27 Burst results for "Mallon"

"mallon" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:45 min | 3 months ago

"mallon" Discussed on WTOP

"Even double double purchase them. Celebrating Halloween on Marion friar town Plaza in downtown Wheaton, Sarah Jacobs WTO P news. The season America is expected to load up on 600 million pounds of Halloween candy. Some companies trying to make it easier to recycle the wrappers. Mars Wrigley, sending thousands of free bags to consumers to collect plastic wrappers and mail them back to especially recycler, Rubicon technology, sending 5000 free boxes to schools and businesses to do the same. Can you make her say they're working on making new packaging that would be more easily recyclable. And if you're baking a pumpkin pie for Thanksgiving this year, you're filling may have had an echo friendly start. More farmers like Bill saws in central Illinois are attracting natural pollinators like these and butterflies to improve the earth the gourds are grown in. You've saved the soil, you save burning all kinds of diesel fuel, which is rather expensive this year. And you don't lose soil to windy erosion and soil erosion and that sort of thing. Rachelle mallon is an environmental specialist at Nestlé. We're helping make sure that that land is able to produce a crop and feed the world. Walmart says it will support 30,000 Midwest farmers in their transition to regenerative farming by 2030. Deborah Rodriguez, CBS News. Sports is next on TOP. Tell you how the commanders did, and last minute fashion. Ten 13. It's a new day. Because COVID vaccines just got a big update. So all the big stuff coming up this fall? Well, now you can say, you pet I'll be there. Because updated COVID vaccines protect against both the original COVID virus and omicron. And everyone 5 and older can get one,

Marion friar town Plaza Sarah Jacobs Mars Wrigley Rubicon technology Wheaton Rachelle mallon Nestlé America Deborah Rodriguez Illinois Walmart CBS News Midwest
"mallon" Discussed on Strange and Unexplained with Daisy Eagan

Strange and Unexplained with Daisy Eagan

02:31 min | 6 months ago

"mallon" Discussed on Strange and Unexplained with Daisy Eagan

"It. Shocking. So, soper turned his attention to the other members of the household and narrowed in on the cook. Irish emigrant Mary mallon, who had been hired by mister Warren on August 4th, just a few weeks before the first typhoid victim in the house fell ill. I tried to find out everything I could about her, but there was not much to learn. Misses Warren said she was a good plain cook or wages were $45 a month, and that she'd been obtained from misses stricker's. Stricker's was a well-known employment agency on 28th street. The cook had not fraternized with the other servants, and they knew little about her. She was not particularly clean. Her name was Mary mallon. That was about all. I have a couple things to say about that. One, $45 and 1906 adjusted for inflation is about $1500. $1500. A week. Which means a lot of people in this country are making about as much as they did over a hundred years ago. Which has nothing to do with anything really, but neither did the information about how much she was paid to begin with. Just something to put in your pipe and smoke. Two, she was not particularly clean. L O L first of all was anyone particularly clean in 1906. I mean, have you ever seen gangs of New York? And addendum B how filthy was she that it was outwardly and immediately noticeable? All I can think of is pig pen from the peanuts cartoons. Why is a well-known employment agency hiring out a cook who was, quote, not particularly clean. Of all the positions, cook seems pretty high up there on the please send someone clean list. Okay, so stinky Mary was now in soper's crosshairs, but he couldn't figure out how she was transmitting the typhoid bacteria considering that food is generally cooked, killing off most bacteria, including salmonella. Then, after going over Mary's menu for her time at the warrens, he found the culprit and I sincerely apologize ahead of time for ruining one of the last pleasures some of you may still have in this cruel cruel world.

Mary mallon mister Warren soper stricker Stricker Warren stinky Mary New York cook salmonella Mary
"mallon" Discussed on Strange and Unexplained with Daisy Eagan

Strange and Unexplained with Daisy Eagan

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"mallon" Discussed on Strange and Unexplained with Daisy Eagan

"In New York City alone at the turn of the 20th century, there were about 4000 cases per year. Most cases were found in the super overpopulated lower east side of Manhattan where thousands of European immigrants lived crammed in filthy, unsafe, unsanitary tenements, often without proper plumbing, or any plumbing. When I say the living conditions down there were deplorable, I mean they were truly dickensian. According to a piece about tenement living from the Smithsonian American art museum, quote, the tenement house act of 1901 helped to improve conditions for tenement tenants. The law required the removal of outhouses and the installation of indoor plumbing and lighting. These improvements proved costly and many landlords resisted making the necessary changes. To offset the cost, landlords increased the rent of their tenements. For those who could not meet their rent, they were swiftly evicted from their homes, their belongings unceremoniously dumped onto the sidewalks. But this was oyster bay, not the filthy lower east side of Manhattan, president Roosevelt vacation in oyster bay for God's sake. So when 6 of the 11 people in this one house came down with typhoid fever, the entire population of the well to do community was like not in my house bob and local health experts swooped in to find the cause of the sudden epidemic, which was normally associated with filthy poor people and not the well heeled oyster bay set. The sewer water was dyed to see if it contaminated the drinking water. It didn't. The local shellfish and milk supply were examined, all to no avail. It is interesting to note how quickly and thoroughly problems are investigated when the people involved have money. Isn't it? Thousands of people in the lower east side tenements were coming down with typhoid fever every year and their response was basically a hearty shrug and a what can you do? The owners of the home mister Warren had rented were concerned that having the reputation as the typhoid house was going to be bad for business. So they hired George soper, a sanitary engineer who had come to be known as an epidemic fighter. According to his memoir, soper said that after checking the notes on the previous investigation at oyster bay. The nearest explanation was at an old Indian woman who lived on the beach, had brought polluted shellfish to the household. Check that off your bingo cards, kids. When in doubt, blame an old Indian woman. But this theory would not stand the rigorous inquiry which I gave it. Shocking. So, soper turned his attention to the other members of the household and narrowed in on the cook. Irish emigrant Mary mallon, who had been hired by mister Warren on August 4th just a few weeks before the first typhoid victim in the house fell ill. I tried to find out everything I could about her, but there was not much to learn. Misses Warren said she was a good plain cook or wages were $45 a month, and that she'd been obtained from misses stricker's. Stricker's was a well-known employment agency on 28th street. The cook had not fraternized with the other servants, and they knew little about her. She was not particularly clean. Her name was Mary mallon. That was about all. I have a couple things to say about that. One, $45 and 1906 adjusted for inflation is about $1500. $1500. A week. Which means a lot of people in this country are making about as much as they did over a hundred years ago. Which has nothing to do with anything really, but neither did the information about how much she was paid to begin with. Just something to put in your pipe and smoke. Two, she was not particularly clean. L O L first of all was anyone particularly clean in 1906. I mean, have you ever seen gangs of New York? And addendum B how filthy was she that it was outwardly and immediately noticeable? All I can think of is pig pen from the peanuts cartoons. Why is a well-known employment agency hiring out a cook who was, quote, not particularly clean. Of all the positions, cook seems pretty high up there on the please send someone clean list. Okay, so stinky Mary was now in soper's crosshairs, but he couldn't figure out how she was transmitting the typhoid bacteria considering that food is generally cooked, killing off most bacteria, including salmonella. Then, after going over Mary's menu for her time at the warrens, he found the culprit and I sincerely apologize ahead of time for ruining one of the last pleasures some of you may still have in this cruel cruel world. The food that had made the 6 people in the oyster bay vacation home so sick was ice cream. With fresh peaches. So, soper did some old school contact tracing and found out that sure enough, everywhere that Mary went. Her poop was sure to go. So profound no fewer than 7 families Mary had cooked for who had experienced sudden inexplicable outbreaks of typhoid while Mary was cooking for them. In each case, Mary peaced out shortly after everyone got sick. To be clear, it's not like Mary knew she was the cause of the illnesses. She had no idea she.

oyster bay mister Warren Mary mallon soper Manhattan Smithsonian American art museu George soper typhoid fever New York City Roosevelt fever stricker Stricker stinky Mary Warren Mary salmonella New York
"mallon" Discussed on Talk Is Jericho

Talk Is Jericho

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"mallon" Discussed on Talk Is Jericho

