5 Episode results for "Mallory Blackman"

Monocle Reads: Caleb Azumah Nelson

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

14:57 min | 5 months ago

Monocle Reads: Caleb Azumah Nelson

"Theaters are still empty. Claiming from cbc podcast has kept playwrights connected to a global audience by adopting state shows into unforgettable audio dramas featuring exciting productions from some of the world's most acclaimed creators for the stage experience. Exhilaration of theater right from the comfort of your own home with everything from gut wrenching dramas to a reverend comedies. You can listen and subscribe to play me wherever you get your podcasts. This article retail. I'm gina gordon. My guess today's caleb azuma nelson born and raised in southeast london. The twenty six year old writer and photographer has earned numerous accolades in his short career. So far including being named by the observer newspaper is one of the top ten best debut novelists of the year and shortlisted and the twenty twenty bbc national short story prize previously. He's been published in literary magazines like latro and grunter and his eagerly-awaited first book open. Water has gone at much excitement. It centered around on and off romantic relationship between two black british artists kayla. Thanks so much for joining me. I know that you have huge demands on your time because your book has just exploded. Hasn't it yeah. I've been kind of astounded by iolanthe disapora in jeopardy seeing everywhere. I think it's you know. I was a little bit worried about coming out in the lockdown and it just i haven't had to have that worry at the moment it just feels like the supposed be really overwhelming and really. I'm really grateful now. I introduced you as a photographer and writer d. You now think that that's switched. Are you a writer. Perhaps with the bisa photography feel like. I've always been a writer. I and i think photography is has been another medium in which i can communicate and express like i've been writing since i can remember likelihood you're like four or five years old scribbler. Like really terrible. Shoot stories have l-. I think the the medium of photography really allows a visual element to come into my work and very much comes through in this book open water. There's a lot about you feel the sort of the poetry the visual the creativity. I mean those are major themes aren't they about about creativity. I think the the the starting point or for any saw them. Artistic expression is feeling and emotion. And then it's working is working from that once have the feeding emotion. I'm trying to express define the best medium for in this case. It was writing but the but the writing contained these elements. Are these references to music can to to visual artists than film which took the narrative elsewhere afforded a different dimension. I i. I would have been possible if i just like kind of ryan straight pros and of course if the two characters one is a dancer. One is a photographer like you. That will so you to kind of explore all of those teams much more than living it. Yeah there's i guess there's a I guess everyone has their that. Point is expression even if is like a professional level epic. Everyone is has something that they do to express themselves in. It was important for me to to have the these law autistic expressions index the title itself. Open water for me. It feels like you're talking about freedom there but you will set talking about the dangers that can lurk in a water. Yeah it some there. Was this idea of justice. Like real ruled in almost infinite freedom. You know when you you'll standing on a beach yukon see where who had the see and like the that kind of idea but not knowing what does look like what. Dangers are present in our in our every day. I think it was important for me to have these Protagonists to have. Like the kind of fullness wholeness like range in which they good light just be in. Just have this freedom by. I wanted to comment on what happens when you find that. Freedom interrupted without giving any of the plus away at this point. Yeah a lot of this is told through dialogue. Which i know is fiendishly difficult to achieve and then at one point you sort of depart from the traditional writing style the whole kind of you say she says tell me about that. Change of structure the About giving too much away the bat point in the story. The narrative has been a bill and bill bill and then reached this kind of the apex this peak in which the image i had to switch the structure slightly so that it was hughley the protagonist kind of like spilling in a way like it was. It's like feeling a competent. And the woods at that point had just spilled over and that's what began to emerge and not not lots of the narrative using the this second person who almost away fruit was really important for me to create this kind of very intimate as very intimate narrative in which the reader can beat by the burford. An audience member nossa the protagonists themselves at an. Did you write it like that from the start or were you fiddling about with with that structure. That was really attention from the beginning. I think i'm always wondering a novel could be like. I'm always astounded by different nobles. Come across the us. Full more structured as a narrative device that this would only serve to push an artist the book has described as absolutely nailing the black experience the london black experience when you were growing up with their books for you that spoke to that or are we only now. Seeing the emergence of of works that will speak to the next generation. Yeah i think when i was when i was growing up his voracious reader like i would just read anything i can get my hands on but there were specific which was speaking to that black british experience. Like our say. The mallory blackman might really An kind of like primary and early teen years and then later on as eighty smith but it was a real struggle to to kind of find tips. The the like i instantly recognized i could. I could understand kind of relate to to various fictional works especially from the over. The pond said like james baldwin and tony morrison writes slide. Those are really integral to save my reading and writing growing up the yet only the kind of feels like now. There's a slight pushing the direction in which the narratives that haven't been beginning to be by fitness way to go now london itself and particularly southeast london almost emerges as a character on on. Its own time about your touch. Meant to your local area because it sets and you still live there yet as a There's something about southeast. London as israel energy to the i. I'm always trying to communicate in a lot of my work. There's a year right is like a character. I think that comes from this real sense of community the emerges you. I think there's like a you know anytime anytime away from south east london. If i'd like gone on holiday or like i'm outlive. London lack i can. I can drop harbor lows the different areas. But there's it's it's almost like a textra to the to the lives of peoples off his london. Communica your parents originally from ghana. How much connection do you feel with. That country is really interesting as a I think it's a place that's For me but but isn't really hurting. Because i've been a handful of time. I think garner is more is more from me like a way of kind of thinking and feeling in seeing as a painter Cha you really heavily influenced okamoto end. She says something similar in into the webuye know ghana is isn't a homosexual. Because i've never lived there but in a way is because of the way the my parents see the valve in my grandparents Currently the way to icy to vote. That's so interesting. How autobiographical is the book. It's very possible in that. Like of the feelings and emotions. Where things i experienced but anita kind of as i said the annual finding feelings in marshall is trying to communicate and in working from that the whole thing came together really really quickly tell me about writing it in the british library like like a like just a very feverish summer. I think i. I started writing in may of twenty nineteen when i signed with miami. Currently it's region end. I wrote for like six weeks. Straight wasn't was kind of in and out of the library at that point in was still working alongside that sars just kind of trying to fit in writing. Where i couldn't i sent her draw than it. It wasn't working you what who. I was writing it. I don't think are quite had the level of focus and intensity of that point. And so i quit my job. I took a roofing had saved just for the next few months. I was just of rights. gambling on myself and and i get to the british library. Non fatty each morning at checkout a handful of books. I'd read for an hour. Then i would just get to writing and it became as really wonderful process. The mush Completely spent i felt like i'd left everything on the page. I finished right at the beginning of september like july. Twenty nineteen beginning at ten twenty. Nine team was really when most of it was written and as we discussed a phenomenal success there was a nine way auction. Alfred debut novel. That's extraordinary and of course there's been this huge response We talked about it. Very much. appealing to undescribed ing the experience of young particularly. Black men millennials. Do you think that there's a different perception of the book from of different races. I think so. I think there's a. I think for a lot of people in my community. This is this is something really nice. Actually my uncle me shortly. After launch event that we have in conjunction with rich library and a big rita and so it was nice to kind of have this movement where she's talking to someone in the family though say it will serve rights but now she's she talking about wanting talking about the event and she said is really special to me right now. The you'll doing this into writing something like this. Why read makes me see. You're writing how blackeyed will feel and for me that was. That was a really special moment to hit up from from someone holding Highs thirty. But it's i think lawsuit people have just taken different things from the book. I think there's you know there's obviously this this love story which runs throughout it but there's also the story of of losses well running fruit as this massive like family members and loss of identity as well been media interesting to see what has resonated with different people and of course there's the whole juxtaposition of masculinity and vulnerability just on pick that for us. I think there's a That's the level of only minutes. He that you kind of have to have when you are in any relationship. I think but particularly in a romantic relationship and nothing would the book thirties. Moments at that level of vulnerability is is tested in kind of like really emerges incomes to the full but the neuro. Tommy swear that Fools away because of not being because of not being able to handle the juxtaposition between the the freedom that you were forty within a relationship perhaps the the lack of freedom outside of a. There's a lot about racial profiling and police harassment. And of course this is something that's really topical. We read about this all of the time. Do you think that now that it is something. That's being highlighted within our communities that there's been a need attempt to address this by authorities nine as simple question lock in the weeks. It's like it doesn't feel like enough is being done to question disruptors which for which exists in have those beliefs and continue to to do actions. You know is one thing for me to to write about this experience to express it but then it's another thing full and it's another thing for people to take notice in another thing for people to to actually take action is really question those structures and questions himself and the complicity in it kind of. It's a wonderful book. They've done incredibly well. What's next few. I am the. I'm looking on congruency. Just enjoying this is moment of released. Because it's felt like it's a long time coming by mussa waking something new another novel where just kind of exploring the communities that make up people in. Yeah kenneth. thank you so much. Thank you voted by. Caleb azuma nelson is published by viking. And it's out. Now you've been listening to monica. Reads thanks to produce a neuro holler and researcher charlie film mccord. Georgina godwin. thank you for listening.

london gina gordon caleb azuma nelson latro grunter iolanthe disapora hughley mallory blackman tony morrison cbc kayla bill bill observer ghana bbc james baldwin ryan London okamoto south east
Feminist Fairy Tales?  Malorie Blackman, Kamala Shamsie, Rebecca Solnit and Jeanette Winterson

VINTAGE Podcast

23:05 min | 8 months ago

Feminist Fairy Tales? Malorie Blackman, Kamala Shamsie, Rebecca Solnit and Jeanette Winterson

"I think we're doing our children a disservice by pretending evil doesn't exist and it seems to me fairy stories already. Good way of as ginette said presenting the container that safe space and place and and the beauty. I think for me as coming up because i absolutely adore fairy stories. The beauty of the most the way to overcome evil was in the initial character announcement. Welcome back to the vintage books podcast. I'm alex clark and in this episode on thrilled to talking to a plane. Writers mallory blackman combination the rebecca solnit and jeanette winterson these wonderful writers of all written stories for a new series of feminist retailing's vintage classics aminist revolution four provocative visiting and urging students they open fairytales remixed and revived. The children and mallory retails bloop. It has story blue blood communist. Shamsi retails the ugly duckling in her story duckling rebecca solnit retail cinderella in cinderella narrator and janette winterson retail. I'm clean wapo story over with compassion and three at that. This compensation is part of an online and with the british library. Vintage huge sense to them sharing the recording a blanket and drink and bleepers in some in some way to be grappling with this idea of the possibility of a fairytale as an active real nazi radical empathy of actually considering it from different angles and thinking okay so for example in in rebecca's retailing him cinderella that yes there are all these the stepsisters. We thought rapacious hideous cruel actually just went having their needs met once really asking themselves what they wanted out of their lives. How important was that for all of you. That's just to reimagine all the different participants in the fairy stories where we just see women. Essential protagonist usually Mallory i stopped with you because again. You've got this ambivalence non-picky not a new story. Well for me i. The phone part of this was saying around with the original. For example in the original when blueberry comes home and finds out that That his wife his new wife has gone into the room and he says i'm going to kill you now and then. She begs her out the sister to go and call to her brother so they can come and rescue her. An i have Nia has brothers in this but and and one of them who knows kind of what's going on in one who doesn't and thinking it's is. It sat playing around with Assumptions and perceptions that i love so much in in in the very so i think i think the beauty fairy stories from around the world is that they encompass all kinds of points of view will kinds of ways of telling etc Embiid's part of the reason. I think they endure. And i i sold for example someone today saying that creating ah retailing's a fairy stories perhaps Moves us away from the original and detract from the original. And i found a really interesting point of view because i thought but do unless it -obituates original inefficiencies. What we're doing here is creating the imaginings that sits alongside the original and as ginette said it's about the connection and the communication. It's about me. It's about kind of taking the folks for example and playing around them having fun with them. Why not and then sort of presenting a new ideas. And so i was. I wouldn't be very interested in doing a a cover version of something that was exactly the same as the original. Then why boorda. So if you're going to do a retelling ordinary imagination a reimagining you have to make it your own. And i think that's what i loved about. This allowed us to do that. But it's really interesting anticipating common ridiculing. We just have not on the original. I mean these stories. All kind of folk tales of consumer on the way they've existed in many versions and kind of the idea of original there might be for example the version the most famous at any point by hans christian andersen's ugly duckling for example book. But really they all kind of as genetic saying the archetypes. Absolutely i mean a i will be no these stories go to many different iterations but also one of the things you do. Adaptation is i think your asking people if they read your version inevitably. I think they're going to want to go back to the original as well. A lot of them syntax. You're drawing more attention to it And you know just to sort of pick up on what mary was saying. I think one of the things you'll do. We do adaptation. It can't be just for the sake of the has to be something you're doing. That is different while still honoring the original in some way and both way of doing that is to just shift focus. You know or or to to show a slightly different angle show with me with the docking. I was really interested in that relationship with the mother who i sits on the brings her into the world but that ultimately serve so abused for bringing the strange creature into the farmhouse that she does her back on her child. And i actually. That's a really rich and interesting thing and and the idea that that might obliterate the original is is such an odd one. Because you're just you you're creating different versions The thing that was already as you say a different version of something. That was already there rebecca. I wrote this four or at least with your great needs in mind. She's also devotee of your book. Men explain things to me that idea of actually hosting something onto someone to a younger generation to someone close to you without being tactic showing a different way of looking at the world through your work. How important is nasty. You know i did. I definitely did it for her now. Her younger sister. Maya fairytale and i'm working on it. And but yeah. But i also wrote because or after i wrote it. I heard from so many people who said fairytales have so much compelling magic etc but the principles in them are so terrible we want to to show to our kids said doesn't reinforce that men hold power women must get married and you know the outcome of what happens to me in mind is very important. What happens to all the rest of you who gives gives a damn those really interesting Trade it for myself hud. We work out what we love about fairy tales and keep it in. Let go what we don't and that felt like that was a big part of the job. And you know angela you know end. There's so many versions said you know these are stories that have migrated mutated endlessly and so they feel incredibly available of course are the feminist rethinking of a lot of novels and things the wide sargasso sea. Jane eyre and things like that but you know there is some maybe more aggression in taking ownership of something written by individual and something that's claimed of just composted deep into the soil from which will grow. Yes yes exactly. We have so many questions from from our our audiences. Thank you so much everybody out there. I'm gonna delay even to them. The question from felicity which is ensure any trading. When do you think the presentation of evil in these fairytales has changed from the originals. Your versions do you think that is evil in these stories is just interesting because that's always an interesting word to think about this. Net wants to start us off. Yeah i don't think we should worry about evil in the sense in. We have to deal with it and it is in there. Of course there. There is evil and everybody needs to face that there's no point taking a pollyannaish view of the world. The world is as it is. And if it's in those very stories so i wanted to look at the female aspect all is being greedy and controlling aspect which she just wants to conceive in a consumer society in the after yet of face it head on a managed the store the fairy stories. Really the most wonderful container for all the explosive stove. It will hold. And that's why we trust it. You know why we trust our anyway. Because it's the it's the container the and you can everything in there In a safe space and let it let it do its work and people can come away with it and not burn to death or or disfigured they can manage it and that is a great thing. I think that all that all its various versions allows but in the fairy stories. It's really there so we don't have to sanitize it. Bleach it or back off. We can handle it within the container of the tail. Is this just this. This is either that rates for example in mallory story and will do a stress there. Is this very great sense of menace of horrible things about happen. I'm really interested in what you say. That internet book. But it doesn't have to be sanitized. It can be led to be there even evening. If you're writing this for a very young medians they love it. They lou sheldon patriotisms. Maverick because i i do feel to be on this. That the fairy stories. I grew up with we're brutal absolutely brutal charles perrault etcetera and And they will cinderella story. I read for example the what but he took one of the assistants torture. He'll also foot wood fifteen and the assistant so toes off so Fit into the slipper blood gushing everywhere which the princeton notice and so forth and and in one of the many versions little red riding hood i read. She goes eight in the end. You know so. I do feel that is the. I think we're doing our children a disservice pretending evil doesn't exist and it seems to me fairy stories already. Good way of as ginette said that. I'm presenting the not contain that safe space and place and and the beauty. I think for me going up. Because i absolutely adore ferries the beauty of the most that The way to overcome will was in the initial character. Nine times out of ten. It was in your character and if you kind and if you try to be good and so forth then generally you. You overcame evil but it was very important to recognize evil in the first place and i do feel the recent The recent move in some children's films for example where you have you have your villains and you have your body's but they can't be dispatched as they were. When i was a kid they have to. They have to stumble and fall to their deaths or something has to happen is not as not that. They are dispatched by the the the pr the protagonist of the pace it somehow their own evil undoes them. And an yes okay. That's it that's a message. But it's also i think i don't see anything wrong with the message that says sometimes you have to sign up and you have to actively fight against evil and i do. That's why size versus a fairy stories. I feel they they. They may have their place. But let's not lose the original tone and bites of the of the original. I mentioned just add. The people ages can can read these stories ninety. I really really enjoyed them. And i'm fifty two so it's obviously not just the children off but somebody here are says. I didn't have a name but thank you very much to this question. How is it different writing for children. As opposed to adults. I suppose to corolla to that would be if trying to write for age. It's what's the difference. mallory. I might stop start with us. That role As children and young adults anyway for me it was no different so basically my my starting point is what kind of story would. I've enjoyed reading as a child retain And what would have said to me. What what what. What would i got out of this and you know an into entertaining in itself. I see nothing wrong with just being entertaining in an of itself road so i. That's that's my starting point that he saw a sort of older children and teens and adults going to enjoy this. But i must admit as a wanting children and young adults. I'm very focused on. Okay this is my book for teens. This is a my book for opportunities for example and then tell the story and then are never ever talking down to children but talk you know having a conversation with them and kind of inviting them to come on board with the story i want to tell and have their discussions in you know as is them coming said it's sort of like inviting children to read them and then discuss the stories. Also what did you get out of that. What do you think was going on. How did his behavior affect the story. And and if you in a different way what was the the outcome of being and so on and there's so many good discussions that could be had for many of these folks so that that would be my approach. Anybody else it's no. I found that actually For me wanda guides was was reading the ugly duckling which i thoroughly enjoyed reading as an adult and yet i knew that the version that i was reading was one that that was also their full for children. And and just i think the tone of that and thinking about how that worked really was important to me in in with now how i was going to go out and i mean the fact is out. I enjoy stories men for german. You know if it's well written if if the story is good if the guards is engaging you know you you get right in there. So the hot isn't the the writing for adults spot. It's the right. Temperature is going off talk of slightly. But i have noticed in these last few months. I've gone back to my children's books of which i've kind of hoarded and taken from place to place throughout many many years unread so many of them again. I wonder if that's just something that's kind of speaking to all of us at the minute. You had she. Then idea stripping something back to essentials it's kind of important isn't it something comforting about going back to books that you grew up with but also there are so many fabulous new books out there and new offers new voices such think combination of the two really have have written books to promise gossip i to go back. I mean it's good you just. In these stories. They often have archetypes characters and situations that we recognize and he's slowly to bring them back to a young audience of never before. It's just great fun. I mean kids. Kids have fallen on. And that's the pleasure of writing for them is a bad delight in the story and they absolute concentration on especially when you read. It could be more wonderful. It didn't actually ask rebecca. you'll deputy your great niece ella. what did she think of the story you know. I don't have a clear verdict yet but last time you know When we were both cleared for on pandemic principles she read me where the wild things which is one of my favorite books of all time maurice endex classic in a couple of other things so she's narrow six in reading on her own. And so you know what. I i wrote it. She felt a little bit young for. I was really trying to rake something. That wasn't few formidable for kids. Who were you know. Seven to ten that the syntax and vocabulary wasn't too overwhelming. But i also knew that it would be read by adults to kids read by adults for their own sakes in its cetera. So but she definitely likes that. There's a book that's of dedicated to her. Actually one of the joys of writing it was. I didn't had never really thought about. The fact that cinderella's real name is ella. Cinders are just unfortunate thing that happens to her and so my book ends with everyone reverting to her real name which is ella. And that was quite fun. And i know ella loves that. In who wouldn't love which you're namesake was the central. Did you just want to say soil. Elected is what we may have talked about. We're running out of time. Them was the each of these books. Most gorgeous illustrations Don't wind door with yet. Such rebecca you went back to the the author jewelry which are also just beautiful But that lights up. Visual pleasure was immense in in all these books One last question to ask you and it was very very good one. I think from alley all that. Any other ferries news the yuan on now tempted to read l. To put you on the spot and two thirds of way through the book for ella's little sister maya and You know all will be revealed in the fullness of time to watch states another. There's almost no fairytale when wouldn't read and think a wouldn't it be much more fun. Honest you know this happened in. This didn't happen like that's you know there's a certain that's not how we do it. Nowadays i wanted you know eve eve. Oh can seem to simple. I wanted there to be reason. Step sisters were following their mother's orders. Their mother was a hungry ghost kinds of explanations for things. I think i think innocence all of them. Thank you i. I like to go to Thousand and one nights something like alibaba and the forty thieves and make a gang of women and have fun with that. So go hang on. This is about you. I will wait three canelas ones. It is so go for it. no. I mean you've just done frankenstein in a way and you'll lost frankenstein's next few is not very challenging semester. As ballots officials intelligence which killing me. I'm really need to finish Because i need to decorate my house for. Christmas is driving me mad. I wanna get this one of the things that i love about fairy tales. You not think that the end they all live happily ever after and everybody thinks it's really tried but hop eight hundred p. It comes from the jomon through the old english. And it's really help us your character to change and it's why we get happens downs and this happened look for the prefixes are it's the faithfulness that comes in which is no random. It's actually connected to you so your they all lived happily ever after which happens at the end of the fifth tactical the shakespearean comedies as well is not try. It's not disney actually say. What is the connection between you as a character which is interesting given the fairytales no really dealing characters what does happen to you from the outside world. So if you're gonna live hap p happily. Ever after. What is your. What is your fate. What is your connection with what what is going before for good oriel amounts of them so that even in the moment that looks like a cliche or just a bit of know. Goodbye thank you. it's not. It's a really deep message about to everything that we do in the world. The real imagined human animal natural and what the entire circumstances don't within the container of the story and they don't go into future. Wow thank you. Nice to though. I which we talk listening to this final episode of the vintage books podcast this year. We hope you enjoyed hearing from our office of the feminist fairy tale series. There's a link in the episode description to find out more about the books. You can also find us at into books on twitter. Instagram and facebook a very happy holidays. Everyone vintage and we look forward to bringing you more podcasts. In the new year until then he reading boldly and thinking differently.

