16 Burst results for "Mama Fuko"

"mama fuko" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

14:05 min | 9 months ago

"mama fuko" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"For depression unfortunately ultimately find out really bad medicine and also smoking. Marijuana is really bad medicine at that time too. I knew things were not right just because I thought that we're going in my head ocean really bad place. It was just sad. You know I just was fucking sad. And they had no explanation for it so I knew I needed help and I remember a New York magazine at the time would always have these best of lists and I was like you know what fuck it i. I'm just going to call these people in. Try to find someone to help me out. And I think I saw one or two and they weren't right from me and then finally I found someone online. I started to see him and it was so expensive and health. I think at that time it only covered like three sessions per ever two months so it was really hard but that was the beginning that my life started to change and that was twenty six twenty six and I've seen them no. That's pretty profound one of the things that he specialized in childhood trauma. And I think that's what we've been working on all these years so there was therapy. There was the medication that I eventually got on and Opening up that restaurant was not something I thought about actually operating the goal of I just have to physically do something to get me out of this this Helen to have a purpose. Yeah yeah the day. We opened up. I was like oh I actually have to figure this shit out. Everything's against us. We're the underdog underdogs and we're going to just through sheer grit and determination. We're GONNA win. It gave me purpose to get out of bed. Isn't it the irony of asking for help being a form of weakness when you tally up the results of which are empowered you to be effective and productive and creative and not asking for help would've actually defeated all those things in you? The real weakness would have been to to not yes Florida's I. It's so ironic and I. I wonder if like my son will feel the same way. Should he ever have the need to ask for help? You don't like the way we grew up. What form media told you? That strength was asking for health. The vulnerability is year this first year. There would be sessions literally were. I wouldn't say a word because I was so embarrassed and I remember like having to come to terms with like. I can't tell anyone that I'm seeing a psychiatrist. I can't tell anyone that I'm on medication. And this is so embarrassing that I don't know what to do with myself and now here I am telling the world. This is what I did. So it's funny. How it all plays out I. That's the most money I've ever spent In my life is still on my psychiatrist for sure which is by the way the most valuable thing to invest in your mental health. This kind of dovetails into I mentioned the elitist thing which I have an issue with but then secondly I grew up in a blue collar area of outside of Detroit and you save money about a possession then you maintain the shit out of it. You treated it well and that's what you did in. You bought a house and maybe you got a boat at some point like these are. The notion of pain for experiences was a really foreign notion where I grew up. So you saved for objects and possessions that were assets and you could pass on and I dated a girl for nine years who worked in a restaurant. And she spent every dime she made at that restaurant at other restaurants. I was always a everyone. There did the same thing I was like. Oh you guys are making pretty good money. All things considered versus what I was making and they will just blow. I never saw people spend money like this on wine on food and as I've gotten older actually read some books about happiness Experiences are a better thing to invest in ultimately if you're just measuring it by what impact it has on your happiness and that ultimately possessions don't really give you much happiness so. I've come around to it for sure. But that had traditionally been my other reservation is like Oh you're just blowing this money. What's your relationship with that? As far as just making that something that you're going to invest in and indulge on and do you have to convince other people that that's a worthwhile endeavor in the industry. Hey I have a reservation at this restaurant. Let's go and even if you don't have the money you're gonNA find a way because like we're addicts were pleasure attics. We want that dopamine it somehow some way. Yeah and even. If you don't have the money I I've been that situation so many times like fuck it. Like Hey I remember like let's go to France and you know let's go to this restaurant. No one has the means to do it but we all find a way to make it happen. Yeah whether it's Max out your credit cards or whatever and you're just constantly in the state of paying off because you're pushing yourself at restaurants and it doesn't have to be the fancy fancy but it's like all your money goes back to eating and drinking. Yeah yeah it makes no sense whatsoever when you think it appears that younger generations have a much different relationship than than I did. They didn't have to fight it. They seem you know. There's all these articles being critical of them that they want avocado toast instead of a house. And I think there's truth to it but I don't know that they necessarily are wrong for prioritizing that but I would say Mama Fico is part of this revolution right but you got you kinda got disillusioned with the reservation fancy restaurant which led to you doing Mama Fuko but then ultimately then did create another Mama Fubo visit co- and that is a make a reservation online ten days in advance only seats twelve people. So how how did you go from? You know. This thing's broken? I'm going to do it this way too. Oh maybe there is a version of this. I WANNA do right. You know talking about Japan and eating well and not just eating well in Japan when I was able to travel throughout Asia. I'm eating amazing meal for like Fifty Cents. Shit like this is something that everyone wants to experience. And that was the next epiphany I was like. Oh fuck everybody wants to eat. Well it's just not accessible or it's expensive but it's not the case the only place where that's not the case as America and I was like it doesn't have to be that way and that's what Momofuku was was. There's gotta be different ways to eat food than eating at a fancy place on the upper east side as much as I love the food there in the restaurant I was like you know what there's gotta be something else. I thought this underground movement that had not been tapped into with food. Let's do noodles and let's try to apply the same sort of discipline and technical rigor that I've learned working at some of best restaurants and apply it to a twelve to fifteen dollars a bowl of soup. So could you leave having one of the best meals of your life affordably and that was really important to me and then now how? How did the reds version? So like we really ran. Momo like almost going out of business a variety of different ways you know so we didn't need a bar and then we did Samba which was starting off as a Burrito shop tree and Breda shop nothing we had ever planned on actually work the way it was intended to so I was so levered on banks and loans that I couldn't have this the original restaurant that was noodle bar that eventually moved up the street closed and we didn't have enough hot water there so the main reason why we did fine dining was we didn't have hot water. No she didn't give a shit about making fancy food. That was the furthest thing on my mind also. We had a situation here that if this restaurant closed by the health department we were. GonNa lose everything out of twenty seven seats a six hundred square feet. We're doing two hundred fifty people a day. It was like a real phenomenon. We literally did the math reverse engineering. So how many people can we serve with the water heater that we have and it turned out to be twenty four people so I don't want dining but like okay? What can we serve? That will justify the same numbers that we were doing for two hundred fifty people for twenty four people so we had to come up with fine dining menu. And that's how we did. Wow we didn't. We didn't do it. We the whole goal was stripping away the bullshit all the things you hate about finding Dax I hate to but people still should go out and celebrate and feel good in my metric was always if you have a teacher from Delaware that makes forty five thousand dollars a year and they happen to be a fan and they've been saving their money. I want them to come here feeling like they left in drop one hundred fifty bucks feeling like it was one of the best things I've ever spent money on the and it wasn't about trying to set a benchmark for people that could afford it. It was like how could we set an experience for people who had to save up money? That was worth it for them to save up. Yes yeah now. You're huge now and I see on TV. You have restaurants in Toronto in Sydney Australia as you. Just said Vegas Los Angeles at some point you transitioning into one of these Thomas Keller type. I know so little about this world but I'm aware of you as like food icon at a certain point and obviously it's gotten so big you must have brought in genius. People to help with this growth. Isn't that an incredibly hard thing than the APP? Navigate growth like that you know. Now we're blessed to have like some of the best and brightest people like I duNNo. I look at my office now and it's like everyone went to like an Ivy League school. They they wanna work here like what the fuck is going on you and all these folks are so good and they're just better than I am and that's that's what I always. I've just learned wait. You're better than this than I am. So you should do it. I just found. That's been my sort of management style is hire people that are smarter than me and just put them in positions to succeed. Yeah you're genius. Obviously is the creativity. Now this is the funny thing is I think my upbringing has done such a good job of me being sort of self denunciation of anything. I'm good at and I swear to God. This is exactly some of the times and hours. I spend with my shrink. It's like have a hard time figuring. What the Fuck I'm actually good at well especially because the people. We talked to interview regularly. A pretty common thread through. All of us is like this sense of being fraudulent one hundred percent..

New York Japan depression Marijuana Detroit France Helen Mama Fico Florida dopamine Mama Fuko Mama Fubo Asia Breda reds Delaware America Dax Ivy League school Toronto
"mama fuko" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