"Of cancer. And the production company flew me out for three weeks, and I spent the last three weeks with him right before death. After he found out he had cancer, he was dying. I mean, everything amped up times like thousand. I mean, those last interviews was last three weeks. You know, he was ready to talk about everything. And he was just like a mess, you know? He knew he was dying. He knew it. He starts crying and says, what have I done and all those sort of things that you see on the show? Can I go back to the 70s here? How long did these crimes go was the course of a year two years? It was all 79. Yeah, so bitter got paroled. It was late 78 and then Norris got out January of 79. Norris actually went to Colorado and raped a woman one month after he was out on parole in Colorado. Wow. Yeah, just one one. And he came back and you know, that's when they got the band started going up the mountains and launching. But yeah, it was the course of the whole year of 79. Yeah, I was just looking at some research here and actually it says it started in June and Halloween might have been the last one and they were apprehended in November so all of this kind of happened over a 6 month period, which is pretty rare for serial killers as well. Usually it goes over the course of time, but these guys were just on a killing spree. Yeah, they were on a killing spree. I mean, they were hunting every single week trolling and hunting for girls. There were a lot of failed attempts too. There was Jan mallon got mace in the face with some chemicals and they tried to drag her in the band. She was like three feet from the van and her screams, the neighbors came out. She was saved. Oh, wow. Yeah. I talked to her. Her story is unbelievable. Kristen, who was interviewed for the show, but she didn't make it in the show. You can actually go on NBC dot com and there's a clip of her talking her experience. Norris actually picked her up hitchhiking she's going to a graduation. He pulled behind the school and said I'm going to rape you and started choking her. And she was almost unconscious that somebody walked by the car and Nora set back up, pretended like he was just sitting there and she was able to jump out of a half open window. But she left her purse in the car, and her first had a piece to her house and said, is lost return to Kristen messenger with her address. Oh my gosh. I know. North called bitker said, you know, this girl is not my face. She just escaped. And bitter her goes, okay, we're gonna go to her house and kill her. By a miracle, they do go to the house to kill her, but she lived on prospect street. They were dando beach, and there's a north and south and they went to the wrong one in the House was bacon with a for sale sign. So they thought it was, you know, she was no longer a threat. She was literally saved twice in one day. I mean, some of these girls stories are just incredible. They went to college campuses too. They were three failed inductions on his birthday. He was trying to get himself a birthday present he called it. Oh my gosh. Yeah, literally is free. I mean, they were hunting like nonstop. There's one girl on the show who the same thing, but she actually had a kind of a relationship with was it with Norris? Yeah, vinegar, vinegar. Tell us about her story. It was very interesting as well. So Tracy was 19 living at the Scott hotel and she was living in room ten and bitter lived in room 11. So right next door, like she talks about, she had called her parents that come home and they said pretty much know you're on your own, and she's pregnant. What's so weird? And they point this out in the show is here's tracing pretty much alone in pregnant and broke right before 2018 when he gave up the bodies in the buried evidence. I was living with a guy my boyfriend who was madly in love with. He had gotten pregnant, he had kicked me out, told me to get an abortion. I had lost my job because the company just went bankrupt. So here I am, I'm homeless. Jobless, you know, pregnant and alone. You kind of the same circumstances that Tracy was in 1979. Ironically. Wow. And my ass is said to me, he was like, you know, if you have that baby, you'll never go on to be a criminologist. He'll never go on to write a book or your dreams will never come to fruition if you have a kid. So it kind of put the fear of God into me. And I had $1500 to my name. And I said, screw it down, you know, I'm going to go for my dreams. One last time. I'm going to try at least. So I used that $1500 to fly to San Quentin, you know, for curation of 6 weeks to interview these guys. Wow. I was 7 and a half months pregnant, like literally bopping on death row, you know, and I was like, you know, I just got to do these interviews and do something with my life. You know, I have a kid on the way. And now I'm about to be broke. Like dead broke from spending the money to do this, but thank God it all played out so perfectly because it was me being 7.

Norris Jan mallon cancer Colorado Kristen messenger bitker dando beach Scott hotel Kristen Nora NBC Tracy House San Quentin
"mallon" Discussed on Harvesting Nature’s Wild Fish and Game Podcast

Harvesting Nature’s Wild Fish and Game Podcast

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"mallon" Discussed on Harvesting Nature’s Wild Fish and Game Podcast

"The in looking at it like water retention is probably one of the biggest things That's that's about it and you do with weight and other things like that but a like the common persons probably not going to have access to a freeze dried a freeze dryer. I guess is what they're formerly called in the commercial world but there's many of them available. No no no. Yeah but dehydrated like we've got some. We're gonna talk about a couple of recipes here. Like a couple of different takes on a backpacking food and like field food. We can classify it as and you get dehydrated generally the majority of people if you make beef jerky you have dehydrated. So you can expand that in some ways with some creativity to make some some dehydrated food. But what comes to mind when i tell you food like been. What do you think most of it. I was kinda thinking about columnists earlier. Like you gotta try to eat as close to how you in person but then like normally when you're not in the field But then i don't know a lot of it is just not good at this point. I feel like. I've been joking. That i feel like i've came full circle where they used to just eat was like doing. This had no money. Rama noodles instant mashed and just like pass out and that cost like forty cents a meal and we'd have like one day where we'd have mallon house you know because it was like a two week trip and but now it's like i've tried a lot of them and most of them are just not good like you eat and you're like that was. That was not an enjoyable meal for the. We're we're gonna we're gonna come back to your top three so be thinking about that but I don't know call them. What do you think when somebody's like. Hey man i'm going to go. Pick up some backpacking food. What comes to mind Mountain house is probably the first one that comes to mind..

mallon Mountain house
"mallon" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"mallon" Discussed on The Book Review

"<Speech_Female> He's kind of <SpeakerChange> my all star <Speech_Female> Edith <Speech_Female> Wharton. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> I love Wharton too. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Oh, sorry. <Speech_Female> <Silence> Wharton hive. <SpeakerChange> Wharton <Speech_Female> hive, <Speech_Female> what about some <Speech_Female> recent favorites for <Speech_Female> both of you, <SpeakerChange> Molly? <Speech_Female> I <Speech_Female> loved a book called <Speech_Female> hashtag good guy <Speech_Female> with gun by Jeff <Speech_Female> charn <Speech_Female> is the name of the author. <Speech_Female> Talk <Speech_Female> about a brilliant weirdo. <Speech_Female> This is <Speech_Female> a it kind of flew <Speech_Female> under the radar when it <Speech_Female> came out, but <Speech_Female> I gave it <Speech_Female> a great review. I thought <Speech_Female> it was super original, <Speech_Female> super funny. It kind <Speech_Female> of deals with issues <Speech_Female> of masculinity <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> race and <Speech_Female> class, and <Speech_Female> it's quite <Speech_Female> unconventionally <Speech_Female> written, but <Speech_Female> also very <Speech_Female> page Turner. <Speech_Female> I loved that one. <Speech_Female> I loved <Speech_Female> the <Speech_Female> somewhat controversial, <Speech_Female> I guess, Patricia lockwood <Speech_Female> book, no one is <Speech_Female> talking about this <Speech_Female> great novel <Speech_Female> about <Speech_Female> the <Speech_Female> magic and the <Speech_Female> disenchantment of <Speech_Female> the Internet <Speech_Female> and I loved <Speech_Female> intimacies by Katie <Silence> kitamura, <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Alexander, <SpeakerChange> what about you? <Silence> What have you read this year that you've <Speech_Female> loved? <Speech_Female> I spent the pandemic <Speech_Female> in a sort of <Speech_Male> crouch of escapism <Speech_Male> avoiding <Speech_Male> the 21st <Speech_Female> century <Speech_Male> and the book I <Speech_Male> love most this <Speech_Male> year was when I <Speech_Male> picked off at Brooklyn <Speech_Female> stoop, which was <Speech_Female> Anthony Trollope's <Speech_Female> the eustace diamonds. <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> it sent me <Speech_Female> into a complete <Speech_Male> trial of obsession <Speech_Female> that I've yet to <Speech_Female> emerge from. And <Speech_Male> so far, <Speech_Male> this year I haven't found <Speech_Male> any fiction to <Speech_Male> equal it, <SpeakerChange> but that's <Speech_Male> not the fiction writers <Speech_Female> fault. I've only read <Speech_Female> the first palace or <Speech_Female> novel. And I said, <Speech_Female> they're on hold <Speech_Female> in my brain <Speech_Female> for some theoretical <Speech_Female> time <Speech_Female> where I'm going to <Speech_Female> be, I don't know <Speech_Female> in a villa somewhere <Speech_Female> for a month with nothing <Speech_Female> else to do and I'll read <Speech_Female> the entire thing. <Speech_Female> Of course, <Speech_Female> that moment hasn't come. <Speech_Female> All right, <Speech_Female> so let's <Speech_Female> end with <Speech_Female> fun question, <Speech_Female> which is, <Speech_Female> besides books <Speech_Female> which are obviously everything, <Speech_Female> what <Speech_Female> other art forms, <Speech_Female> media, <Speech_Female> things <Speech_Female> do you like to read, <Speech_Female> do see <Speech_Female> in general? Are <Speech_Female> you a dance person <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> or a classical <Speech_Female> music person <Speech_Female> or a theater person? <Silence> Molly <SpeakerChange> tell us. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I'm a movie person. <Speech_Female> I <Speech_Music_Female> really love nothing better <Speech_Female> than sitting <Speech_Music_Female> down with a bucket <Speech_Female> of snack <Speech_Female> in front of me and <Speech_Female> mechanically <Speech_Female> moving my hand <Speech_Female> from the snack to my <Speech_Female> mouth while being <Speech_Female> totally and sore <Speech_Female> sold by <Speech_Female> what's happening on screen. <Speech_Female> And I've recently <Speech_Female> been on a <Speech_Female> binge of John <Speech_Female> Carpenter movies <Speech_Female> of discovered <Speech_Female> the great slasher <Speech_Female> films <Speech_Female> of the 70s <Speech_Female> and 80s and have been <Speech_Female> slowly working my way <Speech_Female> through those, which is a great <Speech_Female> palate cleanser. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> And Alexandra. <Speech_Female> As <Speech_Female> you might expect <Speech_Female> from a biographer <Speech_Female> lane stretch, I <Speech_Female> adore the theater, <Speech_Female> I particularly adore the <Speech_Female> musical theater, and I'm <Speech_Male> very much looking forward <Speech_Female> to the revival of <Speech_Female> Stephen sometimes <Speech_Female> company, the gender switch <Speech_Female> company <SpeakerChange> that is <Speech_Female> returning to Broadway <Silence> this fall. <Speech_Female> Whoo. <Speech_Female> Well, we will also <Speech_Female> look forward <SpeakerChange> to a lot <Speech_Female> more from both of <Speech_Female> you on books <Speech_Female> on this podcast <Speech_Female> and in the pages <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> of The New York Times. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Molly young, <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Alexander Jacobs. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Thanks so much for being here. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Thanks. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Thank you so much for <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> having us. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Remember there's more at <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> NY times dot <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> com slash books. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> And <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> you can always write to <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> us at books at <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> NY times dot com. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> I write back, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> not right away, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> but I do. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> The book review podcast <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> is produced by <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the great Pedro <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> rosato from <Speech_Music_Female> head stubborn media <Speech_Music_Female> with a major <Speech_Music_Female> assist from my colleague <Speech_Music_Female> John Williams. <Speech_Female> Thanks for listening <Speech_Music_Female> for The New York Times. I'm Pamela Paul.

