8 Burst results for "Mallory Blackman"

"malorie blackman" Discussed on VINTAGE Podcast

VINTAGE Podcast

07:56 min | 6 months ago

"malorie blackman" Discussed on VINTAGE Podcast

"Anybody else it's no. I found that actually For me wanda guides was was reading the ugly duckling which i thoroughly enjoyed reading as an adult and yet i knew that the version that i was reading was one that that was also their full for children. And and just i think the tone of that and thinking about how that worked really was important to me in in with now how i was going to go out and i mean the fact is out. I enjoy stories men for german. You know if it's well written if if the story is good if the guards is engaging you know you you get right in there. So the hot isn't the the writing for adults spot. It's the right. Temperature is going off talk of slightly. But i have noticed in these last few months. I've gone back to my children's books of which i've kind of hoarded and taken from place to place throughout many many years unread so many of them again. I wonder if that's just something that's kind of speaking to all of us at the minute. You had she. Then idea stripping something back to essentials it's kind of important isn't it something comforting about going back to books that you grew up with but also there are so many fabulous new books out there and new offers new voices such think combination of the two really have have written books to promise gossip i to go back. I mean it's good you just. In these stories. They often have archetypes characters and situations that we recognize and he's slowly to bring them back to a young audience of never before. It's just great fun. I mean kids. Kids have fallen on. And that's the pleasure of writing for them is a bad delight in the story and they absolute concentration on especially when you read. It could be more wonderful. It didn't actually ask rebecca. you'll deputy your great niece ella. what did she think of the story you know. I don't have a clear verdict yet but last time you know When we were both cleared for on pandemic principles she read me where the wild things which is one of my favorite books of all time maurice endex classic in a couple of other things so she's narrow six in reading on her own. And so you know what. I i wrote it. She felt a little bit young for. I was really trying to rake something. That wasn't few formidable for kids. Who were you know. Seven to ten that the syntax and vocabulary wasn't too overwhelming. But i also knew that it would be read by adults to kids read by adults for their own sakes in its cetera. So but she definitely likes that. There's a book that's of dedicated to her. Actually one of the joys of writing it was. I didn't had never really thought about. The fact that cinderella's real name is ella. Cinders are just unfortunate thing that happens to her and so my book ends with everyone reverting to her real name which is ella. And that was quite fun. And i know ella loves that. In who wouldn't love which you're namesake was the central. Did you just want to say soil. Elected is what we may have talked about. We're running out of time. Them was the each of these books. Most gorgeous illustrations Don't wind door with yet. Such rebecca you went back to the the author jewelry which are also just beautiful But that lights up. Visual pleasure was immense in in all these books One last question to ask you and it was very very good one. I think from alley all that. Any other ferries news the yuan on now tempted to read l. To put you on the spot and two thirds of way through the book for ella's little sister maya and You know all will be revealed in the fullness of time to watch states another. There's almost no fairytale when wouldn't read and think a wouldn't it be much more fun. Honest you know this happened in. This didn't happen like that's you know there's a certain that's not how we do it. Nowadays i wanted you know eve eve. Oh can seem to simple. I wanted there to be reason. Step sisters were following their mother's orders. Their mother was a hungry ghost kinds of explanations for things. I think i think innocence all of them. Thank you i. I like to go to Thousand and one nights something like alibaba and the forty thieves and make a gang of women and have fun with that. So go hang on. This is about you. I will wait three canelas ones. It is so go for it. no. I mean you've just done frankenstein in a way and you'll lost frankenstein's next few is not very challenging semester. As ballots officials intelligence which killing me. I'm really need to finish Because i need to decorate my house for. Christmas is driving me mad. I wanna get this one of the things that i love about fairy tales. You not think that the end they all live happily ever after and everybody thinks it's really tried but hop eight hundred p. It comes from the jomon through the old english. And it's really help us your character to change and it's why we get happens downs and this happened look for the prefixes are it's the faithfulness that comes in which is no random. It's actually connected to you so your they all lived happily ever after which happens at the end of the fifth tactical the shakespearean comedies as well is not try. It's not disney actually say. What is the connection between you as a character which is interesting given the fairytales no really dealing characters what does happen to you from the outside world. So if you're gonna live hap p happily. Ever after. What is your. What is your fate. What is your connection with what what is going before for good oriel amounts of them so that even in the moment that looks like a cliche or just a bit of know. Goodbye thank you. it's not. It's a really deep message about to everything that we do in the world. The real imagined human animal natural and what the entire circumstances don't within the container of the story and they don't go into future. Wow thank you. Nice to though. I which we talk listening to this final episode of the vintage books podcast this year. We hope you enjoyed hearing from our office of the feminist fairy tale series. There's a link in the episode description to find out more about the books. You can also find us at into books on twitter. Instagram and facebook a very happy holidays. Everyone vintage and we look forward to bringing you more podcasts. In the new year until then he reading boldly and thinking differently..

ella maurice endex rebecca wanda Cinders canelas cinderella alibaba maya frankenstein disney Instagram twitter facebook
"malorie blackman" Discussed on VINTAGE Podcast