14:05 min | 9 months ago

"mama fuko" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"For depression unfortunately ultimately find out really bad medicine and also smoking. Marijuana is really bad medicine at that time too. I knew things were not right just because I thought that we're going in my head ocean really bad place. It was just sad. You know I just was fucking sad. And they had no explanation for it so I knew I needed help and I remember a New York magazine at the time would always have the best of lists and I was like you know what fuck it i. I'm just going to call these people and try to find someone to help me out and I think I saw one or two and they weren't right from me and then finally I found someone online. I started to see him and it was so expensive and health. I think at that time it only covered like three sessions per ever two months. So it's really hard but that was the beginning that my life started to change and that was twenty six twenty six and I've seen them no shit. That's pretty profound one of the things that he specialized in childhood trauma. And I think that's what we've been working on all these years so there was therapy. There was the medication that I eventually got on and opening up. That restaurant was not something I thought about actually operating the goal of I just have to physically do something to get me out of this this Helen to have a purpose. Yeah yeah the day. We opened up. I was like oh I actually have to figure this shit out. Everything's against us. We're the underdog underdogs and we're going to just through sheer grit and determination. We're GONNA win. It gave me purpose to get out of bed. Isn't it the irony of asking for help being a form of weakness when you tally up the results of which are empowered you to be effective and productive and creative and not asking for help would've actually defeated all those things in you? The real weakness would have been to to not yes Florida's I. It's so ironic and I. I wonder if like my son will feel the same way. Should he ever have the need to ask for help? You don't like the way we grew up. What form media told you? That strength was asking for health. The vulnerability is year this first year. There would be sessions literally were. I wouldn't say a word because I was so embarrassed and I remember like having to come to terms with like. I can't tell anyone that I'm seeing a psychiatrist. I can't tell anyone that I'm on medication. And this is so embarrassing that I don't know what to do with myself and now here I am telling the world. This is what I did. So it's funny. How it all plays out I. That's the most money I've ever spent In my life is still on my psychiatrist for sure which is by the way the most valuable thing to invest in your mental health. This kind of dovetails into I mentioned the elitist thing which I have an issue with but then secondly I grew up in a blue collar area of outside of Detroit and you save money about a possession then you maintain the shit out of it. You treated it well and that's what you did in. You bought a house and maybe you got a boat at some point like these are. The notion of pain for experiences was a really foreign notion where I grew up. So you saved for objects and possessions that were assets and you could pass on and I dated a girl for nine years who worked in a restaurant. And she spent every dime she made at that restaurant at other restaurants. I was always a everyone. There did the same thing I was like. Oh you guys are making pretty good money. All things considered versus what I was making and they will just blow. I never saw people spend money like this on wine on food and as I've gotten older actually read some books about happiness Experiences are a better thing to invest in ultimately if you're just measuring it by what impact it has on your happiness and that ultimately possessions don't really give you much happiness so. I've come around to it for sure. But that had traditionally been my other reservation is like Oh you're just blowing this money. What's your relationship with that? As far as just making that something that you're going to invest in and indulge on and do you have to convince other people that that's a worthwhile endeavor in the industry. Hey I have a reservation at this restaurant. Let's go and even if you don't have the money you're gonNA find a way because like we're addicts were pleasure attics. We want that dopamine it somehow some way. Yeah and even. If you don't have the money I I've been that situation so many times like fuck it. Like Hey I remember like let's go to France and you know let's go to this restaurant like no one has the means to do it but we all find a way to make it happen. Yeah whether it's Max out your credit cards or whatever and you're just constantly in the state of paying off because you're pushing yourself at restaurants and it doesn't have to be the fancy fancy but it's like all your money goes back to eating and drinking. Yeah yeah it makes no sense whatsoever when you think it appears that younger generations have a much different relationship than than I did. They didn't have to fight it. They seem you know. There's all these articles being critical of them that they want avocado toast instead of a house. And I think there's truth to it but I don't know that they necessarily are wrong for prioritizing that but I would say Mama Fico is part of this revolution right but you got you kinda got disillusioned with the reservation fancy restaurant which led to you doing Mama Fuko but then ultimately then did create another Mama Fubo visit co- and that is a make a reservation online ten days in advance only seats twelve people. So how how did you go from? You know. This thing's broken? I'm going to do it this way too. Oh maybe there's a version of this. I WANNA do right. You know talking about Japan and eating well not just eating well in Japan when I was able to travel throughout Asia. I'm eating amazing meal for like Fifty Cents. Shit like this is something that everyone wants experience. And that was the next epiphany I was like. Oh fuck everybody wants to eat. Well it's just not accessible or it's expensive but it's not the case the only place where that's not the case as America and I was like it doesn't have to be that way and that's what Momofuku was was. There's gotta be different ways to eat food than eating at a fancy place on the upper east side as much as I love the food there in the restaurant I was like you know what there's gotta be something else. I thought this underground movement that had not been tapped into with food. Let's do noodles and let's try to apply the same sort of discipline and technical rigor that I've learned working at some of best restaurants and apply it to a twelve to fifteen dollars a bowl of soup. So could you leave having one of the best meals of your life affordably and that was really important to me and then now how? How did the reds version? So like we really ran. Momo like almost going out of business a variety of different ways you know so we didn't need a bar and then we did Samba which was starting off as a Burrito shop tree and Breda shop nothing we had ever planned on actually work the way it was intended to so I was so levered on banks and loans that I couldn't have this the original restaurant that was noodle bar that eventually moved up the street closed and we didn't have enough hot water there so the main reason why we did fine dining was we didn't have hot water. No she didn't give a shit about making fancy food. That was the furthest thing on my mind also. We had a situation here that if this restaurant closed by the health department we were. GonNa lose everything out of twenty seven seats a six hundred square feet. We're doing two hundred fifty people a day. It was like a real phenomenon. We literally did the math reverse engineering. So how many people can we serve with the water heater that we have and it turned out to be twenty four people so I don't want dining but like okay? What can we serve? That will justify the same numbers that we were doing for two hundred fifty people for twenty four people so we had to come up with fine dining menu. And that's how we did. Wow we didn't. We didn't do it. We the whole goal was stripping away the bullshit all the things you hate about finding Dax I hate to but people still should go out and celebrate and feel good in my metric was always if you have a teacher from Delaware that makes forty five thousand dollars a year and they happen to be a fan and they've been saving their money. I want them to come here feeling like they left. Drop one hundred fifty bucks feeling like it was one of the best things I've ever spent money on the and it wasn't about trying to set a benchmark for people that could afford it. It was like how could we set an experience for people who had to save up money? That was worth it for them to save up. Yes yeah now. You're huge now and I see on TV. You have restaurants in Toronto in Sydney Australia. As you just said Vegas Los Angeles at some point you transitioning into one of these Thomas Keller type. I know so little about this world but I'm aware of you as like food icon at a certain point and obviously it's gotten so big. You must have brought in genius people to help with this growth. Isn't that an incredibly hard thing than the APP? Navigate growth like that you know. Now we're we're blessed to have like some of the best and brightest people like I duNNo. I look at my office now and it's like everyone went to like an Ivy League school. They they wanna work here like what the fuck is going on you and all these folks are so good and they're just better than I am and that's that's what I always. I've just learned wait. You're better than this than I am. So you should do it. I just found. That's been my sort of management style is hire people that are smarter than me and just put them in positions to succeed. Yeah you're genius. Obviously is the creativity. Now this the thing is I think my upbringing has done such a good job of me being sort of self denunciation of anything. I'm good at and I swear to God. This is exactly some of the times and hours. I spend with my shrink. It's like have a hard time figuring. What the Fuck I'm actually good at well especially because the people. We talked to interview regularly. A pretty common thread through. All of us is like this sense of being fraudulent one hundred percent..

Japan New York depression Marijuana Detroit France Helen Mama Fico Florida dopamine Mama Fuko Mama Fubo Asia Breda reds Delaware America Dax Toronto Ivy League school
"mama fuko" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

11:13 min | 9 months ago

"mama fuko" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"When you're at craft and then you graduate cooking school and they start letting you cook in that kitchen. Is there anything that you recognize? Oh I do have a niche here. No it's not a niche. It is very much a rigid caste. You're the lowest person there and you have to work your way up till you get to the top and I saw very early on my role was I. GotTa do whatever they tell me to do. Right and what I learned though was it wasn't an aptitude. I wasn't naturally gifted at it. But what I saw about cooking. That was very appealing to me was man if if I do this every day I get better at it right well. The golfing was probably great training for this in a way because it very much yeah. Golf is such a baby steps baby. Step Bay just Mike. Rowe improvements over years. It taught me a lot because I'm pretty lazy person by nature but I get competitive as a motherfucker on. That's yeah that's helpful and Gulf turn me unfortunately into a total lunatic in terms of competitiveness. And that's how I viewed it was. Oh for me to get to this person's position I need to be better than this person. How am I going to get there? When I opened up in two thousand four. No one wanted to work with me. Not One person it gives you insight to how bad I was. What do you think the people would have if if you would have invited someone to be a part of it and they say I won't work with David for X Y and Z? Tell You 'cause I've asked them all my friends to. You're not that good okay. You are never been a sous chef you wanna make Romuald the fuck. You're talking about because you know after I cooked for craft like I came back and went to Japan because I felt like there was unfinished business and I wanted to work there and I learned a lot in Japan cooking. Living Japan was like a life changing experience. Because I learned a lot about myself because Japan's such an expensive country particularly food and I had like an piff Ni but I came to the realization that I could eat really well. They're cheaply and that. That was a weird thing because back in America in two thousand three. If you said you wanted to go to a nice restaurant food people think. You're like a snob right. Oh Yeah Yeah Yeah I would have been people calling someone snap. Yeah because you weren't wrong because you couldn't eat well there. The the whole idea of eating well was yet fast food to eat a nice meal. Meant like some fancy French restaurant that was just exclusive to anyone else other than White People. So it was really elitist. It wasn't democratized at all yet. No not not at all. So this is the weird thing that. I had the realization where I was cooking Japan. I was like wait. Everyone's actually eating. Well I most of my meals at convenience stores like the seven elevens their equivalent like some of the best food. I had weren't like convenience stores like sandwiches noodles. I have the stereotype of Japan and the Japanese work ethic and I guess also through their engineering and vehicle manufacturing which is the only field. I know a lot about. There's meticulousness to their work. Ethos that is evident in their product. So that what's happening with the food? Is there like an attention to detail and meticulous or is it? They're using real ingredients. That aren't process like we're using here. What was the distinguishing factor? That made it all so good. They just care more like. Have you been to Japan before? No I'm dying to go. It's one of the one of the only places Monica I want to. It's the greatest food culture in the world in my opinion and everything's good in. Everyone knows more about food than anyone else in their food culture. Just it goes back like a thousand plus years there restaurants that are like four hundred five hundred years old killed right so but like that all trickles down to everything in Japan is just a little bit better because they care more they just simply care more and like an egg salad sandwich. Would you ever buy an Egg Salad Sandwich at American seven eleven? I'd be terrified? I would imagine it had been made a week before minimally. Yeah well the logistics there in Japan is like the constantly being made somewhere and being shipped to these places. So it's very fresh and it's made with delicious ingredients. And IT'S AMAZING. The Egg Salad Sandwich at a lawson so that convenience store is one of my top five things will ever eat. I want to see now. You're talking our language bean stores. I could walk down the street and I could just buy like. Niko which steen stuffed dumpling of sorts. And it's like fifty cents and it's delicious and I was like wait foods. Amazing here in the cheap food. That's just as good as even the McDonalds is fucking unbelievable in. Ooh We need a rectangle. Sam We need chicken sandwich. Burger King over there. You know what if I go to Tokyo? Mcdonald's because I'm telling you that they say they still fry their fries in beef fat tallow so Donald News mcdonagh does McDonalds McDonalds now really quick so I read kitchen confidential. When did that book come out around two thousand and two thousand two thousand one? Yeah okay so I read that book and I was like. Oh Wow if I had not gone into comedy. That would have been my life. The kitchen life is a bunch of party animals sex crazed drug laden terrible hours. Everyone's fucking each other. I'm like I'm in. That's my kind of culture. Were you experiencing that at Kraft? Did you like that especially given the kind of Cross Your T.'s? Dot Your I's childhood was that chaos appealing so when I first got to craft what I love most was how serious everybody was. It was like you entered like a surgeon's room but the moment service ended. It was like going to a party right right. It was work hard. Play hard and also during service and this is why I've always deemed as like a healthy kitchen is when people are making fun of each other. I was like Oh this is perfect for me. It's like who could hurt. Someone's feelings the most like this is exactly where I need to be. And you're making really delicious food but like there's different kinds of kitchens and I was close with Tony and he wrote about kitchen culture. That was very real at that time but it didn't exist at certain levels in my opinion like the restaurant like kraft was only about food. I could've been naive but I never really saw anything because I was always just working on the food. Everyone was so fucking busy cooking that you couldn't do anything else and it was pretty hard core. There are a lot of crazy stories. I've seen a lot of crazy shit because kitchen. Culture thankfully has been updated. Where do you get the ball? Start Mama Fuko. I'm probably so long as well. No no no more Fu so again like following the footsteps of my brother. My brother Love's allman brothers. So I love the allman brothers. You know eat. A peach. Became like one of my favorite albums and when I was studying everything before I left for Japan like anything you know anything in became my hobby after the first trip to Japan and I I learned that the guy that create a cup of noodles was named Momofuku Ondo and I curse all the time and I was like this. Sounds like motherfucker? That's a great name and I'll use it if I ever restaurant called Momofuku Peach logo. After Japan I worked for Danielle Balloon and injure calmly NIETA upper east side. Institution called Cafe Balut. And you know at this time I was getting better but I didn't know what I WANNA do because at the time. Then if you wanted to have your own restaurant you had to get tapped by the chef so for example if I spent enough time with Daniel Balloon in one of his patrons decided hey. I want to open a restaurant in Boston. Do you have someone that I could hire? And that's how you get a job working. Yeah and I was happy and I was like probably if there was like sixteen cooks in my ranking I was like fifteen and I was. I'm never I'm never going to be better than everyone else around that time. I had my first manic experience on the depressive side. Yeah and things were going south of my family as well and then all in I was also working like fourteen. I don't know what fourteen sixteen hours time six days a week but it was like crazy amount of work and I just was like losing my mind and my mom's bed and cancers for twenty four years. My brother was in the midst of pursuing my dad and all this crazy shit was going on and my reality was like melting away and I was not in a good place so that was another reason why I had to leave and one of the reasons I started Momofuku was I reached a point. I was like fuck it. Who cares you know what I mean like using that sort of that equation of like what's the worst thing that can happen? Yeah right I might just Joe Myself Anyway. So who cares fight? Fuck this up. Who Cares can I ask what were the depths of that period? Did you end up having to quit the job? Were you unable to work? How destructive did that spell? You know. It's funny it's like throughout my life. I feel like I wanted to ask for help. And Even Times. I think I've asked it in college or even high school and high school was pretty traumatic for me to like there's a whole nother like. I went to the private school that produced the last two Supreme Court justices. Oh yeah you into short shorts town Pratt. Yeah got imagine your some of your classmates. Parents were like senators and Shit. So it wasn't a it wasn't a fun time for me so I I didn't really fit in and I am remembering highschool asking for help and people are like you're fine and then I never never asked my parents like. Hey I think I need to see therapists or psychiatrists like that doesn't exist in Asian American household right. Just don't do it. You know what the remedy is is. Stop crying suck. Yeah yeah toughen up yet I need help is is weakness right exactly. Yeah and the whole idea that you need someone to talk to or get medication on. That was just so foreign. That was never going to happen. So you know when I was twenty six. That's where I reached a point where I was like. Fuck it and did you self medicate. Oh my God yeah there we go. I mean man I was really good at it. E Yeah your baseline is feeling like a negative sex and drug even in its worst condition. Continue to to. You'RE GONNA pay that option in my experience. Yeah and because my industry also was like me even after college you go out every night I mean every night. I'm going to bed at four in the morning. Five sometimes sleeping in the locker room just to go to work in the morning. It's insane. I tried to block a lot of that out because it wasn't like that fun but a lot of drinking and I don't like to say that I had a drinking problem but yeah I definitely had a drinking problem. Sharp sharp while you're talking to someone with a drinking so it's okay you're in good company bad medicine.

