10 Burst results for "Mall Sell"

"mall sell" Discussed on Longform Podcast

Longform Podcast

08:53 min | 5 months ago

"mall sell" Discussed on Longform Podcast

"You have these concepts in architecture and in criticism of what people should do and what they did do. This should is in the public good. It's sustainability. Public spaces that are accessible to all. And those are all one form of ideal. And then there's different ideals for the people who are putting up the money for them all, which are like bringing in customers, selling stuff, not spending too much building them all. How do you think about those sorts of tradeoffs and the difference between what people should do based on certain ideals and the practical realities of building buildings? I don't actually believe that better materials are always better. I mean, if you look at if you look at contemporary mall design, there's a lot of marble, a lot of shiny marble, and all the malls I like, like when I talk about in my second chapter, north park has polished concrete floors and white brick walls, and it's so much nicer than these kind of alienating super shiny, super hard marble spaces like it American Dream and some other malls like part of mall of America has been remodeled and it looks very similar. And if you look at photos of those faces they all look alike and they are not warm and they are not human in the same way that something like brick and concrete can be. So I think really in all architecture, it's all in the way you deploy the materials. It's not about the expense of the material. Other part of your question, I agree all of those things should be public goods like the public domain should provide clean bathrooms and air conditioning and like lots of comfortable seating. But it is not doing it. It's certainly not doing it in New York City where there are no benches and moynihan station. And it's just not doing it in general. And the malls by and large are. And we have to look at critics, you know, people who are interested in the future of architecture and urbanism have to look at the places that people actually like to go and what those places are surviving, like there's no point in just standing back and only talking about these idealized spaces. I think most critics, like we want to be active, we want to talk about what people like what they're doing and one of those faces as well. The buildings that you write about have these long lives that they are evolving. Malls are an evolving art form. And how do you think about the lifespan of architectural stuff and do you feel like there's like an ideal time to be writing about it? Well, the nerdy term for it is post occupancy review. And but yeah, I mean, because of the way the media cycle is, like most mainstream media only wants to hear about the building the minute it's opened. It's kind of like those architect profiles like archetypes get profiled when a big skyscraper is about to open in a major city, even if that's not their most interesting work. And so a new building gets profiled the minute it opens. When in fact, we have the least amount of information about it from a kind of humanist point of view. So there have been various experiments over the years. I actually went to rib Shinsuke for a while, was writing this column for architect magazine where he would go back and look at a building like ten years after it had opened. And I thought that was great. All of us would be down for that, but that's not what editors want. There's always like a little bit of market forces at work. The interesting thing for malls was that often when I was trying to research a new mall, like the best first source of information was actually Wikipedia because Wikipedia stays up to date. So if I was trying to figure out how many different owners of all had had or how many times it had been added onto, it was the Wikipedia that would then link me to those local paper articles about all the changes in the mall. And one of the things that I kind of used historical research for was to establish what the mall looked like at the beginning, but then sometimes the ways a place like the mall of America has changed. What you're actually seeing is fashion imprinting itself on the architecture of the mall. And because the mall sells fashion, I think it's honestly easier to talk about the changing looks of a mall than it is to talk about the changing looks of some other building types. If you zoomed out on America or really most countries and you looked at where all the wealth is, it's mostly in real estate. And yet, there aren't a ton of people who write about the thing that most of our money is in, which is in buildings basically. Why do you think that is? Why are we not more interested in a society and this thing that we're perfectly willing to put our entire net worth into? Well, I mean, there's a lot of real estate writing, but it's mostly about the money part of it. And you know, I don't think the people that are making the money are that interested in criticism. I mean, the big mall companies wouldn't talk to me for this book. I read a lot of articles. I read lots of business journalism where they did talk to them, and I just kind of used my own alternate research techniques, but I feel like that's the attitude a lot of times. They don't need me to be little people like me, writing about them. So why would they contribute agree to interviews, et cetera? It's not necessary. But I also think, I mean, I don't know, why don't more people read architecture criticism like this, this is like something that I struggle with all the time because it's like, I think I'm entertaining. I am very connected to the world. I think if you read my stuff, you'll get it, but I feel like there's just this sense that architecture criticism is boring, and I don't know who gave people that sense, but there's just kind of a barrier, not I think, to the actual material, but just to even bothering to read it. But for me, I really like to write about things that I can hold and experience. Like I said earlier, I'm not that interested in biography, but I am very interested in the biography of an object. And again, this is something my editor and I had a lot of back and forth about like he wanted me to write more about people and I'm like, but I love objects. I feel about the objects, I think, how most people feel about people. So what I'm always trying to do is kind of communicate that enthusiasm and that understanding to my reader because these objects really have a lot of speaking to do and I think ultimately it's easier to connect if people have their own physical experiences in the objects. I mean, the best example of this is my last book was called the design of childhood and it was about all the ways in which design interacts with children's lives, especially like in the first 12 years. And the most popular chapter of that book is on playgrounds. And I think it's because everyone's been to a playground. You've seen a playground, so then I think that kind of softens you up to be willing to let me tell you about the whole history of playgrounds. I mean, I feel like that's a great analogy for the mall book. It's like you've been to a mall, but did you know that malls have this whole complicated history that they have periods if they have actually multiple innovators? I feel like you should want to know about that. When you're writing about a niche that's like really, really alive and present for you. But for other people, they're like, tell me the stories of the people behind it, or why is that interesting? How do you sell other people on writing about this thing that isn't part of the general magazine and writing cycle? Well, do you want to know what I led my book proposal for this book with? Please, please. Stranger Things. There you go. That's how you sell it..