Patricia lockwood Wharton Anthony Trollope Turner Jeff Katie Brooklyn Molly young Alexander Jacobs Alexandra The New York Times John Williams Pamela Paul
"mallon" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

05:06 min | 1 year ago

"mallon" Discussed on The Book Review

"But I have zillions of those stacked haphazardly around my room with post it notes attached to them and the post notes are cryptic and I've scribbled them to myself and they have notes about what might be interesting to New York Times readers and what I think is worth highlighting and sometimes there's a book that I think is worth directing people away from if it's not great, but mostly it's just I have an I have a room filled with books. It's very flammable. If someone wanted to take me out, they could just drop a match in my office, and I would be toast. I'm going to dwell a little bit on this paper question because you're far from the only annoying person. Most of the people on the bookstore, the book review, the people who handle features and news and the critics, much prefer print to electronic for work and often for pleasure and it's very hard sometimes for, I don't know, say people 18 or younger are just very high-tech forward people to understand how an old fashioned medium might be preferable to a newer one. Why? White paper. I think the young folk will come around. I mean, the thing about a book is that it's a perfect technology. It's kind of unimprovable. And for me, the thing about paper books is that I can't multitask while I'm reading a paper book, or as if I'm reading it on a screen. There's always that little temptation to go doink around on the Internet. And I just, any excuse I can take to avoid that temptation is very appealing. All right, next question, moving along that process. Another thing I think that people are really curious about when it comes to professional critics and reviewers is how do you read differently when you know you are reviewing something, as opposed to just having fun with a book? Alexander? I mean, the main thing is I take notes. I read quite quickly, so I might do one pass of a book where I'm not taking notes and then another one when I am, especially for fiction, but certainly when I'm reading just for fun, I'm not folding down corners or underlining or scribbling in margins or doing any of that nonsense. What about you Molly? What makes work reading different from play reading? Well, I'm a slow eater, actually. So I do the double read method where I will do one pass of a book where I'm just reading it for the kind of overall gestalt of the book and then once I know that I'm reviewing it, I will reread it with a pencil in my hands and I'll take notes and I'll be more actively kind of forming an evaluation in my mind rather than just absorbing it. Each critic of The New York Times has a kind of different taste, different areas of expertise, gently, of course, only reviews nonfiction, Dwight is our primary poetry person, but you're all pretty wide ranging. If you had to describe the areas that most interest you and that are your sweet spot, what would you say? Molly. Oh, God, I think my sweet spot is actually probably way too big..

The New York Times Alexander Molly Dwight
"mallon" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

05:06 min | 1 year ago

"mallon" Discussed on The Book Review

"What I find so interesting about that time is that the people who were making the most who were so lauded for the market value of their companies made so much of their value through underhanded practices. And they became the talk of the town because of it. They were the names that were mentioned in The Wall Street Journal on a daily basis, and that paradox, you know, to be ethical means to work from your basement, and to skirt ethics means to be a big name and make a big killing. Really is at the heart of the character in a to some extent the heart of the melancholy feeling that I have for that the book has for the country in the future of the country. All right, well, we have to leave it there. I will leave it to listeners to discover more.

The Wall Street Journal
"mallon" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"mallon" Discussed on The Book Review

"From a lack of sleep, huddling through the freezing dark and wanting to die long before bundling the first of those morning editions, he started looking for a new job almost immediately. By the time he graduated from high school, he had worked at a poultry farm, a lumber yard, the law Hoff grain mill on north avenue, and the refractory plant in tilton, a two mile walk. Ever a calling these jobs, thrilling at first, with the promise of more pay and future potential, they soon grew doll and proved short lived, premised as they were, on a simple exchange. My time for your money. Not even good money, really. One sent the bushel two bits an hour, $3 a day. But what amounted to pocket change and gave him a taste of power, ended up blinding Charlie for too long, false, gold for closing on too much, like college education. The law school degree, partnership at a law firm, pictured in his mind as a crystal decanter on a mahogany bar cart, or perhaps some steady climb of the corporate ladder a place in the academy or in the halls of power. More damnably still, pocket change prevented him from seeking any ticket out of that dead in town, as he was convinced he wanted what tethered him to it, a wife and child at age 19. Happily, he took jobs, quit jobs, got fired, walked into storage closets and meat lockers for getting what he came for. His mind always, on some more palpable dream. There we are with the jobs, the professions. There it is. You chose to set this novel during not one of the periods of disaster and heartbreak that we mentioned earlier in September 11th, some of the recent Trump administration crises or the pandemic, but you went back to the 2008, the good old 2008 financial crisis. What interested you about that period? And why that for the story? Well, what interested me for this story really was the fact that this guy Charlie Barnes in his basement being a financial adviser. I believe that I put him there and made him a far less significant financial figure than those who had made quite a killing, leading up to that time period. Because he had ethics. He has ethics. He wants to do right by his clients. He doesn't turn their accounts by selling and buying new investment vehicles for a commission. Charges them small fee, and he takes.

Hoff grain mill tilton Trump administration Charlie Charlie Barnes
"mallon" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

05:04 min | 1 year ago

"mallon" Discussed on The Book Review

"Enterpriser. You know, he wanted to make a killing. He wouldn't make it big. And so they had these two very different perspectives on work in the nature of work, and I probably just fall more naturally in my mother's camp, but I was always very interested in my father's dreaminess in his hope to make it big one day. And that kind of, I don't know, romantic illusion about what you can do out in the world. I mean, this is sort of symptomatic, I think of people with his generation, the sort of like mid century American white man who would have the world. If he wanted it the world was his oyster and he would go out and conquer it and be a kind of, you know, a Napoleon of the era or whatever. And ultimately, you know, it seemed to me like at least the way that it was promoted for men like my father, ultimately seemed to be kind of bankrupt. There was certainly not a lot of ethical judgment in market capitalism. And we've seen this come to bear, you know, the thing that passed for progress in my dad's age is now seemed the biggest impediment progress. And that switcheroo was reflected in the 2008 Great Recession when the book is set where you know, it suddenly seemed that all of the things that my father had dedicated his life to, were corrupt in some manner, or at least it was too easy to fleece the American public. And I think this was a wake-up call, at least it was for me. I want to go back to that period and your choice there and.

"mallon" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"mallon" Discussed on The Book Review

"Better than purity, the one that preceded it, which I think was the only one of let's say this big four, the four books of the last 20 years. The only one that I think you could get a failure would be purity. But I would say this is probably kind of up there with freedom. I still think the corrections is probably the best of the four. But I think that this is a book that one can engage with. I mean, I'm reading it as somebody who was the age of some of his characters, 50 years ago. You know, I was in college during the time he's writing about. And so I'm naturally reading it with a lot of memory in mind. I don't know how vivid or resonant the book will be for people who are younger and don't have living memories of that time. I'd be interested in seeing what younger reviewers and critics have to say about the book. But I do think there's a difference with this one. The writing in this book is a little bit looser. It's not so much a tour de force. I mean, he is a stylist friend, and he has a peculiar kind of lyricism. And this book has fewer figure 8s, the writing is not attempting to dazzle you in the same way that it is in some of the other books. And I have the feeling that that's deliberate. I don't think that's a slackening of his powers or his gifts. I think he's trying for a different sort of accessibility in this novel. And I think the book would be interesting to his devotees to people who have read a lot of him before now. I think it would be interesting for them to see a certain stylistic variants in this book. Tom, we have to go. I want to mention quickly that many of your own novels have been recently rereleased in paperback and just how listeners quickly, the title of your most recent novel. My most recent novel is called landfall. And it's the third volume in a trilogy, a political trilogy. I sort of become the chronicler of Republican catastrophe. It was a book called Watergate set, obviously, during the Nixon years, finale, which was set during Reagan's time and landfall is set during the time of Hurricane Katrina and the Iraq War. Obviously, that's very rich territory for fiction at Tom. Thank you so much again for being here. Okay, thank you very much fennel. Thomas Malin is the author of many novels, including most recently landfall, and he reviewed this week in the book review, the new novel by Jonathan franzen crossroads..

Tom Nixon Reagan Thomas Malin Hurricane Katrina Iraq Jonathan franzen
"mallon" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"mallon" Discussed on The Book Review

"You've worked in this area. Why this time and place? Well, I think the 70s were an enormously interesting decade. The 60s still gets more press than the 70s. But I think it was up to, who said that the 70s were that it was the decade when the 60s trickled down to every man that real social changes that were enduring in America. The women's movement, the gay movement, a lot of these things that changed daily lives really belonged to the 70s more than the 60s to some extent even the fulfillment or greater fulfillment of the civil rights movement is a 70s phenomenon more than a 60s phenomenon. So I think it's of definite interest in and of itself. And this novel is supposed to be the first novel in a trilogy. So my assumption is, I guess you'd have to ask friends and himself. But my assumption is he's going to bring this family forward. The Hildebrand several decades. But it's interesting to me to see him writing about the past, which he really hasn't done up until now because for a novelist who is very interested in social issues and who does have these not just descriptive tendencies, but prescriptive tendencies who definitely has ethical opinions about politics about how people live. It's rather tricky to do that in historical fiction because it can only operate to a certain extent allegorically. Historical fiction is deadly if you try to write it as a conscious allegory to show how well that decade, 50 years ago was just like things are today. And if you keep giving the reader an elbow in the ribs, it's just fatal to the novel. He doesn't try to do that. But if he is trying to make points about the current world, via the depiction of a world that's 50 years old, it is trickier. A reader of crossroads will have those moments..