Japan Golf Rowe Kraft Step Bay David sous chef Romuald McDonalds White People America Boston Supreme Court Burger King lawson Tokyo Mama Fuko Cafe Balut Daniel Balloon
"mama fuko" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

11:13 min | 9 months ago

"mama fuko" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"When you're at craft and then you graduate cooking school and they start letting you cook in that kitchen. Is there anything that you recognize? Oh I do have a knee sheer. No it's not a niche. It is very much a rigid caste. You're the lowest person there and you have to work your way up till you get to the top and I saw very early on my role was I. GotTa do whatever they tell me to do. Right and what I learned though was it wasn't an aptitude. I wasn't naturally gifted at it. But what I saw about cooking. That was very appealing to me was man if if I do this every day I get better at it right well. The golfing was probably great training for this in a way because it very much yeah. Golf is such a baby steps baby. Step Bay just Mike. Rowe improvements over years. It taught me a lot because I'm pretty lazy person by nature but I get competitive as a motherfucker on. That's yeah that's helpful and Gulf turn me unfortunately into a total lunatic in terms of competitiveness. And that's how I viewed it was. Oh for me to get to this person's position I need to be better than this person column. I going to get there when I opened up in two thousand four. No one wanted to work with me. Not One person it gives you insight to how bad I was. What do you think the people would have if if you would have invited someone to be a part of it and they say I won't work with David for X Y and Z? I can tell you 'cause I've asked them all my friends to. You're not that good. Okay you are never been a sous chef you wanna make Romuald the fuck. You're talking about because you know after I cooked for craft like I came back and went to Japan because I felt like there was unfinished business and I wanted to work there and I learned a lot in Japan cooking. Living Japan was like a life changing experience. Because I learned a lot about myself because Japan's such an expensive country particularly food and I had like on saying tiffany but I came to the realization that I could eat really well. They're cheaply and that. That was a weird thing because back in America in two thousand three. If you said you wanted to go to a nice restaurant food people think. You're like a snob right. Oh Yeah Yeah Yeah I would have been people calling someone snap. Yeah because you weren't wrong because you couldn't eat well there. The the whole idea of eating well was yet fast food to eat a nice meal. Meant like some fancy French restaurant that was just exclusive to anyone else other than White People. So it was really elitist. It wasn't democratized at all yet. No not not at all. So this is the weird thing that. I had the realization where I was cooking Japan. I was like wait. Everyone's actually eating. Well I most of my meals at convenience stores like the seven elevens their equivalent like some of the best food. I had weren't like convenience stores like sandwiches noodles. I have the stereotype of Japan and the Japanese work ethic and I guess also through their engineering and vehicle manufacturing which is the only field. I know a lot about. There's meticulousness to their work. Ethos that is evident in their product. So that what's happening with the food? Is there like an attention to detail and meticulousness or is it? They're using real ingredients. That aren't process like we're using here. What was the distinguishing factor? That made it all so good. They just care more like. Have you been to Japan before? No I'm dying to go. It's one of the one of the only places Monica I want to. It's the greatest food culture in the world in my opinion and everything's good in. Everyone knows more about food than anyone else in their food culture. Just it goes back like a thousand plus years there restaurants that are like four hundred five hundred years old killed right so but like that all trickles down to everything in Japan is just a little bit better because they care more they just simply care more and like an egg salad sandwich. Would you ever buy an egg salad sandwich? American seven eleven. I'd be terrified. I would imagine it had been made a week before minimally. Yeah well the logistics there in Japan is like the constantly being made somewhere and being shipped to these places. So it's very fresh and it's made with delicious ingredients. And IT'S AMAZING. The Egg Salad Sandwich at a lawson so that convenience store is one of my top five things will ever eat. I want to see now. You're talking our language bean stores. I could walk down the street and I could just buy like. Niko which steen stuffed dumpling of sorts. And it's like fifty cents and it's delicious and I was like wait foods. Amazing here in the cheap food. That's just as good as even the McDonalds is fucking unbelievable in. Ooh We need a rectangle. Sam We need chicken sandwich. Burger King over there. You know what if I go to Tokyo? Mcdonald's because I'm telling you that they say they still fry their fries in beef fat tallow so Donald News mcdonagh does McDonalds McDonalds now really quick so I read kitchen confidential. When did that book come out around two thousand and two thousand two thousand one? Yeah okay so I read that book and I was like. Oh Wow if I had not gone into comedy. That would have been my life. The kitchen life is a bunch of party animals sex crazed drug laden terrible hours. Everyone's fucking each other. I'm like I'm in. That's my kind of culture. Were you experiencing that at Kraft? Did you like that especially given the kind of Cross Your T.'s? Dot Your I's childhood was that chaos appealing so when I first got to craft what I love most was how serious everybody was. It was like you entered like a surgeon's room but the moment service ended. It was like going to a party right right. It was work hard. Play hard and also during service and this is why I've always deemed as like a healthy kitchen is when people are making fun of each other. I was like Oh this is perfect for me. It's like who could hurt. Someone's feelings the most like this is exactly where I need to be. And you're making really delicious food but like there's different kinds of kitchens and I was close with Tony and he wrote about kitchen culture. That was very real at that time but it didn't exist at certain levels in my opinion like the restaurant like kraft was only about food. I could've been naive but I never really saw anything because I was always just working on the food. Everyone was so fucking busy cooking that you couldn't do anything else and it was pretty hardcore. There are a lot of crazy stories. I've seen a lot of crazy shit because kitchen. Culture thankfully has been updated. Where do you get the ball? Start Mama Fuko. I'm probably so long as well. No no no more Fu so again like following the footsteps of my brother. My brother Love's allman brothers. So I love the allman brothers. You know eat. A peach. Became like one of my favorite albums and when I was studying everything before I left for Japan. Like anything you know. Anything in became a hobby after the first trip to Japan and I I learned that the guy that create a cup of noodles was named Momofuku Ondo and I curse all the time and I was like this. Sounds like motherfucker? That's a great name and I'll use it if I ever restaurant called Momofuku logo. After Japan I worked for Danielle Balloon and injure calmly Nieta Upper East side institution called Cafe Balut. And you know at this time I was getting better but I didn't know what I WANNA do because at the time. Then if you wanted to have your own restaurant you had to get tapped by the chef so for example if I spent enough time with Daniel Glued in one of his patrons decided hey. I want to open a restaurant in Boston. Do you have someone that I could hire? And that's how you get a job working. Yeah and I was and I was like probably if there was like sixteen cooks in my ranking I was like fifteen. I'm never I'm never going to be better than everyone else. Around that time. I had my first manic experience on the depressive side. Yeah and things were going south of my family as well and then all in I was also working like fourteen. I don't know what fourteen sixteen hours time six days a week but it was like crazy amount of work and I just was like losing my mind and my mom's bed and cancers for twenty four years. My brother was in the midst of pursuing my dad and all this crazy shit was going on and my reality was like melting away and I was not in a good place so that was another reason why I had to leave and one of the reasons I started Momofuku was I reached a point. I was like fuck it. Who cares you know what I mean like using that sort of that equation of like what's the worst thing that can happen? Yeah right I might just Joe Myself Anyway. So who cares fight? Fuck this up. Who Cares can I ask what were the depths of that period? Did you end up having to quit the job? Were you unable to work? How destructive did that spell? You know. It's funny it's like throughout my life. I feel like I wanted to ask for help. And Even Times. I think I've asked it in college or even high school and high school was pretty traumatic for me to like there's a whole nother like. I went to the private school that produced the last two Supreme Court justices. Oh yeah you into short shorts town Pratt. Yeah got imagine your some of your classmates. Parents were like senators and Shit. So it wasn't a it wasn't a fun time for me so I I didn't really fit in and I am remembering highschool asking for help and people are like you're fine and then I never never asked my parents like. Hey I think I need to see therapists or psychiatrists like that doesn't exist in Asian American household right. Just don't do it. You know what the remedy is is. Stop crying suck. Yeah yeah toughen up yet I need help is is weakness right exactly. Yeah and the whole idea that you need someone to talk to or get medication on. That was just so foreign. That was never going to happen. So you know when I was twenty six. That's where I reached a point where I was like. Fuck it and did you self medicate. Oh my God yeah there we go. I mean man I was really good at it. E Yeah your baseline is feeling like a negative sex and drug even in its worst condition. Continue to to. You'RE GONNA pay that option in my experience. Yeah and because my industry also was like me even after college you go out every night I mean every night. I'm going to bed at four in the morning. Five sometimes sleeping in the locker room just to go to work in the morning. It's insane. I tried to block a lot of that out because it wasn't like that fun but a lot of drinking and I don't like to say that I had a drinking problem but yeah I definitely had a drinking problem. Sharp sharp while you're talking to someone with a drinking so it's okay you're in good company bad medicine.

Japan Golf Rowe Kraft Step Bay David sous chef Romuald McDonalds White People America Boston Supreme Court Burger King lawson Tokyo Mama Fuko tiffany allman
"mama fuko" Discussed on Relevant Podcast

Relevant Podcast

04:08 min | 11 months ago

"mama fuko" Discussed on Relevant Podcast

"Rogan talking about this Gods Plant. Ooh this one sounded Chandler emerges emerges from quarantine is like. Well I watch a lot of netflix documentaries. Looks like I'm never eating beef again. Wasco RETREAT WITH JARED LETO. Understand my own faith okay. I know so. Ugly delicious is a show from. He's a celebrity chef. Yeah I'm familiar with it. I I don't have he. He his restaurant Mama fuko which is several locations in big cities around. The world is really great Cameron I actually eight years ago when we're going this Summer League in Vegas is awesome like totally great restaurant. But David Chang is he's a really compelling host you know he was mentored to a degree by Anthony Bourdain and he really brings that sort of non pretentious approach to cooking and travel travels a huge part of it and e you know has irreverent approach. Especially if you watch shows like chefs table that take itself Mary. Seriously you know ugly delicious. Who are a punk rock thing? It's a lot of fun really great show. I would suggest starting with season one and not starting with the pilot of season two because that is a very different kind of episode. But it's very very good but I think it'd benefit people to kind of get to nose personality before they watch the pilot of season two Which for it's a beautiful episode. But it's about him becoming a father what it's like being a parent and through the Lens of people who think about food So ugly delicious recommendation or one jeopardy number two. There's a great movie on Netflix. Called Hell or high water. It came out a few years ago. What Chris Pine Jeff Bridges it is. It is sort of a contemporary western in that it takes place in relatively recent times post recession East Texas. And I don't want to give too much away from the plot but it it centers around two brothers and a in a Texas ranger who is hot on their tail. After a are involved in a series of bank robberies. It goes on a lot of very unexpected directions. It's very. It's an extremely morally complex movie. That actually has a lot to say about violence about the banking system in America about capitalism age about death fantastic movie tallahassee. In Hell or high water I love hell or high water. It's fantastic she taylor. Have you seen that movie? I don't think so no stress. It is on Netflix. When people send you their log INS and you're watching check it out you're watching all your all your weird food documentaries conspiracy conspiracy ancient alien stuff. Yeah you can you can queue up hell or high water also this one is in probably all that groundbreaking but this is a really fun time to jump back into the breaking bad universe season. Five of better call Saul is on TV right now. They just had the fifth episode of the season last night on AMC but all the previous episodes of better call Saul which are as good if not better than breaking bad or on net flicks the entire see. The entire run of breaking bad is on Netflix and the netflix original El Camino which picks up after breaking bad left off. They're all on Netflix. So re diving into the breaking bad universe is a lot of fun because you forget how great all of the that those shows are and finally this. What is in some cool windy but I actually? I've seen it twice now and I watched it again Two nights ago and laugh justice hard this time as I did the first time. It's the between two ferns movie. Did you guys have? I'm sure you guys both saw it. I did it no. I don't make I wouldn't.