VINTAGE Podcast

07:49 min | 6 months ago

"malorie blackman" Discussed on VINTAGE Podcast

"I'm working on it. And but yeah. But i also wrote because or after i wrote it. I heard from so many people who said fairytales have so much compelling magic etc but the principles in them are so terrible we want to to show to our kids said doesn't reinforce that men hold power women must get married and you know the outcome of what happens to me in mind is very important. What happens to all the rest of you who gives gives a damn those really interesting Trade it for myself hud. We work out what we love about fairy tales and keep it in. Let go what we don't and that felt like that was a big part of the job. And you know angela you know end. There's so many versions said you know these are stories that have migrated mutated endlessly and so they feel incredibly available of course are the feminist rethinking of a lot of novels and things the wide sargasso sea. Jane eyre and things like that but you know there is some maybe more aggression in taking ownership of something written by individual and something that's claimed of just composted deep into the soil from which will grow. Yes yes exactly. We have so many questions from from our our audiences. Thank you so much everybody out there. I'm gonna delay even to them. The question from felicity which is ensure any trading. When do you think the presentation of evil in these fairytales has changed from the originals. Your versions do you think that is evil in these stories is just interesting because that's always an interesting word to think about this. Net wants to start us off. Yeah i don't think we should worry about evil in the sense in. We have to deal with it and it is in there. Of course there. There is evil and everybody needs to face that there's no point taking a pollyannaish view of the world. The world is as it is. And if it's in those very stories so i wanted to look at the female aspect all is being greedy and controlling aspect which she just wants to conceive in a consumer society in the after yet of face it head on a managed the store the fairy stories. Really the most wonderful container for all the explosive stove. It will hold. And that's why we trust it. You know why we trust our anyway. Because it's the it's the container the and you can everything in there In a safe space and let it let it do its work and people can come away with it and not burn to death or or disfigured they can manage it and that is a great thing. I think that all that all its various versions allows but in the fairy stories. It's really there so we don't have to sanitize it. Bleach it or back off. We can handle it within the container of the tail. Is this just this. This is either that rates for example in mallory story and will do a stress there. Is this very great sense of menace of horrible things about happen. I'm really interested in what you say. That internet book. But it doesn't have to be sanitized. It can be led to be there even evening. If you're writing this for a very young medians they love it. They lou sheldon patriotisms. Maverick because i i do feel to be on this. That the fairy stories. I grew up with we're brutal absolutely brutal charles perrault etcetera and And they will cinderella story. I read for example the what but he took one of the assistants torture. He'll also foot wood fifteen and the assistant so toes off so Fit into the slipper blood gushing everywhere which the princeton notice and so forth and and in one of the many versions little red riding hood i read. She goes eight in the end. You know so. I do feel that is the. I think we're doing our children a disservice pretending evil doesn't exist and it seems to me fairy stories already. Good way of as ginette said that. I'm presenting the not contain that safe space and place and and the beauty. I think for me going up. Because i absolutely adore ferries the beauty of the most that The way to overcome will was in the initial character. Nine times out of ten. It was in your character and if you kind and if you try to be good and so forth then generally you. You overcame evil but it was very important to recognize evil in the first place and i do feel the recent The recent move in some children's films for example where you have you have your villains and you have your body's but they can't be dispatched as they were. When i was a kid they have to. They have to stumble and fall to their deaths or something has to happen is not as not that. They are dispatched by the the the pr the protagonist of the pace it somehow their own evil undoes them. And an yes okay. That's it that's a message. But it's also i think i don't see anything wrong with the message that says sometimes you have to sign up and you have to actively fight against evil and i do. That's why size versus a fairy stories. I feel they they. They may have their place. But let's not lose the original tone and bites of the of the original. I mentioned just add. The people ages can can read these stories ninety. I really really enjoyed them. And i'm fifty two so it's obviously not just the children off but somebody here are says. I didn't have a name but thank you very much to this question. How is it different writing for children. As opposed to adults. I suppose to corolla to that would be if trying to write for age. It's what's the difference. mallory. I might stop start with us. That role As children and young adults anyway for me it was no different so basically my my starting point is what kind of story would. I've enjoyed reading as a child retain And what would have said to me. What what what. What would i got out of this and you know an into entertaining in itself. I see nothing wrong with just being entertaining in an of itself road so i. That's that's my starting point that he saw a sort of older children and teens and adults going to enjoy this. But i must admit as a wanting children and young adults. I'm very focused on. Okay this is my book for teens. This is a my book for opportunities for example and then tell the story and then are never ever talking down to children but talk you know having a conversation with them and kind of inviting them to come on board with the story i want to tell and have their discussions in you know as is them coming said it's sort of like inviting children to read them and then discuss the stories. Also what did you get out of that. What do you think was going on. How did his behavior affect the story. And and if you in a different way what was the the outcome of being and so on and there's so many good discussions that could be had for many of these folks so that that would be my approach..

lou sheldon Jane eyre ginette hud mallory angela charles perrault princeton
"malorie blackman" Discussed on VINTAGE Podcast