Hildebrand America
"mallon" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"mallon" Discussed on The Book Review

"Connections, but they were buried in secret and they had to come to light. And that was to some extent what the book was about. But I think he was a little bit unmoored in that novel. And it did not have his strengths. And I think that's the novel of his that a lot of people started and never finished. There's nothing wrong with being a family novelist, most novelists have been, I think, in one way or another, it's the way in which a novelist becomes a social novelist. In order to be universal, you have to be parochial. I mean, hardly the first person who's made that point. And I think that the small conflicts within families certainly in France and families, they're often brought about by larger social issues, the family members don't agree on how to live to ask that question again that Walter burglar asks in one of his books, they have different views of what priorities are, what proper behavior is, what ethical behavior is. One of the things that his characters are always doing is they're trying to live ethically. They're often failing at it, but it's constant preoccupation for them. And I think that that two in a way makes him sort of a throwback. He's not really interested in characters who are exploring their own identities, the way fiction is so preoccupied with that right now, especially auto fiction. But identity politics, governs the country right now. And questions of identity, individual identity, I think govern our fiction to far too great and extent. Franz and characters are in many ways trying to figure out what they're supposed to be a citizens. As citizens of their town, citizens of their country and the world. And I think that that's a healthy thing. I think that the social net that he casts is very important and to try to do it in the way that he does to try to struggle to maintain the intimacy of a novel to have living breathing people and not just have some abstract clash of ideas. I think is a really noble and necessary effort. He almost raises the question of whether a character can be over realized. And that sometimes the characters are so round, they have so many dimensions to them that they lose any edges. We almost know too much about them at times. And he has a way that I'm not entirely fond of kind of withholding a character's early life until you're well into the book. And then you get this large flashback, which almost begins another story. I do feel sometimes when I read him that I'm reading a novel that is a series of linked to novellas, the way that sometimes you read a novel that is a series of linked stories. Sometimes consciously deliberately so sometimes that becomes a kind of default way of presenting bits and pieces that never quite cohere in a normal novelist fashion..

Walter burglar France Franz
"mallon" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

04:39 min | 1 year ago

"mallon" Discussed on The Book Review

"The last stool, a film by Ridley Scott, director of Gladiator, is the true story of one woman who defied a kingdom and made history. It stars Academy Award winners Matt Damon and Ben Affleck, Academy Award nominee Adam Driver. And Jodie comer, who gives a performance critics, they will be remembered from Oscar time. The script is written by Academy Award nominee Nicole hall of center, as well as Affleck and Damon, their first since their best screenplay Oscar for good will hunting. The last duel now playing, only in theaters. This episode, two big new novels of fall. First, why.

Academy Award Adam Driver Jodie comer Ridley Scott Matt Damon Ben Affleck Nicole hall Oscar Affleck Damon
"mallon" Discussed on AppStories

AppStories

02:48 min | 1 year ago

"mallon" Discussed on AppStories

"Play the our dashboard as well and you still on ipod and then we are planning a bigger sort of design. Revamp design change on on the mac. Caplis well because we're still supporting catalina. We couldn't we were holding off on the side of on updating our ui to be having things like batons at the top of the screen or at the top of the window because we felt like that was something we wanted but it was hard to do that with swift dry. But now when we're gonna drop catalina support. We're going to do at redesign of the app to make it a bit more modern than feel at home at big big sur and on monterey. What else is there. There's also the always on the screen that we're going to support and watch up. Which i'm i'm super excited about something up in wanted that for a long time so we want to have something. That actually indicates what's what's running when the when the wash is still think those are some quick notes as well. Oh nice i am excited about. Yeah yeah we're we're really excited about that too. It's something that we've been talking about and playing around with a lot. It's i think it's got a lot of potential. And i think you know i've already noticed yet because it's the way it's built. There are already apps that support it. So it'll be interesting to see. I expect it's going to the uptake on that. one is going to be pretty broad based. Yeah i think the to. And when i saw the demo of that i i thought it was really cool and it felt really intuitive as well like you You just have a not related to what you're working on so for example in orbit there might be you might be in the middle of credit and voice to someone but you wanna give them a certain rate or you giving them specific discount then we want to be able to maybe have a note there and think maybe why you gave that discount and then next time you go back to that invoice you can see the note directly rather than having to find yourself so that is a really cool thing that i'm excited to use myself as well In different apps and context awareness. There is going to be really cool. That's exactly how i've been using it for all sorts of different apps Yeah yeah. I think that's like the biggest thing. So of course a few other improvements that we got with swift guy that were probably gonna start adopting two but decided bigger features. All right. well thanks a lot man. I really want to thank you so much for taking the time to be with us today and talk to our listeners. About what's coming in the fall. I i always like hearing what people are working on and sounds like you've got some great plans for but yeah of course no really really fun to join you to thank so much again for having me all right everybody. That's it for this week. A special thanks again to mallon sundberg for joining us for the interview today and thanks to two concepts the great ipad app that has been our sponsor for the entire summer..

Caplis Revamp catalina monterey mallon sundberg
"mallon" Discussed on Security Now

Security Now

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"mallon" Discussed on Security Now

"Office automatically disables. Mac rose the attackers email attempts to trick the naive email recipient into enabling macro rose with a message appearing inside the word document. The word document explains this document was created by a previous version of microsoft office. Word to view. Or edit this document please. Click the enable editing button on the top bar and then click enable content. So okay so then. There's part of the problem is that they've called it enabled content instead of enable macro rose specifically so just by the said enable me probably militias mallon. Why don't they renamed. That would stop a few people they go. Okay wait a minute. Is that what. I wanna do this afternoon right. Exactly it's called enable content with a generic at it doesn't it doesn't explain the consequences since people transacting in like whose whose lives are about word document attachments they will likely have encountered similar legitimate word version conversion messages in the past. I've seen them. You know the documents legitimate appearing instructions have dike when this actually happens that like. It's like oh this document was from word two thousand three will have to convert it and you go. Yeah okay you know. I've had that. I've done that. You know and i didn't get myself infected because it was real and so the point is they're they're making this look like something that the person who does this sort of thing routinely has seen before and so it's like. Oh yeah okay fine. Yeah got to do that. Click here click. They're fine okay. So now the fun begins visual basic for applications right. Vba this is code which is embedded in the word document which is able to use another longstanding feature of windows known as dvd dynamic data exchange It's able to read a specially crafted dot. Xl s spreadsheet from a remotely located four and domain which it uses dvd to load this into an excel sell in order to create and then run an excel macro. So this is sort of. This is a sneaky way of bootstrapping benign looking code which then uses dynamic data exchange to download some text from a foreign location which it then sticks into an excel sell turning it into an excel macro which is not benign but everything that happened up. Until then was that macro and turn populates an additional cell in the same xl s document which was created by vba with another vba macro which disables offices defenses. The word document is turns out able to indirectly set the policy in the registry titled disabled excel macro warning. So it says yeah. Let's disable excels macro warning which it does after which it invokes the militias macro function in the excel file that causes excel to download. Busy loader payload which it's able to execute on the fly from ram using the run deal.

mallon microsoft
"mallon" Discussed on Spiritual Dope

Spiritual Dope

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"mallon" Discussed on Spiritual Dope

"At home too with the kids to deal with this zoom meetings. He wasn't getting a you know he wasn't getting a free ride out of it right and so his mental her mental health was impacted as well and they're like oh shit everybody's gone through this. We better do something right. So we see i mean so. I think there's some benefit out of this whole cova situation to huge right right. the right. The mental health space of of People spaces place in. Thanks so if i am coming to you. And i am like the client type. I am is who you were before you got the choice spot right. I you know i've got success. Not like you know. We're kind of guy my calendars and all this stuff. What are what are some of the first things that we're going to do together. I we're going to acknowledge and begin to make some separation between the story. That's been running your life You know the story of all the rambos. And i think this story of all the you know the yacky the the unfair the unjust the abuse trauma all those things not for the purpose of wallowing in and You know it just to acknowledge where we started. And maybe what's affecting some of the ways that we see this world how we perceive people and circumstances and then Take that story and recognize it for what it is the gift that it has been and will continue to be in terms of showing us where healing and growth can take place and You know less about the things all the in terms of You know who and what happened all of those things. It's really more about. What did you decide about you. Because of that story knows the beliefs and then we recognize some of those beliefs. Then we can understand that you know. That's been playing out in the background. That's the wallpaper so to speak of our lives on where we make decisions from and a lot of the decisions are fantastic. We need not mess with those but the ones that aren't serving the future that we want to create those the ones we want to take a closer look at and so then from there. I have people do a Day have them write out a narrative of the day in the life of everything they ever wanted to create in their life. You know all outcome based you know All you know all the feels you know touch. T's c's mallon the whole deal So exciting you know. Ev like literally from moment. Wake up.