Netflix JARED LETO Saul Texas Rogan Gods Plant Chandler David Chang Anthony Bourdain Chris Pine Cameron Vegas AMC America tallahassee
"mama fuko" Discussed on Startups For the Rest of Us

Startups For the Rest of Us

06:36 min | 11 months ago

"mama fuko" Discussed on Startups For the Rest of Us

"Just choose. Click that inhibit cell and I'll get the money for that entire thing front minus the fifty percent. I love the innovation all the innovation. That's happening in the in the financial models around. Sassy because that you're right. That is the biggest. Achilles heel is the long slow ramp up. Death it's awesome. It's just a relationship with you and your and your billing software and when you say sell the customer is that they're acquiring the customers information for use your. You are still. They're still in your stripe account the you're collecting money. You're charging their card every month like like normal but then they will see that customer pain stripe cool will take that much money from your bank account pretty interesting if you need money in the short term. Yeah I mean I know folks you know looking at raising around or doing debt kinda financing their SAS revenue. But that's a that's what I'm looking. I'm looking at the same thing so I I look at them and I'm like Oh that's basically just taking your m. r. and creating a line of revenue off of the are and then not actually putting any debt on the balance sheet and also not saying like equity. I was like what what is what is the Catcher. Because that is that's very attractive. Well I think the catch is like when you think about risk. Well I think there is some risk but I also think it's you're basically spending future earnings. It's almost like when you put me on a credit card. Now that's technically dead and this is not but when you put money on credit card you basically are spending future earnings before you have them. And that's what this is in essence so there is some danger. I think if you're prudent managing cash and you know where that cash is. GonNa go or your spot where you know you do. Think you need some some dry powder in coffers. I think it's a interesting certainly and interesting avenue. Look at wrapping us up for today. I'm curious from each of you. What is your favorite podcast right now. I mean right now because you know sometimes I have a favorite podcast for like two months and I have been Jamal and then I move on so you WanNa go first out. Gosh don't go fifty I. I'm like I'm the worst podcasts. Because I I have a hard time podcast because I know some people are able to play to speed and then go through all their their backlog and then for me it's like oh my gosh around the time I can only do one x that said and as a Dorky one. I'm still a big fan of adventure zone. It's by the ball brothers. My brothers and me. It's thirty Andy podcast. Also my brother brother brother my brother and me is is another one. I listened to it just because I need to turn my brain off from work. I listen to a lot of work where they podcast. Starts the rest of us out of Beta a lot of other ones and it's really nice to have something that's just a bunch of people just in a room together having fun. I would say that would be my answer as adventures O and and by extension my brother my brother. How about you during yeah? I'm just going to reject your premise entirely mentioned several my favorite podcasts. Picking my favorite. So I need to be kind of generic and I absolutely loved the Joe Rogan podcast. It is it's interesting. It is just really interesting. Challenge a lot of your thoughts and is entertaining. It's funny and they're so much of it so you don't have to listen. Everyone fully entertained. I also loved the Dave. Chang show the chef Dave Chang from Mama Fuko has a great podcast. That is about food but also about creativity brings people on from his network in the Bill Simmons World. So that's a very interesting one. Unlike Brian Koppelman the moment and I absolutely love the story pirates. That podcast is so good. It's for kids. I can't so look I drive my four year old To school every day. And it's about twenty minute ride. So that's what she wants. Listen to and we just laugh our off about it. It is these extremely talented actors. That take stories that were written by kids and dramatize them and turn them into story and song and so on and it's so brilliant and so entertaining and the kids all love it in. It's like you don't mind listening to it as I don't know how. Many more times listened to the descendants three soundtrack before I banged my head against the wall so story pirates victims Yummy as well. They've written books that kids have. We actually saw them live. That came to Minneapolis and performed at the Parkway Theater and we went and saw they do a bunch of Improv. Right I mean they're really talented Improv actors and so you saw Lee mini. Oh my gosh. We totally did and for me. I mean the one. I listen to forty podcasts. I'm not gonna read through them but the one that I'm really digging right now is reply all from killing media and you know it's a good you have a good podcast when every time. I look at the title typically. I'm like that sounds totally not interesting. I don't care about that and I read the description and be like and it went up by the time three minutes in. I'm like I care so much about this I. I'm sitting in my driveway waiting for it to finish before I walk in the House type thing. So that's been a big one and then I've actually been listening. There's an old D. podcasts. Been around for ten years is not actual place. I can't listen to people playing. I play it and I like it but I cannot listen so I can't do adventure zone tried and I just I can't get into it. There's one where they talk about the lower and the history and they talk about the books and talk about rules and had to be a better. Dm and just all the stuff around at the meadow which of course I'm always interested in can't just start a company to talk about starting companies right. Can't just play Guitar. Have to learn how they're made gameplay do you. Do you have to learn? Learn how it's how the created but save or die and saved for half or the two that I'm really into one who's been around ten years so that's going to wrap us up today if folks want to catch up with Jordan you're Jordan Gall on twitter and hey do I pronounce your last name Right. Is it gall is called. Yes okay. It's not because I used to call you Jordan Gal but that's not because that's spelled right. I heard your pregnancy different so Jordan on twitter and Tracy Tracy makes on twitter because her domain her website is tracey. Osborne DOT COM. So if I if I could get tracey. Osborne Twitter. I would but I did not I had a out of some people might know my twitter user name and that was a terrible idea and tracy makes us better than what I had before. And that's what I have. It's all there and then if you're interested in podcast check out Jordan on bootstrapped web. Thanks so much for joining us today. Thank you thanks to be honest. That was a it was a fun show to prep for and record. Hope you enjoyed it. Certainly feel free to reach out. You can reach out privately questions to the rest of US dot com if you have constructive feedback if you want to give some accolades. If thumbs up me up on twitter at Rob Walling and I look forward to hearing from you..

twitter Jordan Tracy Tracy Joe Rogan Brian Koppelman US Jordan Gal Minneapolis Jamal Dave Chang Bill Simmons World Andy O Parkway Theater Rob Walling Lee Jordan Gall
"mama fuko" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"mama fuko" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"And I'm wondering if that ties back to the underbelly and that resilience, and if you're enjoying that part of it is what fuels or helps to create or foster that resilience. It definitely does. I think about like how much my brain. And my using an day, if the butter delivery didn't show up what I have really celebrated heavy cream, right? Like, guess what? Guess we'll butter is is just. Dairy churned into butter with the wa-. I mean, I won't get technical about it. I'm learning a lot. And I was so proud of that moment of being like, I would never I look at heavy cream differently because the day that I was like, well, we can't not make the frosting for these cakes that resilience that accessing being forced like for me, I kind of put my my hand in front of my face. And I always put it kind of above the nostrils of my nose. And I go like this is where I'm at my best. Because when I'm like fighting to keep just that part of my knows where can get a breath of air in when I have to fight to keep that to keep my head above that just for breath or to a met my best because a more plugged in plugged into my environment. I'm in this beautiful battle mode of like, how am I gonna work this out? How am I gonna take this idea this dream and make it a reality? Because it's an everyday it's an everyday when no one's looking that it matters. And I feel most alive in those. Moments. I don't feel alive when things are going. Well, I'm not complaining on the days. Go. Well, I celebrate them. But I'm not I don't feel alive. I just feel relaxed and relaxed gets old at least to me pretty quickly. Well, it sounds like that's when you get your most creative of. Yeah. Back me into a corner girl, and I will come out fighting because that's when else are you going to look at a box of cornflakes and be like, maybe you're willing to be daring, you're willing to take bigger risks. And to be honest, you're willing to see something to make something out of nothing. And it's the making something out of nothing that has really been the secret to it. All I mean, milk bar was made out of nothing or the very least very little and everything about it is making something out of nothing, and that's the currency of it. Right. Like, it's how do you put how do you value creativity? But creativity is all there is developed you. Let's. Talk about some of your side hustles. Over the years you've written several books your first, mama Fuko milk bar came out in twenty eleven. Did you experience any paranoia at all giving away any of your recipes? Now, like call that silly or goofy probably both. But I stand behind it. My philosophy was very simple. I reference my grandma's a lot because I spent a lot of time with them growing up. They were my best friends. They were my biggest cheerleaders. They also real talked me the most. And I was like I learned how to bake because someone gave them a recipe because they gave me their recipe. We wouldn't know how to make chip cookies if someone didn't give us that recipe did oh apple pie again. Like, if someone needs help you stand up, and you help them if someone needs a shirt, you give them the shirt off your back, and you share like, that's what what are you here for like, what do you stand to gain by not sharing has always been my mantra share? I'm assume. Naming that because your germs unique to you may be. Version of your own recipes do indeed tastes different than anybody else's that are making the same thing. Yeah. Well, the thing that I always say with my team because of course, the reality is that plenty of people are putting our items on their menus and calling them their own. And the thing that I'd go back to is. We're the ones who created it. So we know why there's this much light Brown sugar. There's this much solder. There's this many pretzels or potato chips or coffee ground. We know why we mix it as long..