ginette rebecca solnit mallory alex clark mallory blackman Shamsi janette winterson rebecca boorda jeanette winterson lou sheldon british library hans christian andersen Nia Mallory Jane eyre charles perrault ella hud Maya
Mostly Lit Live ft Lenny Henry at Cheltenham Lit Fest

Mostly Lit Podcast

1:07:20 hr | 3 years ago

Mostly Lit Live ft Lenny Henry at Cheltenham Lit Fest

"I'm Derek. I'm Ray. All. Hello, everybody. Quiet. Yes. Lit. I'm Derek. I'm Alex reads, I'm lifer. We love to welcome Lenny Henry to the show. To be. Another world. Now, this is podcast land. Who knows what's going to happen. So we're we're in basically literature and film pop culture podcast. We record every week we've been going consistently for about three years now every single week upload import costs and recording port costs, and it's very tiring watch. This is fun. So what will do. We will kind of give you guys a taste of what filled like to listen to podcasts, kind of for the structure in terms of just talking and you never know. Maybe you might even subscribe. And we'll be talking to Lenny Henry about all the amazing things he's been doing. So you guys get started. How has your in. Guys. To back. I so monies to get to go to the vents because a lot of them were sold out of. Sold out by mine was running around. You couldn't gain by. On you could have. Got you. Mine was round. Yes. Mine is to make it to a caller and Anthony Mexican ruse come in conversation, which was very rammed as well. But luckily tickets which was very interesting. You know, you watch a caller on TV will have thing. Okay. You know, he's. In my head, I was thinking, oh, maybe he's very media trained, but then seeing him talk is unrolled explain her call is for people. Yes. So cholera airbase the Rapa writer, I believe, rap plays, and he founded the hip hop. Shakespeare Company was trying to get, you know, young people in urban areas to engage Shakespeare man. He's just released natives, which is Sunday Times bestseller, amazing book as well. Basically history of empire and intertwined with he's life as well. Growing up in in London. Yeah, very, very interested in really bigger activist with regard to Grenfell to. Yes, yes. He def definitely is very, very outspoken takes a lot of people to ask you that they can took him down because he's a rapper by really shows them ways. Them something. Yeah. So that's been my highlight of Cheltenham so forth. Yeah. I mean, we did yesterday on how we used passions food books into the digital space, and that was amazing. I was on. Simon savage and Jen Campbell. Bogus cheap, and they report causes wells hosted by service up in kind of maybe realize like kind of my journey, three books and how we here. To this point create in the podcast cause we love. We love reading having these discussions. So then I got. The big highlights is having that discussion and kind of working my way. We have to work backwards, sons, figure out where we started reading what we loved, and then like figuring out that, you know, we, I mentioned the Harry hypotheses mentioned the fantasy book phase and divert into client fiction and then putting out into Harry Potter. Yeah. It's great. Every single Harry Potter book to my daughter and it all off every act to did this. All is damn Stephen Fry. Everything until the half blueprints majority was like fourteen or something. And I started the book and about four chapters of this. I'm going to read this myself. All right. And didn't want to give it up. So being a couple of just reading to myself. But eventually she just read the book herself literally had to read the rest of the report looks to finish the cyclists orients because because I realized that I'd become addicted to it, but reading every night four is that a fourth one. I've already known them. Treat one. Yeah, I'm gonna go with the right way. Yesterday I was on the man Booker the Cheltenham man because nine nineteen fifty eight panel and each panelist had to champion a book that was up for the nineteen fifty, eight man Booker. If the Mandic apprise had had been around and it's great. I can officially say the, I one. Wow, where's my render the pool. Yes. I championed a Cheb as nine thousand nine hundred eighty four things fall apart, and it was amazing. It got really heated as well because people were like, no. The books. Arithmetics the bell, Graham greens. Have we had breakfast at Tiffany's micro say, and. For what the other, the other one, the reason why I forget. 'cause it was knocked out like straightaway. Today fact, they night. Yes. And that was yeah. Cheltenham before to do shows here, and that's your best shorted here. Did. Cheltenham civic is this, is it. One on stage black audience. Show, but it was Tony, anybody know, Tony Tori is yet a hit man enough big and bad mad enough. Sorry, what's your name? He said, you know. Singing. What is that? He's singing to this guy. It was a fantastic show. So that's my other experience of children. But this is my first time to be here in world of tents and books, and I'm living a look, read graciously so to come to a place where it's all about literature and books seeing offers explain themselves is fantastic plus a memoir. Up next year. So to also just thought Simon mayo, more talking about writing in the process, and it's. It's a very rich experience being here combine next year when Montell amazing. So very quickly was everybody reading at the moment? The moment I'm reading reading my the kings, a gift of love. Yeah, say one of his amazing, I think so. Kind of the point a talks about being tend to hotted having strong mind and kind of like finding that balance. And if you find that kind of reached a place of genuine humanity, genuine love these different things. It doesn't mean that you have to be like so open and not really not really mindful of certain things. And how position yourself in. Obviously, the way he writes, he writes, as if he's making a speech and you can hear, it's echoing breathing. Through the words, and that's what I'm reading. It's giving me some stuff I need to get through. Guys, you just gave me James Bolden book and I'm like, what this about? Because if anyone is no penguin now kind of reassuring the lesser known Baldwin book. So does the thin ones? No, these action novels that the lost Nova zero. So just above my head and Tom, how long the train's been gone lesson you'll streak which turned into a movie and they're just amazing penguin doing a great job. I work for penguin if you don't know them. In the book that. Agenda here commotion. Amazing. I. I'm reading is cooled. Like a thief in the night choir Slava is basically. His rambling talking about communism and how the failures of the left and so on. And so on. It's about is because I watch videos of him way talks. He's, he's, he's. So to me, it sound. He seems so intelligent that he starts one centers and you forget what he's talking about going on another thing, but he runs roughing, actually make sense. So I imagine what would be like reading him, funny enough. He's he's re clears the way speak. So I'm just reading that. And yet it's very, very interesting by. What you needed every several book similar, tiny sleaze. So I'm reading about Francis Ford Coppola at the moment said Bogra fair, but he's also kind of rundown of his films and the critical reaction to them and extraordinary guy was kind of one when he started out and ended up working for Roger Corman making 'exploitation films got his chance to work in his early twenties on a phone call dementia thirteen, which bought into the public eye. They was given the opportunity to make a musical note school musical Finian's rainbow. And from that to microphone called the rain people. And it wasn't as big as excess, but he did get to write a film called Patten. So not only was a, was he a brilliant director, but it was also a highly regarded screenwriter. And this book is just this overview of his life and his career, and he's obsessions, and it's fascinating to to read about this guy who was prepared to gamble his own money. He's owns soul and his own. Mental state on making films that he really really cared about. And then when all that failed because he started his own movie studio called Zoe trope, and it failed miserably. He hide himself out as a very good director for higher and he managed to claw his way back to solvency. And so the book is about bat and it's very, very interesting. I'm also I'm also dipping into rereading Stephen king's on writing, which if you're a writer embarking on a writing career, say it's one of the best books about creativity. There's been written about the craft and he's also Stephen King writing about is in a kind of refracted way about his upbringing. His childhood is a very smart writer because he's told all his book. So why wouldn't it be? But he's also very good on craft. So, yeah, I'm really enjoying Meyer eating because I had to read. Member cookbook that Derek was initially, I feel the panel and then he was like, read them. So I have to read them through. And I've actually just finished off Graham Greene's our man in Havana and I actually loved it. I thought it was hilarious and funny before. No, I at the full boat. It's about this man Couve Wormald and he moves in Cuba with his daughter. Millie wife left him very boring man who sells. Washing machines Hoover's. Vacuum. And then he gets purchased by the six to basically be a spy. Man doesn't know what he's doing. And he started making these elaborate tales so that he can keep his job so that he can get money so that he can provide his reading materialistic, devout daughter with things that she wants. I one of the things that she wants a whole. Yeah. These elaborate tales coming true away. They it was we Larry's, but it was a real critique all secret service in Britain, just reading. What did you think of Ryan? Because I did the right thing. I don't like the way green writes. Sometimes like to me when he's his sentence, there's a word that should connect the next word, but he misses it makes you want. I guess he wants to make that assumption. So why y pussy? If that's what he's trying. Works. I've tried to retu-. Critique on on rising to that could have gone without Stephen King, say about his writing. I'll be quite interested. I would be. That would be interesting. I read and it's so weird because on the panel I went to the guy defending asaid. I love the spoke at if I wasn't defending defend your book and I went up on stage and I was like, the book is horrible. Let's take you out. And he just looked at me like I was like, I have to be strategic game is the game game is the game. That's all right. So, okay, did a book we chose this. This episode was on writing, but Stephen King. It's memoir, so he has his backstory. The book has really salient tips on how to write well. And the kind of tools eases too. Right? Well, but that's what you guys think about the book. I want us. Screenwriting pitched I six years and one of the things in fascinated by is this industry sprung up in the last twenty five years about the act, the art, the craft of writing. So you know, imagine that to William Goldman who wrote adventures in the screen. Trade is probably the person that started this idea of you can study screenwriting as a thing you can. You can look at it. You know, he's, he writes a script. He's he wrote a scene, you get in late and you get out early Woody. Goldman starts to ascribe these aphorisms and rules about scream, writing and ideas about how to make your screenplay tied and what it should look like on the page and how characters work. Now, scenarios work and all that kind of stuff. And then there have been other books like. Screen writing and screenplay, and save the cats by Blake Snyder and that all books that tell you how to write and give you a kind of a kind of cake recipe. You start page thirty shebeen inciting incident about sixty pages in the mid point. You know, there's all these rules about screen writing and I'm fascinated by it because I'm creative and I write and it feels to me like every writer you talked to says, don't read those books. They don't work that relation. There's no hard and fast rule book about how to write a screenplay. We'll have to write to novel. You've just got to put the work in and then work with somebody you an editor or somebody that cares about you to help edits and craft and shape your book. But actually by reading the methodologies of people like. Stephen King all Flaubert when you read about how these people, right, you do. And so actually there is a kind of maybe there is a system of how to sit down and craft something. Maybe it would be good to read. These people learn from them and we say, we've done on the shoulders of giants. One wouldn't you read the Steven king book on writing Stephen King, sell millions of books. So I started to dip into over the last six and a half, seven years. And he's taught me a lot about short story writing about memoir writing, and he tends to write when he writes about himself. He quotes writer and I can't remember her name, but he quotes writer and he says that she writes with pin shop, accuracy about past. But when he writes, it's like he's writing through Gore's e curtain. It's like he's taking snapshots of his life rather than trying to tell you chapter and verse with pin sharp accuracy. Because his memory doesn't work like that. And I like that kind of way when I'm writing memoir now and I'm wind, the things I can remember, I'm not. I'm not going around talking to people in trying to go hundred people to tell me exactly what John was like, because I think that's if you remember it, write it down and that's what you remember. If you go out and seek everybody's chapter verse about your upbringing, maybe their own MP maybe it still. So I think it's better to remember the things that stand out with that fly work accuracy and get that down. And then when you read it, you think actually this is quite good, so it's best to do that. But Stephen king's thing I love is about the craft element of the writing a toolbox. It's fantastic. I won't go to detail, but he's basically the the Strunk and white trunk. It's the grandma's stuff. It's the toolbox of not how you shape sentences and ROY, why paragraphs of the way they are in the fig about the overuse about verbs, and you're going to get rid of them and. The road to hell is paved with. It's an, it's just not some bowls. It's really handy recommended to anybody. Anybody interested in writing on highly recommended now because you said you're creative when Ryan you'll memoir, did you ever remember something think this is a dole? Let me just embellish a little bit. Job. Better funnier or whatever. Everybody remembers things in a different way. When I think people tend to do is go where it didn't happen like this Longo spice out Spicer either description in Cartwright's ation you make more exciting than it was because who wants to hear the boring stuff, you know you you absolutely sharp. It isn't like his boring. Sometimes sometimes you have to go through. I remember Bertrand Russell facing saying that we read them. Yeah. When you when you read a novel and it becomes boring, you have to tell you reading the boring stuff because that's what life is like. Nobody's nobody's real life with the boring bits cuts out. Over it something, you know, some guys white memoirs that plowing through them and. Electrodes attached to your genitals, shocking you away. Every twenty minutes puts you know, it's possible to read. The developer team memoir is, is fantastically salacious gossip filled and a really fast read. You read it like that. There are some the George Best memoirs, the same. There's some ways go gotta, get a comb. Wait to get to the end of the fifty and you don't want it to. So I want to be like that. I wanted to be exciting and event-filled sharp and funny. I would. I would hate to putting the reader with the thing of where they feel that got to get three Stephen king's when you read on writing Israel shorts, and it's got so much in it and what a cool thing to lead behind a short book about craft a short essay on his memoirs and improvements can on with it. And then he had a short short story competition with a winner, and he prints the winner at the back of the book. It's great and I wanted to ask the in the book he talks about this toolbox and when he was going through it, I realized things that I did in my writing and I was crap to stop that. When you're writing your memoir, did you have a point where you were like, oh, Stephen King has talked about this. Maybe I should pull back on it. What was the thing that he would have said, no living crap. Take out. Think the good thing that he says is right fear self first. So you right with the door closed. And then when you've got to the end, you. Open the door and and then everybody comes in and he writes for his wife, Tabitha. So top of the king reads every first draft of every Steven king book and. My partner, Lisa breathes everything. I write and I've got a friend who's alliterate, so that's lucky. Who also reads things that are right, and it just says. Got a couple of other people, so it's quite good to have this ideal reader, and I think that's a really good practice just just to have somebody just that's cool. Who bit worried about the bit in the middle or DVD what's out there in the world? For instance, if you're writing about your family, do you want to say that about your dad? Do you wanna say that about your mom maybe should think about revising that. So it's quite good of a few people from different backgrounds. You know that like you like if it's me, they're black hole if all there in the business or they're a friend do has no axe to grind. You know, you don't want somebody who might be jealous view, who has a secret beef with you because they're gonna, say something mean that crushes you, that means you can't right. And you don't want that. You're only want people in your ideal Rita group who are going to encourage you and push you forward in your writing. So I've tried to assemble a little squad like that, and it's really helped me talk about actually getting people to going to read your work and read it. To criticizing to give you like construct review, but just once every and be like, oh, this is fine. They're going to go in and say, well, this could be different, but he's also experts. He's got police guys about guns and about procedure. He's got hospital people to know about medical stuff. So it's within your wheelhouse to cultivate people who can help you when you need to know serious stuff you need it fact checked, but it's research as part of the research. And he also talks about writing on drugs, which is very handy. Think the idea of writing drunk or writing high. And then he talks about the thing when you stop. The feeling of cannot write sober, which is a massive part of his life intervention to stop taking drugs. And then once he did that and a lot of the books he talks about when he was high, they're fantastic. God he wrote carry and he wrote. Cujo and the Tommy knockers what he was off his takes. That's crazy. Yeah. So now when he sober, you know, he's, he's got this massive in a critic saying, yeah, we should get this is. Slow sti. And that's tough to get through. I get why like about is he's he actually mentioned how this this cultivated aesthetic that the creative is this guy gets drunk at night time, and he was like, actually, like a writer you're drunk right now, and he kind of spelled the idea about for you to be creative. You have to take drugs. You have to do all of these other things to fit the image of the creator. I think he did that weenie well, he was just like actually know me. You need to stop doing this because even thought he'd he's got. He forgot some things when he wrote them to say, when he's written bestselling books. Every kiss. Most bestselling books of all time to say that, I guess lots of creatives think we're gonna dream gotta get gotta, get high. It's a thing creatives of gotta go out and I gotta get drunk. Did that. You know a thing that's the brave courageous thing is to just sit there with with with yourself and with your Cup of tea and all your water, your coffee go. I'm going to do this. I'm gonna. What can I do about just being mean? And under just try and find that feeling that you have when you're drinking on? The hard thing is the hard yards you go to. Go to your writer, staffing of sitting with yourself and the coolness gluing your boom to the seat. It's nasty and it sitting there and it's just brighten good or bad. You have a bad day good day, but you try and get to the end try and get you five hundred pages and you see, you see what it is, how how do you deal with the criticism rejection and and the like just because when you're writing something been three in something regarded, it thought. Thought. After show we've dairy want to just because I know. How do I overcome? This is something that is just the first thing is be proud that you finished something because let's start things finish them. So the first thing it'd be really proud of yourself. The criticism is gonna come, whatever happens and I think you got to you wrote, you must've wanted people to read it. So you got to take on the chin when it comes and also take the Steve. Pretty thing about that book is Stephen King talks about the rejection slips yet a big spike in his office every rejection. He would just put a rejection on spike. Would carry on. And I think eventually people started to say not for us, but well done, try and think about this when you start giving him a little tips and then eventually somebody will go, yeah, this story, we'll have this, but it took him alone time. And what you think when you read these sexism on writing is my God. Stephen King went through all rejection. Maybe I could maybe eating courage you to write because he went through hell trying to get these things away. Of course, in those days when he was writing, you had all these outlets for short stories now is not so many think it's different now because you can go online and you can applaud your stories. But back in the day, you sending things to nave and playboy and penthouse trying to get your stuff published and they're also short-story outlets to, but it's different now I think you have to be very, very tough and develop a thick skin when you're writing because you know. You know, not everybody's going to like everything you do, so you gotta get used to that because even your family, this isn't as good as thought it was going to be family. You're going to have beef with stuffy, right? So you've got to be careful and you're going to have your creativity close to your heart because it's going to be some straight coming from somebody that you know and love the my Mikey go shouldn't, right. You're going to protect yourself from that stuff. So I mean Stephen King because he was sending stuff out and putting things on his rejection spike, he could kind of go just going to carry on, but that's takes a lot of doing. Surround yourself with people who are going to support you, make sure you carry on. So speaking of developing thick skin, Stephen King, cools editors the divine now when environs something. And I've sent it through to age editor and they've come back with critiques. My first thing is lands. I mean, I call them up. Actually, yeah, I, I'm thinking, Iowa grow. This is why you just don't get it now. Do you have like that when you get the edits back in just like, oh my God, like my shit, write-off and my editor's trying to turn me into a decent one. I'm working at fiber fiber at the moment and I wanted to that because. Sikri soon and take, whoa coats and people at that. Secret soon city print, and it just smells like they know what they're doing. When you're in a place that you editors are so smart, you the fact is they invited you to write for them. So I tend to listen to what my says because you'll really smart, and you know what you're doing collaboration in the end that if you're on the other end of that, if you're asking to be admitted into. If you ask him for writing deal than taking a chain of people give you criticisms because you're asking to be admitted into the hall of fame, you wanna be one of their published writers. So it stands to reason that they're going to have things to say about your writing. They giving a bedtime to comment is let Stephen King said, oh yeah, and they started to write things. There was a form letter and then there would write in their own handwriting, little notes. And once they start to write little notes in their own handwriting, you start to think, oh, they getting engaged in my work this time to connect with my work, then there yet, but but once you once you've been signed then thinking to accept what people, it's fine to have the debate about it, but they know what they're doing. You should allow them to have a sane what you're doing because they want to get over the line as much as you do. So what was some of the difficult bits to overcome when doing the memoir? Because it's always that one memory that really wouldn't have to go there. But I might have to go there for the sake of. A my fourth or fifth draft. Now, one hundred fifty draft in a couple of weeks ago and it was a really good feeling. It was like hunting in the PHD, but it was. It was really of demand. But now the tough thing is waiting for the comments. He wants a month to radio and to make notes, he's not going to. He's not going to do type notes. He's going to do handwritten notes in the text. He's going to sit and talk with me for a whole day about it. Never written a book like this before. So this is all I, I'm experience. I'm looking forward to it, but I'm also dreading because it's a long. It's a long manuscript. Another is going to be cuts. He's gonna have an opinion about it, and I'll have to. After allow it after allow his opinion because I want the book to be good. I don't want to get across the finish line. So I would accept cuts and I will accept rewrites because I wanted to be as good as he wants it to be, but it's tough to take people's criticisms. You have to develop a thick skin after not security. When they say things about your work. You have to, you have to be on the train. So I'm going to get on the train and do the work. So I'm wrecking of go more work to do. I'm sure there's another couple of jobs. It might never end until publishing still be there just before publishing. But I'm sure there's going to be at least another two, Jeff's of things. Some fixing some messing around. And I'm looking forward to actually a little bit of looked. I miss things about you when you're writing the memoir, just some tips. It's really good to teddy family about stuff because they might not want their business Chattanooga in the open for everybody to read done in the human zoo. We're talked about my upbringing and my parents and stuff on told stories about my my parents and my siblings had a real problem with it to deal with that after the after the piece of commands, and we're very private people from very private and working class, a man, an issue with me, writing a film script about our family. It was like. It was like, you've divulged family secrets and he didn't. By the way I sent more script. And they already, or they told me that already. But when they watched on until new in, we're going to talk about this. The family business. So I had to sit down with everybody and say, look, you know, you read the script, you will tell me and I told you what was going to happen in it, and you told me it was all right. And now you're saying it's all right, mad the pressure amid doorsteps and people people bothering them at work and