mallon
Rams superstar Aaron Donald upset at end of playoff loss

The Lead

02:08 min | 2 years ago

Rams superstar Aaron Donald upset at end of playoff loss

"The packers thirty two eighteen on saturday and heading into the weekend lindsay. You wrote that you were really excited to see this. Coaching matchup between matlock floor. And sean mcvay. What stood out to you in the battle of the minds here. Yeah i mean because these are two guys who know each other so well and you know. They're very much part of the same coaching tree. They both worked under kyle shanahan about the flora then works Under sean mcvay. So they have very similar offensive philosophies but that was just a game that was full of really interesting. Coaching matchups mallon floor wine. That batch up by far the packers had the better game plan. They were the better team better coach. All of this and sure aaron. Donald was not at full strength. You could tell that. He was very clearly hampered by the rib injury that he suffered during the wild card round but it was just a very impressive performance overall by aaron rodgers and certainly by matt leflore and that entire coaching staff the packers put up four hundred and eighty four yards of total offense against basically the best defense in the league. talked about aaron donald. Who's just a generational talent. Not being at full strength. But how is this packers offense. So effective saturday night. We'll everything they do. Obviously starts with aaron rodgers. Who just seem to have this innate mastery of what was coming and it kind of went viral on twitter a little bit because so many of fox's camera angles shown face on with aaron rodgers where you could see the moment that he realized what was coming that he was able to diagnose the coverage and dictate the play based on what was coming and the offensive line played really well protecting aaron rogers. He was barely touched. I'm not sure if his jersey had a single grass stain on after the game. And you know when you're not getting pressure on a quarterback and you're running the ball really well and you have davante adams who's one of the best wide receivers and football. It really wasn't even a close match up. And you know. I know a lot of people in green bay throughout packers land. Were wondering this is the best defense in football and it has to make you wonder. If that's the way that the packers aaron rodgers played against supposedly the best defense in football. What are they going to do for the rest of the

Sean Mcvay Packers Kyle Shanahan Aaron Rodgers Matt Leflore Aaron Donald Lindsay Donald Trump Aaron Aaron Rogers FOX Twitter Football Adams Green Bay
Attorney General Barr paves way for prosecutors to investigate claims of voter fraud

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

Attorney General Barr paves way for prosecutors to investigate claims of voter fraud

"Is telling federal prosecutors to look into election fraud claims if they exist. Attorney General William Barr has sent a memo to U. S attorneys authorizing them to pursue quote substantial allegations of voting irregularities, despite little evidence of widespread voter fraud in the 2020 election surfacing thus far. The memo prompted a top career official in the department, Richard Pilcher, to resign from his position. As the director of the elections crimes branch, or his memo changes a previous policy that would bar U. S attorneys from launching such investigations before votes are certified. But, he adds, any inquiry shouldn't be based unquote species speculative, fanciful or far fetched claims. The memo notes that the DOJ has seen no claims of any irregularities that actually impacted the election. Alex Mallon ABC NEWS Washington News about a possible

William Barr Richard Pilcher Elections Crimes Branch DOJ Alex Mallon Washington News Abc News
What If Trump Refuses to Concede?

Today in Focus

05:41 min | 2 years ago

What If Trump Refuses to Concede?

"Lawrence Douglas era professor of law at Amherst. College Massachusetts you write for The Guardian and you've published a book called Donald Trump will he go about whether the president would actually step down if he loses. Interestingly. The rhetoric we're hearing now is an knew he was working from the same script in two, thousand and sixty, I can promise and pledge. To all of my voters and supporters. And to all of the people of the United States. Then I will totally accept. The results of this, great and historic. Presidential election. If I win. The remaining. When you started worrying about what you're hearing? will extinct many Americans pretty gobsmacked by the last presidential debate that he conducted with Hillary Clinton. Chris Wallace said, will you accept the results? No matter. What do you make the same until you will absolutely sir that you will. Accept the result of this election and I think trump just kinda refused to admit I will look at it at the I'm not looking at anything now I look at it at the time, and then for swallowed pushed him a little harder in that and trump threatened the tourist the answer I will tell you at the time I'll keep you in suspense. I remember watching that in gang Wow that's an astonishing thing to hear the candidate of a major party say and I have to say at the time I also thought, wow, he's finished. You cannot. You cannot refuse to accept electoral results match just kind of attacking norms of constitutional democracy. So I kind of thought at the time that he was. His own coffin shot. A so much for my prognostications, but even when he won they theme continued from him didn't it guess it did in fact, right after his election I actually started writing as a contributing opinion writer to the garden in the very first piece I wrote was about his claim that he had in fact won the popular vote as well except for the fact that there were these three to five million phantom illegal voters he stated that before I think he stated his concerns of voter fraud and and People voting illegally during the campaign, and he continues to maintain that belief based on studies and evidence that people have to him. Press Secretary Sean Spicer doubling down on the president's claim, but repeatedly unable to point to evidence that backs up the charge that has been debunked by Republicans and Democrats alike, and in this piece that route from the garden I really tried to ask what are the politics behind it claim like that I mean not only did he threaten dispute the outcome of the election if? He lost his disputing the outcome of an election that he want. But if in four years time, he trotted out a similar type of argument not to for the purposes of challenging his loss in the popular vote. But challenging his lost the Electoral College vote The damage this system should be hard to exaggerate. Okay. Say Things feel quite different this time because in the run up to this election, he basically got asked that same question again didn't he and he responded similarly you commit to making. Sure. That there's a peaceful transfer of power after the election going to have to see what happens. You know that I've been complaining very strongly about the ballots and the ballots are a disaster. We WanNa make sure the election is honest and I'm not sure that it can be i. don't I. Don't know that it can be on top of that. He's a lot to say about the workings of the election itself what is his argument and how much does it change now that he's the incumbent president Well. For one thing, he has spent the last three and a half years telling the American people that our electoral system is unreliable, which again is kind of unprecedented act in American history and what trump has done is he's kind of created this heads I win tails you lose situation in which the only way that the system can demonstrate its legitimacy is if he wins and if he loses well, that's simply becomes proof of what he's been saying all along. We having in yesterday's episode that Donald Trump is really hitting out at the postal system. And in particular state Sir automatically send out mail-in ballots voters. Why politically focusing on this issue There's a particular demographic that we need to pay attention to. These mail in ballots a recent poll indicated I. think that around twenty to twenty, five percent of. Trump's supporters intend to vote by mail in pallets that compares to about fifty five to sixty percent of Biden voters who are going to vote Mallon ballot. So we can see that trump is kinda tactically trying to discredit votes that are gonNA, break against him and very, very unfair to our country. If, they do this, our country will be a laughing stock all over the world because everyone knows it doesn't work how many ballots is sending in California's exit twenty, eight million or some massive number. Other states are sending out millions and millions of ballots I don't WanNa. See a crooked election. This election will be the most rigged election and history

Donald Trump President Trump Sean Spicer Lawrence Douglas Amherst United States Massachusetts Chris Wallace Wanna Professor Of Law California Hillary Clinton Mallon Biden Press Secretary Writer
Opioid Crisis Pushes Drugmaker Mallinckrodt to File for Bankruptcy

Bernie and Sid in the Morning

00:23 sec | 2 years ago

Opioid Crisis Pushes Drugmaker Mallinckrodt to File for Bankruptcy

"Report. Oxycodone maker Mallon Cross has filed for bankruptcy protection. The drug company is facing lawsuits accusing it of fueling the US opioid epidemic. It also recently lost a court battle over the pricing of another medication to treat multiple sclerosis, The company says during bankruptcy reorganization, it aims to resolve opioid related claims and reduce