wa milk
"mama fuko" Discussed on The Dave Chang Show

The Dave Chang Show

05:41 min | 2 years ago

"mama fuko" Discussed on The Dave Chang Show

"Taking chances and doing something great and different. And it always bothers me when people don't get the recognition that they deserve. And no one again wanted to happen after the fact, and when I took some time to see just your influence on food. And I actually was like, oh, man people copying you left. And right. And it's something I never took advantage of when we opened up who listen, I don't want to sound like conceited bastard. I didn't invent anything either. But like what we did. And I just didn't know how to like move faster, and I didn't want to cook that way either I didn't want to go buy up in like two doors down from. I lived in New York when you open mama Fuko, and I just remember like noodle bar. Maybe like six months later opening right down the street. Like, oh, this place is busy like we can do this too. And it was a it was shot in the dark, and I just didn't understand how things would move. Right. And this is even before like social. Media. But was like if there's someone else I care about it. Hopefully, it never happens to them too. Because I was not in a position to take advantage, financially or move as fast and also a stubborn fucking. You'll still am I didn't wanna like replicate. Same thing was the furthest thing I ever wanted to fuck and do a little bit different now. But I wanna find a way to do it on my own terms. And I saw that rapidly raccoon your food was being rapidly copied, and I knew after the publication of the book, it's only going to happen more. So I mean, we're cutting out with the jam book in twenty twenty spring a twenty twenty I think that it's going to be really interesting the GOP yet. Yeah. And part of me is like why why are we doing it? And it's ownership. It's ownership of of that saying like, look, this is something that we've been doing professionally as as a brand says twenty eleven who else is doing it at this level and at the scale and at this technique and at this quantity. And that's why I wanted you. If you could. Could to open up as many as possible as long as they could be done. Well, so people would know like, I don't think people understand just how hard it is to carve out a voice when everything is the say, and I think when your critics could probably say like well like she made something like anyone could have made. So she can't claim to it. It's a really slippery slope to talk about without sounding like a self-indulgent asshole. Right. But the fact of the matter is how you did things is no different than any other. I would say artists that put something together that is your voice, and when other people copy that voice, I get fucking pets. I I hate it. So much. Step down. Yeah. I don't know. I mean, how do you feel when that happens, right? Like, it's obviously flattering. It's flattering. It's flat. You know, what is I think the hardest thing too. And this is for any industry is that there's always someone Hungary coming up, right? When squirrel started. No one was really doing breakfast lunch at the quality world, no alcohol, you're doing significant sales with no alkyl. That is the hardest way to do. It is the hardest way. And I just remember Joe cya Citron from Molise being like, I'll never do that model service. You make no money like go have fun doing that. You know? And I think people seeing that it can somehow work, and what it takes a work is moving the line moving people through which is also the hard part about that service. You know, I've started to see other places around squirrel opening with very similar all day concepts which in some ways reduces how busy we are. You know? So it does take people away from from what we're doing because they're trying out a new place. But my biggest fear was that. They wouldn't come back. It's not been the case though. It's not been the case. He's a low you more than over the line has never really stopped. It. It's slower I kind of want to get one of those CAT's cameras that are like come now or like the crispy cream sign that's like hot donuts short line. But I think that is my concern is that there are a lot of options continuing to open in the food space in in LA. And that's why we have to keep iterating. And that's why you have to just keep being betters. You can't stop the fear of someone on your tail is a real fear that I have how do you expand, squirrel? When so much of what you do is based on time and place in tower, right? I would love, and I pretty sure like, and I know that you've thought about it would love to have a squirrel. I think all of Manhattan about that, squirrel. Squirrel away. Something that could be. Yeah. Because it wouldn't have the same level of terroir. It's really hard here because we preserve all the Meyer. Lemons like, how are you? We preserve them here and then ship them or you. And the problem is if you're buying preserve Lyman said are not made fresh, they taste like Palmolive. They just tastes like like a soap. It's not the same flavor. So that's been the challenge of evolving, squirrel, is that everything is like all of our jams are still made in house or doing thirty five thousand jars year in copper jam pans that make twenty five to thirty jars time that's ten thousand pots cham-, we make a year by hand something has to give at some point. But for now, I don't know. It's like, how do you? This is what I've made for myself is like ticking time bomb. Yeah.

Palmolive Joe cya Citron Hungary GOP mama Fuko Molise Lyman LA New York Meyer Manhattan six months
"mama fuko" Discussed on Artist Soapbox * Local Artists on Creative Process

Artist Soapbox * Local Artists on Creative Process

06:14 min | 2 years ago

"mama fuko" Discussed on Artist Soapbox * Local Artists on Creative Process

"That? It's what I do in these paintings on. I call it molecular molecular gastronomy, and if you don't know when molecular gastronomy is he was started. I believe in Spain by the chef that we and molecular gastronomy, you take a dish. And you constructed molecular -ly, you can have a bubble on a little spoon. And literally when you eat it, it tastes like clam chowder like he's really deconstructed is really change into this really simple small aspects of molecules. So I do this for painting on my paintings extremely abstract and minimalist. So maybe one of my paintings. Have like a black square a red, circle and to scribbles. So he's not I'm not painting about food. I'm painting inspired by food. I know that for chef on lamonica is sent through the dish that I did for her was I know galleys, and it's a green chili cooked with an almond white sauce. So literally for the chilly, I literally have a single green line. So the paintings don't look anything like the dish and isn't purpose because I don't want people to come in expecting to see the food. I want people to come in and see this really minimalist simple painting that has an honor tone of food. My first duty is to make paintings. They're inspired by she buoy their inspired by food. They're inspired by the black square by my leverage, the blacks where is my favorite paintings. And we'll times it's literally painting a black square. But I'm obsessed with it. I find his painting sexy. It again, it just it makes me dream this painting. It's weird. I'm obsessed with this thing. But my paintings have to be I about simplicity, and she really and second it's inspiration by debris paint. Did a square representing the burger I put a couple of blue strokes representing the water. I mixed some sand with kind of khaki painting because this hamburger it's cooked on an English Muffin, which is made. Luckily, by the way, so again, so I tried to represent things, but they don't look like the food. That's why it's called. That's why I call it a visual molecular gastronomy because you don't know what it is. Until I tell you. Do you have a running list of chefs that you would like to connect with? Yes. I mean, yes, I know, obviously. I mean, a have some some shaft that are personal heroes a mind. David Chang is one of them. I listen to his podcast, and when I was in Las Vegas. I got a chance to eat a mama Fuko. So yeah, I would love to my fact, he needs to Graham the other day, I sent him a question, and he's like which dish which is the one that, you know, important to you. He never answer. That's you know, they're fairly busy. Apart from him. And maybe a couple other people. No, I think it's interesting to get to meet people. Obviously, there's some chefs here in Raleigh. That are really big that. I did try to get a hold off for these experiment. They never replied, but chefs are extremely extremely busy. That's one profession that literally you have to be crazy to go into your talented, and you like to cook. But to work as a chef on a restaurant to own two three restaurants. It's something that's extremely extremely intense. You have to be a really special person to do that. So that's why a lot of the shafts. I approach Kerr fully just because I know they're extremely BC. I don't think per nothing personally if they would and nobody told me to go fuck myself. But if they say so not take to personally just because I know in which kind of intensity they are. So we've talked about how you moved from feeling sort of over. Unloaded to this deconstruction and simplicity than you are now incorporating the food piece of this does this have an impact on your day to day life, either in the way that you interact with food or just the way you see the world. Yeah. It does. It does mainly because he takes me away from pick -nology. I don't go to Facebook that much anymore. I go to Instagram Alon, and it's just because he's very visual. And it's my happy place. But the people that I follow in Instagram are shafts an artist but on follow many on my friends and Instagram just because it becomes like drama. This series helps me again, just do try to simplify my life. It's really hard for me to paint. And here's why because he's what simplicity I like punk rock a like energy. I like a lot of things. So when I paint, it's a big challenge for me because I only do a couple of things and I have to stop because I see the painting. He's perfect. How it is. But as a painter, you always want to come in and keep working, Dan, the first few paintings that ideas in in this new challenge, the sheep we challenge for me were complete failures because I did a happy stage. Something that was really really proud. But somehow, I grabbed the Barash and Putin one too many more, and I just killed it. Because the whole point it's to learn when to stop that's the hard part with this series is still really hard for me. When I go to the studio, I meditate I have to get psychologically prepare a have to kind of lower my heart rate a little bit and kind of tried to get into the zen. You know, like I put incense in my studio. I listen to, you know, really sm- Soldal music. I'm at because I need to be psychologically prepare to stop in any really really really really really hard. This a little bit more because it's very intriguing, and I think it applies to many areas of our lives that aren't making peace, but also relationships and in

Instagram Spain David Chang lamonica Facebook Putin Las Vegas Dan Graham Raleigh Kerr
"mama fuko" Discussed on Artist Soapbox * Local Artists on Creative Process

Artist Soapbox * Local Artists on Creative Process

06:15 min | 2 years ago

"mama fuko" Discussed on Artist Soapbox * Local Artists on Creative Process

"Conversation with the chef day suggested dish. And then what happens I go online. I research that this takes a few days. I tried to think of the story line. I know like four months Santa aletha, his the proprietor of Rui Falana. He's dish was rice congee? And it's something at first rice congee, really, really simple. But he had subtleties of flavors, and it's something that for him and his sister. He's a really important dish. And again like he was great. We talked for awhile about it. So I tried to research the dish. I tried to find basic things about the dish like in his painting. I obviously put some rice. And in fact, I use green tea, which works great. I love to paint we green tea. Yeah. In the painting for chef along Wien. I poured all oil, and that was no good. Like it. Didn't it didn't work at good. I also for chef Jeff Sicer his chef at Royal restaurant. His dish was a burger. I mean, he was great. Also, he took me to the kitchen, and he showed me how he prepares. You this burger? Because when he told me, you know, my dishes burger, I kind of I don't know. I don't know I roll my eyes because he's he's a great shaft. So I bet he's he's burger kicks ass. But he took me to the kitchen, and he uses this. This method is called Savita. They put the meat in this airtight packaging, and then they put in water and the molecules get cook. Even though the the meat feels rare. It's cooked because the molecules are are cooked interesting. It's really strange because again, this is something fairly Neil that has happened since I left working in restaurants work for his painting. I literally went to the store I bought a burger that had a lot of blood and juice, and then I four the juice on the painting. Yeah. That didn't work either. Because I thought he was going to be more bloody. But no, he just use was a lot of water. I guess in the blonde. So he didn't stain us. Good us. I wanted. So what did you now have to know what about this burger painting? What did you do to convey that? It's what I do in these paintings on. I call it molecular molecular gastronomy, and if you don't know when molecular gastronomy is he was started. I believe in Spain by the chef that we and molecular gastronomy, you take a dish. And you constructed molecular -ly, you can have a bubble on a little spoon. And literally when you eat it, it tastes like clam chowder like he's really deconstructed is really change into this really simple small aspects of molecules. So I do this for painting on my paintings extremely abstract and minimalist. So maybe one of my paintings. Have like a black square a red, circle and to scribbles. So he's not I'm not painting about food. I'm painting inspired by food. I know that for chef on lamonica is sent through the dish that I did for her was I know galleys, and it's a green chili cooked with an almond white sauce. So literally for the chilly, I literally have a single green line. So the paintings don't look anything like the dish and isn't purpose because I don't want people to come in expecting to see the food. I want people to come in and see this really minimalist simple painting that has an honor tone of food. My first duty is to make paintings. They're inspired by she buoy their inspired by food. They're inspired by the black square by my leverage, the blacks where is my favorite paintings. And we'll times it's literally painting a black square. But I'm obsessed with it. I find his painting sexy. It again, it just it makes me dream this painting. It's weird. I'm obsessed with this thing. But my paintings have to be I about simplicity, and she really and second it's inspiration by debris paint. Did a square representing the burger I put a couple of blue strokes representing the water. I mixed some sand with kind of khaki painting because this hamburger it's cooked on an English Muffin, which is made. Luckily, by the way, so again, so I tried to represent things, but they don't look like the food. That's why it's called. That's why I call it a visual molecular gastronomy because you don't know what it is. Until I tell you. Do you have a running list of chefs that you would like to connect with? Yes. I mean, yes, I know, obviously. I mean, a have some some shaft that are personal heroes a mind. David Chang is one of them. I listen to his podcast, and when I was in Las Vegas. I got a chance to eat a mama Fuko. So yeah, I would love to my fact, he needs to Graham the other day, I sent him a question, and he's like which dish which is the one that, you know, important to you. He never answer. That's you know, they're fairly busy. Apart from him. And maybe a couple other people. No, I think it's interesting to get to meet people. Obviously, there's some chefs here in Raleigh. That are really big that. I did try to get a hold off for these experiment. They never replied, but chefs are extremely extremely busy. That's one profession that literally you have to be crazy to go into your talented, and you like to cook. But to work as a chef on a restaurant to own two three restaurants. It's something that's extremely extremely intense. You have to be a really special person to do that. So that's why a lot of the shafts. I approach Kerr fully just because I know they're extremely BC. I don't think per nothing personally if they would and nobody told me to go fuck myself. But if they say so not take to personally just because I know in which kind of intensity they are. So we've talked about how you