Shinsuke architect magazine north park America moynihan New York City Wikipedia
"mall sell" Discussed on Gloss Angeles

Gloss Angeles

03:31 min | 7 months ago

"mall sell" Discussed on Gloss Angeles

"Jared blandino, founder of two faced, is leaving the company. Yes, he and Jeremy, his partner, both in the company and in life, they are leaving two faced and I'm a little shocked, I guess I shouldn't be surprised to face sold to Estee Lauder companies over 5 years ago. We talk about that epic celebration all the time. Yes, besides it cosmetics. I think like the hugest largest acquisition, it was over a $1 billion, right? It was crazy. And it was at the height of Instagram makeup when two faced was just owned that space, like better than Sussex mascara, sweet peach. Yeah, I do love the sweet peach palette, yes. Like top three eyeshadow palettes ever. They're just such a successful successful company. All thanks to Kirby said, Jared and his husband, Jeremy. They started at 24 years ago. Yes. I mean, they were working in a mall selling their products, essentially. So they've built so much. I don't know what to think. I just feel like we're going to start to see this. It's like a lot of exits from people who created these companies and ended up selling. Wendy's on her for those of you that may not know is no longer affiliated with urban decay. She left the company, which is also interesting because she didn't record any sort of official farewell. It was a very quiet exit that Kirby and I actually only found out recently through conversations with current urban decay. People at urban. So it's nice that Jared is able to sort of like say goodbye, say goodbye, kind of control that narrative, you know? Yeah, I felt like he was very transparent about what was going on. I did not expect that, but basically he posted a couple minute video on his Instagram, y'all can go watch it. It's at Jared blandino on Instagram, but he said, you know, when they were acquired by Estee Lauder companies, they had never worked in such a corporate environment before. I mean, imagine like imagine running your own company for so long and then being bought out by a major corporation and then no longer being able to control it in the or run it the way that you are used to doing it. To anyone that would be like a shock, right? Yes. And I feel like because of how corporate works, you're not able to execute quickly. There's too many cooks in the kitchen, so much red tape, so many people approving so many layers and levels. I should say, Jared basically said, in so many words, that they felt restricted. They felt they couldn't be as creative as they would like to be. And that they are not done. Yeah, yeah. Okay, so we know that typically when you sell your company to a brand, you sign some sort of contract for 5 years and that period you can not start your own competing brand in the category. So this would be obviously cosmetics, probably skin care as well. Maybe that had to do with her quiet sudden exit, right? I mean, that would be breach of contract if she did sign something like that. So would you get forced out or would you be penalized financially in some way? I don't think she would do anything that could potentially jeopardize Cali ray. No. You know what I'm saying? That's why I'm like, how does this work? Does anybody have Intel call the hotline?.