VINTAGE Podcast

06:30 min | 6 months ago

"malorie blackman" Discussed on VINTAGE Podcast

"Announcement. Welcome back to the vintage books podcast. I'm alex clark and in this episode on thrilled to talking to a plane. Writers mallory blackman combination the rebecca solnit and jeanette winterson these wonderful writers of all written stories for a new series of feminist retailing's vintage classics aminist revolution four provocative visiting and urging students they open fairytales remixed and revived. The children and mallory retails bloop. It has story blue blood communist. Shamsi retails the ugly duckling in her story duckling rebecca solnit retail cinderella in cinderella narrator and janette winterson retail. I'm clean wapo story over with compassion and three at that. This compensation is part of an online and with the british library. Vintage huge sense to them sharing the recording a blanket and drink and bleepers in some in some way to be grappling with this idea of the possibility of a fairytale as an active real nazi radical empathy of actually considering it from different angles and thinking okay so for example in in rebecca's retailing him cinderella that yes there are all these the stepsisters. We thought rapacious hideous cruel actually just went having their needs met once really asking themselves what they wanted out of their lives. How important was that for all of you. That's just to reimagine all the different participants in the fairy stories where we just see women. Essential protagonist usually Mallory i stopped with you because again. You've got this ambivalence non-picky not a new story. Well for me i. The phone part of this was saying around with the original. For example in the original when blueberry comes home and finds out that That his wife his new wife has gone into the room and he says i'm going to kill you now and then. She begs her out the sister to go and call to her brother so they can come and rescue her. An i have Nia has brothers in this but and and one of them who knows kind of what's going on in one who doesn't and thinking it's is. It sat playing around with Assumptions and perceptions that i love so much in in in the very so i think i think the beauty fairy stories from around the world is that they encompass all kinds of points of view will kinds of ways of telling etc Embiid's part of the reason. I think they endure. And i i sold for example someone today saying that creating ah retailing's a fairy stories perhaps Moves us away from the original and detract from the original. And i found a really interesting point of view because i thought but do unless it -obituates original inefficiencies. What we're doing here is creating the imaginings that sits alongside the original and as ginette said it's about the connection and the communication. It's about me. It's about kind of taking the folks for example and playing around them having fun with them. Why not and then sort of presenting a new ideas. And so i was. I wouldn't be very interested in doing a a cover version of something that was exactly the same as the original. Then why boorda. So if you're going to do a retelling ordinary imagination a reimagining you have to make it your own. And i think that's what i loved about. This allowed us to do that. But it's really interesting anticipating common ridiculing. We just have not on the original. I mean these stories. All kind of folk tales of consumer on the way they've existed in many versions and kind of the idea of original there might be for example the version the most famous at any point by hans christian andersen's ugly duckling for example book. But really they all kind of as genetic saying the archetypes. Absolutely i mean a i will be no these stories go to many different iterations but also one of the things you do. Adaptation is i think your asking people if they read your version inevitably. I think they're going to want to go back to the original as well. A lot of them syntax. You're drawing more attention to it And you know just to sort of pick up on what mary was saying. I think one of the things you'll do. We do adaptation. It can't be just for the sake of the has to be something you're doing. That is different while still honoring the original in some way and both way of doing that is to just shift focus. You know or or to to show a slightly different angle show with me with the docking. I was really interested in that relationship with the mother who i sits on the brings her into the world but that ultimately serve so abused for bringing the strange creature into the farmhouse that she does her back on her child. And i actually. That's a really rich and interesting thing and and the idea that that might obliterate the original is is such an odd one. Because you're just you you're creating different versions The thing that was already as you say a different version of something. That was already there rebecca. I wrote this four or at least with your great needs in mind. She's also devotee of your book. Men explain things to me that idea of actually hosting something onto someone to a younger generation to someone close to you without being tactic showing a different way of looking at the world through your work. How important is nasty. You know i did. I definitely did it for her now. Her younger sister. Maya fairytale and.

rebecca solnit alex clark mallory blackman Shamsi janette winterson jeanette winterson ginette mallory british library boorda Mallory rebecca Nia hans christian andersen mary Maya
"malorie blackman" Discussed on Desert Island Discs

Desert Island Discs

02:37 min | 3 years ago

"malorie blackman" Discussed on Desert Island Discs

"Song. These guys. Right. Dogs. Thank myself. I wonder. Do we? I'm strong what a wonderful world. So I'm going to give you the books no matter you get the bible and the complete works Shakespeare and what's going to be. I think it would have to be Jana. It's yours and a luxury. My ipad can. I think I've known. Absolutely. Okay. Be harsh. Could bicycle or something. I think that's probably what I'd take fine. You can have that. And if there was one disk that you would save from the waves, which one would it be? Louis Armstrong, because even if I were caused by by myself, I'd still believe that is still a wonderful world. It's yours Mallory. Blackman's. Thank you very much for letting your desert island discs. My pleasure. I hope you enjoy this dish desert on discs. You'll find over two thousand interviews with artists, musicians, scientists, sports stars, comedians, and more at BBC. Dot co dot UK, slash desert this, and I have a favor to ask. If you could rate and review the desert on discs podcast, it really helped other people fund us. Thanks again for this. This is the BBC. Hello. I'm Evan Davis, and I'm here to brief. You tell you about my new podcast. Sweet reason these polarized times debates on social media, a pretty shouting sometimes compelled to the extremes. So in six programs which trying a bit of an experiment will be trying to have reasonable discussions on the most emotive issues topics like patriarchy or whether people are too ready to take offence these days, identity politics, that kind of thing. I'll be with guests in the studio and out and about as well. And my mission is to foster agreement or at least to better understand disagreement. So do subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.