Rui Falana Santa aletha Wien Spain Royal restaurant Savita lamonica Jeff Sicer David Chang Neil Kerr Las Vegas Graham Raleigh four months
"mama fuko" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"mama fuko" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"And that was hard. Because a lot of those things are about momentum in the moment. You lose your anthem. It's like, oh my gosh. So what you do how did you deal with that? Well, we leaned in even harder again adversity is a terrible thing to way. So you then went back, and you said to everyone. Okay, now, it's the time like we can't fall down again if we fought on two years in a row tell probably not coming back. So what did it feel like when you were there? I've seen the picture talk to you the next day. But what did it feel like when it happened? I mean, it was everything it was just this moment where. I'll be honest thing. Anytime you give yourself a goal that takes close to a decade Chievo. There's the immediate unbelievable elation and celebration and all of it. And then immediately following that is as kind of a little bit of a difficult time emptiness. Yeah. I mean, you did the summer. You did great things out of it. Well, the way we decided to react to that was. To come home and close the restaurant, gut it and start over again. Well, that's great. Because this takes us to where people can go watch that show on Netflix because that's picks up after you guys have one you're about to close the restaurant to open it again will man you're such an inspiration to me. It's so fun being your friend 'cause we get to have these conversations to like and congratulations on all of it. And what are you really excited about that's going on right now just opened in Las Vegas. In vegas. We have opened a nomad in Los Angeles. And I'm so proud of nomad because when I think about we wanted to make finding more accessible eleven Madison park. But no mad is really where we have the opportunity to make finding more accessible people often ask me my favorite place to eat in the city. I'm gonna get asked to constantly my standard answer is always been mama Fuko because to me Dave changed the way you eat in New York. And I think what what he did is mind boggling, but I also always say, no mad, and it's also people sometimes are little intimidated by it seems like it's going to because it is you guys from eleven Madison park, but I've never seen anyone nomad who hasn't come out of that restaurant saying that one of the great time. Thank you. And it's not like EMP and that it's not it's not an impossible night. It's you can go to nomad you can tell them. I have an hour. You can. I get a reservation. They're also incredibly nice like infant reservation. If you go in there, and you say, here's why it's really important to take my totally boyfriend or girlfriend Vel figure it out for you. And you will have a very special beautiful fun night measure. Yes. I want nomad to be the kind of place where you can go whenever you want. And we can be a lot of things to a lot of people depending on where you're at BS when I'm excited about, you know, thirty nine years old a- turn forty this year. I don't know how many chapters I've had in my life leading up to right now. But pretty blessed they've been really good chapters, and I just could not be more excited for the one that forty to fifty is going to be someone who's on the other side of it. Now, forty to fifty is going to be great for you, man. Are you planning to fortieth already? They're going to be something fun. You know, haven't gotten into that. About to go have lunch with our wives. And I now know this is going to be a topic conversation everybody, you can find will are you on Twitter, Instagram, your Instagram. What's your name on Instagram w Gedara GUID are so go follow will on Instagram? If you.

Las Vegas Madison park Dave Twitter Netflix Los Angeles mama Fuko New York thirty nine years two years
"mama fuko" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

Stuff Mom Never Told You

14:40 min | 2 years ago

"mama fuko" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

"I mean, but that just makes me think of of so many other career type topics that you, and I have talked about where it's like it doesn't have to be like that people are like well women can't stand the pressure. So they just shouldn't even bother women, obviously aren't cut out for this environment. Because this is the environment that kitchens have. And it's like, well, I mean, obviously, not all kitchens function like that. Obviously there are restaurant owners who don't tolerate this crap. So why don't we just agree to change the environment? I mean, you you can influence the you can build whatever kind of workplace culture, you probably want to have even if you are in a high pressure environment, but I wonder too if there's almost locker room esque resist. Instance embedded within an institutionalized within this industry to not want that many women in the kitchen, and certainly not wanting them to call the shots because if you have women in there, then you're going to have to watch what you say you're going to have to watch who you might smack from time to this. Same thing we talked about in our pinup episode about like, well, we can't fart in front of people anymore. We can't have our Cal dirty calendars in front of people anymore. What is the world coming to? But it's that idea that we need to change the people instead of the culture that has a lot of women feeling like they have to walk this fine line. In terms of fitting in sociologists, Debra Harrison, Patty, Jeffrey were writing a guest post over the feminist kitchen, and these are two women whose names you'll see a lot when you start reading about issues of gender and cooking, but they talked about the fact that the women they have interviewed really report this pressure to conform to that. Matt macho environment they end up feeling like invaders and have to. Instantly fight against managers and higher ups ideas that women cannot physically or emotionally handle higher pressure and higher status jobs. But then on the flip side you act too masculine and you'll get labeled a bit or someone who is undermining authorities. So it does become a bit of this catch twenty two. It seems like yeah. You've either got fit into the sexual harassment, joking culture, basically. And be like, yeah, I'm gonna make all of these jokes to whether it makes me uncomfortable or not or I'm just going to be cut and drive just going to give orders. And when I do people are going to, you know, ask me where my sense of humor is. Yeah. Like have to dissects yourself almost. But as Laura to stay no who is a well known, chef de cuisine told the New York Times, it all depends on the kitchen. She says in a good kitchen, male and female really doesn't matter anymore. You get the work done you handle yourself, professionally because kitchens. Can still be crazy places, and you go home and a lot of people say that I I've seen a lot of quotes about like gender. Doesn't matter. Male versus female doesn't matter. It's your passion for the cooking. It's your passion for the craft. And yeah, sure, I agree with that gender shouldn't matter. But it obviously does and it even affects well in a cyclical way it affects how women chefs are then covered in the media, which then affects the trajectories of a lot of people's careers. Yeah. There there's a lot of concern and conversation within the culinary industry over the ghettoizing of female chefs of whether it is useful at this point to spotlight female chefs. And whether that's just again continuing the cycle of oh, look, it's a woman who can cook. Yeah. The editors in chief of both gourmet and food and wine magazine's who are both women. Basically, we're saying, no, no way. Because once you start doing those like top women lists. That's just another way of pointing out differences or emphasizing that male and female are inherently different win. They're saying no once you're holding the knife, you're holding the knife. It doesn't matter if you're a man or woman, but then you have the issue of what happened with time magazine a couple years ago when they put together this gods of foods spread, you know, showcasing whom they selected to be the most influential chefs and literal tastes makers in the US. And I don't know it might have also been around the world and people who were not too pleased with it because the gods of food as gods. Implies were all dudes. It was like that Vanity Fair photo not too long ago that came out where it was like the new face of late night TV, and it was just all dudes and suits, mostly white dude's. Yeah. Yeah. It was Trevor Noah not picture. Yes. Okay. We'll there we go there. We go Trevor diversity here we go. And a lot of people, of course, then called for will if you're going to only feature do we need to have a goddess is a food thing. And then that again was like you said, Kristen criticized just ghettoising female chefs. It would be like saying, oh, yeah. These are good for girls like good for them. But Amanda Cohen who's the chef owner of dirt candy, which is a vegetarian restaurant, which I was like dirt candy festivals. I get it. I know I had the same moment at the exact same moment. Like Dirk candy. Oh, all right. She said on Twitter as long as women are under recognized by most mainstream awards they need their own awards. Hashtag necessary evil. She went onto blog that press gives disproportionate attention to men, which means quote deadline, oppressed nomination committees and food writers focus on just those people creating a cycle of recognition, reward and fame. We'll speaking of Twitter and this whole. The question. Anthony bourdain tweeted out something in response to the twenty thirteen s Pellegrino award for world's best female, chef whom that year was talion chef Nadia Santini. And when it was announced he tweeted out something along the lines of do we seriously need a female chef category. Isn't that kind of demeaning hashtag twenty thirteen which I really appreciate that. He has tag that. And it sparked a lot of conversation yet again. But it was also kind of funny because initially it was a lot of prominent male shifts like tagging all of their other dude shift friends trying to have this conversation about whether female chef categories are helpful or hurtful designations to which a lot of female chefs for like seriously, this this is it this is what we're talking about guys. And I mean, it is a good. Question to raise like does. And this is come up in in so many of our podcast question of whether you female director or female, doctor was kinda just makes it sound like a gynecologist is progressing anything at all. Yeah. No. I get the idea. I get the gist. You need to be like, hey, no, seriously, guys. There are women who are chefs, and they're amazing, and they're at these wonderful restaurants, and you need to go eat their food and recognize them and give them a wards just the same as you do men. And I mean, I think Cohen was right in saying that like, hey, some media people are not going to dig down deep enough to get these names we need to put them out there. But yeah, it's not it's that idea of inserting differences between male and female chefs because of course, there is no gender difference. When it comes to how you cook. Or how you taste? Oh, although some would say that there is a difference in how men and women cook. At least when you look at how. All the media does cover male versus female chefs because even when female chefs get great attention, which is critical for their careers. Of course, if you look at how men are covered, they're usually given credit for intellectual and technical work in producing dishes their masters who dominate the food there rule breakers. I'm thinking of David Chang and Anthony bourdain now, and they're usually seen as he's like culinary empire-builders whereas women usually get little mention of technical skill and they're likelier to be praised for being hard workers following tradition and cooking from the heart. You know, they just wanna feed people. They just want to nourish as women do. Yeah. And like we'll talk about in our next episode. They're frequently portrayed as either mothers or sex, objects, so comfort food, but Harrison, Jeffrey those sociologist mentioned earlier. Wrote that our research on media definitions of great chefs tends to reaffirm the cooking and career choices made by men, even though our interviews with women shifts show that they face stereotypes, sometimes even hostility and family demands that make it very hard for them to reach the same levels as their male colleagues. And so basically looking at art they looked at a bunch of articles, and how men and women are written about and how we define success. And it's so often from the male point of view talking about those impairs why haven't you built an empire yet? How many restaurants do you own? Where are they whereas women who don't get the same type of media attention, and who then don't end up winning the same types of awards? They don't get the same platform that a lot of these famous male chefs do in terms of people even knowing who they are. So that they can go by their branded cookware or watch their television show or or eat at one of their fifteen restaurants. Well, and a couple of examples of how? How this works. If we look at Lydia bossy onic, she's the owner of four restaurants in partner in a number of other. She's a cookbook author. She's a TV host. I was personally introduced to Lydia not on PBS as I probably should have been which I believe she got her start TV wise on on PBS. But rather as the mother of Joe bust Yannick who was a former master chef judge. But because she is an Italian cook partially because she's into talion cook. I think it also because she's a woman she's often framed as cooking comforting nurturing food, the food is always being linked to her family to her grandmother. Even though I mean, this woman is a winner of multiple James beard awards when she's a legit chef. But it's usually always she's always framed as mother wife nurturer. Yeah. And same thing kind of with Alice waters. So she's a self taught chef who was at the forefront of the organic food movement in California. She started the restaurant chez panisse in Berkeley in the seventies gourmet named it America's best restaurant. Two thousand one at earned a Michelin star in two thousand six or two thousand nine but still she's typically portrayed as this nurturer educator. Caretaker adorable small business woman rather than the culinary powerhouse that she really is. Well, it's probably because with her and a lot of other. I think this is particular to women chefs on the west coast, which some of the I think it was gastronomic was suggesting is friendlier in general to women chefs versus the east coast a lot of those female, west coast shifts like waters are more interested in having this one amazing restaurant that they, cultivate, and have a strong hand. And rather than building out a franchise. Yeah. We did read. Several different sources that said that that women tend to be thriving today in the smaller standalone restaurants scene rather than those empires. Like your gravy kitchen. Caroline, exactly what kinda gravy. Do. You won't today is just just bacon. Immed- gravy, feminist gravy? It would not be bacon or it on everything. It wouldn't be. No, what would it be? I don't know. Uniform something minstrel board. We'll so what can help us get over this hump of not being able to recognize more women as the incredible shifts that they are one commenter on that feminist kitchen posts that we referenced was talking about how when you just continue to talk about how bleak the landscape is for lady shifts. It's not really going to help us. She said that what I'd like to see is less focus on how awful hard kitchens are for women and more focused on building networks of female cooks and chefs who can support each other in material ways. Now, if you're talking about separating women out for men, I think this is an actual smart productive way to do it. And maybe not having the fifty best chefs list, and in the fifty best women shifts like that sucks, but to have women forming their own networks, whether they're huge corporate things are more grassroots efforts. That is a great. I. Think way to spend your energies in whatever industry you're in. Yeah. And that's something that's happening with the toe society, which is a networking group for women in the restaurant industry, which was founded by mama Fuko group, brand director SU Chan and I love it. It's it's named for Alice be Tokyo's who was Gertrude Stein's partner who would stay home and take care of the house in cook the meals while Stein was out being you know, Gertrude out being courteous. Yeah. And there's also mentorship programs available within the women chefs and restaurants network, and the group she chef and slowly very slowly. So slowly that there are a handful of examples restaurant groups are seeing the need for better insurance had vacation policies and better maternity and paternity leave options because I'm sure that we're you know, at a point in history. Maybe where I don't know men also wanna take time off for their families. And so I think people are starting to. Realize the need for better policies, for instance, in that MoMA Fukui group that you just mentioned Kristen employees with the company for a year, get free health insurance paid vacations and maternity paternity. Leave the ultimate Mirror Group offers medical dental and vision insurance plus paid holidays. And I know people are like big deal. That's a huge deal for the restaurant industry and Alice waters, speaking about waters, sheep pioneer job sharing programs between parents instituted six months off