stuff. And so it was a really tough time to get through. But with this. I'm sending the next money script all my siblings, and they've all got to read it all. Got to prove it before I go to the next stage and that's a really big thing want off. Like once you've reached that finish line and it comes out, what is it that you want each Rita coming to the memoir, what you want them to leave? Thinking feeling? What do you want this memoir to have in the in the world unlit books on a love, getting lost in somebody else's story. Are we don't memoirs and. I'm interested in the press nicotine detail that people bring to telling the story of their life. I'm interested in obstacles. Have people overcome things you hit the glass wall or Grassi, and particularly when you're a person of color, the story of how you overcame long walk to freedom Mandela. These stories are important and they are the Martin Luther. King story took a Malcolm x. Boggetti the thing of overcoming jail sentence or enduring an assassination attempt or going through a religious change in life or whatever. These things are important and fascinating to read about, and I would like it if people were if people got lost in my story and didn't want it to end because these are my favorite books you get to the like you get to the kind of three-quarters away three dunk being son, and you don't want it to end to Stephen, the best one of the best even king books is the stunned kept getting third of the way through and then stopping and rereading from the beginning because I didn't want it to finish or you know, things fall apart or white teeth or something. You read these books on beauty boys eighty Smith, oh my God. You. Get about offer go, I love this book taught them wanting to end. I want that for my book. It might be that people go. Yeah, yeah. Ready to write a bit of it was all right, but I'm gonna keep writing until people do that. I'm not going to give up. I want to just kind of compare writing jokes and comedy sketches to the Ryan process over a memoir. So for example, in my mind, always think of course FitzGerald when he wrote a great Gatsby, the last few lines muscles wrote those thought this is the ship. Do you do you ever when you're Joe drop the mic drop? Exactly. This is. When you run a joke in your head, you must think this is funny when he was writing the memoir. Did you ever write like a paragraph for few lines and think this is good ship. Well, certainly in the first instance joke about writing jokes. You really bizarre people at Victoria would have been out in the right jokes on the road. I think Romesh Ranga Nathan writes everything and then sits in a room for a couple of days with with another writer. But most people do comedy in a group like this. What about this? What about that many people laugh? That's the job that goes on the page. Generally when you're writing a memoir or a novel or something, you're on your own in a room, eating hobnobs in watching blockbusters Mattel, and hoping that you get struck by inspiration and. Yeah, there's a great in cold. Water foam is the name of the book ho, comfort co, comfort palm where. Yeah, she, she puts an asterisk next to a couple of paragraphs. And I think she I think is this is really good writing. This is deep. She puts an ask Chris by her favorite passages don't do that. But I know if something makes smiling when I'm writing enjoying the writing process and I know it's gonna be alright. No, it's funny, but if it's a grind kind of know, have to go through this with the cause this. This was this was difficult, but jokes is jokes jokes. And usually, you know, for joke is funny. I use. I'll usually know when something's going to bring down the house just because it's the surprise of the nature of the of the way you've written it. But with writing any Pru Brokeback mountain and the shipping forecast. And she writes sentences like she's cracking a whip. You know, it's like the sentences crackle with energy and the beautifully written. And you know, you just think you read it and just go on, never gonna ride up this, so you just got the best you can. You got to be you. So now I'm thinking of all these books a live all these people just going to write me now. I'm not my Angelou on me. So the thing to do is right, like you. Not not somebody else picked out of. Yeah, I'll read them Oscar Wilde just before I start writing because I'm like, I need that energy come to me school out energy. Yeah, I love good Oscar Wilde. Yeah. I wanted to ask you, is Stephen King talks about how watch television right off your l. However I recently was wildest Gumbiner. Your video where he talk about this is the TV and this TV. Okay. And obviously it's based of childish Gambino America video. And my thing is I, this is the TV was quite to me. It was quite an all man. Remember when we used to sit down with the whole family and watch television and now just on their phones, but how would you justify that to Stephen King? He says, kill the television actually, right? Stephen King is a person of a certain age. That's the first thing I'd say in the so much inspirational stuff going on television. You're gonna have some judicious and carefully, but you know, breaking bad sopranos you can't the wire discount these things and that culturally significant, you've got to watch these things. The wire is the most people in drama crazy by white people have ever seen. With some accuracy and they've worked within the community. These journalists policemen immature to apply the knowledge of police procedural journalistic writing to to the problems, initials of the black community in a place with the highest murder rate in America, and they've come out with something that is culturally significant. Why wouldn't you watch that breaking bad? Same sopranos the same. So I think that you know. In this day and age, people will binge-watch things and catch up. People don't watch television the way they used televisions changed and this is the TV was about the way television. This changed and the fact that we need to move the needle along in the conversation about why don't we more inclusive with that with that television while the more black people and Brown people until the vision more women on television. When is that going to change apart from doctor who watch teddy? And I still feel like it's tokenistic when I watch television, it's really difficult and it's because behind the scenes, there aren't enough people making decisions about what we watch from. There aren't enough people of color. There aren't enough women. There aren't enough gay people. It's there aren't enough. People have alternate gender, alternate religion. It's just very much the patriarchy. It's pale male style, white. It's dominant culture that's who's in charge until that changes even little bit. Television is going to remain the same as it's always being what's been great unless for years while we've been. Paining about the stuff is that it's moved along a little bit so that the conversation is changed in publishing. It's worse publishing. It's really bad behind the scenes and it isn't publishes and the guys get to choose who writes what? There's a black section. There's a African section. There's a ghetto section, but it's not general thing of. Yeah, come on. Let's all do something. Families. Cuties are pretty writer news born in Britain, and he's black, but he's not. But he writes, like f, Scott FitzGerald, or he writes, like, there's none of that you're in or you're in a knee and you stay there. So you got black writers workshop. He go African writers workshop got the Jamaican, the African of being rise. There isn't a sense of. Eating at the big table until we get black and Brown editors, and publishers think is in created. You're not going to get that change. So that's the thing to fight for. That's what we're fighting for in the television film industry. And these are transportable things. You know, when you when you look at what's happening in the city in banks that very aware that they need to be diverse and Representative because they do business with the world, they, they are global businesses. So I think publishing and television film global businesses too. So they need to catch up. Benny's a catch up because banks and insurance and things leaving the creative industries behind mental, the that corporate site is more so thinking there's a market here for people who are not straight males eventually, but in the publishing world, the marketing for, I guess, black people is, well, let's tell them the the black struggle story. Maybe that's what they into. Maybe we get nice another slave book though by that. But if it's just any other book. Maybe they were. And I think what go by that. Go by that. So I guess is your take that there should be a change from inside the infrastructure rather than just putting out another black story, choose everything because once you once you have, if you can't see, you can be an oath when you walk into a meeting and you're the only person of color in the room you're sitting there going. Okay, fine. And what I find with creativity and going into a room that is predominantly white is that you're always in an active translation or interpretation. So you always have into explain yourself as a writer and Nabi asks, nobody says to white writers. This. This is another white story. Moggi says that was a black ROY is if you're writing story about coming from the Enzo if you're writing slavery story or or if you're writing a winder story, you know. You know another one for that sort of like you get pushed into that niche because that's what they expect. But you know, what are we? The of their rid of over extrordinary book called my darling, something about a survivalist with the door to his credibly, abusive relationship, and it was a con imagine them. I can't imagine that being a black writer because they just don't expect us to write stories like that. So I think within the publishing industry, you know, the more you open up who's behind the scene is the publishers Reuters owners. The more these these areas are opened out, they will get the chance to find people who aren't just writing that particular race Pacific story. You will get stories about Survivalists and bartenders, and as rings, the cane says in his play misty. Stories about rum comes where couples ride a bike through the park in the sunshine. Can I have a book about writing a book in the sunshine, whereas my rom com in the fact that the Mary's Mike gale, he's writing room comes, but the moment nobody's picking them up, nobody's adapting them to make them into movies because it's perceived that there isn't an interest, you know who's gonna watch that. And I think visit big audience for that. Why wouldn't you watch that in America? You know, you get waiting to exhale Brown sugar, and there's an audience for that, but it's not enough interest is shown in those stories in Britain. Don't respect to Brown sugar and those kind of black Rome comes as well because kind of picked it. They're kind of not disrepute tonight. Many cinemas well, they kind of put into smaller one for the Kosovo watching the because China Perry has his own jet. Yeah, yeah, that somebody's watching these movies. There is a big appetite. I think for guys, you're black podcast. There's a big appetite for alternates entertainment. There's a big appetite for multicultural entertainment. People are interested in cultural, whatever they tell you, people are interested in cultural exchange and look at you guys. Look if Bill street could talk look at moonlight every Vernay Lee Daniels mood. Our loved moonlight. I washed in Brooklyn. It was a mostly white audience, loving it scathing stunning evasion of end. We are interested in each of the story. We grow up within communities. We observe each other, we learn about each other, and I think that. Tuned. was asked how come you're so good at writing white people into a group with white people. Wouldn't I notch right? Why people? They're my friends, my family, whatever. You know, we live in a world where we are observing each other and cultural exchanging everything. All the time. We know about stuff. Allow us the privilege of showing you how cool we are showing you how good we are showing you the, whereas good is anybody else that's what we want. And I'm, you know, when I when I see Mallory Blackman is gonna talk to, wow, we're getting. We're getting somewhere. That's great. Now we just have to get some people writing on Deva. Open all hours. This change that. This change that brothers in. Ball brothers. They live in the platform in EastEnders. The people have always bet on our God. We never know what's gonna capital. Your capital get more asking that my pop. We can do the weekend right now. For us. It was the only street where there was a corner shop. We know black people. Eating where there was no Indian people running. When you say the guy changed recently a long time. But you know, things are changing and. As my friend, Marcus y to said, repeatedly, you know, you keep saying, wait and see. Well of waited and I'm seeing when is it going to change? And it's going to change when the infrastructure changes, and that's what you fighting. So obviously, you've, you know, you've been in ministry for a very, very long time, and we wanted a podcast we've Mallory Blackman and she basically said that the kind of the how diversity is now trending. She said she's seen him before, so she's not getting excited by this time. She just was like, okay, diversities again, Robert rice going to go away. Then in five years, it's going to come back again. But then other people have said this time it feels a bit different. I mean, I want us how. Yeah. Since being signed to write a memoir of February, but lots of letters and digital conversations about publishing and the lack of diversity within publishing. And recently, there was some data that we live in a world of big data, and somebody sent somebody in publishing industry did some research about BA blacks, Asians, minority ethnics in the world publishing, and the results were shocking. Similarly in the world of television and film directors UK where this new information's come out where like three percent of the directors and the TV industry people of disgraceful three percent, north percent, shiny floor, television shows like minimum percentage in dramas. I mean in high end dramas known. And in. In all these other transferable industries, people doing it seems that people really respect the numbers. They rooted respect statistics between twenty twelve and twenty fifteen. We've found via skill set that some people did research, and they did a snapshot of industry and took nine percent of black as you minority ethnic people had left the industry. Where for every two people for every one black person, but left the industry to why people were employed in the film and television industry. And if fifteen percent of the nation's. Emme forty percent of London is a most of the industry is in London, so that's these terrible. So it was like a real wakeup call for the entire industry. So since then, since the activism stone team, the PFI now have a system of three, six, whereby you have to take all three things in order to get your film made. So either subject matter or director or cast two of those have to be diverse. Otherwise you're not going to get your movie made shoot Murphy came to a when he was in charge of sky. Television came to a meeting after an heard, all these people talking about the lack of representation in the TV and film industry. And he went back to sky and said, we're gonna have targets, twenty percent of writers, twenty percent produces twenty percent everything. I'm going to try and fulfill these by twenty twenty and it's been difficult quotas, easy quotas. You can. The guy from IT that one of the cleaning ladies and it didn't lady. And you can say, look fulfilled our quota, the guy from IT in the carpark guy, but we targets you've gotta have the real people at the wiz that doesn't work so sky trying to do that channel four did this three sixty thing, which is like a four foot, thick guideline of what they've got to try and achieve diversity in the next five years. People are talking about it, people are trying to do it and as long as people are talking about it on happy, we need like black lives matter, like hashtag metoo, the pussy riot thing. We're all talking about these things that are affecting us and the making angry and he's good vomit to get it out there. Nothing changes, compensation. Nothing changes where people going. Do you know what I'm pissed off about this? And I'm gonna say something. I'm going to be brave enough to say something people to open my mouth and publishing online. They're bypassing editors that bypassing publishing houses all television stations. You don't have to go no dishes anymore. You can just go this about this subject and I'm gonna make a pop cast, boom. So young people are doing that. Won't people just applauding things and saying what's on my mind while we're taking advantage of this multiplatform world we're living in, I think be activists. Be loud, be annoying because as it says in Sylvia, which is a musical about Emily Pankhurst nobody texting the dutiful person, they take notes, the noisy person, news, always moaning, so be the person that's always moti, moaning and making themselves heard because eventually they got to listen to you. Questions. If anybody highs some questions, they went to Osco. So Lenny. This question. The the Mike's coming Tiv. Sixteen bars of Eric beef president. Why you drink. I'm just joking. And. Interesting to hear actors, writing my mouth. We've just come from Sally field who's written her man. And she talked about she with reenact her childhood. That's how she's to bought things back that she didn't remember. You've talked about just talking about things that you that you do. Remember I wanted to ask you a question. Why are you writing it? Is it cathartic and you writing it for you, or are you writing it for us. As with all the best things. If you start off writing, if you and you finding an interesting, hopefully people reading it will find it interesting to. It was the right time. I think hitting a big birthday. It's sort of like your past cumby of a burden. If you if things happen to you when you when you growing up that you're still carrying around as hurts and slights you can. You can literally. Exorcise demons by if you just keep a journal by vomiting. Allergy can make yourself feel better about things. And I grew up in a time of group in interesting times those racism, I'm writing about times when in medic guy got voted in under the banner. If you wanted nigga for a neighbour vote labour. In sixty whenever it was, you know, Powell just made a speech about the being rivers of blood and profiteering. The black man will hold the whip hand over the. There were times when my brother used to walk past walls that said, keep Britain, white with my mother arrived in nineteen in the mid nineteen fifties. There were signs in windows in every window that said, no blacks, no Irish, no dogs, but mom would walk down the street and people would ask aware tale was so. I carry that. So for me to write a book about this period of my life in the first book, which is called, who am I again is about my mom's life and leads up to me winning new faces and shortly after that, and it's been a huge exhumation of the past, and I hope you find interesting to me. It's kind of. It's looking long, wind rush. You know somebody I think Hobsbawm wrote about the long, long, fifties, over-long forties. The long shadow that, but an era casts. And for me, wind rush castle long shadow mom arrived ten years later, and she experienced not everything that the wind rush people experience. But she experienced locked riots in deadly because of racism and race riots and stuff. So she lived through all of that. My brothers experienced racism and had fights on the street with teddy boys when the ride. You know, when I was at school, I had a fight nearly every day with some guy would call me a racist name as I walked into school. So to write about these things, it's almost like you're breathing out last year exhaling you're gonna call who cover that bit of poison. There. The great thing is that with hindsight, you can have a bit of a sense of humor about this stuff so I can right around it. I can have an opinion about it. That's that's not PO faced. It's not depressed. I can be funny about it whilst writing about something terrible and somebody somebody once said, comedy is tragedy, but we've charged tragedy plus time equals comedy. And I think that's true. You can look back and go wasn't so bad, even it was awful. Any more questions. Personal question. So I get if you want to answer it, but I've always wondered what the you've ever had any psychotherapist with you had me cancelling to process all that. That's what I always wondered, really, because you're very into what happened in your childhood, and it's had such an impact. And I'm just wondering if it's been time that you've gone. Spoken about that post me might not want to say that everybody is out there appear may. Examined life. I'd rather not know about from Cheltenham. We don't do that. Interestingly, growing up in the Midland. Particular black and working class. It's not particularly thing that people people don't talk about their, you know, you're just gonna, go, just drink. Couldn't. But when my mom passed away I was, I was really affected by it on needed to offload. So I did go and see agreed counselor for very long time. I saw somebody for two years and talk to somebody took somebody twice a week because it was just something I've found hard to quantify. Mom was like, I didn't realize it, but she was so important to me. But it was like somebody pulled this cosmic carpet from beneath my feet. I felt like I was freefalling but way this was happening. I was working. I was doing stuff and it's amazing. You know, you can get through an awful, didn't let it crush me an family very tight. So we were able to lean on each other and depend on each other and talk to each other. But I was able to get through a terrible time with therapy, but also with my family, we were very, very tired and we talk to each other all the time about it. So. It was a mixture of the two things really. And I just one more question. When you have a favorite quote from your books. From my book. Tough question. That's a tough question. The so many, this too many really. Girth at talks about the being good. Good, good, good, good. It looks like go, if. Let's go on the page. Good girder. Let's call the whole thing off. Tomato tomato. Talks about the big magic in the act of creation and. I think he's right, but I think there's magic in finishing things never used a Finnish anything. So in the spirit of good, I'm going to say that there is magic in in the act of creation, but there's some magic and into the end because if you don't get to the end Heidi now got, so I'm going to say, look at that quote, it's online. Everybody says it, but this is the act of creation is magical. But I think factor finishing something is even more magical because now you got something to make some currency may can show your friends and your family and go wrote that or a made. The song I wrote this movie, how read Tim, what you think hate you. You try to cross me for at least you finished it. Because it's plenty of people who go way through when they're plenty of people were talking big and then never went on stage and did ten minutes at the comedy store couldn't get, you know, said they were going to the open Mike, and then bowled it at the last minute, but imagine actually doing the open mic and doing five minutes and they clapped or two of the jokes went really well. You're short story published and somebody said, annoys thing, you know. This is important. So he got to do that. You've got to believe in yourself. And I think any way you can do that if you need therapy or you can talk to your best mate, anybody who give you some support do that. That's what you gotta do. So we have time for one more. Question question then I gotta get out of here while. Okay. From. So you all. You'll read books a lot Devin tips on how to get through amount of books that you read. What do you do. Bush read a week after read around two or three books because if I'm at work because I work on the books pages thought to try and get through like, but you're not reading them covered. Yes, I tried to read one for myself. How'd you do it? I give myself deadlines to say, I want to try and read it between now and then and then. Yeah, this is the come. What do you do? Why? Why used to do? Actually, when I was at university and I used to have work at twelve o'clock and I'll finish five. So I used to wake up nine say, I'm going to read four pages Antill ten then get ready to go to work. And as soon as I get home from work, then I read a number forty pages and that would be. My cycle. Yeah. Yeah. You how to books like that yet earlier? Yeah. Galvin earlier and read our, but also while tease by novellas and read those today's to count, you can read three books this week for even if there were seventy pages long, still counts, say, make sure that carry a book everywhere you go and find those little tiny opportunities. They could be waiting for new all like just before you're going to eat or you're waiting for some Netflix show to load or some other show up Stephen king's Stephen King has a book everywhere with yes, probably one of the reasons got run over. I putting away go put my phone away of the day and I was walking looking around. Everybody has their phones and I'm working with my book Eamonn. So trying to navigate it's kind of the same the why. Why are you walking down the road trying to finish the book. Time shame. Like I normally carried one book, but then I remembered that needs to carry quite a few books with the and I'm maybe I need to carry a few books because maybe that will help me that just makes them even more indecisive because I'm like, okay, I have three books, which one do I t's, but be very disciplined because sometimes in the mood to read it, but it depends on how you want to read whether you want to be able to say, I finished this book or you just need to be in the mood kindle on your phone. Join your phone, it's great. You read much more than you thought you were going to read your on the tube or the train or something, and you're just you're reading and you can really plow through on kindle. It's great with people who take their phones and on social media, and I'm read through the time line or go through Instagram. But if you can kind of like take, I'm put it into the kindle out, you're going to get through. Change your life? Definitely. Middle march. Just couldn't. Just couldn't really. What I do is got an audio book and there was an actor, an actress reading it, and it was so annoying because they weren't very good. Reading along with it because I was so Vicks and then go to hundred. I've got this. Now I carry them reading an audio book for the first hundred pages of a difficult book is a really good thing to discipline yourself. Books can be pretty terror. Main recommend? My I. And then Savoys. My name is please by the marvelous. That's what we have yet day. But we thank everyone for comment and we'd be in moxie mitt. Yeah, thank you. Thank you. Shows every Monday on Twitter at mostly that Instagram where mostly let pod, and then you can find out everything that we doing from their own. But we each one day we show out so makes me listen, tunes Google play wherever. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you.

