm It's been around for years. It's been a very. Big Part of the firm. And I think it's really are leadership's foresight to to understand that this diversity is an important part of an organization for their success and that. Foresight years ago is helping us now, right? We AB very strong. African American employees. Network Group. and. They have taken a a large role in. Helping management understand what to do here and giving them a forum to discuss with the employees. What we can change and and I myself yesterday was. A day of understanding and we set aside time where groups could get together and talk about how they're feeling. In talk about the challenges they face as minorities as women as. You Know A. Q. Folks. and. and to me, the most impactful thing was hearing senior members of the firm say I thought I understood these challenges. And I. Now realize that maybe I don't. Write and admitting that we actually had people forum where people people could post videos, and that was I'd say the overriding theme I've seen from leadership. Is We need to do better? Personally. We need to understand better. We need to be more of a better allies. And we'RE GONNA. Take the time to do that. So I think This is a long winded. Answer your question, but I think to me. That's leadership. Right is understanding circumstances change reacting to what people. Need, not over promising because. We're not afraid to say we don't have all the answers. Yeah, yeah, we're trying to figure it out and help us figure it out. Yeah and I got commend you again on that because that kind of transparency, invulnerability and just. Open thinking. creates trust and loyalty and I want to dovetail that into talk about talent, because everybody likes to talk about the war for town, it's about attracting talent and my personal view is right now. I think the big challenges retaining talent. Law firms obviously have taken to cost cutting measures. Some of them have been draconian and people are out of work. And, good people wind up on the streets so. What you've alluded to it, but specifically are you doing other things to keep your your current employees? Not just engaged, but feeling part of this community so that you're continuing to build that loyalty and trust so when we emerge from this that you'll be strong organization on the back end for it, yeah! We. Have we especially during? What is traditionally busy season? We would always because people are working longer hours, we had. Always brought in meals for them right or had them expenses whether clients sites because that's normal what you do during because you're not often times, you're eating dinner, and then still working, so we had that, and now suddenly people are at home, but you still have the deadlines, so we offered people the opportunity to expense meals during the week, and if you, if not meals groceries back, and so you have an option to do that and get reimbursed and have meals, food, delivered or takeout, whatever pick up but also. If you didn't, you could donate your money to food. Pantries so and that was automatic, so you had a choice of either. expensing it or donating it. And to donate it just. Didn't you just did nothing and it would automatically be donated. So I, thought you know it's something. Those are sort of. That's just one example, but these unique things. Creative. It's out of the box thinking. Yeah, and we also increased our benefit for childcare for people because again, the challenges with people working. With younger folks now there was challenging the beginning when everything was closed and baby sitters were not available, but as things have opened up a bit. People have been able to take advantages of that. You know we made a commitment. To. We really retain as many people as possible right, and we're very transparent with our financials and how we're doing. And it's all hands on deck. Right partners are making sacrifices on behalf of the firm. But we're we're explaining to. People were going to Continue with what we can do financially to keep you. And I think being as transparent as possible. An environment that is shifting every day is really important. So people understand We have interns coming in come in the summer. We have new hires coming in and we are committing to all of them. Their jobs are safe now if you if you'RE A. Recent College Grad. In you're. Counting on this job to move into the world and suddenly it's up in the air. It was important to to tell them that. Don't worry. Your job is safe. You know we're GONNA. Stay committed to you, And we've been able to do that. That's great, so dear tell everyone who is watching listening how they can contact. You WanNA learn more about you or the firm shore, so my phone number that you can reach me at is two, one, five, six, zero, seven, three, six, seven six, and then by email you can reach me at.

managing partner Dave bookbinder Philadelphia Matter Movement Recent College Grad CEO Executive Network Group.
"managing partner" Discussed on Behind The Numbers

Behind The Numbers

08:18 min | 7 months ago

"managing partner" Discussed on Behind The Numbers

"So. I myself I'm a consulting. Principal I focus in risk consulting specifically technology risk. So I lead the risk practice for Philadelphia. I lead it risk nationally. As you as you said I'm also the office managing partner vote, Office and lastly I'm currently serving on the board of directors. That's an elected position for your term just like the president. And I'm in the second year. My four year term great. Thanks for that lot of hats that you wear a lot of hats. I want to start with risk management you. You were going to be my guest right before we went into self quarantine. and the majority of the topics we were going to discuss or Germane to this conversation today now we have a little bit of hindsight. Be Able to apply here, but WanNa talk about your background, so it's risk management, and we're GONNA be talking business continuity, but maybe just to set the frame help the audience understand the difference between business continuity and of traditional disaster recovery, right? That's great question so disaster recovery generally. Focuses on the systems right? How do we bring our systems back? How do we bring our locations back right so if you think about it if you were a a major department store, how do you bring that the retail applications back so that you can you know? Take Payments Credit Card payments that sort of thing, so it's really focusing on the back end databases that computers the user applications etc right. But it's it doesn't necessarily focus on the business processes, right and the activities. That you would need to do to operate a business so a great example. One of our clients is a broadcasting company similar this right and How do you deliver the news? The nightly news in? Event of disaster, so it's not enough that your applications are working in your data center has cut over But where are you actually going to do the news? How are you going to get the people? The broadcasters to the station or the temporary station? Do you have all the equipment? Do you have connectivity to? The to the networks, do you? Can you get your reporters out in the field, so there's a lot of other things to take into account. In, a business continuity situation. We actually had this discussion last week at our board meeting. What happens if we don't have a quorum for the board? How do we make decisions? How can we vote? If we don't have access if If people are ill right and the pandemic, so there's a lot of other elements. That take into account with business continuity, so no one could have necessarily have foreseen. What ultimately transpired in the way over nineteen is impacted the world. But. Could business. Owners have anticipated being able to handle the continuity that would have been required in these kinds of circumstances. You know it's funny. You say that because as part of the audits that we do internal audits. One of the aspects we look at when we review a business continuity plan is pandemic planning. And it is something that. Is often overlooked, and maybe they have a cursory few paragraphs in their business continuity plan about pandemic. And it's oftentimes a finding. We site that you're pandemic. Plan has to be more thoroughly adapted. How are you going to deal with a remote workforce? How are we going to deal with the workforce? That's. Ill. Could be worse right? Half the workforce could be, and we often get pushed back for management on that. I don't foresee US getting pushed back on this going forward. Because, they think that's such a out of the you know round possibility of a nationwide let alone a global pandemic that would affect our workforce. We get easily adapt to that and. You know it is something that companies have to look into we have seen. Many companies struggle with remote workforce. Their infrastructure is not built for it. They're not able to send Li. Go from twenty percent of the people working from home to one hundred percent. Can their. Technology. Keep up! How do they manage people's laptops breaking? How do they know that users at home have sufficient bandwidth? To be able to do conference calling right, so there's a lot to take into account with pandemic planning. And Said Board meetings. Virtual Board meetings virtual executive meanings. You know things like that. Are you able to do that so? simply paying the bills. Yeah, processing payments, you know. We have. Some people sending US checks, so we have quickly converted them all and begged. Our clients don't send US checks. Wire. Transfers Ach readdress. Invoicing, you know, we had some invoices by mail. That's pretty much done now. Like everything's gone out, you know we email so. Those certain things you need to have in place beforehand. Yeah, it sounds like you've got a checklist, and it's an extensive one, and there'll be more things that will be adding to that checklist. No doubt as this thing continues to unfold, but let's talk just little bit more about managing the remote workforce as part of a national practice like RSM. To some degree, you're working with remote employees anyway, and there is a challenge working with people in different cities where you're not necessarily seeing them in interacting, but. But. What what's been your findings so far either internally or with your clients about this remote workforce? And how do you keep people engaged and our leaders responding now this new normal? Yeah, so one thing we've that benefited from is we generally have people out in the field all the time right so whether they're working from home or working at a client say they're out and about so our technology is held up remarkably well right so they teleconferencing our email access to resources on on our networks. have. That's all held up very well. Where we've had some struggles, certain lines of business tax the tax people are used to coming into the office, right? They're not while they do. VISIT CLIENTS SITES TAX. Preparers are used to coming in. They have multiple screens as you imagine, they're doing with client information and the different tax forms. So rebuilding that infrastructure in their home has been a challenge rate having three monitors they don't have to. They have three monitors. So, that's been a challenge You connectivity to employees while they're remote. They're not by themselves, right. They're generally working in teams. And there is an element of just come rotary and going out to lunch with each other and connecting with each other is been a challenge. Working Parents of young children very challenging. Being able to get a full workday in while you're six year old is bugging you for snack and you have to help your eight year old with their homework right? Yeah, that's been very difficult. I'm lucky. My children are older. They're independent, right, they're they're teenagers. We they go do their own homework their own lunch. They're fine. But for those parents it's it's been a challenge and.