Mallon Cross Oxycodone United States
Getting bisphenol A out of food containers

Science Magazine Podcast

12:56 min | 3 years ago

Getting bisphenol A out of food containers

"I up in our Green Chemistry special edition of the podcast. We have contributing correspondent. Warren Cornwall here with the story about finding a replacement for the common can lining chemical this funeral a or commonly known as EPA these days high. Warren you start with this fulcrum this point where the tab of a can of soda attached to the body of the Cana Soda. Why is that a good place to start the story? I never knew how amazing the science and engineering around making I can was started reporting this story in this particular case. Ace this point where the pull tab is. Attached to the top of an aluminum drink can is subject to these huge stresses. You have to imagine that the inside of this whole can is covered in this. Thin layer of plastic can't break in order to attach this poll tab to the top of the can Dan basically after pound with a machine on the can top to create this little bump and then the pull tab sits on the bump and then you mash that bump flat because the what is saying. It's the most difficult fabrication in the whole universe. But I think he says in their whole universe okay that makes you and the whole universe the people at Sern would appreciate that but in the universe can fabrication for linings. That's their crux. We're GONNA talk about the lighting's the special liner inside of these cans usually contains. BPA OR A. What exactly is the purpose can't ends contained all kinds of material that can potentially be corrosive all kinds of acidic drinks? I don't know if you remember from elementary school. Well experiment where one of your teachers would put a nail inside of a jar with coq a few days later. It'll be gone so yeah stuff is corrosive And apparently the kinds of stuff that we're putting into cans now is even more corrosive than it used to be. All of these kinds of fancy craft beverages energy. He drinks so they don't want to eat holes in the cans and then the flip side of that. Is that if you've ever put a piece of aluminum in your mouth. It tastes weird and you don't I don't want that flavor to go into the food or drinks so the properties a can lining material have our resists corrosion. Obviously obviously what other things are important. Doesn't create any weird flavors of its own. Ideally it's inert so it doesn't react with anything It's inside the can in a perfect doc world. It's not at all toxic. It's still a benign. It has to be as cheap as possible and it has to go on the cans really easily really quickly quickly because they're cranking out cans at a rate of two thousand a minute so BPA. Which I think most people have heard of at this point because of concerns about its effect on health? Health checks these boxes except for the health one. What are the health concerns when it comes to? BPA well the main concern is that it can mimic estrogen when the body encounters BPA it can bind with estrogen receptors. Enough that the body. Can I think that it's binding with estrogen. There's a lot of debate going on about how much of a health risk is really posed by. EPA in the levels that it's founded pardon people's bodies the FDA still allows it to be used in most food related containers with the exception of baby bottles and sippy cups so the is said that the science suggests that it's not really a problem in other settings said the chemical industry and other industry groups have taken that got same message but you have consumer groups environmental groups and some university researchers that have done work suggesting that it can be problematic one of the stats. You mentioned in your story. About how more than ninety percent of people who live in the US have EPA in their urine. We pretty much that'd be a and US And some governments non. US governments have also decided to ban PBA right. You know the only one that I know of its flea abandoned his France right and you know one of the thing. I should know just going back to a comment that you made earlier about. BPA and cans. I've been told that for food cans in the United States about ninety percent of it is non. BPA At this point so food cans like peas and corn drink cans to or know for aluminum. EMINEM drink cans. It's about fifty fifty. Okay they've cut way down on this but about how much. BPA is still out there. Do you know how many cans with US liner are made. Every year they are every month. Yeah estimates are worldwide that we crank out about four hundred fifty billion with a B. Tans every year yeah three hundred hundred and fifty billion of those are aluminum drink cans the other one. Hundred billion are food cans some not small percentage are lied with. That's right you talked to. Scientists at a company called Thou spar that came up with a a new alternative a few years ago and a very unusual way. How did they get involved? Vow Spar in two thousand seventeen was purchased by Sherwin Williams. Okay this company had a business. Making chemical can linings and and one of the significant parts of that business for them was making BP based linings but they and other manufacturers were seeing the pushback from consumers and some governments guest EPA and so they were looking for alternatives. What they were finding is that? The alternatives had drawbacks right. Some of them were for more expensive or didn't hold up as well or did perform in some way that Kanye manufacturers wanted or for if they were trying to find a replacement in the same family of chemicals as BPA that family abyss females. There was concern sern that those chemicals were going to have some of the same health related concerns that beep at everybody was pushing to find a replacement because the biggest fear fear is that governments are going to step in and say no more. BPA Right. I mean the thing that's interesting to me is that they decided to go for it. Because you can imagine a company saying Oh man that could be a really expensive yet and there's a guy in the story who kind of figures in the Tom Tom Mallon and he's interesting because he's very much industry insider he's worked at. This company is whole life but he from the outset said look. We're going to have to go about this a different way. We're GONNA have to reach out to people outside the industry people outside. The industry don't necessarily trust US anymore when it comes to things like BPA safety so we're going to have to think about this a different way. People tell me that this is really unusual. This is a real culture shift. So what did they do to narrow the pool of chemicals out there to replace. VP aligning so they bring in a chemist from the outside who has experience in the pharmaceutical industry and the pesticide industry. So basically he had this long list of bisque dolls. That might work as can liners and the first green that he did was running them through a computer program that would see whether they were likely to fit in the estrogen receptor or not and then the ones that came out as potentially a non estrogens they then sent off for a series of slab screenings. The basic one was a yeast screening where these yeast cells have been engineered to glow when they're exposed to estrogen compound. At that point they have to do more tests to find out if these chemicals are also going to work well as a can liner they finally narrow it down to one candidate. Wow it's called Tetra. Methyl BIS Funeral F or T. Mbps they narrowed it down to this one mechanical and it had passed them basic tests when it came to its ability to affect estrogen receptors. And it was able to stand up to The harsh environment of inside a can. This is where they turn to. Basically they turned to their critics and said you tell us that this isn't safe to wasn't said they were challenging them the way they described it to me as they were coming to scientists and saying we want to build a better molecule for this. What should we do to make sure that it's actually going to be safer? Yeah they posed this question to environmental and public health advocacy groups and they impose that same question to researchers who have done a lot of science studying BPA and they actually took the chemical to their labs and tested faceted out and a bunch of different ways. That's right they set up the payment in a way that the scientists said they kept their independence so so the best example is a endocrinologist at Tufts. Anna Soto has done a lot of work on. EPA and its effect on in breast tissue the company made a contribution to tufts with no strings attached so it was not hurt to her lab specifically and then she came to tufts and said give me money for my research search and she found that there weren't Astra genetic effects from this alternative to be. Yes right she didn't find any evidence that was stragetic And then the secondary element that that was interesting is that she didn't find evidence that the can lining was leaching any of its T. M. B. PF contents into into the liquids. This letting him ICAL has been approved by the FDA for use in food product container. So it's already on the market. It's already something that people have probably encountered in their day to day life. The company has their chemical has been used to line twenty two billion cans since twenty seventeen nine. Wow so a lot of cans but a small fraction of the overall universal cans right going back to the safety testing that we talked about. I think it sounds is wise to approach people who have built up the skills to test for Indian disruption in their labs but is there ever a way to know if something is safe. It's kind of like the bigger question if the FDA's testing aren't necessarily rigorous enough. What should be happening to show that a chemical a safe to go sit next to food that might absorb it? That's an open question. Part of what was interesting to me about. This story. Is that when val spar went looking for an alternative Bernard route for testing their product. There was no road map for them to follow And that's still the case. They can't point to a battery battery of tests and say look. We have jumped through these hoops that everybody has agreed are the hoops that we should jump through did it successfully and therefore we can declare our chemical to be a gold star. Green label chemical. Is there a movement to codify. Something is an endocrine disruptor if it does this and if it doesn't do these things these five things or these ten things and it's not an endocrine disruptor. There are various efforts to come up with better more more rigorous more detailed ways of screening chemicals for possible construction. Regulators would argue that they currently have tools for declaring declaring whether a chemical is an endocrine disruptor or not and they're working on improving them so it's not like they're saying that their ways the the only way and there's no improvement to be done right our other companies going to follow this model of looking for chemicals to replace something that people have a lot of questions sweat and then turning to people outside industry to test it for health concerns. I don't know I mean I've talked to some people who've said that they think it it's a promising model. They think that the experience of Alice bars had suggested a company can do it successfully. But you know I've talked to other people who've said that there are companies who are working to develop greener safer chemicals but have really chosen to do it internally and keep it to themselves salves partly because there is a concern that if you say that you're trying to replace one of your chemicals with something safer you're bringing attention into concerns about safety of the clear curly us. Well thank you so much more and I sure thank you Sarah. Warren Cornwall is a contributing correspondent piece in Washington State. You can find a link to his article and the rest of the special section on chemicals. Tomorrow's Earth at science mag dot org slash podcast

EPA United States Warren Cornwall FDA BPA Green Chemistry Tufts Cana Soda Sern DAN France Vow Spar PBA Tom Tom Mallon Eminem B. Tans VP Kanye
Truth vs. Lies: Anime