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November 16, 2018: Hour 2

Here & Now

42:15 min | 2 years ago

November 16, 2018: Hour 2

"From NPR and WBZ. I'm Robin young. And I'm Lisa Mullins. It's here and now in California, the massive campfire continues to burn the death toll has risen to at least sixty six and the Bucao. The sheriff's department says more than six hundred people are missing some of those people may be safe, but have not yet contacted officials to tell them, they're okay in all ninety seven hundred homes have been destroyed and some thirteen thousand people in and around Butte county or displaced hundreds of the merging refuge in a WalMart parking lot in nearby, Chico, California as NPR's Frank Morris reports many say it's a good place to be for now. A week after driving through flames to escape the inferno in paradise. Jesse Cartwright's sits bundled up against the cold on a metal folding chair surveying the same parking lot where she landed the morning her ten in her home went up in smoke. There's nowhere to go. So we just came here and slowly. But surely, it filled up what started as a trickle of campfire evacuees has mushroomed into a sprawling community, dozens of tents and lived in cars spilling over with clothes food dogs. Neighborhoods are forming around friendships forged in a town that no longer exists. Absolutely. Yeah. Everybody found one another and we're sticking together. Definitely Tammy Missouri is living in a cluster of tents in the so-called. Wally wood section of this improvised town, is it created another sense of community that was loss. It's almost like you lose your church. You lose the neighborhood store that you see. Somebody you know, you lose that that neighbor next door, you know, so this is recreated here and micro spot. But, you know, this is our new sense. I think that's what everybody needs most right now. But this place has evolved to take care of all kinds of needs. I'm just looking for a band aid yesterday. You know, what my unit a mask? Tables have sprung up at the end of the parking lot, offering all kinds of services from hot teed cellphone charges to healthcare. Julia or Benowitz and nursing student just showed up here with boxes and boxes of donated medical supplies. And that I heard that WalMart we're starting a whole little city here. So we we decided to come by and see what they needed and there was nothing medical going on. So we just out of just compassionate. We didn't want people to be walking around sick. Or, you know, potentially missing something that could, you know, make make them get sicker. Dozens of volunteers sort free, clothes blankets and camping gear. They fixed and serve thousands of hot meals a day, people wander around giving a gift cards sometimes hundred dollar bills, some porta and handwashing stations. And here's the thing. Nobody's really in charge. This happened on its own. Thank you. They outpouring of support from the community has been tremendous. Susan Kisco Naan is camped out here with her daughter and son-in-law, it's. Hard to let yourself get into a depression. When you've got people we had coffee brought to our tent to this morning. I mean and people somebody's doing our laundry, a laundry company came in and ended up bags and they're doing our laundry and. It's hard to. Fall apart when there's so much support. Really, it's great. The fires stripped these evacuees of everything they owned at least for the time. Being that goes for people who stuff was spared like Dustin Kimball living here in a tent. I'd like to get back. I have a motorhome sitting on my mom's house waiting for us. Yeah. It's okay. My mom's house is good and my motor sitting there. But I can't get up there. Whole areas cordoned off and residents are told likely we'll be for many weeks. Meantime, the weight goes on in the WalMart parking lot. Tammy Missouri says shock is giving way to foreboding. There's a lot of certainty, and like this has been great like I said the people been phenomenal. We have a basic stabilization. But now we need to progress from that on the county state federal level. What can happen for me? Lots of people here say they've yet to see any aid from the federal government. They say they'll need it to restart their lives when they leave this parking lot. And just last night. They learned they'll have to do that by Sunday for here. And now, I'm Frank Morrison, Chico California will today of federal judge ruled that the White House must return the press pass for CNN reported Jim Acosta, which as you know, was revoked after that contentious exchange last week during a press conference a Kosta came out of the court after the judge rule. In his favor. I want to thank all of my colleagues in the fresh who supported us this week. And I want to think the judge for the decision he made today, and let's go back to work. Well, others are a little more cautious. The judge a Trump appointee based his ruling on a Costa's fifth amendment right to due process, which the judge said had been violated. The judge did not rule that reporters had a first amendment right to free speech and the White House then released this statement today, the court made clear that there was no absolute first amendment right to access the White House in response to the court. We will temporarily reinstate the reporters pass will also further develop rules and processes to ensure fair and orderly press conferences in the future. There must be decorum at the White House and later in the morning after the ruling, President Trump spoke to reporters in the Oval Office and said we are writing up rules and regulations. So at least it looks like they could possibly revoke his press pass again, if they create a due process. But how is social media reacting? Joining us for our weekly social media. News roundup is family. Okay. Host of the stream on aljazeera English high femi- halide IRO. What are you seeing? I. When you say hi that. I it's interesting that judge with Kelly also weighed in on the initial argument from the White House that Jim Acosta from CNN used force with the intern. He was trying to take the microphone back from mouth Austin number of questions, and he said as there was video circulating now. Some of the video that second thing was editing a playful way mischievous way, but some of it was edited to make it look as if Jimmy Acosta IT huts all hit the intern in a forceful way. And the judge actually said that they is likely untrue partly based on evidence of questionable accuracy. So everybody online. He's debating about is this real video. Did this really happen? The judge acting as waiting on that as well n t on Twitter is saying but wearing the constitution. Does it say anyone can have a price policy laid out rubbing why the judge made this decision so far and I do not. Stand. This debate continues about Jimmy Costa style of reporting when he is at White House briefing say serenity says then maybe you should have a Costa reflects when he's behavior and apologized to colleagues whose time he monopolized. So there are those who are supporting the White House in this. Absolutely. And, but it's it's funny registered said schone mentioned those videos because there were such funny videos of, you know, for instance, somebody had Jim Acosta then karate chopping with the young woman who's trying to take the microphone, so the judge actually weighed in and said those were funny. Yeah. The one that I've now he he wasn't talking about beams on Twitter. Let's be clear, but he was talking about the initial session from the White House that he touched the young intern in an inappropriate way likely untrue. And then of course, there were the celebration memes and one that caught my eye was a swagger from Woody. The cowboy from Toy Story swaggering through on his me. And the president who shed they said, this is Jim Acosta walking by into to the White House pref- rest room. That'll be a moment. Want to turn to another moment. And apparently, it was just a moment. Because a lot of clamor. This is what happened with it's scary from the Washington Examiner reporter there who tweeted a picture of congresswoman elect Alexandria, criti- Cossio Cortez, and what she was wearing as she was on Capitol Hill. And it looked to be a shot from the back, and she was wearing basically dark suit and carrying a dark bag, but he had a caption that suggested that she might be more wealthy than she admits to being there was fast and furious. Blowback the reporter at scary eventually deleted the tweet, but there's a bigger picture here. Femi- tell us about that. Well, what happened was pitchy was taken from the back. So there was some conversation online about looking like. It was a stool ca picture and the quotes from Eddie scary was off tell you something that Jackie and coat. Don't look like a go who struggles. And he's goes back to an original story about a week ago where the congresswoman was saying how difficult it was to be able to afford to move to Washington DC before she officially gets a salary and some people being supporting that saying, of course, if you're you're young a millennial, and you're going into congress, and you don't come from a wealthy background. This is the reality. And then a lot of other people on mocking her. So the conversation escalated very very quickly, Eddie, scabby, code the congresswoman ago. Dictionary dot com who does beautiful trolls as you said. Well, this is what a go is. Now, a female child from buffed full growth, Alexandra Acadia coach has is not ago that is from a dictionary. And then offers a using that this doesn't look like a go who struggles. Exact wording and inputting up ridiculous pictures of people in very flamboyant outfits, and so the trolling continued, but the real the real sort of debt about this and the conversation about this is that if we're going to have a diverse congress diverse congress people lawmakers, then they should be out of come from different backgrounds without being being mocked about how much money they do or don't have that's the deep meaning right that or so feeling that they're being more than that close. There's that. And by the way, this is probably why new study confirms that social media contributes to loneliness depression, anxiety because people are tweeting pictures taken from the back of you. And you don't even know it about the clothing that you're wearing familiar, okay? Host to the stream on al-jazeera English helping us take a look at the world through social media this week femi-. Thanks as always you'll say, welcome. I watched so much social media. I've probably I'm no Liang shis. And it's always good to be on here. And now you Jimmy out you hide it. Well for me. Thanks. This is. You may have seen the hashtag. This is my lane. It's part of a huge online spat between emergency room and trauma doctors and the NRA it started when the American college of physicians issued a report calling for more research into guns as a public safety issue to which the NRA tweeted out that self important antigun doctors should stay in their lane and practice medicine rather than opine on firearm policy. Well, hours later twelve people were shot and killed by a gunman at the borderline bar and grill in Thousand Oaks, California and trauma doctors ward back Dr Daniel K wrote on Twitter, dear NRA until you're covered in blood and pronounce someone did in the trauma bay or told him other that her child is dead or sewed someone's scalp together. So their family doesn't have to see their brain matter. Please don't tell me what my lane is. Dr. How Email wrote moments who always remember furious. Honking in the ambulance. Bay picking up the lifeless twelve year old from the front seat. Like he weighed enough. Nothing putting him on the cot so many holes. No breathing finger thorough custody his finger plugging a bullet hole so much blood shooting up my arm. He died hashtag. This is my lane. Joseph saccharin is trauma surgeon at Johns Hopkins hospital in Baltimore, Maryland, he launched. This is Arlene page on Twitter, and Dr saccharin you've also been sharing grim insights into treating gunshot victims. But you are also one of them. That's correct. I was a victim of gun violence when I was seventeen I was nearly killed after being shot in the throat with a thirty eight caliber bullet this is during a high school football game nineteen ninety four and my hearing a little of that. Now, I mean shot in the throat. Yeah. So you know, I actually have a paralyzed love focal horde. And so I do have a little bit of a raspy voice. And you know, when something like that happens. It's such a young age, it really changes your life and this. This second chance that I got really inspired me inspired me to go into medicine inspired me to become a trauma surgeon, and then really figure out. How do we work at that intersection of medicine public health and public policy, in fact, he trained with the same surgeons who saved you to be the trauma surgeon that they are. And so now you see gunshot wounds every day, would you think when you for saw these tweets from the NRA stay in your lane? Well, you know, when I first saw that type of communication, I really was incensed. And it honestly was a clear demonstration to me the rest of the medical community, and frankly, Americans all across this country that they are not serious about moving this forward on this public health issue that we're facing. Well, look this is been going on for a long time. We remember congress hasn't substantially funded gun violence research since nineteen ninety six and that was after the CDC got curious about the NRA claim that guns made homes. Safer. So they did research and found out to officials horror at the time that in fact guns made homes, far less safe. The NRA was so angry about that study. They went to congress and lobbied to get funding for that kind of research cut off, and they essentially did with the Dickey amendment, which is why we haven't seen this kind of research you and all these other doctors now in this study that came out that prompted the NRA tweet this time around, you know, are saying you need that research. Do you think you're going to get it? The research pieces such an important point because gun violence has less than one percent of the research funding that other diseases, for example accepts this have even though gun violence and sepsis kill about the same number of Americans every year. So having federal dollars to be able to figure out what are the solutions to dealing with this problem? Similar to what we've done with motor vehicle fatalities in the sixties and seventies and tobacco is going to be so critical to move this conversation forward and really be able to implement appropriate solutions. This is about all of us United together. And so right now a lot of us are in conversation with other organizations to team up with them to be able to again work together. Similar to what we have communicated with the NRA. We feel like everyone deserves to be a part of the solution. So we're not going to style ourselves off. We are. Going to break down the silos and work with existing gun bonds prevention organizations, gun owners in order to really help move this conversation forward and implement action that's going to save lives and make community safer. But do you think that things have shifted, and, you know, the response from the doctors would seem to indicate that maybe they have we've surprise lots of F bombs in tweets and people saying that must be my lane come into my lane. I've cared for victims of gun violence for the past twenty five years. This is from one doctor another neurosurgeon shared a picture of a bloody bullet she'd removed from the brain of a six month old that had been shot at trauma surgeon, New Jersey posted the picture of the blue plastic chair. She sits into till pairs their child has died an emergency room doctor in Louisville sent a picture of blood just covering the floor. And as we said a lot of a lot of rage. And by the way, can you try to explain where that comes from? We. Explain your world and working with gunshot victims. Yeah. So let me just say that the medical community those of us that are, you know, day in day out taking care of these patients, we are literally on the front line. And so for some person or group to think that the medical community is not a part of this conversation. I think is sorely mistaken. Because the reality is, you know, Robin any complex health solution. Like this cannot be solved by simply one person or one organization. It requires stakeholders from all walks of life, and so when I have to walk into those waiting rooms, and I have to talk to those mothers, and fathers and sisters and brothers and tell them that their loved one is not coming back that that type of experience that we have to go through every day. Most people don't understand. Let me just talk broadly about what's happening in this country every day over ninety five people die from gun violence every day. And that's not to mention, you know, the over three hundred that are shot every day. And so, you know, when we talk about these match shootings, and which get a lot of the media coverage. I think one of the important things to remember is that's just the tip of the iceberg. In fact, we have young black men that are being killed in our inner cities all across this country. And frankly, their story often goes on told look part of that tweet from the NRA, you know, it was stay in your lane. But also that you're too much in your lane that doctors only talk amongst themselves, and that they published these papers in a vacuum with other doctors conservative commentator, Ann Coulter a tweeted out emergency room doctors pull Cuba's vines and gummy bears out of human orifices. Every week that does. Make them experts on pool horticulture or chewy candy. I mean, the point they're both making is that, you know, this doesn't make you an expert. I would presume you disagree. I absolutely disagree. And actually, let me let me just take that a step further. You know for them to say that we haven't engaged. Other groups organizations is categorically false. In fact, the American colleges surgeons met with the leadership of the NRA in January of twenty seventeen to try to determine how do we find some common ground in order to reduce farm injury and death in this country. So it's it's not true and the editor of the annals of internal medicine in which that study was printed sieve, we're not antigun were anti bullet holes. Look a doctor found a group of firm. The American Foundation for firearm injuried reduction in medicine wrote a letter for doctors nationwide to cosign pointing out that that thous and oaks mass shooting was the three hundred. Seventh in twenty eighteen enlisted some of their concerns when in which includes the devastating effects of bullets from high capacity weapons. Do you see that is it is it that different? A bullet from a shotgun in one from a an assault type rifle. Yeah. Absolutely. So, you know, in America, we see the full spectrum anything from a handgun to, you know, the AARP fifteen and a lot of these mass shootings and the pattern of injury can definitely be different. The AR fifteen really pulverizes tissue and causes a significant amount of destruction. So, you know, even if you didn't necessarily, you know, hit that specific piece of tissue the blast effect might cause injury to it. So they are very different. Look you survived a shooting. You carry it, obviously are conscious of it. And now you see victims every day. Did you ever think, you know, the heck with the wall? If you're if you're going to bow the NRA, I'm going to France, you know, and take your life back from what what is really kind of grimness. Do you ever feel that way? Absolutely. Not. I am an American I love this country. And this is let me just say this is not about us versus then are a or us versus anyone else. You know? I think when you look at the conversation people try to polarize it, and the reality is Robin as Americans we have a lot more in common than we have. It's similar so