BBC Jana Louis Armstrong Evan Davis dot UK Blackman Shakespeare
"malorie blackman" Discussed on Desert Island Discs

Desert Island Discs

06:56 min | 3 years ago

"malorie blackman" Discussed on Desert Island Discs

"The best. This thing to me that was Gladys, Knight, Basou Mallory Blackman. How did you feel about you marrying? I'm presuming a very white Scotsman because he was a Scotsman. Yes, indeed. I'm so lucky because my mom and Neil's mum, they judge people by who they are, not the color of their skin or religion. Whatever is kind of, you know, take people as you find them. And so you know, Mali bless us 'cause she died a few years ago. She was wonderful. And my mom's things always is only makes you happy and he's Goodhew than that's all that counts. And you have said that you refuse to live out the cynicism that would actually would have been understandable and easy to adopt giving the treatments that you've been on the receiving end of the, you know, in the streets and at school, did you feel that then sort of being embraced absorbed by this Scottish family in some ways helped you to deal with the idea that everybody in the world had a horrible strain of racism running through. I felt a dealt with it before that when I was thirteen fourteen fifteen, I was very angry. Teenager. I kind of felt I'm not gonna live like that. I was becoming the very people I despised quite frankly. I mean, I'm and your anger was stoked by the racism. It was partly the racism is also when I was, I think. Was thirteen at times while thirteen and and part of it was because I, I was watching film, went to the cinema sat by myself because I used to go to the cinema lot by myself and it was Disney's Robin Hood of all things. And three guys came up behind me three white guys and to them grabbed my arm. So I couldn't move in the sexually assaulted me. And I and I was so former ties. I mean, they belong and they thought it was a big joke. I kind of managed to get away and ran ran away from floods of tears and absolutely traumatize, and it was kind of they were horrible. And then it was all white memo, horrible news what people were horrible and I got to the stage where I do. I really wanna live like this hating people because of their color. This very thing. The I object to people do it to me, and the thing that brought it home to me was there was a song I really loved called what you won't do for love by. I think his name's Bobby Caldwell and I love this own. And then I thought I to go and get his album, and I went into the record shop and I found one of his albums and he was a blonde guy. I'm member stemming is l. p. oh my God, he's live. And then I saw, are you. Are you really going to stop liking the song just because this guy's wide and that's been hit me how how far at full Innis his. That's when I kind of caught myself and I, no, this is silly and pseudo taught me a lesson about you. Judge people based on how that person is in you. Don't generalize describe their behavior to lie all what people are all black people, Chinese people or whatever. That's just ridiculous. Let's have some music melody. Then tell me about your seventh choice. Well, this is sing by my chemical romance and thank you Lizzie because she was the one who introduced me to this. I love the song because it says, you know what? You have a voice, and then anyone ever take that away from you and don't be afraid to stand up for what you believe in an even. You'll speaking and people hate you for what you're saying. Then if you believe that you have something to say, stand up and say as, and that's another love that message. Mike room, manse and sing. Sue Mallory, just over fifty years then on this earth. As you look back at your half century, are you satisfied with your achievement so far. I don't think satisfied is the right word. I, I still feel I have more to do are still feel this plenty of things I want to do. I want to kind of try and make my Mark. I mean, this is gonna sound really silly, but there was a really bad film and I was a child cold, the seven faces of Dr lower with Tony Randall. He was paying seven different characters. And one of the characters was someone called apple onea's who was blind, but he could actually tell people's futures in one city. Woman goes in once future. And she's, he says, well, basically tells us she's a silly woman. She's never made her Mark in this world and she dies. Nobody will ever know that she even existed. She'll be just forgotten and she's, she's never s- put a step out because she was afraid of putting a step wrong. And so and it's really strange because at bay of that film as always thought with me because I thought surely the point of life is leave the world better place, and you found it even a small. You can do it by smiling at strangers. So they feel good about their day. Doesn't have to be huge, huge things, but just about sort of treating people the way you'd like to be treated. And I kind of feel is not the point of being on this planet. So I'm certified, no, but I feel like I'm doing what I want to do. I'm writing, which is, you know, I'm one of these lucky at alz who's actually doing something that I love and only a few months into being children's laureate. Then I would you like to make your Mark? They're not the end of my two years. If one child comes up to me and says, we'll because of what you've done. I'm actually she reading now. I'm reading more than I was. Then I would feel okay, I, I've done some good there. My campaign might my aim is more children reading more. I've always said that and it's about encouraging more children to read and telling them that there's so many fantastic books out this. If you don't like reading, you just haven't found the right book few yet and is about letting children and teenagers discover books for themselves and you and they have the absolute right to read books more than once and they have the apps. Salute to put a book down after three chapters. I really firmly believe that that's what will encourage them to know that books are there for them and their friends, and it's not about read this. They get enough of that doing exams. Now you as the dreamer us, the person who's imagination is floating away you on a desert island. Will you be in any sense, practical? Will you be able to build a shelter. Because one of the books I used the carry around for years was the SAS humble home put your hand. So it was all about if you find yourself in the desert or your phone. So from the ticker, whatever this is how you civilized. So I hope so. I hope what have those skills? Let's have you piece of music then what are we going to hear? This is what a wonderful world by Louis Armstrong. And I've told my hobby that if I die before him, I want this played at my funeral. So I love this song.