US managing partner Philadelphia Principal president Li executive
Bars Among Businesses Allowed to Reopen This Week in Dallas-Fort Worth and Other Cities in Texas

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

01:25 min | 8 months ago

Bars Among Businesses Allowed to Reopen This Week in Dallas-Fort Worth and Other Cities in Texas

"Governor Greg Abbott says Texas has been successful at slowing the spread of Kobe nineteen so he's allowing more businesses to reopen Texas is prepared to move into phase two for further opening up for business very importantly every decision I have made is unanimously supported by our team of medical experts the governor says daycare centers can re open he's also allowing restaurants to boost their capacity to fifty percent starting this Friday bars will be allowed to re open on Friday as well but only at twenty five percent of their normal capacity I would bars re opening this Friday many across North Texas no there getting ready but he Kramer is the managing partner with the Katy trail ice house and said they have removed tables from their large outdoor patio to me the governor's regulations and will require their staff to wear masks and gloves at all times we have about twenty five dollars dispensers around the property and are engaged in a you know unbelievable disinfecting and cleaning campaign that will go on all during the time that were open he says they will also eliminate self seeding for the time being and will be again seating customers the governor's twenty five percent capacity rule does not apply to

Governor Greg Abbott Texas Kobe North Texas Kramer Managing Partner Katy Trail
Changes to Relief Program Trip Up Small Businesses Seeking Loans

Morning Edition

03:47 min | 9 months ago

Changes to Relief Program Trip Up Small Businesses Seeking Loans

"There's a big question looming over the paycheck protection program that the federal government set up that aid money is not reaching business owners of color why not and here's Danielle Kurtzleben looked into it the first time Rosemary Bolger applied for the small business relief loans it didn't go well she needed a loan for naco creative her small Minneapolis based company which has created ad campaigns for brands like the NCAA final four so she went to her credit union they were hard to reach but eventually I got through to someone and they emailed me back saying the current process for them because they don't process SBA loan I wasn't aware of that then after trying and failing it to other banks she managed to find one that was accepting applications for new customers and she quickly applied but then next week I got an email from them saying you know the money is running out and then now it's just going to prioritize their clients that had borrowed before the budget has applied there again during the second round of funding but hasn't heard back yet but she could use the money and fast her team is currently working through the pandemic without pay we will have a healthy pipeline coming into this year as soon as this came down everything went on hold and then disappear lawmakers set aside thirty billion dollars for smaller lenders with an aim of helping business owners of color like Bhoja but a new report from the small business administration's inspector general found that minority owned businesses may not have received loans as intended because the agency didn't tell lenders to prioritize those borrowers the carers act ten rules specifically laying this out the report also recommended that the agency collects demographic information going forward an additional problem for these owners is that they are more likely to be sole proprietors in other words their businesses are owned by one person according to Ashley Harrington senior policy counsel at the center for responsible lending what we're talking about getting rid of color most of them are very small businesses so their sole proprietorship or they have less than ten employees who are likely to be a sole proprietorship than any of the other small businesses the budget has six people on her team and they're all contractors making her business one of those one person's sole proprietorships some of those were only allowed to apply for PPP funds one week after other businesses that put them in the back of the line to get the money which ran out quickly during the first round in addition relationships with banks matter according to Michael Roth he's managing partner at next street which works with local governments on small business policy black and Hispanic owned businesses because of their lack of access to capital and banks and financial institutions and friends and family are far more likely to use personal funds to finance their businesses and generally that's run out of you know personal checking accounts that could be a problem for some businesses in the program because some banks would only loan to people with business accounts so owners without those were shut out boy just says that if she doesn't get the funding it won't take her business down completely but it could make life harder the main thing that we're on the verge of losing in their office space but yeah we will go out of business but it's it's already hurt the contractors who rely on her for income one of my team members and taken a job with Amazon for example but but we're still pushing to get business in for now she says they're working on a new project to make sure health information about corona virus can reach poor and immigrant communities as well as communities of color Danielle Kurtzleben NPR

Minority-Owned Small Businesses Were Supposed To Get Priority. They May Not Have

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:45 min | 9 months ago

Minority-Owned Small Businesses Were Supposed To Get Priority. They May Not Have

"There's a big question looming over the paycheck protection program. The Gut the federal government set up that aid. Money is not reaching business owners of color Wi- NPR's Daniel Kurtzer looked into it. The first time Rosemary Borja applied for the small business relief loans. It didn't go well. She needed a loan for Neko Creative Minneapolis based which has created ad campaigns for brands like the NCAA final four. So she went to her. Credit Union should reach. But eventually I got through to someone and they emailed me back saying they can't process them because they don't process. Sba Loan I wasn't aware of that. Then after trying and failing it to other banks she managed to find one that was accepting applications from new customers and she quickly applied but the next week. I I got an email from them saying you know. The money's running out and then now just going to prioritize their clients that had boroughs before the Bulla has applied there again during the second round of funding but hasn't heard back yet but she could use the money and fast. Her team is currently working through the pandemic without pay we have a healthy pipeline coming into this year. As soon as this came Dow- everything went on hold and then disappear. Lawmakers set aside thirty billion dollars for smaller lenders with an aim of helping business owners of color like Boba but a new report from the small business. Administration's Inspector General found that minority owned businesses may not have received loans as intended because the agency didn't tell lenders to prioritize those borrowers. The cares act had rules specifically laying this out the report also recommended that the agency collects demographic information going forward. An additional problem for these owners is that they are more likely to be sole proprietors in other words. Their businesses are owned by one person. According to Ashleigh Harrington Senior Policy Counsel at the Center for responsible lending we're talking about businesses of color. Most of them are very small businesses so their sole proprietorship or they have left teams. Leave in fact more likely to be a sole proprietorship in any of the other. Small businesses budget has six people on her team. And they're all contractors making her business one of one person sole proprietorships. Some of those were only allowed to apply for P. P. Funds one week after other businesses that put them in the back of the line to get the money which ran out quickly during the first round in addition relationships with banks matter according to Michael Roth. He's managing partner at next street which works with local governments on small business policy. Black and Hispanic owned businesses because of their lack of access to capital from banks and financial institutions and friends and family are far more likely to use personal funds to finance their businesses. And generally. That's run out of you know personal checking accounts that could be a problem for some businesses in the program because some banks would only loan to people with business accounts so owners without those. Were shut out. The boy says that if she doesn't get the funding it won't take her business down completely but it could make life harder. The main thing that we're on the verge of losing is our office space. Yeah we won't go out of business but it's already hurt the contractors who rely on her for income one of my team members and taken a job with Amazon for example but but with still pushing to get business in for now. She says they're working on a new project to make sure health information about corona virus can reach poor and immigrant communities as well as communities of Color

Rosemary Borja Managing Partner Daniel Kurtzer WI Ashleigh Harrington SBA Credit Union Ncaa DOW Senior Policy Counsel Amazon P. P. Funds
"managing partner" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