instead of focusing on our differences, we have to start with what I believe we all have in common a belief that we are now today in this country in a situation. That's not. Okay. It's not okay. For children to leave for school in the morning and not come home in the evening. It's not okay. For people to go to church synagogue, concerts, work and not come home because they've gone violence. So we have to start acknowledging that we are facing a problem. A public health crisis. That's Dr Joseph saccharin a gun shot survivor himself as a teenager. Now a trauma surgeon at Johns Hopkins hospital in Baltimore dodgers sacramen-. Thank you so much. Thank you so much for having me Roman and we reached out to the NRA. Join us to talk about this the invitation still stands we're hoping here back. This message comes from NPR's sponsor, indeed when it comes to hiring. You don't have time to waste you need help getting to your shortlist of qualified candidates fast with indeed post a job in minutes. Set up screener questions then zero in on qualified candidates. And when you need to hire fast, accelerate your results with sponsor jobs. Do users can try for free when you sign up at indeed dot com slash NPR, podcast, terms, conditions, and quality standards. Flowing. Roughly one in ten Americans say, they're allergic to the most reliable antibiotic the world penicillin, but doctors and the centers for disease control and prevention have been casting doubt on the widespread diagnosis, and they see it as a public health dilemma for member station. W P L N Blake former reports it's not just that many people who have an allergy in their charts or probably fine. It's most says Dr Elizabeth Phillips an adverse drug reaction expert at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, and when I say most that would be ninety five percent or more efficient that are labeled or not truly allergic to Tennyson. The stories are remarkably similar most get the allergy label by age three and Philip says, it's usually based on inaccurate assumptions and old science most reactions that occur in childhood in factor related to viruses or infections that the child has encountered. So for instance, a rash. I would just break out in hives around my hands. My L. Does my knees was really weird. Katie Lipscomb is a mother from Franklin Tennessee, she suffered from frequent earaches as a kid and regularly took some form of penicillin. She also had occasional allergic reactions. So they figured the penicillin was to blame. She never had any testing to confirm, but it still in her charts. And if she sees a new doctor, of course, they wanna know if you're allergic to any kind of medicine, I've just always put penicillin 'cause that's what I was always told she even had to wear a bright red bracelet while giving birth to her three children warning doctors not to give her penicillin, but no one ever asked how she knew even those studies. Now, find even kids who had a legit allergy almost always outgrow it the immunologists working to debunk the diagnosis admit they've probably been part of the problem themselves. You know, even in my own practice. Some of the things that I call penicillin allergy. I don't think that they really were penicillin allergy. But I didn't know what else to call them. Dr Cosby stone. Vanderbilt says even a decade ago. Researchers didn't realize that a penicillin allergy can go away. And usually does he's now working with colleagues to pilot a questionnaire that will probe deeper into patient stories starting early next year those with mild childhood reactions, maybe given the medication just to see what happens says the risk is pretty low others who had more serious experiences. We'll get skinned testing. I several sites around the country are working on similar responses because an unnecessary penicillin. Allergy has a price. Even though there are alternatives penicillin is often the cheapest and most effective antibiotic, especially when given to patients before surgery to preempt an infection. Studies have found patients with an allergy are much more likely to develop a surgical infection. Stone has an analogy, you know, penicillin allergy to me is kind of like a tree that got planted too close to your house when you were a kid. It's no problem at first. But over time the tree begins too quietly loom over the house and then. Like trees. Do it dies and becomes a disaster. Waiting to happen. The infection that you get when you're not expecting. It is the same as the storm that comes up on your house when you're not expecting it and strikes the tree, you know. That's right next to your house such that it falls on it. I mean, we we often don't realize how many things we can do to prevent a bad outcome before it happens. Of course, the challenge is getting patients to do something about it before they show up in an emergency room, requiring trauma surgery stone predicts it will likely take a decade to reeducate patients and their doctors about the prevalence of penicillin allergies or lack thereof for here. And now, I'm Blake farmer in Nashville. In recent years agents from ice, US, immigration and customs enforcement have been stepping up raids on franchises of the convenience store. Seven eleven some franchise owners claim that corporate seven eleven is using ice to intervene in what our internal company disputes and to put pressure on shopowners seven eleven considers troublemakers reporters from Bloomberg BusinessWeek investigated, the relationship between ice and seven eleven for a story that was published this week. Michael Smith is senior writer for Bloomberg. He co authored the story with his colleague, Lauren editor, Michael you write that on one day in January of this year ice agents, raided ninety eight seven eleven stores they were in seventeen states and in Washington DC did they find undocumented immigrants working people working illegally. Well, they rested. A few on in January. I haven't heard about any other rest, but they don't really publicize them always. So it's unclear how much they've actually found. But what is clear is that this company the the parent company because this is a franchise company. So all the stores are basically independent contractors that are paying to use the seven Levin name and to operate under the all their procedures. So the stores are almost customers in this case, you have a company that is really really putting a lot of pressure on store operators, and they're using potential violations of immigration law to really go after people they do not want to continue to be running their stores. So this is the the backdrop of all of this you write about the internal strife between franchise owners and the seven eleven CEO Joe depend on who has cracked down on franchisees since he took over, and as you write to purge certain underperformers and troublemakers suggesting that corporate seven eleven is using federal immigration authorities as leverage and kind of an enforcement tool in business disputes with franchisees is that. Correct. Well, that's certainly what the franchisee say. And that certainly would has been alleged in multiple lawsuits it's impossible to know whether they're actually sort of writing out franchisees. We weren't able to show that without any doubts. But this is what the franchisees believed because a number of the stores, for example that were targeted that. We're rated this year happened to be owned by people who have been actively critical of the company's policies and also were involved in lawsuits against the company, we found several examples of that. And they just so happen to been rated and also in dispute with the company. So the franchise owners what what is their beef with the CEO Joe dependent? I mean, if they're if they're filing suit against him. What's the basis for those? Well, it's basically bad blood that goes back years, and it all boils down to money because depends on since he became CEO in the two thousands. He's basically worked to really really improve profitability, which means getting a big. Or cut essentially of the revenue and profits every store generates that's the way franchises work the franchisees have said that he's basically just gone too far. And they've he's made it so that they really just can't make a living running a store because they take so much of their money, basically. And because there's there's a mandate that, you know, somebody will will come in disguised as a customer to make sure that all the red bull cancer are front facing. Or, you know, the that things like boy suppose, I don't know if this is a bad thing or not, but the slurpee machines have to be cleaned every so often or repaired a repair can cost like four or five thousand dollars. What are the mandates that the CEO is putting on franchise owners will over the last say decade, if you will it's it's been a progressive tightening of the requirements that the company puts on stores in terms of what they have to do, and the kind of scrutiny they come over, and it go it goes from everything like employs having to wear certain name tags two. To hundreds or thousands of items being in stock. And when they're on in stock they get they can get sanctioned for that. And there's also significant scrutiny of things like bookkeeping, and and and whether everything is going into the till or not, and so there's all kinds of surveillance electron IX Valence, physical surveillance. But the main thing is just the company has always showing up at the store and saying here's how you have to do things has to be this way, this way, this way, you gotta order this this this, and this and all that adds up to a tremendous amount of sort of micromanagement of how stores that are supposed to be independent. Operators are allowed to operate. So seven eleven says, it has no advance warning of immigration rates. And that only gives the government information about a franchise owner, if corporate has reason to believe that crimes may be happening in the store, wouldn't what is seven eleven specifically telling you about this. Well, that's basically what they say. And again, they say we we don't read out our franchisee. So. To speak. But if we find wrongdoing we will turn that over to the federal government if we find any evidence of crimes, including immigration, Michael Smith reporter in senior writer for Bloomberg. We will link to the story that he wrote with his colleague Lauren editor at here now dot org. Thanks a lot, Michael. Sure. Thanks for having me. This is a story about a woman who traveled miles to thank World War Two veterans. She never met but owed her life to the woman is Deborah long from Chapel Hill, North Carolina. She's an instructor and a genealogist and a daughter of holocaust survivors since she was a little girl. She always wanted to know about her family's history. And eventually she made it her mission to find out who the American soldiers were who saved her mother from a concentration camp in Germany. I've been doing a lot of reading of military books and by came across this list for the liberating unit from sauce fatal where my mom was emancipated and came across Norman Kearns name. He was the Lieutenant Colonel. For the division at that time. And I just started to Google Norman cards found his obituary within a few steps I was able to locate his son Norman KARN. Son Bruce long wanted to. Thank bruce. Kearns for what his father did in the war rescue her mother from the camp by some massive coincidence. Kearns daughter, Sarah happens to work at the veterans affairs facility in Bedford, Massachusetts. She's the clinical librarian and veteran while her grandfather, the liberator is gone current invited long to come up from North Carolina and thank other World War. Two veterans herself relieve this year long did common and told a group of them her story, you're looking at a picture of my mother shortly after she was liberated from south fatal Germany, which was a concentration work camp. She is still wearing the jacket that an American soldier gave her even though this is months after liberation and the vets were. Quiet during the presentation, but she spoke with each of them at the end, one of them was the former army sergeant Russell Lang one hundred six infantry. He's ninety seven now and was a prisoner of war eager to tell her his story. I was and so the war was waiting closer and the bombs were done in the area. There were going boom, boom. I remember. Well, but I just wanted to tell you. I'm glad you Metsu. Thank you. She leans down to his wheelchair to give them a hug. Thank you for Deborah long, having beds. Just see the family of holocaust survivors is important. Sometimes people don't realize what their impact is down the line many of them have suffered greatly about what they saw. They were very young boys. Like, my my parents were very young. And I think many of them were traumatized and shocked and felt guilt. It what they did. Or what they didn't do or what they couldn't do. And I wanted to let them know that at least in my case, I can speak for my family. They saved a whole world of people. So it's something you're doing for them. And for you, both definitely I don't want to make the sound like it selfless. I'm doing this as a way of honoring my parents. I'm a poor substitute for them. But it's better than I'm sixty some years late than not to say, thank you at all the gift that Debbie's given us is priceless. Sarah, Kearns is the woman whose grandfather helped rescue Deborah long's mother. It was the missing puzzle. Apiece. As a veteran myself, I've had the experience of going onto placements and not knowing whether the efforts and sacrifices that we had made made a difference. And of course, as a relative of veterans, you know, you do wonder whether or not what they'd gone through with their families have gone through was worth the sacrifice, you know, inherently that it was. But here we have proof that their efforts to combat the Nazis into shut down. The concentration camps was not in vain to meet somebody who literally exists because of the efforts of veterans is of the most profound nature. Sarah, Kearns of the Bedford Massachusetts V A N before that Deborah long of Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Their families are forever linked by the events in Germany in World War Two. Last month, a British science fiction show, doctor who featured an episode from its first black writer author. Mallory Blackman co wrote the show about Rosa Parks in it, the doctor and her companions have to save parks from time traveling would be murder, and the BBC drama isn't the only show that's taken on race recently NPR TV critic, Eric deg has a look at that. Hi, Eric Harley. And I'm thinking that normally when we speak to you about race in television. It's programs that always deal with race there. You know, Ray Centric, and this seems different. Yeah. I thought it was worth taking a look at some shows where races not necessarily the main thing that they focus on. But they made a very specific effort to create storylines that talked about race indifference, and they did a pretty good job. Okay. So let's take a look a doctor who focused on race in a couple of recent episodes one show is about the nineteen forty seven partition. Of india? Another about Rosa Parks that we said an in the Rosa episode. We get to see characters interact with America in the nineteen fifties. So give us a little about how the writers did that. So this episode actually reminded me of a joke that a certain comic used to tell the time about how if he had a time machine. He was a white comic. And he would say if he had a time machine he could go back to any era in time. But by folks could only go back maybe ten or fifteen years before, you know, these got sticky. So this episode features the doctor in her companions humans who've hang out with her accidentally actually landing in Birmingham, Alabama nineteen fifty five and a one of her companions is a black man, and he picks up a glove that white women has dropped and tries to hand it to her in her husband slaps him. And then Rosa Parks actually steps up to try to defuse the situation. And we have a clip. Let's listen to you. Crazy slap jewelry the newspapers, you know, what they did. Into young Emmett till from our town. So was immaterial vacation from the north couple of ways to. Woman in Mississippi. And the next thing they find his body in the river, you altogether. Yes. Very grateful. Missus hawks Rosa Parks of what a payoff that is so cool. Yeah. That's wonderful. So when you have characters of color that are going back in time it's hard to find a period where they weren't people color being oppressed. And so to actually deal with that and say, hey, we know this has happened. And to also have this be the product of the first non white person to act as a writer. Dr Who it was just an amazing moment to watch for anybody who cares about equality. Well, and time travel is shaping up to be a real way to bring race into programs. Let's turn to the fourth season of outlander the historical time travel drama from stars main characters Claire and Jamie arrive in the new world in the eighteenth century seventeen hundreds they're taken in by Jamie's Anticosti on her plantation. She's more than one hundred slaves now. Clear has traveled back in time from nineteen Forty-five. So how does she interact with slaves and slave owners? This is what's interesting. The episode explores the structure of slavery and how even when people who own sleighs wanted to try and free them. There were all these strictures in place to make it hard for them to do that. And I think we have a clip where Takata and Claire kind of discuss slaves and Claire makes it plain how she feels into custom explain how she feels this. Check about my summer. So Dave to me. I consider them fans to think they feel the same way. I'm not sure what I catch the meaning you wish to conveyed they see things a little differently since they didn't have any choice. My sleeves are quite Hoppy heat. I shoot you way. When you're you have tried to run away over the years, again, the outlander show in this moment, not only do they have to negotiate slavery. They also have to deal with native Americans, and the fact that the British are coming in and taking over this land. And we know how that's Tori, ends right? As we know how that ends. So it's interesting to watch the show negotiate all these different ideas and not shy away from facing them as we've seen in other TV series. Meanwhile, let's turn the NBC drama. This is a favourite it has focused on how race affects our day-to-day lives since its first started. But a few of the recent episodes, you point out have been really powerful. So just briefly what's interesting to you about the way. This is us has approached race. Yes. So we know this is this is this family drama and three of the characters are related, but one of them is a black man who was dotted into the family, the white boy or the white. Man is dating a relative of the black man's wife. So he's dating a black woman now, and here's a little clip where the woman who's dating the white guy is wondering whether or not it's worth it to date him because he doesn't seem to understand what she's going through his black woman. Let's let's check it up today. The gas station cashier didn't realize we together, and she was rude to me. Not on the obvious way. Just got it. Kevin. He was. He didn't get he didn't even see it. Yeah. Exactly. So this is a wonderful way to sort of get at an element of the Goshi eating an interest relationship. If it's the first time, you've you've been in one, and I just love how this is takes those little moments of little things that people don't necessarily realize they've experienced it. And they turn it into really interesting storylines NPR TV critic, Eric Dagens with a look at you know, shows that he's applauding for their look at race, Eric, thanks as always thank you for heavy. And here now production of NPR WBU art association with the BBC World Service. I'm Robin young. And I'm Lisa Mullins. This is here and now.