Pants On Fire

07:48 min | 3 years ago

Truth vs. Lies: Anime

"Every week we bring onto grownups one. I think you're GonNa know where this is going. An expert the other also an expert. Uh No a liar. Yes and it's the job of a human child to help us figure out who who'd get spot a liar better than a kid. What are we about about today? Deborah we are lying about. Hannah may a style of Japanese animation that is known for colorful graphics and action packed stories that often take place in the future or fantasy World Lisa. Do you know anything about anime. Well it just so happens that there is an anime character modeled after me. Who is that so it was Mecca Music Moto? He was a giant sound machine in the future. Wow more concern observe somewhere with that. We could see that enemy No unfortunately he didn't reduce go over very well People wanted to see action but Mecca music. Modo was all music all the time you know. How do I do and Show was cancelled after the pilot. I'm sorry to hear that. But it's a thing we appreciate sound machines here. And now and we'd love to hear the sound of you telling us about our contestant that's it way better than anime thank you sure are human child. Contestant is an eleven year old from Waterloo Ontario Canada who loves surf and as a five pound dog named Lola. Back Up. Bafana's Hi Becca. Welcome to pants on fire. Take you came all the way from Canada. That's amazing. Have you been here before. No this is my first time. Oh so nice. I hope you have a great time. Are you planning on doing anything anything fun while you're in town. I think we're going to go to Central Park Nice. That sounds like fun. I'd love to go deborah. Take me I will take you. If you'd like to go anytime any time. You said the dogs are Peon me. Not say that but it's probably true that would probably happen and also tell me you own a small business. Is that correct. You're an entrepreneur. Uh what kind of business do you have a dog Englishness. I have a full total of one client five pound dog now. It's my mom's friend dog know her mom's friends dog. Oh that makes sense. Yes and what is the name of Your Business and that does barking mad dog walking walking services. I loved that. Did you come up with that yourself. Yeah that is fantastic. Will Best of luck but we also want to know more about you back up but we're going to do quit while we play our game to choosing ally so you are going to tell us three facts about yourself. Two of those facts will be true. One we'll be ally Lisa and anybody. You're listening to the PODCAST. We'll try to figure out which one is ally. Okay Becca. Tell us your three facts. Okay I've been to La. I broke my wrist on the first week of school. I Love Sharks and WanNa swim with them. One day. Okay I think the line is breaking the ricin and because if she wants to swim with sharks she definitely wouldn't want to swim with that's true. So yeah that's why the broken wrist you think is the lie all right back coat which one of those things is to lie. I have been to La. I've never gone tally. You've got it wrong would you like to go to La one day. Hopefully we'll maybe didn't come on the show me we could get you the LA. Jeez oh no. Don't listen to him okay. Our first expert is Paul Wolcott. Paul can you please introduce yourself tobacco as High Becker. My name is Paul Wall. Glad I'm a freelance Manga artist working on three different titles right now. So I'm very busy. Okay Hey and our next expert is Carrie Mallon Carey. Can you please introduce yourself tobacco. Hi Becca I'm Carrie Mallon and I'm a coma creator. That means that I create anime aimed at young audiences like kids under the age of ten. I most famous for my character tools pup chime make youtube luke videos about Berry interesting Nazi shuts they have some food on a Hibachi or something Lisa I do and it's GonNa be delicious but also yes S. eight times that is that's right. That's when we put our experts on the hot seat while they answered questions Lisa. Who should we put on the hot seat? I I'm going to go with Kerry. Because she said she does stuff on Youtube and maybe if I'm nicer she'll introduce me to those people who do the youtube videos where they open up. All these videos may open up bags and you're like what's it going to be in that egg and then you get inside and it's a toy and you're like Oh my God. I love that tour. That sounds very cool. Can't wait to see that carry you GonNa Hook me up I'll I'll find out if I know anyone in the world very good. Okay Beck. I do have a question for Kerry A. K.. What exactly do you do What I do like on a regular day to day basis ACIS is computer animation of characters that I've created? I was really inspired when I was a kid by. Hello Kitty and so Tuttosport my character. There is a super cute French bulldog who has all these adventures and he's always on his way out the door and that's where he got the name tools So I create those on my computer using to Zucca programming and then I upload them onto the Internet where they've gotten a quite a following. If I do say so myself you should put them inside of an egg. Maybe next time the reason why I was inspired to work in the first place was that I feel like kids. Kids love it. Adults love it. Even older people love it like. I don't know if you know this. But in Japan there's a whole version of an ray called the game okay which is aimed at older audiences and it's specifically about older characters like eighty and older telling stories about their grandchildren's success? Okay cool and call. What do you do exactly? Yes I'm illustrator. which the illustrates Manga Stories? Now do the pencilling inking and coloring. I have a Manga coming out next year called Sheesh Bro which is really female female empowering we see a lot of male male female roles and not a lot of female roles. I've really wanted to switch up the game a little bit. Well thank you if I was GONNA be What you do carry? What tips would you give me? I would say the first thing to do is come up with something that you find cute because If you find a cute than likely a whole bunch of other people well There's another character in my episodes. That's Larry the typewriter so sometimes like inanimate objects can be cute. So look around your world Decide what if you added is to it would become a character and then start doodling. Becca do you not typewriter is this is something from ancient time. Yeah just check it and by the way machines are not just cute. Were ruggedly handsome as well. Yes fair point.

LA Lisa Becca Deborah Youtube Kerry A. K Hannah Central Park Carrie Mallon Carey Canada Paul Wall Modo Waterloo Ontario Canada Sheesh Bro Bafana Wanna Paul Wolcott Beck Japan
Shoppers expected to spend $730 billion this season

Up First

02:51 min | 3 years ago

Shoppers expected to spend $730 billion this season

"Shoppers are expected to spend even more money this year than they did last year. The National Retail Federation predicts that over the holiday shopping seasons of through Christmas Americans. We'll spend around seven hundred and thirty billion dollars. That's with a B. A lot of that will still happen at physical stores but a survey from pricewaterhousecoopers. WBZ for the first time this year found that the majority of shoppers are saying they plan to do most of their holiday shopping online like Lou rather than in stores and that's actually really one of the reasons why to me and a lot of retail watchers one of the biggest themes this year. Is this slow. Change of the meaning of black Friday is beginning to disappear or is it just going join online. Well we have to clear. That still is the busiest shopping day of the year for most stores but for the past two years the number of people oh heading to stores Ford. Those doorbuster deals has inched lower. Shoppers are now armed with smartphones. They can do instant price checks on. What's going on at other your stores? Is it worth standing in line. Here I talked to Peter fader professor at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and he says more stores are also realizing that maybe the people who only show up one weekend November are not the best customers and so they're broadening their appeal with really strong online discounts and sales on so many days of the year including more made up shopping holidays like cyber Monday this coming Monday or prime day and this year also because the calendar gave us a super late Thanksgiving there fewer days between now and Christmas some stores started offering black Friday sales like weeks earlier back in October and and all this is washing out that meaning of black Friday. It's still huge but maybe not the focal point of Holiday Shopping Alina. What's going to make parents desperate this year? Your people stand in line. What's GonNa be big well? Overall the top sellers are close and gift cards. But then as you're alluding to the toys are huge. Actually my colleague. Dr Is Rafi. Spent Black Friday. The iconic toys R. US. You may remember. The company went bankrupt in twenty seventeen but a former executive is trying to bring back starting with two locations. The first one in New Jersey opened on black Friday and they are Darius spoke to shopper. Monica Mallon it's been kind of a staple growing up so so we've been doing black Friday on toys for many years up until they closed their doors so excited to see come back and as far as the hottest toys of the season. Go the classics like legos and barbies. Hot Wheels American girl dolls. They're still at the top of the list for many shoppers but Internet sales tracked by analytics. Showed that so far this week online. Fine the biggest sellers are yellow surprise dolls and pretty much anything related to the movie frozen to Shows Fan at all off coming to a shelf near you. NPR's Lena Shell thanks so much. Thank you

LOU National Retail Federation Pricewaterhousecoopers Dr Is Rafi Monica Mallon Ford New Jersey Lena Shell Wharton School NPR Executive Peter Professor Darius University Of Pennsylvania
U.S. prosecutors open criminal probe of opioid makers, distributors

CNBC's Fast Money

03:47 min | 3 years ago

U.S. prosecutors open criminal probe of opioid makers, distributors

"We are following a developing story in the OPIOID makers the Wall Street Journal Reporting Federal Prosecutors have opened up a criminal probe into a number of these companies. Let's get right now to make trump back at CNBC HQ with more details. Make Hey Brian well. These companies are already facing thousands of lawsuits over their role nuclear crisis. And this may be a case of another negative headline rattling stocks. Now we already knew that these drug makers and distributors had received subpoenas from US attorneys concerning the controlled Substances Act Johnson and Johnson. Kevin Mallon Cotton Amnio on the drug company side and Amir Source Bergen mckesson of the distributors now. The Journal reported today that federal prosecutors have opened a criminal investigation into drug companies examining whether they violated that act which the Journal points out is normally used to go after drug dealers. I spoke with Bernstein analyst. Ronnie Gal who said he was surprised that the stocks were moving so sharply lower on this. He said investigations investigations are one thing but criminal prosecutions would be another and right now. The report is that the probe is in its early stages but he also pointed out that these stocks had recovered quite a bit over the last month on some potential expected relief in these lawsuits particularly Teva. Some of the companies have reached a tentative settlement framework with some state attorneys general over the OPIOID the degation but not all states are on board. And it's not a done deal. Meanwhile oxycontin maker Purdue Pharma continues to make its way through bankruptcy trying to get more CDs on board with its settlement proposal which is contingent engine unsettling DOJ probes as well and a New York case against multiple companies is scheduled to go to trial early next year unless a settlement is reached. They're the headline today. Just another reminder reminder guys at this saga is far from over for these companies brand make tro make thank you very much or you guys. Just talk more about this. I mean these are big names. The stocks got hit today but this is an issue. We're talking about a criminal probe. We're not talking about a civil case. We're talking about criminal charges here. So the headline risks of significant name like mckesson for example. And it's done this a number number of times within the last six months one thirty one fifty five back to one thirty back to one fifty five. It's probably headed back down to the thirty five W. trade these stocks right now. You don't autumn because that's not the environment we find ourselves in people will say mckesson nine times. It's cheap it is cheap but the headline risk is too severe. So it's down seven percents today my senses senses this further room to the downside but one thirty five level. I think you close your eyes and you buy it again. Well if you think about John Jaso they are clearly both. The most diversified in the one is the biggest balance-sheet and in fact rallied On a couple of small state settlements in terms of civil charges. So I if you think about the headlines that are going to continue to fly in the face of of frankly on Johnson Johnson a handful of fronts. I don't think you have to go in there and run. You don't have to run in there tomorrow and buy it but I do think you have a dynamic here with a company that is at least I made it very clear. There are places where they think you know. It's worth settling and places where they're going to dig in very hard and ultimately we've seen this balance sheet is actually a rallying cry for the stock during difficult times time so I actually think this very well insulated around here is best as I can understand it very unclear. Federal Criminal Environment. Yeah I mean you got teva which is down fifty four percents year Amnio which is probably too small dimension. I mean make mention it so I will again. But it's down eighty three percent. Let's not forget about you. Remember insys therapeutics. Anybody Remember Insurance Nancy. They filed for bankruptcy in June. The stock basically went to zero because they had criminal charges around opioids now. They were more of a sort of a biotech nick base in Arizona. The point I'm trying to make here and I do wonder you don't know where these are going to go. This is the national crisis. We're talking about criminal charges. Any reason to own any of them in that circumstance. I guess if I had to own one I would go to John Jay with seventy and they can afford it right. The balance sheet is as Tim. Tim is talking about is the best shape of any of them. But I don't think you need to. I don't know why you need to I don't know why you need to chase him. Go

Johnson Johnson Ronnie Gal TIM Amir Source Bergen Mckesson Wall Street Journal Cnbc Hq Mckesson United States Kevin Mallon Cotton Amnio Purdue Pharma John Jay John Jaso Bernstein Arizona DOJ Analyst New York The Journal
Sugar Cane, Squalane and Sustainability in Beauty with Biossance