Jared blandino Estee Lauder companies Jared Jeremy Kirby Wendy Intel
"mall sell" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"mall sell" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"To the financial windfall has been the emergence of dedicated fan bases who are coalescing around groups on Discord, the preferred platform for NFT and crypto enthusiasts. Allen subscribes to the idea that having 100 true fans is better than having many casual ones, so he spends 6 to 8 hours a day interacting with his fans on his Discord, where they offer encouragement, feedback, and memes. Because many of them have bought a share of his masters from him, their emotionally and financially invested in his success. For his next project, he wants to break down the wall between artist and fan even further. I want to be like, here are 20 demos, let's make an EP together, he says. There are a lot of creative people in my Discord, but they haven't necessarily had the mechanisms to be able to exercise their creativity. In building up community and infrastructure, Alan and others NFTs as a viable alternative to the current system of major music labels. Labels have long been powerful in the music industry because they provide artists with cash upfront, mentorships, mass distribution, and strategies to thrive, but in return they usually assume creative control and the rights to an artist's masters allowing them to use the music in perpetuity. Owning masters was so important to Taylor Swift that she is re-recording all of her old albums from scratch, NFT musicians believe that a new model like the one offered by catalog might be able to provide financial stability, creative freedom and community all in one go. Halik mall became a believer in the power of NFTs after a decade in the music industry, including being signed to labels, led him to grow disillusion with the system. There was a large degree of manipulation and a lack of regard for my wider vision as an artist, he says. Last month, mall sold four songs as NFTs for 56 ETH, now $261,000. Mall also has a thriving Discord owns his masters and is using the funds he made from NFT sales to build a music and art studio in Barbados, which he hopes will uplift a community that often suffers from brain drain. Before your fan base couldn't be in the label meetings with you, but now we're all the label together. He says, it's like being in the auction house window versus going and campaigning for what you believe in. La Tasha and LA based musician who sold over 50 music and multimedia NFTs says that the ability of labels to nurture talent from the ground up was already on the Wayne before the rise of NFTs. I haven't connected with a label in years that was fully into developing artists anymore, she says. Artists had to before really cultivate numbers on platforms like Instagram TikTok and Twitter before a label would even look at them. I think it's important for artists to think about their autonomy. As individual artists build ecosystems around them, more collaborative efforts are also amassing momentum. Song camp a collective founded in March has hosted songwriting camps for dozens of previously unconnected songwriters, with those new creations selling for thousands of dollars on catalog. The.

Halik mall Allen Taylor Swift Alan La Tasha Barbados LA Wayne Instagram Twitter
"mall sell" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