Basou Mallory Blackman Mali Bobby Caldwell Neil Gladys Sue Mallory Louis Armstrong Disney Tony Randall Robin Hood Goodhew Innis Mark Lizzie Mike room apple fifty years two years
"malorie blackman" Discussed on Desert Island Discs

Desert Island Discs

08:35 min | 3 years ago

"malorie blackman" Discussed on Desert Island Discs

"The flower achie- wet from lack me by to leave song by Jennifer more with, hey, Kim home. So tell me Mallory Blackman this teacher, the careers teacher, she said to you, black people don't become teachers in Dade. Yes. She was one who had to write all university references as she said to me. Okay, Mallory. What you want to do and I'd had all worked out from the time. I was seven, eight. I wanted to be an English teacher. I wanted to teach English and impart this. My love and enthusiasm for English texts and my said, well, I want to go to goes miss college. I want to do an English drama degree, and then I want to be a teacher at the end of it. And she just looked me in the eye said, well, black people that become teachers. And she said, why don't you be a secretary instead? And I looked at it and I said, I don't wanna be sexy. I want to be an English teacher. I mean, no disrespect to secretaries, but that's not what I wanted to do. And then she said, well, she said, I'm sorry, I'm giving you reference for that. And she said, besides, I don't think you're gonna get your English level, which is nonsense because I've never felt in English. In my life. And so I remember looking at home thinking while show you won't cow and if anything, it made me work harder. But then she said, I'll tell you what, I'll give you a reference to do business studies at Pauline state. And because that's the only thing he would give me a reference for as far as higher education was concerned. That's what I ended up doing. How do you look back on it now? For years for about three or four years. I wasted my life hating her 'cause I thought she'd ruined my life. I look back at it now and if I met her, I would thank her. She did me a favor because she taught me that somebody stands in the way of what you really really want to do. You don't stand there. I'll giving with them and you certainly don't let them stop you. What you do is you find a way to go around them. And so an an I, I went to college and I did my, I did been studies for half a term and then I was ill and I was rushed to hospital and had to come back down to London to recuperate. So I gave up my place at college and then I got into goldsmiths. I applied off my own bat and I got in and for one reason I never went. But the point is it proved to me that actually I could do it. I could get into university. You've talked too much Maria boats about boots and school. And I had this idea from when I was sitting. What about a socially. Gregarious teenager. Did your boyfriend's enjoyed the schools? Not really. Actually, my first serious boyfriend was when I was nineteen and he was twenty four when he's my heavy. We've been to give cocoa. But I lived in my head and I was always getting total for having too much imagination of daydreaming. Mom really versing did when I sort of eleven twelve is not go to school with them leotards and tights and separates in my bag, sort of blackout fit. And I had this special bell which I'd adopted which utility Bill and the idea being that if kidnappers ever came into the school, I would run into the toilets dome this little hard in this outfit, and I would come out and I would do some action kind of Bruce Lee so and save the day. And for two years I walked with this uniform in my son's school satchel. My even my mum's just said, you always music Mallory black when we're on your choice of morning. Well, this is what's going on by Marvin Gaye and I love what it says and it's about you need to walk in someone else's shoes to really know them, but talk to them don't assume things and God knows we need some of this today because there's so many assumptions made about other people or other religions, or other races, or cultures or whatever. And it seems to me, we're talking less, I'm you should be talking more. Pick it side. Burnish. Children. What's going on engaged? So there you were with your Leotard in your, especially that did you Tilleke belt and you decided Mallory black men that for all your English exams that had been passed and passed with flying colors, you wanted to go into computing was that when I was rushed to hospital and had my pending out, I came down to London to recuperate and I gave up my place on this business studies course because it was not for me and I applied to go Smith had an exam of exam. I had an interview and I got in and I thought I'll defer entry for year and go and work and make some money. And then I'll start at goldsmiths. I started working at software house and I'd never even touched a computer before I started working there. When with this been then this is nineteen eighty one. How big with computers. They were huge, huge. I just loved it and I gave up my place that goes missing. I stayed in computing for nine years where you secretly writing poems, not stories, and again for my own amusement. But then when I was in my mid twenties, I had enough of computing then I thought, okay, what can I do? And I tried acting causes for walnut was a dead loss, absolute rubbish. But the are used to come up with sort of scenarios for improvise ations and after what it was a man of what you think we should do. So at the end of the course a said to me, have you ever thought about writing some of your ideas down because you come up with some very good ideas, and that's how I started on my writing classes and kind of try to get into it. So then when you wanted to take that step out of a mom. Sure. Pretty well paid job in the being financial markets analyst and in fulltime into writing. Did you worry about the cash? Did you think? I will play the gas Bill was an Amine, but I, I was so unhappy. It was taking its toll on me physically and mentally. I started having really bad nightmares not as wake up screaming and I was so desperately unhappy because I wanted to write. I didn't want to work in computing anymore. And so in the end because new, my hubby could see how happy I was. We made a deal that I would take a year off and I would try just right solidly for that year and see if I could make a go of it. But if I couldn't than not have to go back to computing. So I'm right. It was eighty two rejection letters. That's really about eight or nine different books when letter ET threes sorted on't doorman. Yes, we quite might what you tell me about that day. Oh, I still remember that because in every time the potion arrived at charging stairs and it was always dear Mallory. Blattman not suitable for our list and no, thank you and I had the person I meant charging downstairs tour open the letter, and it was the amount of Blattman we would love to publish your story. And I just did in the whole screen my head. I was so thrilled. I'm my hobby came charging, says, going, what's the matter? What's the matter. Just freaked out and it was one of the best days of my life. And after my third book was executive for publication, that's when I gave up my job. There was a very new authored, I think could gave you a little bit of encouragement when you went along to have your signed. Tell me about that. The color purple by this was the first book I read by a black author that featured black characters, and that was when I was twenty two. That's a hell of an age to get to. Before you see yourself reflected in the literature you're reading. And I remember she was doing a signing at the silver moon bookshop, and I, I don't care if I have to queue up all night. I'm gonna meet this woman till I stood there with my heart that book finally got to the front of the queue, and I said, could you right? Don't give up in it, and she said, I can't that. What does that mean? And I said, well, I really want to be a writer, but I'm getting so many rejection letters and she just looked at me. She said, don't you dare give up? And she wrote to Malvy, don't give up Alice Walker and I thought, well, I can't give up now. Won't tell me. Thank you. Let's have some more music than Mallory Blackman. What are we going to hear on Europe? Sixth, yes. This is the best thing that ever happened to me by Gladys Knight. And the reason I picked this is because it's for my hobby Neil. And that's what he is. He's the best thing that ever happened to me. The