Debra Harrison Anthony bourdain Gertrude Stein Amanda Cohen Kristen Twitter Alice waters Trevor Noah partner Lydia bossy onic wine magazine time magazine US harassment Mirror Group New York Times Dirk candy James beard Michelin Laura
"mama fuko" Discussed on High and Mighty

High and Mighty

05:10 min | 2 years ago

"mama fuko" Discussed on High and Mighty

"Two nights in around Vegas without gambling. I gotta I got a fucking. I'm so high. I've ran today. I'm fucking losing. It ate so much food. I got the cereal milk white Russian from milk bar. Oh, my milk and fucking went down to the craft's able and drink this fucking boozy s huge milkshake was cereal Arthur wants to attack you. Look he's brought you every toy he wants to play. He wants to already get down turning on what our favorite like fucking love blue ribbon. And Cosmo, of course, classes Mo's like third level. I love that secret pizza secret pizzas. Awesome. And they have an excellent now, they have a milk bar, and mama Fuko that I also like the aria for the way it smells. Yes. Good. I like the wind for the way. It looks like colorful prom with a win is that I feel lost in there. I still have time. I went I was like I every time. I went to go to my tower. I went the wrong. Yeah. I tower shit is so confusing. My. There is not even the sixty third floor in this side. And they're like, dude, you're you're at the boulevard. I don't love the small casinos like the old hard rock in the palms. Yeah. There there's something that makes me feel like I'm in like, feel sketchy sketchy. I like I like, the Balaj Blasio is a fucking grade the Balaj, I really still like even though it's suppose spoke. It's like old. I like reminds you oceans movies gambling there. Yeah. I like the Venetian and specifically the Palazzo because it's like the haven't spent a ton of time there. Grandmother. We staying I don't know yet. Details to come. I'm so glad I'm so happy someone else's planning it. I'm like tell me here. Tell me here's my routing numbers. Budget? You wanna wanna find me a flight, you could do it? All. I'm loyal to fucking delta dog. Flu today, a different influ America, usually played delta, very disorienting. We're the purple just like this is blue and red too. That's all you know. All right, sir. Just sit down. Sir. Sir. There's nothing more. I love that looking rug pulling out shit like after someone's ranting on Twitter, and we just retweets like, sir. This is a Wendy's drive through window. Do that. Yeah. I love that fucking undercutting undercutting bullshit. I mean, that's just the favorite. Classic improv moved to two guys have been talking about like the most discussing should ever in Asian signing over here. Exactly. That's fine. Honey, I Finally, I still think that cut. Okay. Is a funny move it still works like in the middle of an improv cut. All right, guys. Like. It depends on how it's done, right. If I'm in and I'm like. Our someone who like turns it into show by walking out in the front going to what are you doing? Ryan. Undercut them. Brian get back. Pause prototype. Down like, all right. Well, so this this is a faulty robot. This is when you have to put down you have to kill it. Right. Yes. And. Like Jesus guys that was awful fucking. Good. Yeah. Adams talking about Steven Seagal novel the way of the shadow wolves that we reward the forward by sheriff Joe or. Great the floor, and we've been reading that passage by passage on action boys, shadow wolves tear patriot. Which is an insane sentence. I just said, but the book is crazy. It's about it's about native Americans who work with the US marshals to enforce immigration rules, like white people native American people working together to not let Mexican people into the country. You work. No more immigrants right Indians. They're like, well, we agree about that. We were saying that since fourteen hundreds dude. Vegas has some cool like non-casino shit to do to shopping there. If you can get like if you can get like an activity together, especially on a bachelor party. He's have one. He I always Yano on the first one bail on that. We're going to go shoot guns on my count me out. Yeah. Shotguns there. I've road ATV's there. I don't eat for. I went to summer league basketball there. Don't even like best do. I would sit and watch hours. But you bet on that..

mama Fuko Vegas Arthur Balaj Blasio Yano Cosmo Twitter Mo basketball Flu Venetian US America Ryan Brian Steven Seagal Joe or Adams
"mama fuko" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"mama fuko" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Those are the words of Christina Tosi who once upon a time was writing food safety plans, mama Fuko when shift David Chang asked her to make dessert for a private party at the restaurant, the cakes and pastries were divine and so began the journey to creating milk bar at MoMA Fuca. Shortly thereafter, it spun off as a standalone bakery in the east village. Now, there are many bars in your city as well as bakeries in Los Angeles, Washington DC, Las Vegas and Toronto Christina Tosi is now a television personality, and an author her latest book is aptly named all about cake, Christina Tosi. Welcome to design matters, Debbie Christina. Is it true that you name all the refrigerators in your eleven thousand square foot kitchen in Brooklyn? After superheroes. And celebrities basically name every piece of equipment at milk bar because we learned early on once you have more than one refrigerator in more than one mixer win son's like girl, the mixers acting up like the walk ins running hot is which Walken. And when you say, the Luke Skywalker, you go like, you'll twain the rock walk in or. Yeah, Christopher Walken. Basically, the logs that we send out when you work early in the morning, you send a log to basically your buddy that works the evening shift as you were the morning shift. It's a lot easier to communicate as you can imagine makes the job much funnier. When the log reads, low Kim was acting up today. Luke Skywalker is running hot Christopher Walken is running cold all and you're like a member into a secret society where you're talking about equipment in the kitchen, but in our stores, we do the same thing like our coffee, Hoppe Ritter. Williamsburg. Store's name is Dennis hopper..

Christina Tosi Christopher Walken Luke Skywalker Debbie Christina MoMA Fuca Dennis hopper Hoppe Ritter mama Fuko David Chang Williamsburg Brooklyn Los Angeles Las Vegas Kim Toronto Washington milk
"mama fuko" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:19 min | 2 years ago

"mama fuko" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Towers and a million square feet of retail we're able to create, a destination right off the bat while we would. Say retail residential and commercial are the three essential components of a mixed. Use what's really important You've got to, intensify those uses and you. Intensify them with all the little things you? Do in between, those uses, so the, pub the public, space the gardens the shed the vessel the observation deck mass transit let's explain a couple of those the vessel is a giant two hundred million dollars sculpture. Comprised of one hundred and fifty four interconnecting flights of stairs the shed is, a six hundred million dollar arts center with an, outer shell that can expand and contract there will also be restaurants. Gyms and a hotel all these things create a sense of community that, touches every aspect of live work and play can you do that right, away you're saying that you want that. To start very quickly that this deals, like there's a sense of place here yeah we think we're on track to do that we'll open by next. March so come spring of nineteen the first half. Will be open it'll create a destination the likes of which New Yorkers, have never seen I think part of the issue for us is that until they, see it you can't really imagine it how do you make sure. That people are Living in these buildings and that it's not investors? Maybe, foreign investors who buy them. But then, don't live here and then don't help you create that sense of place. Well it's very difficult to sort of legislate that you have I lived there I think it depends on the nature. Of the residents, so if you're, a young, millennial worker, you're going, to be living, there because. You're gonna be paying a lot. Of your paycheck out and rent if on the other hand year retired couple and your empty nesters and you want. To keep the family home in Westchester or you got to retirement space in Florida for the winter you're. Going to be there a, good portion of the. Time but you're not going to be there a hundred percent of the time that's what New. York City is New York City? Has a lot of people that live here obviously eight million people do but there's an awful lot of people. That, residents here that have multiple residences in different. Cities I imagine though that. A lot of New Yorkers. As they watch these beautiful glass. Towers go up they. Wonder will I ever be able to afford to. Live in a place like that well we certainly hope they can I mean, just behind us here we. Have to rental buildings close to six hundred Units. And we opened. In the last two years one hundred percent leased and. We'll be building affordable combination as well, and Hudson yards and we'll be building condos too so I think the the whole concept is that there's. Something for everybody because of the cost of living in New York City where conscious of new segments of the residential market super small units the seniors community refining seniors for instance still, want to stay in the city because the city allows them, to stay vibrant they like to walk out onto the street and see. What's happening so that perhaps that. Different model for seniors living in an urban environment when I. Look, at this series of, glass tall buildings and you hear about the celebrity chefs that will be locating the restaurants in. Here it sounds a little like Las Vegas what do you think about that well first of all, the billions, are all tall that's true but they're not all glass we have stone all? Over, the place okay and we're. Very mindful of not trying to create a skyline of all tall glass buildings but To answer your, further question, on on, the restaurants food and beverages a huge important element of any urban environment has particularly. True in New York where people dying out a lot in so. Having lots of restaurant options which includes celebrity chefs but also includes shake. Shack and sweet greens which you pass on the way, in here today and mama Fuko and we've got probably five different coffee shops I, mean we're trying to be very mindful. Of what the public want and? More, or less demand, today in terms of a. Full dining, experience and that dining experience. Important because it goes too late at. Night. Starts early in the morning it goes too late at night and that also is important, attribute Got gotta keep a lot of the new worker so. Big part of what we've done today is build what, we call the workplace of future because we're mindful of the workforce of the future and that workforce in the. Future wanna do everything in one place if. They can, live here they would if they can't they're going to spend as much time years they can and that means that their leisure time in their eating time in their dining time and so we ask all our retailers stay open. Till ten at night because you, want that constant dynamic neighborhood field Jay cross takes us on a tour of some of the unfinished parts of Hudson yards the ground floor of one tower has that. New building smell the marble, floors are protected with plywood, there's caution tape blocking the many new and unused escalators. And the ceilings are many stories above us so this is just a big race. Track so there's retail in the middle and there's retail all around that is gonna be basically a mall in here You don't like to use that word because the. Mall is generally one level has horizontal suburban. Exercise were seven levels and seven, levels in America's very unusual seven levels in Asia's not uncommon at all so But this, is gonna be. All retail right here where we've all retiring we're walking. Through his, retail we're, gonna come out on the. Corner of thirty third and tenth and never gonna. Walk along to thirty. Hudson yards which is office the buildings have been designed to group together various industries one.