16:22 min | 1 year ago

"mall sell" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

"And so i want take it a little bit farther. Because that's what i do anyway. You know when you pick up one of my books. It's not the same as picking up walter edition or someone else is going to be a slightly different experience and hopefully people expect going. Let's take a quick break and hear from today sponsor. Let me ask you a question. How many books are sitting next to your bedside right now. That are only half red. It's just hard to find the time to read so much. But with blankets you can have all the most important ideas and takeaways from the world's top nonfiction bestsellers. All in a fun. Fifteen minute read or listen. Use these blinks to get inspiration. Learn more about books. You'd like to read next. Broaden your knowledge and getting new perspectives blinking takes the top nonfiction books. Like rich dad. 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All in. one place you can do it all but why do it all alone learn. How just works can help with just works. You can on board new employees with ease take the guesswork out of employment and tax regulations access national health insurance plans and save hours on time tracking this things with payroll and don't worry they have twenty four seven expert support so find out how just works can help your business by going to just works dot com. That's just works dot com for more information. All right back to the show. I'm glad you touched on short-selling or short squeeze because this is crucial to understanding this story. So i want to just quickly cover. What short-selling is also what a short squeeze is for those who don't know it's imperative to understand. Yeah so short-selling is a way of betting that a company is going to go down. We all know long it. Accompanies gonna go up. You buy the stock. The stock goes up in value. You can sell you make the way you bet against the company is you do something called short-selling which is you borrow a share. Let's say a stock is trading at ten dollars a share you borrow share and you sell it on the market for that ten dollars and you promise to return that stock to that person at some point in the future so if the stock goes down as you believe it is to five dollars you then rebuy the share for five dollars you give it back to the person you borrowed from and you pocket the difference which would be five dollars but the problem with short-selling is is that you are. Losses are not capped at anything. They're actually unlimited is if you buy it at ten dollars and the stock just starts going up you still have to return that share so if you have to buy it back at twenty dollars you've lost if you have to buy it back at one hundred dollars you lost ninety dollars and they can go on theoretically forever so if you buy a ton of shares yourself on his hair shorts that means you borrowed a ton of shares and at some point you have to richmond those ships and what happens with a short squeeze is. Let's say you short sal meeting borrow a bunch of shares. You sell them on the market and let's say for whatever reason because good news comes out about the company or suddenly for whatever reason everyone read it. Wants to buy the company stock. The stock starts to go up. You're in a tough position because you need to buy shares which also pushes the stock rights and so if there's a bunch of shortsellers suddenly they're squeeze as they try to reach the x. They all dive in at the same time. Trying to revive those shares. The price keeps going up. They keep trying to rebuy and it just gets worse and worse and worse so that's essentially a short sleeves and it's happened a number of times history men. It can be very very dramatic because it happens very quickly if something happens to make a stock start to skyrocket all the shortsellers after dive into the market the same time to get out or else they could lose everything i mean. You don't just lose one hundred dollars. You could lose a billion dollars if the stock goes up chairs and that's essentially what happened here and what's really interesting about this story with game. Stop. is the people on the other side. Were attempting to make short squeezed out. They weren't buying the stock most of them because they believed game should be worth of thousand dollars a share. They were buying stock because they saw that wall street had this huge short visit and they knew if they bought it. They could or a short sweet at one point in time. One hundred forty percent of the shares of this company were short which means that more shares were short than exist which means that what happened with people borrowed it sold it and then borrowed it again and sold multiple times and so that's a very dangerous position for people on the short side and a lot of the hedge funders. I talked to who were not on. The short side. Couldn't believe that people were still shorting stop with that much of a short. Because you know it's crazy. I mean you're going to get killed at some point. It's very easy for something bad to happen. That's what happened. And so there's a lot of reasons behind why hedge funds continued to short a stock. The basic reason was is that game stop. A company looked like it was in a lot of trouble. This is a company that brick and mortar in malls selling video game consoles in a world. That's gone digital right in a world that doesn't go to malls anymore especially during a pandemic so you would look on paper and say okay. Game stops in a lot of trump. This companies probably gonna go the way blockbuster or You know you can name a dozen companies that have gone out of business and this is just the next one going out of business. But the thing that that i think wasn't taking into account beyond the whole read it mob was. They did have some outs one of them. Being the video game market is actually whom and game stop has a community of people that love video games so separate from the fact that it's as brick and mortar store is also has this millions and millions of people who nostalgically love game stop and buy itself video games and so they're pivot to the digital world is actually not that hard for them to do if they could just figure it out. That's where the value proposition comes into this. But the reality is what happened was it turned into a massive short squeeze. It turned into this massive. Let's take down wall street. Let's stay strong and state aids together strong with the thing that would go off on. read it. let's look at this dat. Let's all stay together on this Getting killed and most of this activity this cohort of folks who wanted to quote unquote. They own stick it to the man by running up. The price was happening on reddit on wall street bets. So i'm assuming that you spent a good amount of time on red and