NRA penicillin White House writer NPR Twitter Robin young Allergy Jim Acosta Lisa Mullins California WalMart editor congress Tammy Missouri Deborah long federal government
You Got Served!: Spring Reads, London Buses and Dracrys

Mostly Lit Podcast

2:07:37 hr | 2 years ago

You Got Served!: Spring Reads, London Buses and Dracrys

"Rate. Baxter. Another episode all. Hi, guys. Welcome back to another episode of mostly bit. It's your boy. Alex reads, go, right? I and we're back to bring you another week of talk culture, talk and just General Mattis mass lit Ness, allow I thought mass, okay. Let's do that you want to read. I really support that. I'm not messy. I I'm a you know, when you are recovering mass. So, you know. I was messy messy is fun. But I'm I've recovered muggles Kumi, a healed hope. Hi. Which we therapy? This is what we do the thing. You guys so much for listening and continuing to support us, and we love you guys. Let's get into the show. All right, sir. Okay. We're gonna hell all my okay, guys. This is gonna be the funniest thing of his. I'm certain nervous. First of all, let me all right. All right. Take you back to two thousand sixteen explain to them. Taking it back to two thousand and sixteen when mostly it was the beginning. Of its Jeremy, and yeah, we we've had out that Ray of like old school tunes. So and then extended the TV and films. Various. Hi. So. Basically guys if you guys don't. I have to vacation and you'll girl hails all the way from a tiny island in the Indian Ocean could sans just off the case of may nine hundred. And I was born that grew up then to that was like five years old came to London in. Spirit just says. Anyways. So yeah. And I am when I came out five years old like, and I was very sheltered. But also, I didn't know any English. So things that will happening around me just didn't register because I was quite like taking care of. And I watch things like FOX kids and small small Nickelodeon, but I was just adjusting to a new world, and none language that meant that a lot of things that people around my age kind of knew about from their parents. And also, yet don't stand the people. I lived way not, you know, British or knew much about this type of culture. And so that's not how I was raised and therefore you can say that I'm a little behind, but I don't like to think over that way because I've discussed sweat therapist because this is a really salt. You know? And she told me to look at it. I'm not just pop pop. British Portland's very I'm full. I'm full in all full Ray. Fooled nece. Events. Is anyways about. Thousand sixteen let me start to to where I started. So when we started we just we started to do a thin code, we educating right or the miseducation. Now, we're back to the nineteen. We've we've been through loads between twenty. Raise learned quite a bit. She has surprised me with you things have been oh. Late. But it's good. It's always on time. What we do. So. But we're gonna do is at the beginning of each show. We're gonna I'm gonna throw it a few questions to Ray, general pub culture questions from the era that as she loves and has likely missed jointed connections. So then call the education of miss Rifah. Diagnose born power does not. I'm sorry. Oh, this just justified. The reason. So okay. So we're gonna stop. The education. Serie for. Ready? I'm ready hit me. In sister sister, starring Tia and Tamara marry. Who were they always telling to go home, go home, Roger? Actor marcus. In my favorite films. Not stop the yard. I know this film, this my favorite film. I watched two in your with miss Kinchen. Have film cloud. Remembering Amari and J boot my babies with. You're talking about. I think y'all go wherever y'all gone. Hey. Hey, guess who's coming? The film just randomly the name. All right. When you remember them all? All right points. That was eighty three questions says, it's not the whole. List? Okay. Which artists known as the Queen of heartbreak and knee-high boots sangam drama. I'm thinking is it Mary J? Okay. Okay. The queen. Pay everything. Everything about love breaks. Come with it. Okay. Finally, what did? What did Whitney Houston? Ted had trifling man to do off the. It's not right. But it's okay. It's not right. But it's okay. I'm gonna something. Anyway, weight is not right, buddy. Okay. I'm gonna love, you know, leave you gonna. Okay. Leave you. She says it's not right. But it's okay. I'm gonna make it any. Him to pack his bags up and leave. Back kilby. Okay. Okay. End that unhappy the girls, you know, you got to be alone to figure out who you are rather than be unhappy with the traveling try. These were quite easy flops. Lyrics. Yeah. So we're going to be one. I'm so glad I need because it's all the Twitter means and and the ration- and the knee high what clues out of being too. Yeah. So yeah. Two three his time. I fully reeducate. Questions coming. So each week enjoy this. This. Looking for my statement? But yeah, so we're going to talk to anybody has any questions that they want DMZ. Me. On Google before. So that's reeducate riper. Who's this week? Author. I'm trying to figure out the film. Because I have to do. Okay. Who's is where we just show somebody who's doing something amazing creative industry within the publishing industry or just general. So who's lit week this week? We have the two amazing founders of on way press that is marriam Jim and Rennie Amaya, and they have the co founders of this new publishing new indie publishing company code on press. And actually they will be concentrating on the consistent focus celebrating and promotional divest voices. Most particularly that Blackmun writing in the sci-fi and fancy genre. Am I think the fast book that they have out actually is a book by Rennie cooed doses of memory? I believe. Yes. It's it's told as the return of the earth mother series. So I think that they might be more than just one and the first one is doses of in by Rennie K A Meyer. And I knew that she previously had a I still say. Cover launch was gladly to. I had to go to good friend wedding. Mr. which really, but it looked lovely and they go great coverage of it. So yeah, those are the two phenomenal women and on press is our who's let fall today. One of the founders Mariam said that as she spoke to the books that our she said that you know, as black women diversity is incredibly important to to them. And they felt that publish the publishing world could be doing a better about Mark making this a reality. And she said we often find that divest voice even characters missing from publishers. And this kind of takes the old way back last week's episode with the phenomenal. Tommy unleash you talked about how that we sent. You're raising our selves out of our own imaginations because we don't see yourselves represented, and we all know representing all of selves, which is catastrophic but. Yes. Congratulations to own way, press found by Meriem Jamaa, and Renae Amaya we look forward to reading the book and many more titles. Come out that press. Puppet in company stuff. Yeah. It was in the books. Yes. Done it again. Yes. The ads that is who is lit for this week on repressing, actually. Four to see more from you guys losing. So okay. Okay for if Alex Reid. Read everything book. I told them a Bali, right? So I'm at a weird because everyone was like why are you told me that I just didn't? So I'm working with nights of publishing favorite people's. With them. And they I'm editing. The book shaping cochon, which is going to be written by Mark McIvor also nine as slight cuts and you're looking for to see what comes of that. I've never edited a book before this is like editing editing reading it through proofreading. And so I'm not excited as new things completely different. To my name name. Nobody knows what that means. But. Yeah. Skate almost die. And it's really cool. Kind of is there a particular audience because I know that nights a look CD children's. Yes. So like, we are really I think that it's it's a kind of self help McVay tional kind of piece of writing for like young people, but it's across any age, Janice. He's got a lot of experience. He wants to say and looking forward to it later on this year when that happens. And the Monday. All the no. David. These old precedent third. Nice shot. MU David knights of. I'm just I'm just completely stunned. I'm just going to be stunning. They have the book the book of coming may of them sakes. Amy. We need a party Brixton weight is just amazing stuff that I'm seeing right now. I'm yeah. Like, I just shot them. All the things that we want to see happening in the publishing industry, generally, just like the creative industry not just like the small sort of in coven of blackness generally around. Like, obviously, the phenomenal candies is on the Sunday Times bestselling this. And that's what I like to see is like these books on just going around us when the ones like just talking about it to our selves, but the population the general population is a whack not only seek validation from it because we know we're let to just like we need big a Pat homes, and hopefully yeah, about one way. Reclusive dummy ring from bullying to echo. Just doing doing moving. Everybody need to show people a lot more. So Chris Charlotte Kennedy's shot to Charlotte to you right shot. Everybody done shot. Everybody's everybody's battlid. Again to give chase say that. Continue. Mitt this week's broken up into two pieces, but we're going to be talking about offspring reads. And then a we're gonna probably discussion a bit later on. Also to say, you know, we will always be about game of thrones later in the show. The fest episode in the second episode, if you haven't watched it stopped good to just that you know, that that's coming. Yeah. And what are we to talk about lightning? We're gonna we're gonna talk in in. We're going gonna go under the pills the night came the smell all his juices. We go we go in that low. We're going that in. When it's cold. Anyway. So. Spring reads guy. No new one of the changing seasons happened last week. You guys felt that beauty to full Easter with loan east the weekend. It was hot note. Everybody was misbehaving AL's misbehaving. Everybody was just moving a little bit mad, and it was a good man had a lovely broach luggage. You know, my has her inflatable what to bed. Let's just say that. Yeah. When the times change and the tides change what we will be looking. Read what you guys have to look forward to in the coming your first of all, okay? How the winter? Have you go winter reads? I'm still listening to becoming. Helen long listen to beautiful, but it's actually quite low. I what else did I say I wanted to. Oh, so I'm also reading we haven't really touched on what we're eating. But I'm one of the things I wanted to read in my winter reads was a black leopard red wolf, Alex always calls it red lion. Babes. No, still again Jane's. And we've spoken about that. I think this is going to be doing possibly at the end of next month. So reading. Gets the reading an online we haven't. We just talked about it. I'm in the middle of reading math, and I'm actually also reading notes Menendez planet by my Hague. Do that. Yes. So actually, oh, there's an orchestra of minorities book by she goes over your mouth, which I have bought it having started yet. But that's also a book that we are definitely going to do on the show in the next month. So make sure that you're reading it. So that you know, when the time comes you can really get into the discussion. That's right. So spring wreath Alex what you have for me. What do you want to look for? What are you looking forward to what should the people be looking forward to to reading in the next Hugh monsters survey so this week or last week now that you've seen the three nine two hundred book launch on Thursday, the twenty fifth of April. So this is the debut book by Ashley Hickson Lavin's, and at least on the bus so entirely on a London bus traveling from hawks into higher rates. Taking place just over thirty six minutes. Three nine to unfold through cast of characters coming from very different worlds. But that's gather through shed suspicion as the threat of terrorism. Loons looms and published by own it London. Crystal. But yes to read him up book because like is not too long. It's very like it's very interesting cover is just the bus, and it's one of those things. Yeah. Yeah. It's like, it's cool. One of those books. Should really identify with the London experience in in a way. Do you know what I mean? Like, it's just 'cause it's like all right? It's red. Now, I was watching knits Instagram live clouds. Let me go and they were talking to people about their experiences on buses. About what what day funnies experience the bus and stuff? And when you you don't realize how much of your life is spent on buses as a London as somebody who grew up in and all scores. Lived in London. But grownup up in London between the years of say in two thousand and two thousand and two thousand ten pretty much your whole school life. On on a bus. Stop is happened. I remember when there was the terrorism attack in two thousand and five. Five I think it'd him off class, and my friend a message from his mom's ain't go on the buses. Yeah. And you know, everybody was not God. We walk home because we really you know, what I mean. But it's a it's a deep kind of connection that we have the buses you see a bus number like long. How about? I eleven to school and our interschool mackanty which goes into me because that bad. And we would meet at Waltham central. And don't laugh you like maybe like six girls would gets like will get together. And we would we will take the metro, and we would read it go straight to the horse section and that the comic section that would read which is quite close to the horoscope section order. I was so unique and things I would read the whole paper though. I was really well like, well, I was a Welsh it because I would read the whole metro would get the horoscope section. That's when I would stop and then read the cutting COMEX our was funny today would go back to the Boston, which is always got back at the west mice. Spot was like. Yeah. Not straight about the one right in front candies, and my friend cachet would sit somewhat else, and they'll other girls that was sit. Elsewhere would all have the back of the bus eight eight five. And realize. Addition is you do this for years every day, honestly, like? So between seven eight on the way to school the front all of the bus like no, I'm cool came. Cool. Between seven and eight. It was very much run. Them says tens. Tens. When we go on the bus like it was like it was a time. So we got at the beginning of the Russ route. We run to the younger. We would like eleven twelve. And then there was this like this adolescent shift happened, and it's like you slowly find your way just the middle of the back of the bus back. Cool things happened on the bus, my friend, my friend provides fledged passed to shop to either told to be quiet. Nothing's changed. Obviously one day. I remember reading rice reading out to the gulls my diary post because I was really motion and I ready out to them. And there was this random stranger guy turned around to me just before he left us. It gets better. And I I still remember this. Now, I feel like in your ten random guy just to setters runs. It gets better. I if to say, you'll young like over yourself Yemen. This book is really interesting. I look forward to reading. I'm actually going to read it. This is the thing. I mentioned this is definitely read a three nine nine hundred ninety two amazing amazing. We have so much on these buses. Crystal thatt's out just to read what crystal has said about Ashley actually is an exciting voice with the debt skillful avation natural flower leads and the -bility Creal benthic weld and characters as well as exciting new literary fiction. Also, actually offices impulsion contribution to the literary landscape. And is the kind of unique talent that will delight readers and the industry so keen to find huge decide to actually join our glorious of debut authors and to be publishing three ninety phenomenon. So you're Gerber. Go grab a copy of. Speaking in speaking to him sin. What do you have next? I'm really excited about this book his. It's a woman who I think is like smart. And let me just give up. So it's cool touch. My hat by the amazing beautiful. Phenomenal intelligent, ama-, debris. And it's a book that essentially talks about like Emma in this book takes on takes from Africa through the Harlem renaissance and even like that power. And and today's world in the idea of just the natural hair movement and in this book couldn't touch my head. It's rather academic an academic perspective of the idea of black woman's have and the politics around it the fun around at history around it because I hair is rather political for those who haven't naturally for those who wear weaves and wakes and for those who put book the crack on. Relax, it protective style. 'cause you know, MVSA ways pretentious dial she's deficit doing album, and yes, so she talked about a culture per patient wars and beyond. And it looks at everything from hair capitalists like Madame CJ Walker in the early nineteen hundreds of the rise of she moisture there. But when she moisture a little Bill. Issues from two from present. When they went from black heads. Everybody's have. We want happy about that. But yes, talks about in the scope of black hair styling ranges from pop cultures because Mulji from priests local times to the afro futuristic. Yeah. And so don't my basically in a wide proves that from the being from far from being only half black culture can be understood as everything from an allegory for black oppression and liberation. I mean, I heard of the book and. Vitually and. I think is really interesting because she I thought it was going to be book of essays about battling. Even like high experiences with about. As a mixed race woman. Etc. But it was a really approach to black hair. And it was really mazing amazing pitches in that of her getting ahead Caine road by women in Africa specific on the place to sit Africa, west Africa. And you know, she's had done. I it's just the political the political Ness of it on the cultural heritage because I never I for a long time when I was younger. I didn't think he was political. I thought that it was political in in the domestic in that for me passing me. I kind of had my father's half. And my father's more Bantu in way, black African. Whereas my mother is dislike makes myself. And and when I was younger, it was always all either such a shame that you don't have your mother's head. Oh, you know, when you brush rifles head the good thing is like what I look it doesn't it's more than that. But I always was rather when I was young very insecure about my head because I had cousins you had like almost Cooley type have had like that all the way down to the offices, and I was. Like, why don't I have that type of hair? And it's so interesting that for example, when I was young I think all mixed race. People have had that is quote unquote than ours. Because, you know, oh, your you wanna get with somebody. That's maybe Arab Lucy's votes like tailored by the arbs. You get with arable who has nice hair of think about your children, and it's phenomenal. That like ama- is a mixed race woman. But a Harris full it has. I believe it's you know, something that she has to contend with. And is quite interesting to hear her perspective on interested that you know when? You don't people have like these? Oh my God. You may say you your head must be nice everybody. Nice people simply has its slick somebody who like because some I mean testing and whatnot and. That's how I should tell you that does. Like, I shouldn't even know this. Yeah. I don't know it. But he does. See over the I never like have done in my life before. Thousand people it was like that won't. Why just realize that sometimes it's just just genetics. Chances will come and Spinneys, which is why I'm very very very curious as to how Meghan Markle's child who just arrived had skeedaddle the hose or. Because I'm a child when she's the. The. On this because some people like actually why it's almost like having black ish when I black ish. I mean mixture. Before the cut folks that had. L revenge on the Royal family because then that's playing the whole idea that black hair is less than in a way ribbon bureau. Exactly that's opponent about the term. Not. I do want to have some. Carly kills me. I want to see old answers comfort with the baby. Meghan side. Even though she identifies as biracial we get back. Cool cute. But. Smart in verbally. She murdered by racial, but not wedding. Unheard general starts on live. Hell. General thoughts in life. She basically just like she ain't gonna go around. Something about the they want to considering an African name for the child dies. I saw around on the news could just be new spin all. Princess. We have Charlotte already. Scarlet vice Diana go for that might Danner about that would be quite heat. Debris dirt touch. My have. Really Conforto reading the guardian has called it. Groundbreaking and Yemen is why black ham is life where it's nobody all three hundred pages. But low key is it's coming out on the second of may. To not see away. No. I think this week when this drops may show you get hurt flame. We get her on. Kenya? Took to her about that should be fun. That's another great. We have despite author cold. Dr Whitelaw the third, and so that's what the delay. Why true? Why the fact is a professor of white studies. He's a professor of white study undisclosed college and university. Cambridge probably one of those. Him. He's around. He's about. He's retold the story told me Bristol. So why Thad has told Nels Abby the phenomenal on abbey of how to survive otherwise in the corporate world and how to conquer the world as a white, man. While black. So I think this amazing book it comes out in the middle of may. I'm so looking forward to getting stuck into this. I need to read it, and I just kind of wait. But that cutting is published by cutting gay. I'm just. During the white man commandments, namely that winning justifies anything and everything to commit cheap. Success be on your capabilities with lessons on the value of shock and all compassion on the burn and pretending races of doesn't exist. Big like, a white man teaches you how to understand overcome and over throat still Whiteman in the whitest shade of pale world of work. I can wait. In the reviews to come in thick and fast. I want to anything when lot cone. Cosigned Benjamin's an IS co-signed. Everybody. The I in the corporate world, and I think for me is going to be something that I'm reading and I'm going to love as I way Cobra corporate world, and obviously Nelson is a previous banker and LOKI. Yes you worked for. Previous client of where I work. And I think that this book is going to make me laugh, low key who actually teach me a few things, I do believe certain things might be higher, but satire has definitely in element of truth in it. And that's what makes it hilarious there. Those are the things that we should not miss out on. It's funny to me. It's not true. Yeah. White third is distinguished professor of why people studies at Bishop elementary university and the deputy vice chair of the center of the center for trying to understand. Why people see you WB? Has numerous TV shows, including good cups could white folk other disease and scientific proof for white man's is is indeed code. Sister tainting the pieces of like a white man to nose ABI. He neither being seen nor heard of course, of course. I can away. Yeah. Congratulations. Congratulations for what it down the store. Those. Fantastic of to this out sixteen may make sure you guys go, Google and Amazon. Everybody off that jab Iceland. Present at appeal box address that I link them below. Appear boxes. News round PO box newsra or somebody's next place. A piece of age. I never got one maybe appear anymore was was that black women that used to do his times. She's married to a Jellicoe. That's she's marriage black used to she's back on spur. Money-saving with with with my Louis Hughes that she had fast like black woman. I saw low key in a prominent place much. She made the world is return. I'm just lying. She's she did the Sheila me round and then of her. I'm a military. Eliza. The black guy that used to the new stuff now Richard on like BBC news anyway, so they used to do that stuff. And then Jerico biologists cited for time. And then all of a sudden Martin Lewis came into money saving expert stuff, and she's the cope. Komo's. Like him. She'd been writing children's. Jones beach. Amazing peaceful. Black laughter. Yes. So I'm looking forward to now's book and. And. Getting him on the shy to know what you know, it the thing about this book is that it's it's something that a lot of black and other minority people can identify with while wacky trying to find trying to be successful in this world. I also think that obviously, you know, how much I don't facial. That is I think this is don't fish I'll read 'cause it's facing vice funny and not nonfiction that is triple me like six facts cleanline- up about line the story, and but this is a really attentive able and obviously because it's really relatable I'm super excited for. And festival. Duly. Of your your teaching and we look for. Thank you. Next. All right. What do I have? Okay. Cute cute. Basically the next that I have is children. Vengeance. From wise. One reason. Wait for the read this because I need to know what happened to them. What it means to me? Book three go to. Can you? Oh, she enters. She dies. The ones. Like. Yes. Basically guys as Lhasa. You guys know that we spoke to told me she has a phenomenal Kurt the next series of. All children of value ambandoned from the legacy of a ratio book too. It's coming out later on this year. I mean, obviously, I'm in an episode out by pan MacMillan character does a character. When I am the nowhere. Shut up. Tabby? Guy. Harry, all these ration-. Why did you want me? Are you hearing? Ray in the let's. You hearing because I'm hearing it loud and clear baby. Don't worry. I'll take you. DC's tweet yet that built as always taking those say my name girls everywhere when she was the new mile. Creaming say many my game site. She's always taking the Kosova sheet in Potala, and they came through. She's like why she did the Super Bowl and the came. She's always taken my name goes to new milestone. Listen. The person who tweeted dollars because I can Kenny like that Michelle is the same my name dowry. You main man, you my left hand. Yeah. When I go and axe in my role as general Rifah, but I will take you with me 'cause we in about crowd mentality up in here. We can win. Absolutely Tommy, why don't you want being? It's fine is my main two basic. Essay. Children. Is the breathtaking second title in Tommy Adeyemi, why fancy trilogy legacy of Risha following groundbreaking debut. Children of blood and burn the story picks off after baffling the impossible and the Mari who is mean. But not because I'm a general have finally succeeded in bringing back Matic's land of racia-. However, but the rich ritual did in the last sort of the last few pages of the last book will sorry powerful much more powerful than they had Majid that they knighted the POWs of not only the I who other people have magic in the land. But also some of the nobles with some sort of magic magical ancestry. And so now Z struggles to unite birth maji, INA ratio where the enemy is just as strong magical as with other people so Amari's Murray's mother foams an army of Royal. That is true. I am camman being what do you mean? Alex, alex. We just read this. Month. Those mother in the book she was built and low key Bill bitch. Why aren't you light skin? Was was was horrible. When my mother forms an army of royals with newly awakened powers because you know, Cesky Z fights to secure a marines right to throne because you know, bad veg China ever store denarius tug Aaron protect the new match. I from the monarchy's grass ocean. Maybe I'm not general for the bad on me. That'll be really bad for the really low on brand. Anyways. So they civil war looming on the horizon e finds himself as a breaking point what does this bitch? Do she must find a way to bring the kingdom together a watch as a racial test at self apart? I call it. To look forward to world. Alex, we need to make sure that I'm in this movie the second one, anyway, I don't even know speak French now, I just I'm about to be here. You got this far by yourself? Port. I will write you. I'm just out here. On the year. And not know in spring specifically. Yes. Plus you as what we're looking forward to reading all my would have been looking Licinia skimpy. Another one of those like, the loss Hypo came out just dying to get any minute, caring up, Asians, and tell me recently did a thing online wish to spout. How rejections she got. I think she. Yeah. Got sixty rejections from agents, and she spent four years writing tuna blood and bone and how the fact that within two years. She's listening to books both of which are on the year. This definitely will be on the New York Times less. We've seen the covered the cover for the next book is just outstanding from Alice while I love this woman. I think she's a young lady who allowed young black girls can be up to her story is just magical creative. It lifts us up. And. It's a well. Whether what is black. There is no the reasonable oppression. The person that is dead. Is is our own inflicted by others are different just our wealth raise