09:37 min | 10 months ago

"managing partner" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"The managing partner of the financial enhancement group we have a lot going on with the federal stimulus package right now known as the Care Act passed I depending on when you heard it earlier in March it is there have been some major major changes and I just have to tell you it is phenomenal how quickly the government responded both in the federal reserve side and in the government side in terms of getting legislation out now that said now whenever you whenever you get the stuff out of Congress that quickly they're gonna be eyes that aren't dotted tease that aren't crossed so there's gonna be a lot of this it has to get amended as we go along the way but identified at least sixteen different parts I heard sixteen different ways that this could impact a family member and what I did is took our planning team and we it kind of assigned a different different areas of it to different people so on the phone with us today we have dean Huddleston dean is our lead adviser in the Lafayette Indiana office he's been with with the financial hits my group for over five years a big part of our practice very very influential especially with social security but dean has taken on the task of helping you better understand the rules for borrowing money out of your IRA's and four one Kays and distributions out of your four one case that aren't really loan so Dean welcome to the program hi Joe glad to have you warm bodies I'll just let you I will give you the the rope and you just take it and go where you want to go you can either start with the loans or distributions to pick one let's let's talk about the distributions from your IRA is in your qualified retirement plans normally under the rules prior to that the the new carers act anybody who would make a withdrawal from a IRA or qualified plan and was under the age of fifty nine and a half not only would they have to pay tax on that distribution they also have to pay a ten percent penalty as an early withdrawal so for two thousand and twenty that two percent penalty has been waived between January first of this year through December thirty first of twenty twenty now we also have to remember though you can only withdraw a maximum out of your IRA or qualified distribution plan or combination of the two that equals a hundred thousand dollars or less so that's a really big deal it's a huge deal folks and in one of those one of the planning things that you need to keep in mind that's why we say tax planning has to take place every year think about it if your income has been disrupted this year you're a business owner and you you work for a company where your income's been disrupted and it's gonna be a lot lower this year than what would normally be you want to take that money out of the IRA this year and if it if not taking it out if you don't need it you may want to be doing a Roth conversion because your income is so much lower so take advantage of those lower income brackets said Sabina if I heard you right that's a hundred thousand dollars and it's the combination between I. R. A.'s in your four oh one K. is that correct that is correct that the aggregate total between the two the other part that moves along with that is normally when you take a just person disbursement from a defined plan if you were not rolling it into an IRA or such and we're receiving a check normally twenty percent mandatory federal tax would have to be without that is also being suspended at this time so if you take that distribution all of that money is coming to you during at the same time no wait to have to file your taxes and get that large sum of tax that you paid on the distribution back in they're doing everything they can to get money in the hands of people as quickly as they can now do we I I know I ask you this for it like at the financial hits record for instance our for one K. plan does not allow for loans so correct how does it could could you get a distribution out of our four oh one K. if you needed it yes an in service distribution is allowed in during this time so whether whether you have a loan or a a don't have the distribution in service or not it is allowed at this time the other fabulous thing about it is the taxes I mean because it is taxable still all these distributions you have the ability to spread that tax burden over a three year period wow that that's a big deal that goes back to the late nineties when you're able to do the first Roth conversions and spread it over a couple years yeah is it that's another huge deal you don't normally have that opportunity so again that's that's something to be able to pay attention to now what what would happen if I took the money out my one to put it back in he you can do that as well you there is a three year window that you can re contributing their dollars to the IRA or the plan and you can do that tax free so insert it is another beautiful thing take your time as a money flows and be able to put that money back and get yourself whole again so you've got you may I have this as I recall when I read the legislation and they may have changed by now it seems like you've got the ability to put money in a you know now and then even money in this year and then you got money to beat the ability to put it back in in three years is that how you are all yeah that is that's correct so it's not like a payroll reduction where you can pay it back in over a a three year period it's you've got three years to get it back in but you can only essentially make two installments well you can but you can make installments to yourself outside of your attic outside of your employer plan and or make one or two lump sums is totally up to us to look at you as somebody who has a as of last is the administrator of a four oh one K. plan ours I can tell you that's gonna be a complicated deal but okay so yeah those are those of the distribution so tell me about the loans okay another big thing in the past when you have with you wanted to make a loan out of your four one K. four oh three B. you were limited to fifty percent of the vested value with a maximum withdrawal of fifty thousand dollars yeah no matter how much was in your plan the new rules because of code of nineteen says that you can have the amount of a hundred thousand dollars or a hundred percent of your vested balance whichever is lower okay so you can't you can't borrow money that you don't own caresses the employers aren't forced to let you do that but you can get up to you in the end then that you had eight eighty thousand dollars in your account you could end your vested totally and of that eighty thousand dollars you could literally take it all okay that is going to be very very very important for for people that we take care of in for for people that are listening to that so you want you want to be thinking about your tax bracket this year folks this you know there's gonna be people out there that say well I don't want to take money out of my retirement account I get that I I understand you don't want to take money out of retirement but this is an opportunity for you to be able to take money out at a lower tax bracket than what you normally would I mean even if you only took out let's say there you're you're you're married you can and yeah and you're over fifty you can take out fourteen thousand dollars for instance pay the taxes on it this year and use that money assuming you had earned income to be able to contribute to to Rafael Reyes and the chancellor you're gonna want to pay attention to where your tax bracket is this year as you go dean any any final thoughts anything you want to add another another part of that is also a normally the maximum repayment for for for one K. loan is five years that has been extended to years well so no payments three twenty twenty through December to December thirty first and then you have the normal five year repayment so essentially if you can borrow the money right now and it has to the loan has to occur after the cures act was an inactive so he took a loan out January that's not going to qualify for this but between the time was a March twenty seventh between the time the cures act was enacted in December thirty first no repayment during this year thank you buddy I really really appreciate your insight your wisdom you're listening to consider this program on the host Joe Clark along with each cancer thank you dean Huddleston for being a part we'll take a break and be right back Amarin ideal so the patriots sending the team plane over to China and loaded up with masks and bring it on back I appreciate the efforts but let's be careful with going over to China coming back right now kind of feels like everybody's trying to do the right thing around here they're bringing the mask I don't know who I trust more China or the patriots the somebody's going this thing on foreign Nigel weekdays forty seven ninety three W. why BC when you're living with polycythemia Vera or P. V. you might look good even when you don't feel good symptoms can.

managing partner
1099 vs. W2 Employee: How Are They Different?

Kim Komando

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

1099 vs. W2 Employee: How Are They Different?

"News do you receive a W. two or ten ninety nine which means independent contractor employers need to know the difference it's very important to make sure that you are classifying your workers correctly since miss classification can result in costly financial penalties CPA Dan Gail Trude managing partner at cal truth in company if you are found to have misclassified employees as independent contractors you will likely have to repay all of those taxes and benefits that you weren't paying for before independent

Managing Partner Dan Gail Trude
"managing partner" Discussed on The Playbook

The Playbook

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"managing partner" Discussed on The Playbook

"To help others and give those opportunities are there and I love the fact that when someone will run to me and say he winging check this out and they'll they'll literally reach into their right pocket like look. I've business cards in there and I'm like Oh that's awesome. Let's exchange cards and I'll help you get to you. Get to your goal of emptying that right pocket and like so. It's just to me that I think is I WANNA. I want to help. I really WANNA help. And that's and that's to me also what it means to be a really good venture capitalists because anyone could be you know an alligator of money or anyone could just deploy capital like. That's not as big. You know it's no it's like. How can we help? How can we help you achieve your hopes your dreams your goals? And that's that's what it's all about and two that last question. I have is probably most valuable as all these entrepreneurs and investors that watched and listened to the playbook. What do you look for his your so opening in helping? And you have a downstream. It's not about seventy six capital. I know even from request that I've made of your company and you. It's like we really aren't interested or can't help you but have you tried or can. I introduce you to. There's always this downstream. But what advice would you give it? I know it's unique to you but you know I'm an investor. I have you know something. I want to pitch the seven six capital. What do you think the best method of getting that? Information to get the alignment at least have a shot to ask for your help. Well I think one of the things that we do at seventy six capital to help entrepreneurs is we were out there like we're out in the in the community so when we have our sports innovation conference each year which we recently did at Citizens Bank Park in Philadelphia where we had our sports betting summit here during. Cas come to our events need our team. No we were. We're very open about the events that we speak at the events that we go to. We're out there very publicly on all the social media networks like you and saying. Hey I'm going to be in this city. I'm going to be here. I'm doing this. I'm doing that you know. Come Introduce Yourself. Give me a business card you know. Meet the rest of our team and need an executive summary of business plan to have you accept people to just have an idea I think i. It's yeah let's introduce ourselves join us. Hi I'm Wayne. Hey that's simple so wing that you said that and then and then also think about like look. Use some of the tools that are out there right so today. You're so lucky. I mean think about how network used to be right talk. I used to read the newspaper to try to find people in new three people that were there card group their golf group or temple or whatever right now everyone has a thousand people that are network minimum linked in. Now you know and you know you gotTa have a good link. Didn't gave him and you gotta understand what's happening on twitter and instagram and don't forget facebook you still can't forget all the platforms that are out there today right. I'm not a real tick tock guy at this point. That's a little bit worried. Actually it might die on the vine no pun intended Gary. Because he's pushing me but this has been awesome. I just really appreciate the insight. The honesty and kindness is I think a lot of people in your position. Don't portray that but more importantly you walk the walk. You just talk the talk. I've known you an of you for a long time. And that's why I was so excited to do this and I'm really excited to learn more about some of these other ventures that we have that are relying instead of justic and making a lot of money helping a lot of people having a lot of fun as you know. This is Wayne. Kimmel the Managing Director of seventy six capital with Dave meltzer entrepreneurs the playbook..