Full Coverage

04:10 min | 3 years ago

Sugar Cane, Squalane and Sustainability in Beauty with Biossance

"Today. We have a really exciting main feature. I was quite giddy about we have an interview interview with Catherine Gore who is the president of bioscience not the United States or the universe which is a skincare brand primarily early skincare and she is really really interesting really lovely. I understand is trying to get his treats out off the shelf. Anderson in Cooper you bad baby. We've finished arteries your Navon yours yet but yeah I went into the view quite skeptical say Apr.. We know how I feel about clean beauty. We talked about this last episode. I can be a bit skeptical about what that means. What is but she turned me right around on everything they're doing is very much about sustainability and yet protecting the environment a bigger issue as much better. I'm more to think about that one to thank you bye clean shuttle but bioscience and Catherine fascinating also she was one of the first employees he's at Sephora ever wow yeah she's nojeim an og Sephora Gal and like you'll hear so much more. She is such a fascinating surreal the bronze that she worked on she worked on in house branding at Sephora in their product development on the cap on D. and on Fendi and I'm jake is fascinating woman and it's a fascinating brand so stay tuned for that definitely love that as all chat but before we get to that is news news news flash off the the press fresh off the off the press it's fresh. I'm hot as fresh impression so press news what you got Lindsay. We've got we've. We've got just fucking loads of pilots. Well you know what's coming at you. Do know what's coming. After I get married yeah I mean I'll have put off by a able to pull off the excitement a little bit because it's wedding then birthday than Halloween Dan in Christmas. You've time this very well. You've it's like I feel like on sex city. which is like you get a day? Yeah you get the day and your home. I'm having to I start two days three frocks living the dream but yeah I mean you know I feel about Christmas. You know you are in my living room right now juicy behind me where this Blue Gutierrez count. That's the tree. Massive data is going to be massive. It's GonNa be it's GONNA be sobek alarm so excited about it and that's just not Sanderson is managed it in a box good boy. Clever cavs looks pleased with himself. I know you're very good is still not getting any traits. We get intrigued so we in all kinds of trees. Christmas trees Christmas treats. I do love this about Christmas launches because normally when it gets too close to holiday Chalets Fox's oxes and sets of things. I don't need don't know don't care about but now is the Hawk full-time when we're getting really really sexy. Mallon agreed aide pilots four days off the pilots. There are so many there are so many so the first one. I want to draw everyone's attention to is a new twenty-eight Shade Palate from Natasha DNA. We all know what this means. It means no money. No money's in the bank I mean spending spending spending but we also means exceptional quality Anderson's. GonNa need to tell him to stop it. That's not a box for you. That's a box of very nice beauty products for me and Anti Harry to review you obviously he's touching it so delicate no little idiot he was now. He's like I'm going to get in. Yes thank you. I'm sorry I had to be. We don't be naughty yet. It's it's spending but it's GonNa be good it's going to be I have yet to meet. Natasha denote a ballot salad. I didn't want to bend over and show good time. I won't lie. I mean they're beautiful aren't they. They're just donning. I'm all in for the minis and there is a new mini coming. I do love the mini mini gold polycom which I'm very excited about if you are not in the

Anderson Catherine Gore Sephora Cavs Cooper United States Polycom Natasha President Trump Blue Gutierrez Lindsay Chalets Fox Sanderson Mallon Jake Harry Fendi Product Development Four Days
Johnson & Johnson Ordered to Pay $572 Million in Landmark Opioid Trial

Post Reports

08:40 min | 3 years ago

Johnson & Johnson Ordered to Pay $572 Million in Landmark Opioid Trial

"So this is a landmark and defendants johnson and johnson and johnson's misleading marketing and promotion of tate's created a nuisance as defined by fifty s section one including finding that those actions compromise compromised the health and safety of thousands of oklahomans. It's the first time that a judge as ever held a drug company responsible responsible for the opioid epidemic lenny bernstein covers health and medicine for the post. He was in the courtroom in oklahoma yesterday. When a judge ruled that johnson johnson johnson will have to pay five hundred and seventy two million dollars for its role in the opioid crisis. He ruled that johnson and johnson. Jason took part in a campaign of misinformation deception that persuaded doctors and opioid consumers that these drugs dogs were less addictive than they really were and more helpful than they really were. He ruled that johnson and johnson because because it owned two companies for awhile that produced the active ingredients for opioids and sold them to other companies which which then turn them into drugs was responsible all of this despite the fact that johnson and johnson's own drugs account for just about one one percent of the opioids prescription opioids consumed in oklahoma city their argument is that they can't have played such a major role in the opioid epidemic amac but this judge found otherwise yes that was one of their arguments they made several but yes that that's the key right there they're saying how can we be held old culpable and asked to pay five hundred seventy two million dollars to clean this up if our drugs were only one percent of the opioids in oklahoma that is certainly one of the things that they will bring up on appeal so this five hundred and seventy two million dollars that johnson and johnson has been ordered to pay hey. Where is that money going well first off. We have to remember that. No one's gonna see that money probably for years if johnson and johnson does carry harry through on its promise to appeal they'll go up to the oklahoma supreme court i and that could take a couple of years and if they lost their they go to the u._s. Supreme court and that could take another couple of years typically the payment of the money would be stayed all that occurs. If by some miracle they turned around tomorrow and wrote a check either for five seventy two or something less than that it would be going to treatment it would be going to prevention education law enforcement emergency services. There are babies babies born dependent on opioids who need all kinds of care. There are children in foster care whose parents are unable to take care of them and so the state is taking care of them. All of those places would get some money and for the attorneys for the state of oklahoma and did did they feel like this five hundred and seventy two million dollars was what what they were looking for that. It's enough to take care of a lot of the problems saito seen so. This is probably the most interesting thing that happened yesterday. The the state of oklahoma asked for seventeen point five billion over thirty years so if you look at five hundred seventy two million <hes> it's a much smaller amount now now a judge bachmann said was i can tell that for the first year it's going to cost five hundred seventy two million to take care of this crisis what the state did not present me with sufficient evidence to decide is what happens after that. I just can't tell so. The number is much smaller than what the state asked for but it's a one in your number of course the opioid epidemic is not going to be abated one year. It's going to take decades and what what's really interesting about. This is the fact that this is just one line of many legal cases that are starting to come up against drug companies blaming them and holding them responsible for the opioid crisis so how what is this ruling in oklahoma effect what we might be seeing in these other legal cases against other drug companies around the country so we've got two sets of cases going foreword. We've got another forty some odd states that are suing any number of drug companies just like oklahoma and then we have cities counties native american tribes hospitals other groups numbering somewhere around two thousand plaintiffs and they are all consolidated in a federal case in cleveland so let's put that aside for a second looking at the state cases you would expect okay oklahoma one using these theories to the extent that that is possible under each state law you would expect that state to adopt as much of the strategy that oklahoma used as possible because after all it's a winning strategy at least here however we did have a case in north dakota in may where the judge threw out a similar claim against purdue and said that doesn't work here so while this is a landmark it subject to the vagaries of different states different laws different defendants <hes> on the state level now i will say that if a judge is willing to find a company liable and they only produce one percent of the drugs consumed in a state you might be encouraged by that because if you're suing mallon qrat if you're suing purdue if you're suing any of the larger manufacturers you might be thinking to yourself today. A boy johnson and johnson was held liable and they only produced one percent of drugs. I've got a guy who produced twenty or thirty percent of the drugs or a company that distributed twenty or thirty thirty percent of the drugs moving over to the federal lawsuit. It's much less certain. Federal cases are different from state cases and those are cities and counties rather than states so i think we should be cautious in the amount of influence with tribute <hes> to the federal cases so for the lawyers who were fighting on behalf of the seat of oklahoma. Uh what was the strategy or the legal argument that they were making that ended up being successful so oklahoma had one claim and one claim only they claimed that the drug companies and eventually it just became johnson johnson has they settled with a couple of others that that the drug companies created a public nuisance in the state of oklahoma that affected the health and wellbeing of every resident of the state public nuisance law aw is generally used for property problems is i am sledding your backyard with my sprinkler system. If if a polluter is polluting river if a brothel is creating a nuisance on the street and and we wanted shut down you go to the the court and you claim that it's a public nuisance and the remedy is that the court makes you stop it. Make me stop flooding your backyard. They closed down the brothel. They make the polluter stop. Stop putting stuff into the river. The lawyers here took a very novel approach to public nuisance. Lie may be unprecedented which they said said because public nuisance covers the health and well being of the residents of the state of oklahoma. We are claiming that johnson and johnson violated the public nuisance law because they affected the health of everyone here. Now oklahoma has a broad public nuisance law many other states and cities and counties. He's also have public nuisance laws but vary so it's not entirely certain whether that argument would work in other places but were tear when you look at the ruling from this case and the legal arguments that are being made in these other cases against companies that are being accused of fueling the opioid crisis. What do you think is the big question. That's being asked here the big question that's being thought about here in terms of culpability ability so anybody who even opens their eyes or reads the newspaper or watches television asian knows that we had a prescription opioid epidemic in this country for many years and it still continues today it. It may be a little bit on wayne but it happened and many thousands tens of thousands of people died. The question is can you prove to

Johnson Johnson Johnson Oklahoma Oklahoma City Lenny Bernstein Tate Purdue Jason Saito Wayne Bachmann Cleveland North Dakota Mallon Harry Seventy Two Million Dollars One Percent