wall street bets researching for this book. So i'm kind of curious. What were some of the most surprising things you discovered on the site. Yes oh first of all on its surface when you just look at it and the reason. I called the book. The antisocial network is the dirty free. For all i mean. The language is horrific. There are some people who are just trolls. I mean read it as a is a world full of people who were just having fun and taking the piss out of everyone else and just sort of troll it but as you look deeper into wall street bets specifically what i found was number one. There's a lot of really smart people on like people who know much more about investing than i do. They might be amateur investors but some of these people really understand this stuff and do some really good research and the other thing i noticed was that it was a very diverse group. He wasn't the do have of white troll guys sitting on the internet and there's lots of all sorts of people read it and lost by the end of its wealth and nine nine meatball. And you have to read between the boss and the people who worked for hedge funds and the people who are just out crazy and a lot of college kids and things like that but as you dug deeper you definitely saw a lot of interesting analysis. What i also love is the way people would put up pictures of their accounts. Their wins in their losses and people are almost more excited to put up losses than wins and there were people putting up things where they lost one hundred thousand dollars in two days and everyone makes fun of them but at the same time. It's the camaraderie. It's this like that. I think was very unique to wall street. Bet his people putting up their losses. More than there. When i think when he started out he was being ridiculed because he put so much money into game stop and he lost. He was losing. It was falling apart and people were making on them and then when he starts to make my suddenly puts up this screen shot which shows or seven million dollars in profits. It's this kind of incredible moment where it's almost like let's rally together. This is actually possible. And so yeah. I don't know. I had a lot of fun honored. I spent a lot of time on it months. Twitter a lot already in and i'd always kind of looked at it and stuff like that but this was the first time i really saw the power looks. Community is pretty impressive when people get together. It's incredible what power they think. That's something wall. Street is still trying to deal with the try to figure out how you work around the idea that these loosely affiliated groups and be more powerful than wall street back and you've got nine million people each have a two thousand dollars stimulus check or whatever that's as big as any wall street bank right there and so it's intriguing. It's an intriguing thought. I think there's something there that we could all learn from. Actually there's a book called mindset and sort of touches on this like flipping an issue on its head celebrating your losses and i found this on my own business with trying to raise inter- capital you can get one hundred knows before you get a yes and it can really wear you down or if you're an actor and you go for an audition. You told no all the time and it's this idea of like celebrating. Those knows like flipping this on his head and because really at the end of the day. Persistence is all that matters right. And so this idea of celebrating losses is intriguing to me. I agree entirely like the writer. Obviously your life is until you make it. It's so much rejection own. I was a struggling writer. I got about one hundred ninety rejections before opening first book. And i would take him to the walls so i had just walls covered rejection slips because it was like it powers forward. It's like you live in that misery and it's kind of romantic. It's an interesting point. I'm sure actors. It's even worse because it's to your face you know you go in. And he's living in front of someone and they reject you. That's that's a hard thing to get used to. But i do think the more you revel in it the stronger you. I think that was going on for sure on this sport. Is you know people who are willing to take risks. Because even if they lost they still had something to post. You could post your massive loss. Then get some level of feeling of camaraderie out of that and so people were willing to take risks. That on paper made no sense at all of the whole yolo investing comes out is the whole idea that and explain it in the book for like a college kid who's got a couple thousand dollars. The idea of making five percent of that is pointless. Why take a safe investment that you might make a little bit rather than just dead on something that you could get a ten x. Any college kid agrees with that. Always go for the tax. Never go through the same thing because it doesn't change your life but a yellow beck does change your life and it makes sense to me. Someone who's been involved in gambling my whole life young going to like the idea of just doubling. Your money is not that excited. When i used to go to vegas all the time you would see people sit down at the blackjack table with a thousand dollars and when they hit two thousand dollars you'd say oh you should leave just doubled your money but that's not exciting right. Nobody leaves doubling their money. Nobody in vegas knows this. They count on it and that's how they make their money. No one will leave doubling their money. He believed to make ten times their money before this cable. Because w money just doesn't feel like a win and i think wall street doesn't necessarily understand. That's what's going on here. They think people made twenty percent. Now we short. It's gonna go back down but that's not how the people aren't read it. Twenty percent is meeting listed. They wanna make two thousand percent before they would walk away. And i think that's something that someone has to figure out. Now how do you analyze and people are crazy. People are not thinking straight. they're thinking. I watch annexed. Let's take a quick break and hear from today sponsor you guys know. I'd take my food and beverages seriously. And i'm a big believer in the idea that you are what you eat and it really does matter where your food comes from. That's why my wife and i are craving fish. There's no other place. We go to than the wild alaskan company. The wild alaskan company sources wildcats seafood from alaska and the pacific northwest. You can choose from salmon or whitefish or combination and every month. They have these different specials to explore. But they're always of the highest quality sustainably sourced wild cot and that's the key word wild cot seafood delivered right to your door. 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"mall sell" Discussed on Meditative Story