Gary Citizens Bank Park Dave meltzer Philadelphia Kimmel facebook twitter executive Managing Director instagram
"managing partner" Discussed on The Playbook

The Playbook

08:24 min | 1 year ago

"managing partner" Discussed on The Playbook

"Okay great. Ceo Great Idea. But how is this actually? GonNa be monetize. I'm looking behind me at what I think is a gold mine your visa network which is truly sports betting network the first one you are. Cnn twenty four hours of sports betting which is only going to exponentially grow. But if you take this year you know. How does that entrepreneur or Avi see look at it and say great entrepreneurs great product but the final step is? I'm not going to give you my money because this will never make money. You run across deals like that sure and I think also comes down to is will that entrepreneur. Listen they truly want to be a partner of ours you know. Can we really have a conversation saying you know what you know? The lace is really shouldn't be this dark blue they should be green which are balls are green laces but this one actually hasn't dark beliefs because this is for USA baseball This is their little And so but you know even if it's a minor change like that or it's like okay you know. Let's let's work on your your the one pager. Let's work on your. Let's work on your deck. Let's try to make better. And if they want to take that kind of feedback from myself and my team then I know there are at least coach. Like it's here about you. Hear that in sports all the time right him if someone's coach -able if they're not want to have that kind of player on your team instead of having just this wild freakish athlete. Who can do all these things but just doesn't listen. You can't just win with that kind of player. You want to have someone who's a real team teammate. And a real team player Johnny Manziel. There were there. Were some other things but at the same time you think about it right. I mean and that's when we invest in a company and we invest an entrepreneur. We jump on their side of the table. We roll up our sleeves. Were with them. Were in the mix. And that's what's so exciting. I mean you mentioned this now. We're sitting here at the south point. Where vison and Brian Musburger and his team have built these sports betting network and it's it hasn't been like straight to the top. I mean it's it. We've we've been fighting and working hard and working but also but learning and listening and working with major the major networks working with the major cable companies working with the platforms. That are out there today. The radio side of things I mean serious has been an amazing partner with us and so we like to be able to to to sort of look for those kind of traits and qualities and you cannot see Yo Cam at entrepreneur work with others. Will they take advice from others? Will they listen are they? Are they good people right that? That's the that's what it really comes down to those same values being great venture capitalists like Yourself Great Venture Fund back and saw. You even awarded the top in Philadelphia business person around your innovative all all the baron. Even cited about is our director of marketing. She just got Forbes thirty under thirty in the sports category. I love your team player. Now that to me. That was like amazing. What Jessica got its Jessica? Patrick Mahomes Klay Thompson and Julia Roberts and her and I was like that's amazing and there's some other athletes in there as well but I was like I was so proud of what she did and how she was able to because she worked so closely with our companies helping with marketing helping with their with their with their with the you know just the way. They talk about themselves and they can. We can position as companies because of the years of experience that we had in the business world. And you can help shape a company because a lot of times. It's just how you say it. That's true and how that's presented to that end raising money you know. There's a balance between. We need to facilitate funding this but also looking at your history and the people that. I know that are part of your fund in different investors that we discussed. They're good people d. Do you walk away from money when you know. An investor doesn't listener there's no alignment with an investor even if they've offered you a ton of cash To get into a deal. This philosophy goes across from limited partners or investors of ours or CO investors and other businesses Partners that come along and Entrepreneurs. We sit down and entrepreneur. I don't really like them. They don't really like me. Then what's me because this is not like a quick process? Yeah we could be working with entrepreneurs for six seven eight nine ten years on an I wanna make sure that when the phone rings at as you know this this happens the all the time. It's eleven o'clock at night you've had a long day running around all over the place meetings and interviews and all the things that you're doing and it's eleven and you finally go home and you're there you and your kids are asleep and I see my wife. I'm like Oh wait I gotta take this. And if it's not the kind of person that I wanted to a lot of time to eleven o'clock causes you know it's not about the business it could be like. It's an emotional thing. My Mom's not feeling well. Do you know someone this hospital dino someone this and if you want to help those people more than just a business perspective then it just doesn't work and so for us that's that's huge thing and that goes across everyone that we work with and we're very fortunate have been really fortunate to be able to find an identify and invest in entrepreneurs that we have very common Common values it's interesting. You say that because that was in front of a young entrepreneur and it was the first time I ever had seen a twenty year plan. He he had the torn them still looking at it and it just blew me away. I said I love the fact that time is in variable for you that you understand that everything evolves and that this is happening and I said I haven't had twenty three year old who you know in his Ivy League kid who understands so. I got a deeper conversation. I'm still considering it. But on the other side dream of seeing that but to analyze what's going on and how he's planned out twenty years in kind of think through with all the dummy tax that we paid situational knowledge. Still Take Care of the money side of things. What inspired you excite. Love this book and I write once on one degree of separation by six degrees of Wayne. Kimmel says to me this is. I reviewed it. Be kind to your future. You'll basically it's about providing value and service. You're really kind person which you know they call me. The Wayne Dyer Sports Agency which took a huge compliment. I was kind of the Wayne Dyer. Venture capitalists like kindnesses price at six times in this interview already. is so important and it's in this book as well as far as how we get the relationship capital and be able to leverage the network we have to provide value. I mean to me this was. This is a big giveback right. I wanted to try to help others and help other. Whether they're entrepreneurs in the for profit world in the nonprofit world and just share some of the tips and tricks that have helped me over the years and if they can help others. That's great you know one of the things you know. Every single morning I wake up and I fill up my right pocket with business cards and my goal was to give away all the cards in my right pocket and then fill up my left pocket with from cart cards from people that I'd never met before and then try to take those contacts and turn them into relationships and then help those people not an I. It's not like just help them so they helped me help them. And you know who knows what happens in the future but that's to me. It's all about building the relationships and building your network because as we were talking about earlier it's relationships are everything and if you're able to pick up that phone it's more than money. It's it's it's way it's worth way more than money and so I have certain things that I did as a as a twenty something kid just kind of running around back in the Internet days trying to meet people and you know and I came up with a couple of things that helped me and so I feel like it's important to try.

partner Avi Cnn Yourself Great Venture Fund Ceo Jessica Wayne Dyer Sports Agency Wayne Dyer USA baseball Johnny Manziel Ivy League Philadelphia Patrick Mahomes Klay Thompson director of marketing vison Julia Roberts Kimmel
"managing partner" Discussed on The Playbook

The Playbook

08:02 min | 1 year ago

"managing partner" Discussed on The Playbook

"Have Wayne Kimmel the managing partner seventy six capital. Our lives have swirled circled and aligned. And I really wanted you to have you on the playbook because your journey represents one that I think will be more common than not in you and I both have very similar journeys growing up with Jewish guilt in our lives. We were talking earlier. Doctor lawyer failure for you to absolutely so that led you which way the law school right to law school and get. David thank you so this is great. This is great. I think a lot of other things as well which is great A lot of kids today are even under more pressure. Not just because they have guilt. Ridden pit parents like ours chief in all different religions in in vases but more than ever you and I deal with entrepreneurs so now education has changed so much. The arguments to not go to school are much greater than they were traditionally when we went to college there really wasn't as many options. Now there's so many case studies that I even see people like with memes that throwaway that Calculus Book start playing fortnight. Righty ways that you can generate in monetize things I WANNA start with. I know our parents made us go to law school but how valuable throughout your career has been well I. I'm a big believer in education and I have a nineteen year old daughter and a sixteen year old son and my daughter's in college and my son's a sophomore in high school and I want them to learn as much on a broad base of things and it's one of the things I even with my brother I when he he also went to law school he actually took over. My Dad's law practice supposed to do right in the nineties came around. I went right to the Internet world and I didn't go into the my brother Larry did. And you know I think that. It's a education's really important and my law. Degree has really helped me a lot in the venture capital business. Because every deal that we've ever done. It's a stack of legal documents. And you have to know what's going. What's inside of those documents? You can't solely rely on your lawyers your general counsel you really need to know what's in there and what I've seen also from a lot of MBA's don't have the legal training. Just have the business training. It really don't know how to read those documents and understand what a one one point. Three is like what what is that? What is that section? Really mean? And if a if a words highlighted or not or if it's in capitals I mean we know those things from our law background so that's an important thing so get a JD MBA. I think is a huge thing and if you'd get a JD MBA at an md. Oh my God right. Yeah right young you know. Learn as much as you can when you're younger because business make so many different twists and turns especially being an entrepreneur and so just to be able to be knowledgeable and have a little bit of a background even to be able to speak and converse better with your with your own lawyers your accountants. I mean to actually know what some of these numbers really mean. So that when you present them to investors and partners or you actually know what it is in that. And that's a big thing. And then you're an expert at networking you know. One of the skill sets that you and I both pride ourselves on is treating people the right way providing value so that network grows and grows and grows. I think through education that network really starts off with an advantage. Oh absolutely I mean. Look my my Maryland terrapin networking if I met someone last night here. You know we're here in Vegas at the south point during the and like you know. Last night I came over to me like your Turkey March. You and I'm like Oh my God like right there. Your brothers your brothers. And we'd never met and his companies in Seattle in our company. You know it was in Philadelphia. And but but networking is everything. And it's all for us seventies capital. It's all about working with the right kinds of people you know. Look being in this business for over twenty years in the venture capital business. You wanted work with people that you want to spend time with because taking business from an idea to going public. Those are those overnight successes right right takes forever so for us. It's all about working smart nice people who also have a really big vision and are passionate about what they're what they're doing so that's what it's all about and that in that comes through and then you can see that within the entrepreneurs that we get involved with both of us were in technology in the nineties and then solve the opportunity of raising money and I think if we could help people the most. It's with the activity of raising money. How to raise money when his money if you should raise money? What's the appropriate message to raise money what they're investing in all these different questions? I get all the time as a mentor and so to you. What are some of the key piece of advice coming from someone? That just point blank. I think you'RE I. You raised twenty million to start your first one with really no true experience. You know is all grit in personality and values you know. I always invest in values. I funny people ask me when I'm betting a deal. I'm asking weird questions. Told me the worst thing that's ever happened. You and who's WHO's accountable for it. If they go to like blame shame and justification no matter how great the business deal just goes right in the trash. There's certain things that you have learned through the years that you can help other people with their first race. I think part of it. Is You really have to believe in what you're doing right? I mean it's it's gotta be something deep down inside and that's what we looked for right. I mean if it's just like I'll have this idea. Here's this thing. Here's Business Plan. I just wrote and I think you know it's going to be a billion dollar idea and like okay but like why are you really behind you truly passionate. You really going to because as you know being an entrepreneur you're gonNA run into a lot of walls. You're going to be told no so many times and I talked about it in my book. I'm like every no is like a not yet or let's try to have the next move. Closer do yes. I like that. I like these. Are the kind of things where you have to have that you can tell you almost like feel it in in an entrepreneur. And so I. If you really don't believe this if you really really not into it then the other side is GonNa is going to sniff that out immediately. And they're not gonNA INVEST IN YOU. So you gotta be totally into what you're doing and that's a that's a big part of it because again and it and it and it is A. It's a journey that you're you're you're you're venturing into. I mean it's GonNa it's GonNa take a while I mean you're like okay like this this ball here right and this is our our. Ceo of a die mechanics is CJ handwritten in CJ. No this is taking a long time to make this work. And the sensor in the Bat and everything they've done their deals now with all the major Baseball Association's whether we so this ball actually contract velocities spin rate kind of wear. Your arm is when you're as as you throw. I mean his fingers are all your fingers and it's it's it's phenomenal in this without the use of radar gun and that information that data can go directly to your phone ipad computer and so you could give this ball to you. Know a guy in the Dominican and he can go throw and that information could be on the computer of you know the at the organization that's based in New York or Chicago or la or doesn't matter so it's fascinating West but this takes time and it's hard right and you gotta like the kind of it's tough. You gotTa have toughness to be able to get through this. So let's use this as an example you have a very passionate and CEO experienced at at persistent. These are the things that I look for as well. But then you move to the actual idea and you start looking at it and analyzing saying yeah. This is an idea and I find that. Sometimes I'll get a passionate persisted entrepreneur. And he's too in love with his product. He hasn't gone to the next step. Which you seventy six capital are really good at is.