New York City Las Vegas York City Hudson Westchester Florida America Shack mama Fuko Asia Jay cross two hundred million dollars six hundred million dollar one hundred percent hundred percent two years
"mama fuko" Discussed on The Dave Chang Show

The Dave Chang Show

12:38 min | 2 years ago

"mama fuko" Discussed on The Dave Chang Show

"Now. So we're going to talk about the major Domo. We used to explain how you how you came up with the major Domo name he asked so so the major doa name. It's crazy because now it's like proliferating to all these other things. I was trying to write in Chinese characters. What Momofuku men and my Chinese. I can't even write Kanji. So I wrote what was a variation of lucky peach or Momofuku in Chinese characters. And then I had to translate it to someone else who read it and there's like that doesn't mean that at all. It means like a head of household or something like that yet. And it was by total accident that we sort of got major Domo. And then I was like, oh, I've heard that word before and then means all these other things. Besides it being a super cool restaurant name, it has a variety of meanings. It's kind of like the master, right? Or just like the way I'm interpreting it is like the person and that's in the know. Right. It's great. As soon as you told me the name, I was like, wow, that's a great name, right. Sounds Japanese, but it's not. It's actually Latin for major dominace and then I love these Jackson positions of weird Esa teric Asian words in English, and I just thought it was perfect. It has the same sort of syllable pronunciation, vowel pronunciation of Momofuku. You needed stumbled onto something Gade when the guy had been squatting on major Domo dot concerts nineteen ninety six has a great and it in that's been squad. That sets nineteen ninety. Six is a good name. It's a good name and it just sounds cool, and it has to have meaning and like major sound something. Domo sounds Japanese and there's all these other ways we can split that name because we've had a lot of luxury with Momofuku. So some ways I just leave, I major Domos west coast along with. So this podcast is catching to cool timing career. 'cause you move to LA you're launching this restaurant in Los Angeles called major Domo for the first time you've been in the city with food? Yeah. I mean, I've been coming to LA for many years now and this is the, it takes. A completely different context when you're going to actually open up a restaurant. So I've been going to Santa Monica farmers market for many years, but I've never actually looked at it in the prison that like, oh men, maybe this ingredient will go into a dish that I'm gonna make. So everything's different. Now you've been stocking the farmers markets? Yeah, you love it. You have that water market. You'll have Hollywood on Sunday, Santa Monica on Wednesdays and Saturdays, people of Los Angeles. Don't understand how blessed they are to have year round unbelievable product. I knew it the first year I moved here and then I forgot. And then you came here and you were so passionate about it that it reminded me halacha. It's amazing. That's truly one of the best reasons to live in Los Angeles is to get amazing of kontos and then strawberries and the farmers just genuinely care so much about your input and what they want to grow and it's super delicious stuff. So people always say that it's almost cliche chef wants to utilize the Greenmarket here, but. I don't think people quite understand what it's like. It's like skiing on east coast mountains. And then you finally get to the Rockies. You're like, whoa, this is amazing, right? This is a whole different playing field. I was gonna say, you're almost like a basketball coach who finally has all the players to run your offense. Yeah, a little bit. I got Chris, Paul and James harden and Kevin Durant. It's totally different L a.'s presented its own challenges, which is why I think this podcast is a good thing to talk about in terms of opening a restaurant that's localized just in LA and also the general problems and the high drama of opening up any restaurant without the context of like a reality show. Right. Like that. I was feel that soc always so much natural drama in restaurants in general, particularly the pre-opening that it's good to share that because I think it gives context to a diner that's eating there. They don't know this stuff. I just know nothing about restaurants and how the sausage gets made basically. And every time you've ever talked to me about this, it was a hundred times more complicated. Than I ever imagined. It's incredibly stupid and sisyphean in it's sort of task. It's like giving birth in some ways. Anytime you speak to like a director or some kind of creative that is giving birth to a piece of work. It's very similar, but it has its own idiosyncratic stupidity, so I don't know why we do it over and over and over again because there's a moment where everything seems possible and then you realize, oh my God. Why did I even do this again, this is all the odds are stacked against me. It's funny because I've launched a few things as well. And you do hit a moment where you're like, how's this going to happen? There's this panic sets in at some point, and then you hit a second point down the road where it's like, wow, this is happening. Okay, put an overturn. That's sort of where I'm at right now. I'm actually terrified every day. I wake up thinking that this is going to be the biggest joke in LA. I think it's going to either really be great or it's going to be is Charlie. So I think it's a great move. I always liked to star, but we'll can you go backwards. So you've been thinking about this for what? Three and a half years. We signed this deal about three and a half years ago. We signed a lease. Okay. You knew where you're going to be your in this part that's pass. Chinatown were north Chinatown near Dodger Stadium. Technically, it's called Elision park. I remember seeing it and being like, wow, that is crazy. This is a crazy raw space, and I remember seeing downtown locations like seven, eight years ago when people are saying that downtown was taken off newly this, like even before of like re best ya. Yeah, yeah. And I was like, no one's ever going to come down here. This is insane. You didn't know about Uber yet though. I didn't think Uber was going to completely alter. Los Angeles city's been altered more by ridesharing than Los Angeles. People drink and people go anywhere now because of that. But you know downtown and I just remember thinking like, oh man, like I feel like such a dope. For not expanding that downtown LA back then. And I was like, I'm not going to do that again and it's not just about like, I don't want to be part of gentrifying movement. It's simply about counter would do something. Awesome. That adds to the awesomeness, right? Yeah. So we've looked at a lot of spaces and we've been looking at L A for only gun. So it's two thousand six. We've had some very near misses. We almost open up in the air, some famous properties and the Hollywood area. What are you looking for when you're thinking like I'm going to LA like what? Rank your top three things you want from location to competitors to what it would he? How do you serve it? I mean, I think you need something Connick about the space. There's a sense of time and place that that is important. So when we were going to open up, that was the first thing that I always thought about. It has to have a location that is meaningful. What makes it meaningful? There's got to be something different about it. Like best the when I first went there. I was like, I didn't even know this area was here. This is cool Royal and you just felt I've felt like more of an experience than just walking restaurant because that's what L A to me is discovered more and more about it. It's these pockets of buildings in architecture that could only exist in that specific area even though it might not make any sense, and then is it acceptable, right? Yeah. Like I, I remember this year. It's like people. I didn't understand why someone wanted to drop me off at my hotel because it was in the other direction now I get it. I'm like, I'm sorry, man. I'm not gonna drop you off and that was something that didn't understand. Then I have much better understanding now because this is a sprawling suburbs, like city where if you're on Santa Monica, you're really never going to leave that area. Santa Monica talk, it's pockets. Yeah. So maybe think like if you're going to create a concept or restaurant in that location, how do you create something that is going to be compelling enough where people will leave their comfort zone and that gets tougher and tougher in the post mates era? Yes, it's tougher and tougher to get people to go more than twenty minutes anywhere. And that sort of goes back into the first thing about having this iconic like location, you know, I think one of the great locations for restaurant was the old. Oh my God. What's the Republic space was publique when Neela. Campanile. Yeah, Charlie Chaplin's office yet. It's so cool and it's got so much history. In the fact that it's a restaurant. It could only exist there. Right. So when also you're talking like going back to LA thing that's on the brea right near, we'll share. It's twenty minutes from seven different places like Hollywood hills. It's twenty minutes, Beverly twenty minutes, Hancock park, ten minutes downtown LA, twenty minutes. And those were the ones that usually seem to make it in LA and ANSI Silverton likes known that about that area for a long time because Mozart's there the multiplex. So locations locations important. And I think the third thing is is what kind of food or are you gonna make in that location in that sort of conic area? Do you feel like the food has to be the customer can describe it in a sentence or the customer will just tell a friend, the food's great, just go there. Does it have to have like a brand, I guess is my point? Yes, I can expound on this much more. It's important that you're able to explain what you're doing in a sentence or two sentences tops. I still haven't figured out how to do that with the food were doing at major Domo. But with mama, Fuko was so explain do not explain the food moment who after all these years, because I hated what people like all you just make Asian food. I'm always like, fuck you. Like. It always makes me so upset. But like when I need to, like if someone asked me in there, they're not in the food world. I oftentimes say all, we'd just make something Asian and then they go, do you make sushi I'm like, no, not really. So I think Momofuku has always been this something that is Asian American. Sometimes it's sometimes more American, like we've embraced definitely different things, but can I tell you what? I think the brand rusher I think you became the brand of Boma Fuca. It was like their shifts. Great. There you gotta go there. They have a great chef and that became the one sentence explanation more than the food. It's possible. But like Momofuku it to me has always been about the people like I've gotten way more credit than I than I ever deserved, but we've had a mazing people and we've always been able to tell different stories. So you know, it's like nothing better than saying, I'm opening a steakhouse like that's so easy APO AP L or I'm opening up sushi when you do something. A little bit bigger than that. That's hard, and it's a little bit more confusing and I'm really trying hard not to confuse anyone. I think the best way when someone says, hey, what kind of food or you're serving when your friend goes to you and says, hey, let's go out to dinner Thursday night where you wanna go, let's say we want to go to major Domo. They're like, what are they serve? It's like it's hard as cry, but you wanna go, it's awesome. I don't know how to talk about it. It's awesome. You don't hear restaurants described like that too much. Right? It has to fit into a certain kind of category. Do you worry that I would say the one strike against you potentially in LA is just that people don't know who you are. It's possible people know you are, but also like on the east coast, if he did this, everyone who now you are. I think that comes with pros and cons. You have to live up to some kind of legacy, and I've thought about this this restaurant opening for a long time. You don't want to open up something that you could get somewhere else in LA because food in L A so great right now that you want to be a good neighbor, but you also want to add value. Don't want to. I mean, just do the same thing. Someone forget in another part of town. That's really difficult. That's why I thought you had such a great chance to succeed here because whatever you're gonna bring to the table does not exist right now. Now I, I don't think. I mean, we'll see this. This is why I'm so fucking terrified about this because you're almost like bearing your soul like completely naked to public and you're hoping for good results in a good review and having experienced some of the worst reviews I've ever had in New York because I've always had good reviews for the most part. It is so worst feeling in the world to get talk about that. Sure. We had opened up AUstralia and Toronto in Washington DC in like two thousand ten to two thousand fifteen. We haven't really done a new project in New York while we had opened up Fukuda sort of fried chicken sandwich shop. We hadn't done a new concept and we had taken on some investors and we made some changes. And I think a lot of this was a reflection on the fact that as Momofuku grew who have like many. Employees and huge staff of people, I just didn't know how to go about

Los Angeles Domo Santa Monica Hollywood major Domo Charlie Chaplin basketball Domos Jackson New York Dodger Stadium Rockies Momofuku director Fuko Elision park AUstralia