the whole racial tension. And we're just trash there wasn't an yes. Your rich? Okay. Let's do that with that now. And it's one less thing to worry about whereby. We're not just fighting outside of people buying our selves. We can do that. We just have to deal with it. So yeah, I'm really look cool you'll aversion vengeance. Who? You're you know, you might you might want to meet sign up for some plus one. My main was. All right to. Okay. A mix it up with another white author. This book is called the art of not falling apart as an audio book. Go by a woman, Christina Patterson. She and the reason why this book so because she's a generalist, and she basically chronicles life having what journalism. On journalism, and she basically got made it under and she got a point in her life when she realized like she she is not married kids. And she's not with anybody romantically career is kind of like hidden everywhere. She went on had a conversation of various people very that. She's along the way along alive. I as a as a journalist working on the column at the independent and in the book editor at the independent and various things and she talks about. How important is not to fall apart? But also before the apart in a way that protects you I'm helps you learn from life was about how she loves parts. Really says about how she loves parties, and he always puts on a birthday party, which coincides coincides Christmas cetera, and you know, she talked to people about in a who lost people who've lost siblings of Las passes. And it's a very interesting look at life from a perspective of somebody who is in the forties and fifties and just trying to kind of make sense of everything because we get so caught up in China since everything not twenties, and it's like. Ten years died. When you when you deep it ten years into adulthood. Most sixteen we knew nothing as eighteen we thought remaining. Number three while we don't have nothing for three twenty five twenty five. All right shit. We'll. Crisis hits. I knew Christina talking like forty fifty something and saying, you know, she put everything down like she was at work. She was doing editing. She was editor head and many just win the point. Yeah. So you kind of speaks the point kind of speaks to the point with megani. When she talks about the most hyphen things. Now, our generation is quite future proofing abusive prefer cells. So that we do multiple things today at one thing kind of stops. We still thing going on these other stuff, but it's a very very good book. Like, I mean, sometimes it's difficult identify with a. I I think while you're white woman as well. Mike. Being in journalism is very feeble yet, very what will cost Pima dominated industry and white female dominance yesterday. I mean, it's like it's very interesting perspective perspective that she has about one story where she you got made it made evident, and she ended up at the press awards with the redundant, and he like skipped out the door because he didn't want to confront that. And this is I mean, it's says things that is like he can fire somebody on the sparks. I think in particular building that she was what building when you get fined or made it on the ExCo building security, of course, the other building and. She she was talking about how they had to turn the building. She went in that day thinking that you have. That I like eleven AM without a job is this really one of the things other people. Yeah. There's other people that she spoke into have been through that as journalists as people in the NHL. This is like the one thing that I've been looking at health and watching TV it's just like the idea of how we can place yourself and yourself at you know, key the things I do because the things that you do outside things they can achieve go in a minute in a minute. And so when people talk about all the things that they do all the things that they've accomplished in life. I was one of these people for very long time. I'm I'm very goal orientated. And so it's always like, what am I going to next? What have I cheesed ever changed these things, but you don't start at these things can go, and I think the one thing that everybody stop standing leading. This woman is that serve. Hey, honey. How you doing? Is that the entr your intrinsic value just comes from the fact that you exist? The fact that you exists means that you are worth something. And obviously, I'll always take a religious thing. Because obviously, I believe in God. And in my head is like I in government not relate to it. But I I the conscious imagination over bigger being made me, and therefore I matter just like the highest mountain on this earth, just like the most beautiful creation the most beautiful invention on this earth. I matter exactly the same way because I am a culture. She being that was made from that high power. Even if I was a bloody Trump even fouls, harmless, even even if I didn't have anything to my name. I would still be worth the same low key. I mean blow say we are on the same. We are. We are low key. Burien talented woman, but Turks like idea. The work that he has. Up in here. I'm telling you, and that's very blurred. These things can ply ineptly havoc on. Yes. To relate to go in the second. And I think that is I think that confidence you derive from and when you know that is like expert about this people include my therapist, and it's life. And it's just like the idea of letting things define you towns of wack accomplishments goals is very dangerous very dangerous because they knew site use out who does exactly what she took about. And that's what I think is this is like Jason. I'm just like I am. She's moving my again, it's. We will know what we we all know what we're expecting. What? However, this book is great. The obviously as I said, you have to be very money, especially if you're coming from a perspective of at the minority perspective as the for example, if you're black woman listening to this or reading this book, you've got you're going to be rolling is some parts. However, if you look if you take things objectively as a K, I can apply that to how I deal with my manager. You know, how deal with this person? It's was really good. So I think that what the read. Is worth the kind of time. She's done a lot for herself since I mean, anybody who is made from a job and then Pacific themself up has done done the job. I mean, that's very very amazing amazing quality that some people have anybody has it. This is about tapping into it. Comes to less. You're gonna have your you have to pull up via strings when you know that foreclosure silence coming on the house logo gotta pay that Bill you you're gonna take the so you I'll say everything read it all falling apart. Even if you have a way of twenty percent of it just keep having to sit. I've ever I'm gonna say just specifically for the audio having. Yeah. Interesting is your final site. My final book is actually a book has already been published before. But it's kind of having a new face onto it. It's. The garden actually did a an obstacle review on it. So more than twenty five years off the ground breaking daughters of Africa theology. Margaret Busby reflects on the next generation of black win rises around the world and so daughters. This book was published a while the hash day of Africa. Did you five years before I was born? And. And now all mislead second unthought Aji excuse me with various black women and just writing about the lives and stuff. And now we have new faces, and we have some of my, and I say our fair some wa favorite women writers, including years daily ward. And. Bany bio. Margaret jettison panache to Mattie, Mahama NHS area compromise. I don't want to miss out. But yes, especially anthology of essays. And I'll read the first paragraph of review time was when the perception of published writers was that all the women will white all the blacks men to borrow the title of the key nine thousand nine hundred black feminist book at best that was a handful of black female writers Tony Morrison, and will my Angela who acknowledged by the Natori establishment. This was the climate in which more than twenty five years ago I compiled and published daughters of Africa, the smart Busby. It was critically claims. But more significant has been the inspiration that that the has been the inspiration that nine thousand nine hundred thirty two fresh generation of writers who formed the coal of sequel new doses of Africa. I'm this. I think is is that he or yard came out in March. And I'm precise to read this because y'all. Like, if it's call Mallory Blackman, scored your sedately ruled is go. I Obama added bio our favorite people just talking about their experiences of being got Fermin in twenty first century person. And it's so rare because a lot of the things that we do see right now. And I think you know, what I'm gonna say because maybe two years before last year, we would talk about how black culture is essentially osmosis from American narratives. But I do firmly believe this is very very much changing look at phenomenal wax that we have had throughout the loss eighteen months to two years of of black women writers. And I think that it's now outside of the US, and we are it's. As that renascent that we spiracy spoke out, and I don't want continue to say, oh, it's new, you know, our narratives so US orientated is filled with the froth of US humor in life. We're actually taking that mantle now. So I am going to let that narrative rest and say that it's just beautiful to see these these new writers coming up. Having our experiences and anything, but you're touches this great. So yet guys new daughters of Africa previously the publisher before. But now it's an adult youth new voices by the phenomenal. Margaret busby. Who's been just in this literary spare time? I guess. For a long time say mazing as I just read it and got the God were decent 'em. If you have right. It's that is by Margaret bus B's published by Marion new doors of Africa don't launch at the women of the World Bank center and somebody else make sure yet co those spring rates we're gonna move onto our general discussion the minute after this break, Berkeley. We're back. I thought that this will be good for this, Geno discussion around rices creativity and corporations, and I think that so we're basing its of an article last year school, but lost year publishing house was launched. What's publishing house per somebody who has deserted does the polish company was lowest in may two thousand eighteen is cool demontfort literature, and it started by a man could John dementia, and what his main goal was to make sure that writers would be paid full to make writing about being Ovallis as a viable career being paid to write the book. There will be paid us Alary of twenty four thousand pounds a year, and they would in that year that would they'll monkey salary. They would work what as in. Right. Liberal once pub. Once it's what is publish. It. Would then go through the process of traditional publisher would go through. So the book the book cover, the title, the editing, the marketing strategy and all sorts, and yeah, I thought it was really interesting kinda we look on Mosa because Jonathan comes from a banking background. He's a banker this company to kind of make sure that novelists had a viable career. And I thought that it was a good question to us because we have so many people in this community as in the writing community in publishing world who discuss all authors getting paid a pittance all not game pay that much in advances. And you know, the very few get paid the million of million wherever mouth the foreign advance in Sichuan and. I wanted to know what kind of about that. Because he can't see them a corporate background. And he's looking at obviously from a business strategy way is like this money to be made their money to be put in to the creators who want to do it. So what is that what you thought about about that to be honest? I think the me this challenged a very snobby attitude. The I once had low key still struggle. This is growth guys, quite right? I would even say like up until last year, if you told me that all, you know, what do you think about paying writers to write? I'd be like a one. How would you to write your book seller wide wanting to pay to right because it's technically a luxury? Right. So should young. The I previous nuqta like get a real job. And then exactly, and I think migration from the fact that in a way, I was coming from very privileged background in that not perfect background in privileged mindset. The that are still you get a job. But writing is extra curricula writing something that you do talk in my head like being a fulltime rice to me walls. And also still is KOMO carrying made a million rising is something that you do Montauk. A what you already do and therefore deal with him. Do you know what I mean? But However, I have come around the idea that you know, what there are people in the swelled who writing is it that is the career that is what they want to grow up being for me. It was always like, yeah. I want to be a writer, but I also wanna have a job. And because I came in the world. As came into the world. And the wall told me you need to have a job and writing is luxuries extracurricular is this thing that you do for art, and uh know, and maybe maybe squad car came into my my my mind in that sense in that I do still very much have this idea of writing us this. Internal saying writing as this art think and M I willing or shoot people be willing to invest in a rice writing because what if they're writing is shit. But then. Jill I mean, other like the nice together for that. Because I end the day. It's this is somebody's career. This is then how do you structure in business was kind of art on the two things? Regards, the investment at a like people don't necessarily see things as an investment of money in whatnot. If you're buying a ton of books, obviously, just to the people the end that's kinda worse as a share. So of you buy at men, a cinema peaks pips judge says people by amount, and obviously helps fund particular careers, or whatever. People when you look at what you get for what you buy when you buy a book your investing in an author an office career. That's very that's quite an using. When I buy a book, I'm buying the story is only obviously now I'm aware of the publishing industry. Night shift of his two. Yeah. But ultimately when we obviously who's a bit more about how it particularly words. But when you actually in that, okay? I want to write this book. I'm going to write him and put it out. Ultimately intimate buck the advance that was given to now when you've got the sky dementia. Trump into the for talking about. Pay you salary each month. Whatever let me sit down and editor on them. When you start to sell the book, it's a bonus on top of this item. Two million pay. Take me I'm making the money right to me that makes sir. My sense. But obviously, I position of outside of particular industries that what what David he goes in to another side. And I think I did arts should be seen as this vacation on this extracurricular thing. You should really should be this kind of. So you may not you know, you want to create and you wanna create for a living. How can you make viable living in when I grew up. And I said to my diet. I wanted to be an actor said, that's great. But you have to know that that some deja going to be out of work. It's not it's not a consistent career, especially at the beginning. So what does that look like? And that kind of anything who I it wasn't a thing. Like all could make it what in my mind. It was more of a I I can sustain that. I don't know what that means. And when things in place of things, but it's okay. So you can kind of create an atom critic music to ever and because it's be paid and live then a discussion behind. Hi. I think that the like I said, very different neat. Because in a way, sometimes you might even isolate the creative industry from the corporate industry. So, you know, mainstream citizen to alternative cups, and when really actually works together because as much as a writer, you're writing and you're thinking about your art and your craft and you'll plot and your story when you get agent, and when you you know, you book gets picked up and motorist auctioned or I guess picked up by publishing industry literally flips on his head. Then it becomes what is your PECH? How we're going to market this who is going to buy. How are they going to buy it who is the audience? So then it becomes a balance between creativity and coop coporate mentality. Marketing actual, I guess. The other side that you don't consider me as an artist. Right. I eat them these two things can work together. But we just need to find a better way. So in my head, I do relax this idea that, you know, the manga guy did with regards to funding writers to write paying them. But by do herp that the writers have our business savvy enough to look at their contracts that okay when I'm writing you're paying me twenty four case right as year. First of all I'd say like low key the Goshi shape up because not enough forward to others significant person me significantly key. Light advances war five K, not advance the not as a new one. I found out. I was and I was like, what's when you think about what it takes the first of all depends on what the publisher. Believes rains in the in story that PM pushed edits everyone's gonna have a Harry Potter. I would imagine her how I heard once would have been really, no. Yeah. I just so happens that something's takeoff in ways, he never spurt. And when you think about what writer does Z the hours of research, depending on the book research, the creation the time in down like. If you're getting paid the same mount, you know, somebody who's a commissioning editor or somebody who's an entry level generalist or somebody who works in a. A law firm, but not necessarily corporate city one or whatever did I mean like it. You had to think of K as good as an as an entry level because I keep an eye on it does any city. And so things that the clarity that comes with something. Like, this that sense. However, I do think that case a one when you've written out, and then it's comes to marketing, and then the payment next what happened author. Of how many voile -ties how what's the percentage of gross at your getting from this? And then what's the percentage that this organizational this corporate entity is paying you. And then can you go she if you're writing another book can you renegotiate or are you stuck in for more than a few years in the same thing? I think that's when the creativity aspect of it needs to be more business savvy. And so I don't like the idea of creativity coporate being these two things are different. I'd like to see them more entrenched in an era Van Dyke Graham will you as as creator what in the middle? You understand business? You also understand crazy puzzle. I mean, you understand criticized controlled on us creating at the end of the day. But you can't just leave. Exactly the business savvy and all that important at the same time when we think about when we think about this. We've got to really understand everybody's coming from the perspective and face now. I don't. I did things mutually exclusive, for example, if you are working in a corporate peration copy, great if you can call want to nine. So that for me, I'm a bit. Like, you know, you. Everybody creativity. Something comes from a deep coma. Medine spiritual kind of place like me like you want to sit down and you on a story. You wanna you wanna translate? What you're thinking onto a canvas you want to incorporate a person on a stage. That's what you wanna do. However, the realities of life is that we need to keep the lights on. What is it that? How can you find the balance and people are writing and writing and writing and writing this still waiting for their chance, but they have to shift in places, and they have to put like get money. Elsewhere, teaching all righty. Craziest faces cobalt is great. I mean there are many sacrifices. Don't get me wrong. Like you. Walk your Ossoff two point where you just be crying in a cab at three AM come back home like because it stat tough. And the compensation is great. But you have to sometimes you ask is it worth it some to some people that it's alive too is to some people smell. You just have to send you all the time. We investing in our craters faces Eiter think because. The fact that people have to struggle to just express themselves is a real issue. I believe is a real issue. We need to get a space where everybody can live and can create as a baseline this is. Yeah, this is why with this particular aspect of politics history. I think that corporations creation. Yeah. Because it's like you can say we need Tenny Rytas on XYZ publishing platform. We will pay you for into your stuff because in the process in which the mobility uses they had to have the application of it with the interview do all the stuff. I was the interview will be discussing your idea, and what not and you go through of that as if you would go through any other job. I did is time for example, what inoperable now is that a lot of creative spaces. Owned by corporations. Let's talk about something stupid arena. Stupid the book like publishing houses. A lot of times these publishing houses our cooperation. Gwynne HarperCollins all of these things they are Ecole peration that owned by private equity companies. You have your bookshelf to stones and all these of the bulls they are owned by corporations such as public private private equity funds. Dow owned by big holding companies the by big billionaires and only guards do you know what I mean? And so I do think that it's more intertwined than you think and people are just not giving the one the creators of the bottom money, and then giving the coporate in the middle and top time to live their lives. And it's just all messed up. And I don't know how gonna find out of the is literally a Jew process for everything. You mean, we need the revelation? The creatives have time in the Coopers that have alive. This is it. There's a whole distribution of world that he's happy. If you think about how much do you K takes in from the on the creative industry and about how much they they literally money, but you have to spend it on the other side. You have time you have money to spend the regard. North of one hundred. Yeah. In the UK some myself today. What is it was good on this damone furniture place? This is the person. That's you do location form you signed an NDA, which is which is why to me because it's like what what you trying to protect NDA's. As. NBA acquainted to be signed to protect the application process. Psychometric you test. The what's Glazer test of ever reasoning are maybe needs knife. You can spell if you're if you're all right? Third circuit NDA. Wow. How required to sign to be signed to protect you. When we discuss your ideas for novels as part of the interviews. Yeah. Discuss ideas is the next stage will bring you in for by telephone interview to discuss any ideas, you have the interview. Leszek stage before yet. But before you get to the six day j- interview investment banking firs because he's about girl. We'll bring you infant interview to meet you discussed the is. Peak. To tell me. May you are? And the final if we the times. So again, these these negotiable. Appeal the vice so what I'm hearing is that the base salary is twenty four K. If you wanted to negotiate ball negoti out guys, you can Dallas T means. But what I'm saying? I found it's very interesting case study, I still look at how we're kind of appreciate in the creates a within the Chris base. Thank you. So. To me is like I can't lie. I'm and I'm still struggling idea when I write for instance. And one of the things is offering about is like I remember having interview. And be like, yeah. Ryan, slim, not fully only because I don't I thought of the art of creating and and. Coporate mentality. Getting in the way of that. I'm very much anti establishment when it comes to the acts of creating. So when you are creating I really hurt is authentic and not money orientated because it comes are easy to not let me just write this article because the commissioning editor is is going to give me three hundred pounds for eight hundred words and just Bryce it. I'm very much against even though I see the privilege in being like, oh what you don't want me to get through hundred have bills to pay. You don't get three hundred pounds because you all about art. I mean, I see how that can be translated in that way. But I'm still very much adamant that actually you wanna create create freebie ultimate goal from us. And I really wish that that that to me is when it comes to people who create who right who paint who make music. Who have oganisations at all about protecting that that is so important to me possibly one of the reasons why when I write I don't show much of it. I I don't share because I'm just like very protective personal issue. I know herbs. My biggest worry rations and creativity mixing is that one foregoes the other and corporations had the money and the background to stand. But does does the creativity? Have the backbone to say, I'm still going to be created in the face of all of this. This much of an opinion that it doesn't sound alone. It doesn't sound alone in. I mean, you need it needs to have the support structure of something scotch out. You're the structure got the structure, you can then let creativity flow within it. Like, I'm saying some people. It depends on who you are. But yes, guys, if you have any questions for us any questions on this topic in particular dealers, mostly at G modo com or you can Diaz any stage of de mostly. It and. All righty, right right around. Onto nicely flex. What are you watching? All right. So so this things I'm watching right now. See I'm what two things. You want to watch clay always end up watching it. All right. So I decided to get back into watching over the Easter weekend. You something that we can't. We just found myself. Just what I watched. I am too dressy part series. So maybe the movie, obviously. So I was park to it's I'm going to watch Jesse parliament loss world ultra support three three. I think it was the more Jesse dress. Tune in the Las world. However. The NAS when I just three. Okay. Watch those over the weekend. You know, what I found I found the Steven Spielberg is like an amazing. I just got white has a cult following. Do you think a really strong audience from from like Star Wars to back to the future to Indiana Jones tonight, even Jesse park to all of that stuff and understanding and understand why he has all of that? Because of the like I remember when I went to. Empire woods and empire. The magazine have these awards each year, they kind of celebrate him as the director as director and like just person of the year and the all cut when the soundtracks that. He has the the orchestra the music the intensity that he brings every story that he tells each I think did ET is well like. Like the intensity of across it. I just is Gary. Yeah. Out there jumping for what we because of the music because of the. This this dinosaur pretending to be silent an end. And it's really funny because it's just like the way that he's kind of built up his career. I'm not obviously host even still better like vist wherever however of the stuff that I've watched I've really really understood that the the soundtracks have been so important to everything is written and directed bridges. And I just like Jessica can this is really this is a really amazing series as much as you know, this could never happen in real life ever, which most of his stories are like. They con- happen. You think, but then even do they couldn't might be able possibly. I just did not sure if they will happen. So yes, I was dressy park. And watching the good fight. I just go. Watching the I go back into the good fight to this morning. Yeah. So I'm just in those spaces off in a minute. But does all I'm kind of watching and the minute needs to get back into the British dramas are happening on like ATV and BBC things like ghost. And I was I wanna watch fleabag. Talking about it. The tweet compared it as a war tonight chewing gum or fleabag. And I was like that's a very interesting comparison that you're making because you've got a woman lead right of a story, which is pretty much similar demographic like in environment time nine. Yeah. A white woman's lead his been making several quite oppress right about now during gums, not really been like, it's not new the minute. I mean back like ending of the series three quite a new media thing something why would you put that up on people? Some people might not have never had it too bad during gym bag now not so you why did you put the why'd you put them up against each other down this anyway, so yeah, I'm looking forward to in talking to the British dramas flea bias and all that stuff on TV the bay and all that stuff and whatnot. Yeah. Say I'm watching. Well, I've been continuously watching homecoming film by builds say on Netflix and overseas film by nephews from Bob Hope, you know, that they definitely had had an Email, of course, an from pulpwood detainment m no sorry that caption can't work for us and over he he guys having what time coming. I don't I think you should be listening to this podcast. You know invites I personally don't approve of you listening to me and addicts talking. Coming is a documentary by built say on Netflix, documenting twenty eighteen bay cello performance. Giving us only twenty twenty minutes of