Ceo Wayne Kimmel David Maryland managing partner Vegas Seattle Philadelphia Larry general counsel Baseball Association New York la Chicago
"managing partner" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

05:03 min | 1 year ago

"managing partner" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Fortunate enough to be the managing partner engines are program director bid been with the staff for almost eight years now kind of kind of an amazing thing what we offer to financial his pickup is very very simple I would call the next steps program and that's really what I built this radio show around if you will years and years ago but next steps is simply this if you give me and you call at eight hundred nine two eight four zero zero one and you say Hey I want to come in and talk to an adviser I'm gonna promise you three things when you come in with the meat with me or with the meat with somebody on our team that's one way to tell you things you need to consider today we're gonna give you things you're probably gonna want to consider in the future and more importantly if we choose to partner together we're gonna tell you things that FTG will do for you and put it into writing that's our next steps promise that's what we do so what I try to do on the show every week is give you things that you want to consider the financial hands but group we reduce financial regrets that's our that's our job if you will I but we do it by taking care of people who don't want to worry about the money and we know some of you still want to do this on your own and that's your business god bless but if you're looking for a fiduciary somebody who wants to treat has to treat legally your money as if it were there is somewhere in the same situation that's our business our fiduciary and now we have a team of twenty seven people would love to sit down and have a conversation with you you can give me and you call at eight hundred nine two eight four zero zero one so when the four segments we had today we talked about the tool box I contrasted exchange traded funds with mutual funds and stocks the difference we had a question and I used to tell people once I crossed seven hundred and fifty million in assets that we wouldn't take any new families and and I said why is it different today and it's because of the market growth the way volume is trading and the way the market is in nineteen ninety four nineteen ninety six pardon me either actually about three hundred more publicly traded listed stocks than there are today there's been a contraction in the number of stocks are traded but the size of the market is you know seven or eight times greater if not more than the where it was at that point in time so it's changed a little bit of the research in a white papers they're still a limit I still problem across to to a half billion I based on what it is we know right now exchange traded funds are wonderful tools I strongly encourage you to learn about him we have a little a a paper that you can get if you would like it and a checklist just why ETFs are better than mutual funds giving you G. a call at eight hundred nine two eight four zero zero one and you can ask for that or just go to our website at your life after work dot com and your topic number two was very vocal trust vocal trust are they good or bad good shade it depends because you can't say everything's good I guess I was looking at it as opposed to not having one and just letting everything go through probate I'm just trying to play the devil's advocate I don't forget okay hi I can't imagine not having a trust though I can see clearly show you people who don't need one right right right I mean if if your only purpose for a if your only purpose is to avoid probate there's now enough things that we can do to keep you out of probate even with your house that we can keep got a probate without having a trust if that's your only purpose for having it then it may not make sense if you're after the privacy control from the grave protection of marital property for your children there's a lot of other reasons why I like the trust and why I would use it and well in in one of the cases where you don't need a trust and you just you you there still are beneficiary designation form that you can use for something to UT transfer on death payable on death that labor de that you can attach to your house in Indiana now there's a there's a there's wonderful things we give you three reasons why you may want to consider contributing to an IRA in two thousand and twenty four two thousand and nineteen so into what was the first one tax deferral tax deferral the idea that you don't wanna pay taxes today not necessarily my favorite idea for most people most people already have too much tax deferred in my opinion but you can go back and listen to that segment again if you go to a podcast or website and you can download it and listening to it at your leisure that what was the second to type of thing you could do and I have with it with an IRA converter contribute to around a Roth IRA you can't do the conversion the conversion would be for two thousand twenty right conversion stop thank you you can still contribute to your Roth IRA but here's the one that I think people mess and it's really it's really one of the the most important things I think we help people understand and when they come in to begin that retirement planning process what's the third reason I would put money and I don't know yes you do this is Kim Lansana okay can kids not here's date so it makes it it's every dollar we when you go to retire it is our job to help you replace one hundred percent of your standard of living nobody wants to have a lower life when they retire right if you go online and you read these academic articles that say you need about seventy percent of your income to retire well I have no desire to put me or you or anyone else that box god made us all unique right what you need is a hundred percent of your standard of living and we're going to go through a very complex process.

managing partner program director
Friends Theme Song Writer Allee Willis Dead at 72

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

Friends Theme Song Writer Allee Willis Dead at 72

"Detroit native who runs some big hits for TV stage and radio has died great songs Allee Willis best known for writing that song September from with wind and fire as well as the theme to the TV show friends died in LA on Christmas Eve at seventy two friend Brian that story I was a managing partner in three sixty access the new media marketing in music company in Detroit work with us so she lived in now way she was there because that's where the industry during the time that she was working that's where the body was recording in a lot of the song writers and artists with their in which she had doubled Detroit spirit so much about who she was and really one of the nicest people I've met in this business really I mean she was just incredible Willis was inducted into the songwriters hall of fame last year she said in previous interviews that in

Detroit Allee Willis LA Brian Managing Partner
Fast Five: David Horton, President of Schweizer RSG