Mallory Blackman London Jennifer Marvin Gaye Gladys Knight Europe Dade Blattman Kim Pauline state secretary Alice Walker Maria Bruce Lee Malvy writer executive Smith analyst
"malorie blackman" Discussed on Desert Island Discs

Desert Island Discs

08:20 min | 3 years ago

"malorie blackman" Discussed on Desert Island Discs

"This. These songs of freedom. Why. John songs. But money and redemption song soon. Mallory Blackman you have said that when you were a young child, you thought the world was your friend. Tell me about where you were born? I was wanting Clapham and then we moved to Beckenham. So I went to school in Beckenham. And what do you remember about those? Very early years going to the park and playing and and school. And I remember my primary school learning French and loving there, and I used to have a piano in a back room. I used to love sitting there and just a little tinkering away. My very earliest memories of my dad buying me a walkie talkie doll, and he pulled the cord and he's thin came towards me arms outstretched gain, mama, mama, and I went screen what head out in through in our open fire and my dad was just staring at me not knowing whether to laugh or screaming had come over from berbie. Does your mother worked here as a seamstress, your father was a bus driver. What was their plan in coming to Britain, a better life, the same as old sort of wind rush generation. It was coming to England. For her life, more opportunities for their children. And I, you know, I think it was one of these things where you you come across in, you think it's going to be a certain way and it's not, and it's a struggle. But that said, even with all the things I went through, I think I had to easy than my mom and dad when I came over here. But my daughter certainly has an easier the me. So we've reached generation. I do feel things get better and they, they had you hear your mother here, but you had siblings who had been left at home and wear. The plan was quite commonly as often happens to bring them over and they did come over when they were. I think eight and ten. That's right. Sister way that must have been a massive change for them? It was. I mean, my sister says, now that she or she remembers his how great was how cold it was and how much she hated cornflakes. And I was so excited coming back from heath, and I'm sitting in the column talking to them. They said they couldn't understand a word. I was saying, so I was talking really quickly and all of a sudden they went out of Houston, lack cents about three years old. My sisters. I would have been five. And you mentioned they're sort of tinkling on the piano and enjoying French in school. You were very engaged little girl where you you like learning? I, I, I'm still do. That's why they're all these different courses every year. And we had a set of encyclopedia britannicas which kind of ubiquitous for black families in that time. And we had books on science and nature, all kinds of nonfiction books. My dad wasn't a fan of fiction books. He thought they were complete and utter waste of time. And his attitude was it's not real. It's not true. You need to live in the real world Mallory, and so he refused to buy fiction books, but he his thing was education, education, education, and reading the newspaper and learn facts. And I, I think he was wrong in the, I think I learned more about people and being able to walk in someone else's shoes and see through someone else's eyes from fiction books, and I ever did from nonfiction, let's have some more music. What on your search? Tell me about this while this is right said Fred, five minute Crippen ins. And I chose this one because this is the first song I remember listening to on the radio that made me. Love howl with laughter. And even now I defy anyone to listen to this and not have a smile on their face. Together, one gender in steady as we go. Shifted Putin even lifted where he was getting nowhere and Xiao Wei at a competency and write said, prayed, give shot the jolly up Tom jolly from the bowl below. Off this even complained in way was getting nowhere and Xiao Wei competency, Johnny. That was burned Krivine's and right said pride, you knew every single word. Well, that should be have a playlist, but we have a dinner parties, our house, we have a playlist and it's kind of soulful music clinic mix of music. But we always hope very crippling somewhere and put it on shuffle. Now you've said that when you devote ten, you realize that the world was not happy ever after. Why was that. I think my mom and dad were going through difficulties with their marriage. I mean, they spit up when I was thirteen and it was a very acrimonious split, but it was also things happening to me. I kind of walked down the vote in, I'd be I've a spat or people telling me to go back to where I came for more, and I think what Clapham gimme the bus then. So you know, it was a hard time before I kinda think most people were friendly, and then I kind of went to the opposite extreme and saw that most people weren't, and I didn't believe in happy ever asked. I wasn't seeing it reflected in my own home life and living through that. When you're in your early listen years than I, it's quite often the case that teenagers will turn in on themselves. What did you do with that sense of frustration and disappointment and angst about the world? I started keeping a diary. I didn't realize it at the time, but it was a really good way of getting into the habit of writing every day, but I pulled all my feelings into the diary. I would write stories and poems. Mostly poetry and fat, and I kind of felt called account talk to anyone about this and some of the stuff in this full of bitterness and anger. That's how I felt at the time. Were you in to Royce school? I, I never got discouraged from doing it and some of them McQuay a you. If you're not writing stories kit going, we'll we'll kind of give you feedback. So I've always had wonderful English teachers in class reunion, courage to come up to the Fronton read the might. I wrote a poem when I was in my junior school, the cool the jungle, nine member the last two lines and it wasn't particularly good, but my teacher light it and she said, oh mammy. You can meet the parents evening and she's got me to the front of the class and said, okay, Rita out then. And I stood then I wouldn't say win should call a Mallory. And I said, I don't. And she said, well, why not my said, I'm show and everyone cracks up nothing. I'm never going to write another him again, but luckily I got over it, but it was sort of horror story in the I love writing, but I didn't want to. I didn't wanna share my stuff, but it was the same. I started writing and I joined a ways into writing class and my shooter said to me, I would never read my stuff out. She'd go round and call him, and then she say, okay, I mean, it got to me, say, manager, you want to read your work and I'd say, no, thank you, not this week and every week it was. No, thank you. Not this week and after terminal hall, she got fed up with me and just look me in your and said, Monory. Do you want to be a writer? And I said, more. Than anything else in the world. And she said, well, then you can have to shit. Okay. Off the port love and everyone cracking up. Nothing on may fading kind of figured it was funny, but fading absolutely mortified, but it was the best piece of advice that ever received my love because it's one of those things about if you want to do something go for, it don't don't, you know, through a hamlet and are about just go for it. Let's have some music. Tell me about your fourth choice. What's this? Oh, well, this is the flower to it from lack may by Delhi. I used to piano lessons when I was younger and I gave them up, and then I heard this and it made me want to take up the piano again. And it is one of those songs that I hear, and it just brings a sense of calm and peace over me. The

Beckenham Mallory Blackman Xiao Wei Clapham John England Royce school berbie Britain Houston Krivine Delhi Putin Tom jolly terminal hall writer Rita Fred Crippen
"malorie blackman" Discussed on Desert Island Discs