Meditative Story

05:11 min | 1 year ago

"mall sell" Discussed on Meditative Story

"It changes me for a couple of years. I feel almost a mobile. But one day i pulled some old sneakers out of my closet. They're not even running sneakers but they carry me a few blocks another day. I jog a few more. I keep at it running. I start to see can take me to a different place inside my head a place where i'm the writer of my own story years later here. I am in key largo with this. Strong body is built. The world narrows to just a few meaningful details like the peanut butter sandwich waiting for me at the next stop. I'm still chuckling about my dad. He and my mom are divorced but they are here together to support my run. This run is my own journey but it's also a family affair also on a high from meeting a man last week at a party who i'm sure will become my husband. She feels the same way. Because after three days he proposes. I'm running in a very long straight line but i feel like i'm being held in a circle of love. I grabbed the peanut butter sandwich from my cousin and pour water on my head. I have twenty six hours to go. Many miles in the spectators have been and the runners are no longer close together. I jogged straight. Slat stretches seeing only south florida as usual wide asphalt roadways pastel condos strip malls selling sunscreen and flipflops. My family has our routine down. They leapfrog me and we repeat the same drill. I feel solid in my body. I'm trying not to go too fast or too slow but just forward step after step by early afternoon. It's face melting really hot. I've been training new york all winter and spring where it was twenty degrees cooler at mile. Forty my uncle says you still have a long way left. And we all stare daggers. At him he learns the first fifty. Miles are uneventful. Which is good if you're having trouble in the first half. It's going to be that much harder to keep moving. The sky slowly darkens without much color. It must be sunset. I've been running the whole day. The air rushing in and out of my lungs feels cooler. The sweat moves through my pores on my forehead. I tune into my body for a quick scan. My legs don't hurt my feel swollen but not too bad keep drinking. I think i need more salt. I want those pickles mostly. I am focused on my next goal. Just get to the bridge. Just get to the rich. It becomes a mantra matching my pounding footsteps. I have to get to the seven mile. Bridge around mile seventy before a certain time and the bridge will be hard because it will be dark again and no support. Vehicles are allowed to stop around miles. Sixty i can feel hot spots starting to burn on my feet. The beginning of blisters usually changing shoes and socks are enough to prevent this. But this is the furthest. I've ever run at one time at the aid station. My mother a doctor ministers to me applying powders and oils and petting my leg. As i leave her for the next stretch as always she knows just what i need without a lot of words being spoken. All gestures convey one message. You can do this.

south florida new york
"mall sell" Discussed on Have You Seen This Man?

Have You Seen This Man?

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"mall sell" Discussed on Have You Seen This Man?