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

08:49 min | 1 year ago

Fast Five: David Horton, President of Schweizer RSG

"The s three hundred helicopter traces. Its lineage back to the Hughes to sixty nine it received its FAA certification in nineteen fifty nine the US army bought some eight hundred of them for pilot. Training called it the osage over the years. Here's the little helicopter was owned and built by several manufacturers and in two thousand eighteen was purchased by a new Fort Worth Texas entity called Schweitzer RS jeep and. Today we're speaking with its president and managing partner. David Horton so I just wanted to talk about what's going on with the new Schweitzer and what's going on on with the three hundred thing that occurred to me. David is as we discussed. The three hundred is hardly a new design. You obviously think it's still very during competitive and I'm curious what about it after fifty years makes it competitive in two thousand twenty a couple of things. I is the opera ability. It's useful load operated do helicopters from fish potting range wildlife management the cattle mustering who law enforcement. Uh they actually use them for harvesting Christmas trees and training and one of the most robust trainers ever produced the other thing is the safety of a helicopter. I I got a substantial. Thank you reckon with best in class for the class that we operate in and I think those two things make it a very viable so helicopter. I know durable there. Lots still in operation or third in production stopped ten years ago helicopter. Belkin eighteen you know like the fifteen sixteen thousand sixteen timeframe and so it wasn't quite that long ago but there's only a handful bill but yes they have been around for a long Okon like most helicopters you replace. Parkas needed is not a complete overhaul interval. One time in operation. You can still get hard pale mainly because the retirement of the model though. The army is hard-pressed. Hell but we think somewhere around seventeen under this what we estimate. I assume helping support those as a part of your business plan part of the attraction of taking control right. It's pretty straightforward the first. The thing was is to support the existing operators so that they could depend on us to keep their fleets operational. That was first and foremost the second thing was to in the The new production going get the new production line and all the things related to that production certificate supply chain vertical integration. Take all of those things set up in order to be able to produce new helicopters. Then the third thing is to upgrade the helicopters. Currently have you know whether it's a different power plants or Avionics suite or just the vehicle management system bringing into the twenty first century on the things that the pilots in this day and age would look forward or to Saying that you know the modern helicopter when will we see taxes made S. three hundreds. We have started. Actually this week put together together. Are I e model and the ideas. We're going to probably put together four over the next several months. And the reason it's GonNa go slow as the EPA has validate eight hours. Kimberly instructions planning so to speak to produce the helicopters the FAA has worked with us very well so far and they're very excited about helping us get the next level of production support by you know helping US produce the entire helicopter I think after the first three or four or five helicopters we should be able to have have a what they call it. A limited production certificate. How many do you think you'll produce in here? We're going to win for the families flow. They maybe next year and maybe three times that much the year after probably fifty to seventy five a year would be a good average. They're actually the two models of the three hundred right it's three hundred c and the CBI correct and how do they differ. Hey Model Venkat you. Copy model of our helicopter has a higher horsepower. Engine Mexico's way to twenty fifty. And it's the helicopter that a lot of the military trainers to use around the world and so the CBI is lower macro swayed helicopter. Seventeen hundred fifty pounds and it runs the engine that is a a bit lower horsepower. Trade off though is primarily used for training helicopter although people use them for other things around the world but jacked up wedding costs. You'll possibly twenty five to thirty dollars. Our last thing speaking of dollars. What's the price of a three hundred and see beyond we think the three hundred thirteen they can be ours can be in the mid four hundred fifty thousand dollar price way somewhere in there the TV? I would vote four four or five four ten. Is it a three place. Helicopter both to be seeing is definitely a frequent helicopter when we configure it at the left hand drive it can be a left hand drive or right-hand-drive if it's bigger as a left hand drive there'd be a free fights helicopter. CPI for developed is to place helicopter Walker because the primary Pollen Command would be sitting in the right. So what's the market reception so far. You've got some motors. They we're actually able to contract for twenty seven helicopters love them. CBS and then that time we have received notes of interest. I I guess for people like listening to you are counts proxy another forty Salat orders. Considering you haven't even begun yet happens AH happens bill probably two three times a week. We get Paul's about wing to get into a helicopter. And so while we want to go faster than slower on the Production Avenue helicopters. We have to take a pay where we feel comfortable about what we're building and our partners. The best player comfortable about what we're building. You actually acquired three models from rights three models from Lackey Sikorsky. There's the three thirty three as well. Is that likely to go back into production. That's turbine helicopter right. Yes it is. Our Turbine powered helicopter. Three thirty three. We think you've got leg but we've got to do is we gotta find a customer and and have a pretty decent order a pretty good back before we start producing the three three three. We do have a demonstrator here and we will be actively working They'll That helicopter over the next several months years in order to build the backlog we think the helicopter does have some legs. We think it's gotTa play. The world especially for military trainer depend on what the market perception is. If we can get out there and sell it and we can provide something that we think is the value for things and then we will put the thirty three and when do you think you might be getting your production certificate for your operation in the field. Well we're planning on the first quarter of twenty twenty but I think you know everything has gotta go perfect in order to meet that date again. We're not trying to put too much pressure on ourselves because we really would rather do it correctly and makes it a bit you know as we start the production that there's no more kinks or any kind of issues with regards the production of the helicopters. I plan is the first quarter of twenty twenty and were dropped little hard to get that done if it bleeds into the first by the second quarter. Uh He'll be okay with that. There are two production certificates. We're talking about right isn't one from parts and the whole aircraft and all the thank certificate what they do is they limit to production tickets to what they call articles only for left currently what we have articles only production certificate once we start predicting the helicopters as the confident that we can build the helicopter sneak. Article only restriction will be removed the actual unfamiliar with this on articles. Only can you produce parts and sell them exactly what we can do. We can produce every part the helicopters for the second part of that is putting all these parts together to make flying sharing that the second part of the production certificate but yet we have the authority to build every art our helicopter. So are you in business now. Making parts and selling them for businesses to seventeen helicopters tale hard every day to manage our supply chain cups. I feel you're in a helicopter hub aren't you. You've got aerospaciale there and bell's not far away. You got some veterans around you. You know. That really helped him point of you. Know we've been able to attract

FAA United States David Horton CBI President And Managing Partner Fort Worth Texas Schweitzer Belkin Hughes Army Avionics Lackey Sikorsky EPA Salat Bell Kimberly Mexico
Zuckerberg tells Congress he’ll delay Libra until regulatory issues are sorted

BTV Simulcast

05:34 min | 1 year ago

Zuckerberg tells Congress he’ll delay Libra until regulatory issues are sorted

"So Facebook CEO mark Zuckerberg is defending his social network before Congress let's take a listen to what some of Wednesday's exchanges between soccer Berg and lawmakers is it a currency are you a bank what is this association it's it's very it's a very complex project and and and as you say it's risky do you consider libra to be money I consider the were to be a payment system so it's like me having my money and Wells Fargo bank you could think about it that way hello you we're not a bank we're not applying for bank charter I think the right now it's like that's the problem this is a Mister soccer but that's the problem that's what we're facing here my commitment is that we're not gonna launch a in the lever payment system here or anywhere else around the world until we get the approval from F. soft in the other relevant U. S. financial regulators the American competitiveness angle and the competition with China is a national security issue in China especially they immediately kicked off this public private partnership with some of their biggest companies in order to raise to try to build a system like this quickly it will be possible conduct anonymous transaction using libra there's a whole host of problems so will libra allow anonymous transactions I think that it is an open question it's pretty hard to stop anonymous trading of I missed something there a congressman I think this is probably more of a policy issue and question them but has he has your cold currently exists can you can you transaction anonymously with glee congressman it certainly would be possible to build a system that would allow that I want to ask you a very simple question Mr Zuckerberg capitalist you socialist congressman I I I would definitely consider myself a capitalist frankly I'm I'm not sure there was learned anything new here joining me to discuss in Washington it's Keren patch or managing partner and co founder of federal financial analytics the Washington based advisory firm and also in Washington and deputy director of the open markets institute that is Serra Miller Karen let me start with you is there any more trust with regards to Facebook and libra today than there was yesterday I think nothing was answered other than the commitment that that lever will get regulatory clearances before one change but from a home how for what and whether the product exists after that I think is very much still to be determined this was a promise but not one with any specifics any timing or in my opinion and clarity are the problems here is not about libra but the fact that it's lever and Facebook in Facebook's name is attached to this project I think that certainly doesn't help I mean from the hearing today there are two takeaways in my view one is that lever at is toast number two is that rose to his leg you know he he did not do himself any favors here but the the idea that regulators in the U. S. or around the world are going to allow mark hi mark Zuckerberg ten it potentially undermine the entire U. S. financial system is is highly unlikely at this point so I don't think he did himself any favors at all and it is opened him up to being punching bag from both the right and the left on a whole host of issues that went far beyond the brass Karen you chuckled a little bit when Sarah said that lever was toast do you agree that lever feels a little bit dead on arrival no I've said that before that I think this is the worst product launch ever and that's counting the new coke and the reason for that is because they didn't understand a very fundamental fact the payment system currency financial transaction it's about other people's money social media raises a lot of privacy and many other issues but you're putting economic equality on the line when you start taking other people's money and I don't think to this day mark Zuckerberg of Facebook get that this is different Congress told him that again today from both sides of the aisle show shed and I'm not really sure they get it now is there a is Berg brought at China and said if we don't act China will on this announcement China already started making some of their digital crypto currency gains in the market as well is that an accurate statement or is he just plain to our fears about China taking over I think absolutely the latter a few years ago right we saw face back trying to find and create new censorship tools so they can launch in China so there's no real that principle here and this talking point was actually rightly called out by one of the members in hearing today which was encouraging to me saying like look I don't think this is about us using China or else having to choose mark Zuckerberg I don't think that's a real choice and he's absolutely right about that soccer Berg shouldn't be standing up there saying if you don't let me do whatever I want in China is going to take over in our economy or take over this market that's absolutely selling we shouldn't be modelled modeling are kind of corporate policy after the

Mark Zuckerberg Congress Berg Facebook CEO
"managing partner" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"managing partner" Discussed on 790 KABC