Desert Island Discs

08:49 min | 3 years ago

"malorie blackman" Discussed on Desert Island Discs

"There's this is the BBC highs. Kristy, young here, desert island discs is taking its usual summer break. So we thought we'd take this opportunity to showcase just a few programs from our extensive back catalog. And as this is a podcast, the music has been shortened for rights reasons. This week. My guest is the writer Mallory Blackman who I interviewed in twenty thirteen. My castaway this week is the writer Mallory Blackman a prolific and multi-award-winning author. She has powered her way to success not just through talent, but dogged determination and perseverance to from the careers mistress who told her black people don't become teachers to the eighty two rejection letters she received before she was published. Significant parts of our life seemed to have been spent proving people wrong at technology was her first career was in computing. As a writer, her books have tackled challenging, seems bullying teenage, pregnancy, racism, and terrorism. Currently, children's lawyers, her own formative years were spent in south London, whereas a little girl, she went from thinking, everyone was her friend to feeling as a teenager, but the world was her enemy. She says, goot stories, made me reassess the world and people as I thought I knew them great stories made me reassess myself. So Mallory Blackman, assessing ourselves. I think that's a very tricky thing to do. And what would you have put in the introduction that I didn't. I think that was a beautiful introduction Bank. You terms of an assessment of who you are, how would you sum yourself up? I'm still working that out. You know, the certain things. I think I'm not sure how I feel about that. So I think it's an ongoing process, but I think that's the way it should be really children. And particularly teenagers are who use specialize in writing four. And I would say that teenagers are are just about as tough as it gets in terms of an audience as a readership for them. How do you judge the right subjects in the right tone? I go for first and foremost. I go for the subjects that I would have been interested in a teenager all the topics I'd love to read about as a teenager. I hated it when people would say, oh, but you understand that and all they patronize you. So I desperately trying not to do that in my books. And what were you reading a teenager? Well, there were very few books for teenagers when I was growing up at quite a while ago. And so I went straight from the age of ten, eleven. I went straight onto reading adult books, and I was lucky because I had a really good. Librarian because I was dumb library so often. And she gave me a Jane Eyre when I was eleven and the first couple of chapters can, and then I got hooked and I loved it so much. And then I read Rebecca, and then I've devours George Eliot and so many others and then got into Shakespeare. I'd reach rechecked place for myself and I went some highly unsuitable things for eleven year olds like Jacqueline Susann and Dennis Wheatley empowered Robbins and so on. One of those people who can't give a book away. Once you've read it, do you have all your books afraid? I do. Yes. We have a fifteen thousand odd books in. One big hunk is not actually. They're just pulled up all over the floor bookcases back tobacco mill in the attic in every room. Pardon both rooms have bookcases in it. I've read that you one of these people who likes to learn something new every year, what? What are you learning this year? Well, actually I'm continuing with my Chinese. I started Chinese for term two years ago and last year it was drumming. I kind of dabble in things. It's a bit dilettante of me, but but I do like to kind of do things that stretch my mind. My imagination stretch my abilities. Speaking of your imagination, I would think being the sort of writer that you are, you've imagined your island that you to be castaway. Yes. What are you picturing a tropical island, why it sands blue skies blue sea and absolute peace and quiet. Okay. Let's listen to some of the museum that's gonna company you on this other Dillard's ending island. Tell me about your first choice this morning. What are we going to hear? Maller we're gonna hit. You. Uniting nations