actual documentary time because obviously this bitch is busy and she's just doing everytime holding his hand up because he wants to say something what's up? Wrote courses to has already like told me that I could I wanna say. You know, what's so funny about this that we we stream this, and we could have been patient. Patient. I remember the Sunday, we we streamed this whole thing. I haven't downloaded on my laptop today. The fast one the factors. I I. Remember, what should I was like, you know, what could've just waited for this. So up, right. But yeah, I've been watching that consistently obviously beyond say drops a whole album light live album alongside it that midnights. Listen to do every every other day, and I am general painter. It's just been playing in the background girl. Like the good system to get number one. But tell me why it has been so active. She posted a video of her gang, edges laid. I was like why are you acting like a human being what is wrong with you? Mike bag what is wrong with? Why are you giving us access into your life? I don't understand. Okay. Telling us what you're doing heading about your collaboration that I hope is not anything to do with house of Derry on our trash. Why you telling us what you do is. Sure. Videos entering before. Say has a phone case that has letters they built they own. It Sheila STAN of Bill say this how you know as big in the building Sheila, STAN. Hi, self. You know, when they told the hive the come down and we will bitch. Fuck up. Help. Brand. She's a fan of in brand phone case. We've let's say the name the anagrams around it. I was like bitch. What what are you doing? She gave us a whole instant live of her hy-vee party added. Confused think this whole two weeks of the merge stress. Before the puts out like. Use an upturn the whole marketing strategy. In your team now. It like we don't have album marketing people nowadays because of what you've done with south title disrupted, the whole situation that people have jobs now, you wanna give them. They're just back. Make it make sense. Kit. Make anyway, she's big let marketing anyways, that's why I've been watching all I also watched a film like I said, this is up. Yeah. Jane, the virgin his back now. And that Rodrigez woman, we don't she's she's a way would. But she's Jane the violence. So I asked her Jane the virgin love that show. Even though I Rafael show lead her and stinky Matteo because generally, much and almost me sick. The actually no talking about never watched it on Netflix is called someone. Great. And it's got the guy from our stop peaceful man from the look for him. And it's essentially of great Cup me off of housing. Why crying? I don't know. But this film is essentially this beyond letting girl who wears a t shirt that says let off which is very. Black like black slime, which is one thing that I I'm very uncomfortable with because I'm not yet show, you're promoting your people. But at the same time, you using black nuances to make what you do just because. Very. Uncomfortable with uncomfortable. Because it's what's been shown. Shortens maybe. As for. Just like Bonna team do that shit. Was it black people? Let me just tell you. All right. With a Latino. No, I get to plenty. Did you see that? Hope I just felt like. African Americans anti I don't stick. She was giving us Oskar nominated Academy Award rose. He was giving us a kademi award. Reactions people say she's anti black. I real fuck with her. But I love her. Engine. The virgin we just need. Suppose they've got that girl in that film with spike the series. She's she's hammer. Meanwhile, she is in that film after I think this woman is absolutely beautiful gorgeous. Like, I don't understand how someone like can you what? What good mates you pitch? You made by God. Anyway is curious. Gorgeous. She's in there. She's like she's in this film. Someone great which is basically needed of Ninova drug as the character guessing over up with Keith whatever name is and she's areas. She's very oh. Hard headed. Anyway. So yeah, I watch still guys if you are going through a break up or you misundersta don't be Washington. Because this is this I genuinely wash this like a background thing like background radiation. It was just supposed to be there. When I came. Yeah. To all of a sudden, I go into and I miss the MO if that was supposed to go to bed, and I was really sad. But I think he was peaceful one of the most beautiful part was when Nina overdrive as character was just like ordering something and Keith was like, all I love you. And I thought I was going to die the higher coming someone grain German juvenile Kush. The one that was. Most people. Oh, I'm twenty six of my juvenile sister. Throw people haying champion nine leap twice if you need to wonder. I know what you know, several people. The one that we're asking for the one that need help. You also read guide, Alex once told me that I have five people a Maper. Wall in you, you have angry angry Ray you go over the passionate raid. Subtle ray. Jetted ray. In guys go out, and they'll be ten five minutes. I just won't be there because I'll just sit. Like, what was it? She just waiting. Quiet was up like nothing. What's going on nothing? Are you? Okay. I'm just fine. The worrying. Dusted a live show again notoriety. I have half amendments like the big thing. She's from. To some tired. I don't wanna see it. The people. This five one five I can adopt them. That's why watching and I also spilled I wanna watch guys is cooled velvet bustle. It's a film. That's Jake Jilin. How Jilin how somewhat guy told me student? How why people know how to? I was like given how and he was Jilin how anyways. He he's no that the film on Netflix come out, and it's all about like shit. It's all about basically a parody on and pretentiousness and over that. But also it's supposed to be a horror. But it's not really because it's low key at this comedy very tongue in cheek with. He and Netflix, and I'm really excited to watch it because I remember when the nets the trailer came out, but I didn't watch it. That's why I'm going to watch possibly tale sometime within the next few days. The and. I'm really watching much except in busy school. That's the. Let's talk about Deborah friends. Throws. We should have an engine music. Does it? Into the tent and. Okay. So we're back on season. Eight of gave with runs. And we are two episodes in which we were heavily contesting the US audience because we're pop of fighting you at the same time because you got to sit there in your living rooms five PM. Well, we want to sit there. Go away to nine nine PM on the Monday. Because what have you we Twee spoilers? I'm means and old on fair time talking about this of x y and setting. I know. Yeah, we know. So theorem. Birds. Given the context it's going to be a war. It's going to be cold. It's going to be like everybody. Everybody is dying dying and everybody is really trying to so one one. Snipe. I quite like people always do you guys. Remember game of thrones game is slow but season seven spoiled, you guys and you guys out my God. It's so fast paced. No, remember, how slow and you want and full of dis. Hell game of thrones. Was but season seven guys thinking that this share is all you know, Roberty property lows of action. No, so season started off with the narrates tug Aryan, and essentially everyone coming to winter fell because that is kind of where the whites and the white walkers of basically on their way from from. The no grown season seen seven obviously sassy and everybody was kind of aware like Donnie and Joan where like yo these people come in. We to forget about our little thrown made a swat. And we understand that we have a big enemy, and I think that's wonderful because it really tests people's. How do I say it resolve resolve also perspective because festival says he's dumb? Fuck. I love I love this. But also, she needs to stupid a little bit smart in a way that she's not going to the north that she's like, you know, what you have. I can fight these people for me when you've loved then you can come to Miami. Serie three episode one episode one arise in winter fell with John and reunites, I. Episode one to episode one is pretty much the everybody's stocks reunited. Like, literally Arias their, Thaddeus. Season seven. But always there John are for the first time since John sees brand for the first time since season one episode two. So they of that obesity. Basically come together terrier is out here. As the hand of the Queen and whatnot. And bronze doc, his just moving mad. He's like being die guys hard. Hard life worth living guy because Brian is what what from episode two. We kind of understand that. And those are this big profound moment in that brand as the three eyed raven low keyed Nur's the beginning and end of times, he is the memory of math threats the mall. Exactly. And that fall what he does because he can access and go and people. Okay. Go to the SARS. We know only if the autumn specific thing he can go to and find out. Yeah. Actually, he is at the memory of man. And the reason why he's got the Mark of the night king is because these what will they want to end the fest men, they want to end man, and if you remove this profound season two way to spot like the fact that if you remove the memory. If you remove the memory of men, you remove life and living and aspect, and that's an end of season two that kind of doing this whole strategy of y'all. How are we going to defeat these wokers because they're much in on winter fell? And they come in for us. They've got the Sarah's for Seri on whatever. They've got him. And how are we going to do this? Why did love I mean, obviously episode one was to just reuniting aria and Salazar and of diversity met. But like Danny, and Danny fitting in understanding the north Ameri about this business there, really. The answers really good humbling. It should have been homeland homeless for dinner. She's like she's calling could all of these parts. Marine. No this. Oppose. You call over here. You'll blood self and your driver. Besides what you eat. How anything they want? Looking at I. Here. This is like top of the fact that I do think that maybe the nurse to die because the right is a really painting bad light. Why do people in Dinares as complex? She's superior tonight is a Queen. That is all she's known in my head. I'm like this girl since since the after the first season when have dragons were born Oshii has known her whole childhood has been a Jamie Lancaster killed my father. I am the rightful heir of the throne of west rose. I have to do whatever it takes to ensure the girl that and take the throne now, she's gone back. And she is being a Queen and people don't want to bend the knee the North Island down what they won't because you know, sounds is out. Check lucky maverick Carter Carney because Kara growth growth has exponential. The current L O R Yash Dahl to me after light season six. I Denny flashy. Should die because she has nothing like he's. Jeez. I think she needs to like nothing heard. What's the word grievances about just kill the people? She wants to. She's the other half are Shane kill the hound. But now they're made a bit light. I'm here. Five have sex in because I genuinely to produce that as our little sister. She's a psychopath because locate but the father we finally find out that Jones. No finding out dessert people who've been reading the books Binion early. Just fine finds out within the series. He's gonna talk area and he the right for added. I where are thrown. And that was a very interesting moment between him and some well, and obviously somewhere way discovering that his father and brother dead. The knee. It was a shack killed them too. Mung Tommy's oh ever heard that claim. Yes. Paris. Car. What less? Really? And that's why really right Danny because people die because they thought she's got his appetite complex. No, she is a Queen. Or she's. She had to tell someone that she killed his because embed the knee. And that's what every king before her has been doing the Rathi in have the mad king all of them. That's all been doing. So why should she be any different issue should those rule differently in that, you know, she's has mad white savior complex, and she's been saving all the slave saves bay. And she come in here, and these people on slaves, and so they're like, why should we support you and she has to prove to themselves, but she's in the north. I do think that she should sit down and business. You know, what the north you have been through it, you you guys can be the Republic of west roles. You guys can can have this little ad. I will take west roles, and I did love to episode to Sesay was no India because vigil matter no more. You're on a great joy disgusting. However, I want to put a baby bitch. I got one. How do you know? She might not have had one name. She's calling. As a creed of the books and at that point. So we be on the books. Now, these have hers are doing whatever the hell, George has told them or whatever the hell they want. We don't know happening Missouri's review. New assessing was pregnant fussy idea think she's pregnant occurs. So you're great joy the on call of the on Yarra. They he basically decided to go to king's landing without the elephants. Bessie wanted what my? Just bring that data. So she's she's got this. At this thing. We're always thought process the questioning your choice in men that NT you understand that NT's the man that she has exile. I mean Iraqi empa- it shouldn't love, Jamie. He our she did laugh on they loved each Agra. Agra massive a love is frontal. As far hands your twin brother find a man that is just like. Iraqi end. Actually, I did in the last season. Overseas who came and she loved him. In love with you know, Leon Leona star as she even the start was in love with very good. How Gary we do, you know this shit. Everybody's matt. This is a true. That's true. So she could never live up to what he wanted one in the. He entered the was she added. The what thing. Like marine and being with your brother is very normal, especially with now, Danny is with Joan snipe jumpstart is Danny's nephew, join me and done when Johnson I found out that he was like egelton Garin dining was live. Basically, what your you wanna come from our thrown jas? They are nothing sleeping with my my nephew. They and like the tug Aryan family been doing his ass knows think about you have two people that are only ever that show nephew about. But I'm just the day that the same age. It's like, okay. So it doesn't mean that. Okay. So it doesn't mean that at the same age as the con expo because of the relationship wherever, but they are literally of the same age from different histories and the. For apart. If he had anything about who he was and his identity. Doing. They would continue the are coming to. My eyes. Things anyways episode one ends with Jamie arrive in winter. I'd raven. Bradstock? Two days. What it what what's going on? Actually, we decide that. I died. Okay. 'cause I could see everything. Opens up episode to winning trust. Jamie tries to walk every phoning in front through you all prisoner. Did I have for you? What the things differ love you dust off the side of the duty. And I was Ted. I'm not quite half. Like people talking about how Danny shouldn't have like gone wild for like, she should've forgiven, Jamie. But all Danny has known is this guy that murdered her father? She's not a thing. This is what was found that position. Father was banning people who are episode to episode to know she realized how far was apart from west because we see happen had. We see we see several things we see John shucking and jiving around the cost. Like, he's not gonna find yourself trying to go. I'm john. Like, she's gonna find you. We see feel on meeting again. Time in history. And I'm so happy that low key something is going to happen that because sounds has been messed up by manage. She's about to give power to anybody with a penis because theon grade don't have one she's like, you know, what you can be mad because low key the thing that gives you some some idea on your toxic masculine the day. And I loved about that scene when St. on came back and dining sister. She's like, well, you know, she's in this land, and she's going to do I want to fight for how stock, and I think that is one of the reasons that would make Danny give away claim to west are to the north to have stopped because she understands the power of the she would present a mean when you see the power shift power, peaceful low power shifting in this episode in tiny took. You know, I'll come to you as as a Marrakesh. She was right. I get that being manipulate because there was a very good minutes episode. Oeser Gina why I think it was located feminists episode because. Brianna tough nights. Got that. Because I was really emotional. Part when when when dining I'm sensible talking ally. It's because you can see a family. I mean. I mean. She's like, you know, what it's cool. I love your brother. My brother. Love's you saying that we've come so far. This is exactly where we should be. What's going on winter fell in the north? She's basically saying the northeast to be it's it's. We're not going to bend the need to know. She's basically the people with minimum till in the north online. Now, we're not we're not doing that. And. But I just figure out how she realized that she with E ON. On came. And she knew and she was like, whoa sons were people have cried like cried when she met the own again and feelings been through hell Carta growth because he had to and sounds helicopters by seems like everybody forgets that. If you see that because I was off. Argue Matt sons. Opinion. Exactly what's up six thousand dial the one episode nine, but she's been in the power of different people. Be smart as on the been sure. Bisi if she's been through loss of family members aria two seasons. She's like she's been through the banter things are allowed to fight. Africom just before Danny came into having the episode. She was talking to one of the Macy's and being all right open. This gay for these people to come in south excuse me is running without ever just moving. Find him. Some dumb thrown talking about get dropped full these what wokers, and which is the I dispell get he from this part. She is funding winter FAO. She literally is the lady of winter Belga. She's wanting this thing and everybody else gets that. The so she cannot she to print people arrived winter Ville. Phenomenal never power because being Email hoping going back and then John king in the north leaving. At the end of the day sun's sunset con she's gonna die. She mentioned what I love about our Martin is the fact that all the dogs that we hated now the characters have strength this year and that have power and eat less. What episode shave the nineteen of Brooks out brand, the beauty talk about the three. So what does that has all the honeys right out? All the Honey. Bye. Ane on her neck. Me Latin STA is for me. I've wanted that relationship since since season, I think it will see them two or three too. So before middle guy, I always. You know when what's her name? Lady of winter foul. Ca- capitals, whatever slash caulking tally tall. Oh, brianna to take this man to west rose exchange of for my daughter's sift backhoe ride when he went back and told her about how this killed the mad king. And this is how I felt about the way that both-. He went back to save her from the bed your via was like dead. They had they have this tension that tension was really played out in the last episode in episode two I've for me, I've always wanted. And I think now that that live that doing slash we have a little bit of a triangle with my guy Thomann. With the big woman drink. Months with rain right now. Now is the big this is I mean, I like I like to love the fact that Jamie, Jamie ninety. Oh, dying fun. She's like, you know, what the day, right? Story has closed. Always does. She said Libby. Dash kim. Doug is in. Aimar? She was spiting Ren Lee was on running on the cable. I'm going to be the king brandy wasn't Marjorie. She was like fighting in tournament or whatever. And he miss somebody mistake me. She was a nice I've not night by I would like to be whatever something vise the vice she was nights actually did that big big grin guys going to see this on Monday Monday. You've already seen the episode Barbara. Tommy is Abe. She's not dead yet. Confide me. We'll talk about it because dying has stories and the day. Holy has ended. Remember, the that's all she's on a story terrorists kind of tip. And her lip is ended else. You can do a pop get married and have kids and live in the live in the country. And such. Because remorse. Lead an army of to the army of the dead and dying. There's really not going. I can't crop. That was really interesting episode just because without the narrows and sounds deniers in John denied, the whole try to tell Sam to get decrypt. Like sounds like hold on one second one Compaq a minute. In many today. You're trying to tell me the guy who had killed white mall. Kill these workers realized that it was the dragging last. I did it as a name and justify by you are able to get trucks. The Kirk key anybody in the crypt is dying. Because how many times they mentioned the crypt in episode episode to the night king is taking one white to the the damn killing everybody, and they're going to kill themselves inside hours. Go into the crypt of the dead is coming up. Chris taste in. The creek was when it was wasn't a crypt. Oh, the cook. Dead. People are meal is coming the debt Yoko into the into the crypt with the Dan people that people with people that are alive. So what's going to happen that logic will tell you that you have to be away from the crit the Gretz because the dead end you are going to be stinky by the army of dead. I don't know what to expect. I didn't know the day. I'm going to be an accident. I the episodes when our this. This is the first of the eighty minute episodes parents at the capacity at she directed the battle of the path. You're right direction. The battle of. I think that obviously your listening to this. And it's already happened. Came as we keen. I got now TV low key. I was so close I got not TV are possible. On my debit card out already. I got TV. I should probably use lies more. But my having yet. But yeah dies. So if you're watching this if you're listen to this RIP to all men that have dyes path knee. I think that brianna of tough is dying. Even though I really really really I want her Tiba clarity. What ahead to live happily ever? After Jamie, nine star and Ford just die. I also think that aria stop is gonna stab 'cause I don't know. She's have sexually. She finished up. New auction this accuser people see what she might. She might kill us. Then because I say that the whole episode she wasn't that shooting the premier fears, but kicked the night king sent his army to winter fill through two kings, London, take UC, but has. Panther reasons. She was not nervous when she was in there. But after they say in what women internal the scene shows. They didn't see the Nike because usually you always see the Nike Nike's distinctive. They're saying that he arrived the army winter from the white walkers the generals rather than to fail, but the Nike himself has driven vissarion. Rich. Yeah. I mean, John. Inter it you can even ride for Syria. It's a question of whether he's tug area. He's not because I think that the night king is brand the builder who built the wool. And so I thought you so beautiful when John. Vote basically Rageh grill because that's namesake of his father and. Drank on yet, the namesake of his father right out and essentially back in the day when the when the tug areas were ruling that were like, sister wives egg on all of these other people. They were just riding dragons. There was he was married. Two of his sisters one and one was like the one that he was slightly fucking onside looking and it was beautiful. And it was just like telling you literally. So I could fire blood which George are before the winter winter, and it's basically a book told by may STA about the talk Aaron lineage, and I'm telling you guys game of thrones is all about the tug Arians because locators whole series is all about John Sner. He's tar Garin. This whole thing started because the tug Arians overthrown by the Barra. Athens because you're proper thought that Leon was with regard, Hugh, stolen. She wasn't stolen. Liana was in love with Rageh gave bath jarred his rifle after I ever just mad. What will always be the child that whole this whole thing about pressure is now on jobs like yo have all these cases by don't want. It. Outweight? What is the thing is to tell me? I don't wanna be the thought I don't want that by weight. So now you telling me that I'm the king. He's gonna be a so much behind the Lord of because it's been almost. Relationship with the caveat here. The ad. I thrown he's act IRS rely on a she made snares who I feel sorry for Danny because her whole life. She told us she was air. But the now she's found out that it's John. That's why they actually do need to marry and restore the tug is dying. She didn't think Allman good it's my nephew or the people. What you think was in? Oh, it's my nephew the I was in. Oh, we are tell Gary if we can rule. Yeah. It was. Came to the. Wouldn't it be? She's been the one that's been told bordering. You want ministers even told you want to write for? On the air because your brother been dead because he was asked how you other right for you have been the biggest savior ever personally outside of all this year is for mad because everything they can take on the white walkers. What Danny has been making Astor poor marine cough. Yucai suitable for people. Why are you not taking taking a nice ferry over to these lands? So you can live in peace. But you want to take the throne king. Let you. Tom anyways. Basically, we just need. I don't know. What's going to happen this episode? I'm excited. I'm actually gonna wait up until two AM to watch this. Life allies with it doesn't mean. Much should respond to us because you don't wanna pay for my few weeks. Very much. There's actually a package or not which means you can lose it until over. A three month package twenty-five twenty. I'm coming onto the sky bay came through. Listen. Skype is a sky that on demand thing. So somebody gave me. Games. Where my cousins my trial. Oh my God. I four people have already had about finding cost because I was moving crazy. One because I'm lucky grandma. I nine light. I stream amid measuring ventures like, yeah. I sat him on my leopard. I will admit my. So I actually what she fasting Monday morning. I wake up at like six or seven and watch it for two AM or do we? Yeah. Just also guys people go online, again, I stop places spoilers have some so control the go and lied. I from we've you Doug online, sometimes we'd like avoidance on Twitter and stuff and St. pad. See temple isn't rule. Life really is. But snow was going line. Mark is fine at least half line give it until at least Wednesday put up people, then that's fine. Because. I'm talking about. What about as well? But I think I'm not don't. Spoiler on Monday often. Come and taste. I'll be like on and people were like solve blood. They worry just Joel mccower tests pitch to narrate. She's so annoying. I want all nervous died on this episode minutes. Yeah. Personally. I just want to do that myself. But at the same time. The end of the day. I'm going to speak openly about the episode onto. Skies. That's big for me. The big for me out of said are other cry. Okay. I cried my eyes. That is the end. So each week we're going to recap because obviously we had two episodes to recap. We also had the spring reasons weeks long episode. I like it by the same time general weeks, we will be reeducated MS right for we will be having topic about particular industries and stuff, and we will be talking about books as usual. We will be talking about abor thrones. Furnace and the likes. I haven't seen any but deeply continues to send please, please. To continue to the interaction and your time. In regards to this episode. We've got the should how should be funded as you create his be funded. Being paid to Sam writers. And do you agree with what game of thrones talking about with the spring reads cetera? Just last spring spring reason we will read them out on the show specify whether you want them to be anonymous, but we putting them anonymous. Anyway, so thank you so much into this week. Do remember to rate review and subscribe on actions? We have any announcements reads might become backs in mine on. Very. Gaff as to you every week at why would be like I want to go. I want to go out lowness. I'll go to therapy bitch. 'cause for more than you. Okay. So that's the piss commission. Figure out right now. But I had hosted six months of how many how many sessions and guess who did know gay light therapy can have over we can have couples therapy, but not couples. Why would you get therapy said hot Cossack so much? Gosh unfitness by. Yet. So is we be coming back in the next week? So just keep an eye out for that. Bye bye. It's about burqa and safe with involved in. Cream? That's pretty much it. So just subscribe, right view comment comment and do do Email us continuing wind up being amazing. So then guys catchy guys next week. We we. 'cause we will spoil the next Monday. You've been told now and make sure you wash adventures endgame because we will flow that in-depth after I watched it from school. Mr. care about it back. I said we will see you guys.

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