"She is the managing partner of Dylan law group army has a friend and you know doing has a case proceeding. all right we are trying to patiently wait for the authorities and Portland to do their jobs investigate these crimes arrest people and charge them but that hasn't happened yet so you know at some point we'll have to sort of assume it's not going to happen but I am trying to get the benefit of the doubt to the authorities to be clear you know there is lined up to I think want to do their jobs and then there are you know supervisors who may have a different political bent weird and I'm wondering if you have any opinion on the amicus brief that's been filed on behalf of many cities and counties Los Angeles to overturn the read the insanity ninth ninth circuit Martin first of Boise. I've heard about it I have not had a chance to review it we've had a busy week in court at our firm this week so but of course I think that the first of all my analysis of this is that a lot of these cities are reading this ninth circuit opinion too broadly because my circuit opinion as I recall says that you can't move people off the streets of there's nowhere to put them but you know California spend a billion dollars on homeless miss remediation and has places to put them into the political will to do somehow made a settlement that qualified place to put them as bad for every individual in the street they they codify that in some way and that's when they are there yeah wrote down right but I think anyway I I think people are interpreting that ruling too broadly but certainly it is and and out liar and inconsistent with reality here in California so hopefully it does get a second look and you know today the president nominated to more of judges to the ninth circuit so as as time moves on we're getting a more favorable and rational make up of that court so that's good as well let's talk some calls here this is Tony Tony go ahead you're on with our meat Dylan. yes thank you so much for that topic it is very relevant to those of us who served in the courts at Sportage repairs there are hundreds of people or. also medical interpreters. service free masters who serve as independent contractors at the we are what we are waiting to see how this legislation get it back but we don't see anything good in the legislature work start and we're also part of the group that don't have a high the body is that I'm aware of date that's on there you know at the people you know negotiating I'll be happy so there's no one at the table negotiate negotiating for us that we found ourselves on the table eat for lunch so I thank you for this attorney it for others that are trying to push back it fight against this law however it decides that now we're fighting against the lock after the fact. yeah that's right I mean you know we didn't talk about this one of the main impetus is of this entire project is to I believe to unionize more workers and to bring more of them under the some of the government and being beholden to the government so certainly anybody who works in the court system is being greedily eyed as a potential you know government worker unionized person without the flexibility that was previously previously available and can can I also just say I know we're we're kind of running short on time congradulations yesterday on the this the California judge that says that trump is not required to show his taxes to be on the ballot here in California. yes this is a rare positive ruling for cal into citizens frankly on this on the civil rights front because California as. the flaw as B. twenty seven which purports to require all presidential primary candidates to report five years of their tax returns to be on the ballot and the judge heard two and half hours of argument yesterday Morrison England in Sacramento I was one of the lawyers arguing before the court and we were able to convince the court to issue a injunction on the enforcement of this law issue a written ruling stating his Basie's by October first we just got a court order a few minutes ago saying that he'll do that but as we don't know the exact grounds but he heard arguments that involve preemption of federal law first amendment first misses the Asia and fourteen the man that qualifications clause in a couple of others so very interesting case and the attorney general's office was there are going for two and a half hours on the court was not persuaded. as a president called in thank you. me but I mean he has his own set of lawyers there were five cases the president was represented by his counsel there I represented the Republican National Committee the California Republican Party a list of Melissa Melinda's assembly member Melinda's and two other trump supporting voters and there are other interests represented there judicial watch represented a Democrat and an independent voter who also challenged the law so I think that the judge was not looking at this as a partisan issue he was looking at it as an over reach by the state issue and I'll quote unquote Hodge podge of different regulations in fifty states is not consistent with the constitutional requirements for this type of election very wise and smart ruling I think he listen to everybody carefully respectfully but I'm thrilled to win one occasionally for the right team thank you for your hard work I mean that you're fighting the fight that need a lot of us don't even know what's going on but thank you. my pleasure army thank you so much for that few with Dylan D. H. I. L. L. O. N. law dot com also P. N. J. A. B. A. N. on Twitter thank you army Preciado thank you bye bye we do live in seven ninety KABC what would you say if I told you can get a brand new S. U. V. for free and it doesn't even involve a ski mask or a clothes hanger the federal reserve is lowered interest rates for the first time in eleven years and that means opportunity for you my friend Andy in his guise of purpose funding will a five minute call go over how much you can save and tell you exactly what they would do if they were you.

Dylan managing partner Portland Boise Los Angeles Martin billion dollars eleven years five minute five years
With all of Silicon Valley's startup money, where's the investment in climate tech?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:53 min | 1 year ago

With all of Silicon Valley's startup money, where's the investment in climate tech?

"In our climate tech series how we survive. We're in the heart of the tech industry this week. Silicon Valley which which is also the home of the venture capital funds that back a lot of the innovation here and those are concentrated in a quiet office park on one little street called Sandhill road. So what are they doing to invest in climb attack. It's not an area that we've spent a Lotta time in Scott Cooper as a managing partner at andriessen Horowitz it is is a big name firm it helped kick start skype twitter facebook and AIRBNB and Cooper says the VC community is a little shy about climate tek lots lots of them invested heavily in solar and other renewable energy ten or fifteen years ago and lost a lot of money when a bunch of those companies went under I think a lot of the old models unfortunately fortunately assumed or dependent on government subsidies to make the businesses work and given how fickle those are with political climates. There was a lot of heartache when some of those things went way and then fast forward to today. Even if you want to put money into cleantech the scientific innovations you might need for a cool new climate tech solution might not even exist public-address is with S. K. ventures. It's kind of heartbreaking as an investor because it's an area where we'd all like to be much more active but it's not obvious what a large check do that would generate a return within time horizon of a venture fund which is less than ten years basically. It's a lot easier to fund products that are purely digital like APPs or social networks than it is to get into super tricky real world tech like batteries are storage or heaven forbid infrastructure the physical world atoms are a pain in the ass us having to actually work with the physical world slows everything down dramatically these days sandhill road does have some venture capital funds that are investing in sustainability. We we look for mission oriented entrepreneurs that are going after really big problems in big markets reporter is with G to VP cleantech venture fund. That is a spin off from the legendary. VC firm Kleiner Perkins Kleiner decided not to keep green investment in the core fund after all those failures a decade or so ago and Porter says G. Tube EP has a broad definition of sustainability so we're not just investing in clean renewable energy we're investing in Three D. printing wanting and new ways of approaching manufacturing and logistics and collapsing supply chains and food to bring producers and consumers closer together. GDP invest in everything anything from electric buses to buying and selling used cars so long plays toward a greener world but nothing that's obviously going to save us and and then there are a handful of investors who wanna make much bigger faster moves. I think the opportunity is incredibly massive. This is Seth Bannon founding partner at the small venture capital. Oh firm fifty years based in San Francisco. We want people to realize that the technologies to mitigate adapt to the climate crisis can create trillions of dollars worth of wealth fifty years is is investing about fifty million dollars compared to about three hundred and fifty million dollars at G. TO VP. Now the biggest name of the game is breakthrough energy ventures it was launched by Bill Gates and other investors in two thousand sixteen to invest over a billion dollars specifically in clean energy but Bannon says the entire tech industry it needs to step up its super frustrating to me when I see people that control hundreds of millions of dollars and determine what companies ISG funded companies don't tweeting about the next e Gaming Unicorn that they're chasing when you have millions of people people who are being forced to migrate all because of a crisis that technology can solve so when it comes to funding tack to help us adapt to climate change the venture capital. It'll industry that gave us the semiconductor and personal computers and smartphones and social media is still mostly in the shallow end of the

Seth Bannon VP Silicon Valley Scott Cooper Kleiner Perkins Kleiner Bill Gates S. K. Ventures San Francisco Andriessen Horowitz Managing Partner Facebook ISG VC Reporter Founding Partner
"managing partner" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