together by Ladysmith black Mambazo, Joseph, shabby LA. LA is the the leasing is such a brilliant songwriter and I just love the sentiment of this and I love the acapella sound and I love the message in this song as well too. More. Ladysmith black men Mizzou and Abbas's way uniting nations together. So Mallory Blackman you have. Well, I've got done here. You've published over sixty books now how many exactly I think it's about sixty sixty one now. Okay. I'm not that I still hunting off the fifty two on this smokers. Obviously that would take too long, but I think probably it would be fair to say that you are best known for the northern crosses series. It is for those who haven't really sort of disturbed pinned fantasy that has centered on discrimination and racism and very cleverly. It's all in reverse. It is the whites who are discriminated against in the western world and how much did you mind you to experience for the the heart of that book far more than any of my other books. Actually Callum, the white boy in it. Some of the things he goes for based on real experiences. I had like the first time I traveled. I cars on a train in the ticket inspector, accused me of stealing the ticket and and that was done of quite frail because looking at me and I was so embarrassed by thought this news gain have. Did you get this ticket from which you get this ticket form? Did you stand up to him. I did in that. I said, I bought it. I bought it, but it was. It was. It was one of those things where I was absolutely mortified and felt totally humiliated and knee and economy. I'm wiped off and things like sort of saints. My history teacher, how come you never talk about black scientists and inventors and achievers in history. And she said, because there aren't any and of, I didn't know enough at the time. This has been, I was sort of thirteen fourteen to comebacker how and sort of mentioned a few names talking about history. Let's talk from him about recent history. The third Buchen in that series called Checkmate's caused a very big stir when it was it was published in two thousand and five. It was just a, I think it was a week ahead of the London terror attacks a female character in your book is being groomed by her uncle to become a suicide bomber. You should extrordinary prescence there. What occurred to you at the time of the bombings, knowing that you had just published this book with with that in it? It's one of these shocking things. There's been. I was working in computing and I worked in the city. It was around the time of the IRA mainland bombing campaign, and I just remember how terrifying that was where you you kind of go to 'cause you had to, but it was one of those things where you saw is the day where I sort of catcher Bom. So of course, men this happened. They were calls from various 'em piece would never read the book of naturally that the book should be banned and obvious trying to cash in, etc. And I just saw cash in I wrote this, this is taking me two years to riot, but in terms of using you, imagine nation to create that scenario. Did you feel that you were in touch with something that was possible and likely to happen in Britain? Because so many people felt a sense of extreme shock that we could home grew our own suicide bombers, even put another time at happen? I think so. I mean with I did that with north and crosses because Callum does join what he calls freedom fighters. But what what sort of society at large coast terrorists and is very key to me to present both points of view in that book. And it is this idea of if you don't feel that you are part of society that you have a stake in society is very fertile ground for extremist to say, we'll come to our side. Let's do something about it more music than Mallory Blackman. Tell me about your second disc of the morning. What's this? Well, this is redemption song by Bob Marley, and I love Bob Marley. I love the way it's arranged. It's just him and his guitar. And the words I feel is so moving. Keila province. We stand aside and look. Some say it's just part fit. We've got food Bill to bull. Won't you hear this.

Mallory Blackman writer London Callum Bob Marley Ladysmith BBC Kristy LA Jacqueline Susann IRA George Eliot Jane Eyre Maller Dillard Rebecca Bill Britain Checkmate