07:03 min | 1 year ago

"managing partner" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Managing partner of westpac will partners I wish I'd like a cooler title managing partner like doesn't really sound as good as the banana queen I'm in the studio with Leo Lana banana to banana queen I I we mentioned earlier we had cocoa Vinnie on about the banana queen I just really got to step my game up so when I put everybody in my office to work on coming up with the core title at some point seizure of the business it's it's a young business your year at March of last year so when you went all in with that right you said your real say license Asia this is who I am this is what it is that I want to do did you ever have any doubts about it right because you started moving along I like it because it's such a and our unique thing that you're doing or did you ever have moments where I got what what my name is funny because I didn't really feel was that unique like there are chocolate dipped bananas in the world but I think I would make it unique I stand out a little bit and I've just had so much fun with it that I don't know I didn't there was no there was no doubt in my mind that it was going to be fantastic you just now I just knew eight four had somebody tell me before the rockets but there's a whenever I watch you'd system like the universe is going to ban dear well like if I just want somebody get done is gonna get done right I think now I don't know if there's a lesson inside of that I think most successful people that I meet hi yourself included sure that trait right where they they just know that I'm I'm going to get this done like there is no alternative that gets its forward always and I think when you move through life that way you carry yourself in that way the universe really does tend to bend your well and it's in exactly what you've done right to believe that you face adversity then you substance kept moving forward it was a learning fun experience for yes and I've been through some stuff like it's crazy I think I would I was talking to one of my employees yesterday telling her some of the things we I've been through in the past and she was just like how is this business still going and I'm like I never saw it as this is the end all be all like it was just keep going that's it yeah I'm just keep moving forward rapidly the only way you fail in any business is if you get out of the business as long as you keep moving for some days it's giant leaps and some days it's baby steps but you just keep moving forward odds are talking about the progression of the business obviously so you had the the the awesome first party experience talking about the growth of the company and then I partnered up with Ambrose whiskey he is a banana infused whiskey and so he called me logically Russian yeah he's like I'm launching this this liquor and I'd love for you to be a part of it so we started doing all of the big pool parties on core and access and daylight and wet Republic in so I just went around with him and I started making all these connections and it was super fun and it was like fifteen minutes to serve two hundred to three hundred bananas in the process I broke wheels off my card I had malfunctions I had to get my husband to help me and that's when I truly learned that I had to employees somebody to help me full time because it was so busy and right after I did my first banana card event people Sir to reaching out and seeing can you deliver these and I was like well I don't know can I deliver these the end so you meet together packaging and started delivering that was in March by mothers day I delivered thirty three dozen bananas to complete strangers who I know I just didn't know who they were how they'd heard of me and now we deliver anywhere between a hundred and three hundred thousand a month a banana business yeah it's always money in the bananas banana suppliers okay as they were got into it and it's for whole foods I've done so much banana sampling now and I did not a huge fan of Dolan shechita they're very starchy so we've moved on to Ecuador and Peru which are favorites and they don't leave that like starchy filmy taste in your mouth so I'm very picky about bananas they have to be long and straight and I like go mad hunting for the evolution of the banana sampling to find the world's best bananas yes for the banana queen and shocked that we had to we had to do a lot of sampling around that as well I'm like that so now is it the same bananas pretty much always pretty much so it's a it's a it's a pretty consistent product yeah now so same but in a same type of chocolate the most part okay so from employees in when you're out of my account all full time employed full time employee okay and added another one so to full time employees and yourself yes with the banana car with delivery are you SO plans for a get a store front war so we were actually approached by Caesars about five months ago a good friend of mine came to me and said Hey Caesar's loves you and they want you to open a shop and I was like oh my gosh I don't know if I'm ready for this like this is huge that really is especially you mean five months ago your business for like six months exactly and so I was like well I got to think about it for a minute and so my husband finally looked at me like what are you waiting for somebody else opens a banana business you're out like go do it and I was like okay so I went to him thinking like I don't know maybe they're going to be like oh I change my mind or you know whatever size show up and I'm like okay I'm ready he's like oh my goodness I'm so glad because they ask me every single time I see them if you're ready to open the store so he put me with the architect and I build this elaborate store which is absolutely amazing and he they took it to Caesar's they were so impressed they walked right to the V. P. of all of Caesars entertainment and he said this is one of the best things I've seen in a really long time and they had plans to put me right we're Caesar's meets form shops and they had a tenant that was supposed to be the being and re sign there at least in the eleventh hour so we're on hold with that we're trying to figure out exactly where the banana business is going to go in the meantime miracle mile shops is reached out and offered us a spot as has the north premium outlets so we've got a lot of things coming it is do you I mean so even like a supply chain questionnaire and I'm super excited when you scale up to that do you worry about obviously nasty supplying you know a lot more bananas yes getting wholesale as in how we got a whole foods isn't going to be able to maintain that but yes there's so much that goes into it and it's just meeting new people and figuring out all these new things every day and what's next so moving forward do you did you obviously you're gonna have a store fronts coming at some point soon time frame wise it all just depends on I've got some questions out like for miracle mile just waiting on those and north premium outlets I having I'm having a cart built for that and then the Caesars thing just won a spot opens up so it's very it's based on square footage when I need in square footage wise so you've got a car in the premium outlets the card that you already have an in store fronts potential along those lines but it'll be a little bit different because it's going to have to maintain extreme heat all summer long and the threat for Kuwait yeah I'm not one of those that has right ready ready to go back with Leo Lana banana banana queen after these messages on Las Vegas money resource just because it's called higher education doesn't mean high.

Managing partner westpac Vinnie Leo Lana five months fifteen minutes six months
"managing partner" Discussed on This Week in Startups

This Week in Startups

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"managing partner" Discussed on This Week in Startups

"Investing are so great you're gonna learn a lot every companies like getting an MBA. So if you make ten investments, it's like getting ten MBA's. And in fact, if my daughter's came to me and said dad, I don't want to go to college. I don't want to spend two hundred thousand dollars on tuition had rather spend two hundred. Thousand dollars angel investing over the next five years. You know, what I would say let's go right decision. On the podcast. We like to feature people who are extraordinarily successful. If you're an angel investor and you've done a dozen deals or new fund manager. And you wanna be on this podcast. That's awesome. Thanks for emailing. Emails back and call us back in five years when you've hit as many unicorns, and you've invested in as many companies as my guest today. Christine Cy is with us. Managing partner at five hundred startups. Thanks for coming. Thanks for having me. How long have you been angel investing and doing early stage investing, obviously, five hundred startups as an accelerator slash incubator. I don't know which were you prefer for probably venture firm, but adventure from with an accelerator venture firm with an accelerated, why salaried or not incubator? Well, I think people probably I mean, people kind of use the term interchangeably raise ram. I mean, when I think of the term incubator, I think of ideas that are home grown in house and potentially eventually like spun out, whereas an accelerator your ideally, accelerating companies that come into the program, so but I I think a lot of people tend to use them interchangeably. But yeah, when did you get your starting investing? It was really with the start of five hundred actually I mean, I was fascinated with venture for a long time prior to five hundred no my extra my entire career was in tech in Silicon Valley actually grew up in Silicon Valley. So I definitely was coming out early grew up here. I was not born here. But I it would be much easier. If I could just say I was born and raised in Silicon Valley, but I for the vast majority of my life was was raised here in the bay area..

Silicon Valley Christine Cy fund manager Managing partner five years two hundred thousand dollars Thousand dollars
"managing partner" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"managing partner" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"The insight that i think we have at rise the rest is that there is the real arbitrage opportunity if you're investing in technology and technology enabled businesses outside of silicon valley outside of the northeast so that we we often throw out there that seventy five percent of venture capital goes just three states california massachusetts and new york city until only twenty five percent goes to the other forty seven states and i believe pretty firmly that while seventy five percent of the venture capital goes to those three states not seventy five percent of the good ideas and the good entrepreneurs exist in those three states certainly there exciting things happening and silicon valley but i do think that more than twenty five percent of the interesting business ideas exist outside of those three places and so by going into areas by building the relationships and networks necessary to get to know the the entrepreneurs and the founders on the ground that we think we we are gaining really interesting insight into the next generation of high growth companies and we're also getting relationships that allow us to invest in those companies in a way that silicon valley investors might not have access to so that's at the inside the fund of course and you know we we've been at this for six months and we've seen a lot of businesses we've invested a lot of businesses and you know the expectation is that over the long horizon our fund is going to perform well and we're going to have an argument that by looking at these oft overlooked areas investors could not just create a lot of jobs and do a lot of good they can also earned a positive return continue this conversation with jd vance managing partner rise of the rest an investment fund that supports the most promising seed stage companies located outside of silicon valley this is a closer look with arthur levitt twelve minutes past the hour.

massachusetts jd vance arthur levitt california new york managing partner seventy five percent twenty five percent twelve minutes six months
"managing partner" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"managing partner" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Mount falcon with managing partner alan maloney any minute now i think the big door that we've got closed off the reception area is going to open with our heard and people coming through support tape in what this rounds offers and as you know there is no doors pogue bars lounges in ireland by there is no other place like mount falcon unique igt is special it is beautiful it's on the side of the ocean they would say humbly and if i say that for you and you've never heard that expression before you think it's not guilty but now in fact in homing homely is the word they used to mean cozy and like home we don't use the word humbly that lay i've i've correcting so many people are often but you mentioned weather today is the first gray cloudy day we've had probably in four or five days we've had done so bright that while we were driving around in our duly car rental my hands we'd mentioned it appears they do don't have tinted windows in their cars so typically would need the but this has been so blindingly eat his type years creators authors on lowest guy writes it eases nonguaranteed he's a little after these but you know business of weather in ireland trump no trouble a travelled me that people always feel the need to pray give up your because they weather system that below from the northwest across ireland blows across the uk then blows across france and germany and continues on more in europe and rain in there inaugural woody allen woody allen's film midnight embarrassed you know you greatly you are on.

Mount falcon alan maloney ireland uk france woody allen managing partner germany europe five days