"Staying informed has never been more important. Information is coming at us faster than ever. So how do you make sense of. It'll start here. hey. I'm brad mielke from abc news. In every weekday we will break down the latest headlines in just twenty minutes straightforward reporting dynamic interviews and analysis from experts. You can trust always credible always solid start here from abc news twenty minutes every weekday on your smart speaker or your favorite podcast app. It's a quiet spring morning in suburban virginia. And i'm in the backseat of a nondescript minivan with tinted windows. Deputy marshals chris lure and daniel schimdt. Check our stakeout. their mission. fine. John rufo crisis latte pretty much. Yeah because it's hard. I mean this is robot robot like a little robot. You can drive around with a camera case. You've got a giant pots. Jason is weapon of a rifle today. Shield of yep so Ballistic shield matthew person. Danielle don't think they'll need that kind of firepower. But they're always ready. This turned out to be rufa. You'd wait for other people though. We were not do this alone but if you had you. Had you got what you need. I hope we can outrun. Look that fast. But you'd be surprised sometimes but we do have We have a for their freedom right at any one time there are hundreds of fugitives wanted by law enforcement. The us marshals are in charge of finding them. Then there's a small group of special cases the fugitives who've been so hard to find. They need extra attention. These cases get priority status. They get more resources. Bigger awards like john rufus case. Chris and danielle had been in pursuit of rufo for almost three years now. Much of the work is painstaking. Reconstructing financial records analyzing personal habits and traits and mapping his contacts. But the two deputies also follow up on every possible sighting. No matter how. Flimsy the tip may seem. Today they're looking into a tip. That came into headquarters in arlington virginia. So what is the origin of this guy. We're going to take a look at. What's where did he come from. So he came from one of the inspectors have been headquarters Sent us this tip and our redo it the tips. I've served a guy who looks very similar to rufo at a store. I'm going to give us address Who's in the Couple times and when he found interesting was The guy fit the physical descriptions of rebel heavy new york accent. Same height and weight goes. You can't just ignore that like yeah and we're not gonna ignore any that comes through and what was interesting about it was it came from you know an inspector so somebody who somebody who's like not a lay person right. Who would maybe just say. Oh well and send us a bogus tip like a tip. We got last week was. Oh hey we see rufo. he's in kansas. The guy six foot something. It's likely not rufo paid. You're allowed can rule out pretty quickly just by digging like the one. We got last week where he was in. Kansas danielle's probably spent a couple of hours on the computer and was able to find a driver's license photo of the individual. And we did not need to investigate that. Further buds kristen. Danielle had arrived an hour earlier to stake out the location. It's a small store in a suburban strip mall selling mattresses recliners and easy chairs. Actually as i was kind of pulling into the parking lot at about nine fifteen is pretty easy to identify individual which this tip was about. Did he look like roof food. You he does. He's the same. He's the same height and we have our capabilities of advanced. When we're out in know when we're out in the field out on the street we can obtain driver's license photos on our phones. Depending on state so I always able to identify the individual saw where he parked and based off vehicle information Was able to identify him and so we do. So we know the individual is from new york. He is five foot three revival four. He has a very italian name You hold photo side by side which is always interesting to do so. That's not a bad. That's a pretty decent lead so you know the one in kansas. We looked at it. I quietly enter the story behind them. The salesman's smile melts away as they explain. They're not looking for furniture. He does look like rufo lightly as possible. They asked the man if they can scan his fingerprints..

rufo brad mielke abc news chris lure daniel schimdt John rufo john rufus Danielle virginia danielle matthew Jason arlington Chris new york kansas us kristen Kansas
"mall sell" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

The Adam Carolla Show

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"mall sell" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

"I couldn't imagine going home and handing them to my dad go. Hey bitch get out there. Go the mall sell that shit. I'm gonna watch johnny quest you come back and make it soon pass on barrel head. My dad's like. I'm not even planning on giving you dinner tonight okay. I don't even know what we're talking about with these candy bars. That's back in the day. For whatever reason we we had to fill trash the boxes of trash bags. Summer sausage magazines and like remember. The big gets two free coupons for a personal pan pizza hut but exactly. Where is this money going. Why is only worth the three dollars pizza. Yeah this money going. I still have like ptsd if anyone ever shows me. The miniature manila envelope member the miniature by the way they don't make a medium size they make one. That's this big. They a two inch little manila and they make the big one but the little manila would come with candy bars. And there'd be like oh you take your money and you stuff it into the little manila and then they pull it out when you check the candy bars and every single year exact. Same thing i'd give the case back. The case had twelve candy bars on it or in it when i got it now. It's got one and a half. Because i couldn't. I was a junkie. i understand. My.

two inch one and a half three dollars twelve candy bars tonight two free coupons single year johnny quest
"mall sell" Discussed on The Dork Forest

The Dork Forest

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"mall sell" Discussed on The Dork Forest

"They're like for people who can't take care of anything. It's like get a path. Oh so you can put it wherever it doesn't need a ton of anything and hilariously. I typed in the words of Apophis and it's actually Pothos places right? It's actually a pothos is the name of the elf is the the album It's the name of the name of the plant. So you've got you've got a couple of those or one of those or got a I got a couple of those I've got I have a snake plant. I have to snake plants. Actually. They are also would be very familiar to you or anyone listening if you're like what the what the hell is that? Like they're just kind of the tall leave. It's just kind of like Spike my friend described it when I bought one is like she was like, it looks like the hair of someone like a cartoon on Nickelodeon like, yep. Yep and their conversational plants because they kind of look like but they look like at all like a like a look like a bunch of snakes standing around. Yeah. They also are pretty hard to kill ice and can be and what you know, you don't need water them much right? And then I've got a pet. I I've got a pencil Cactus, okay. They're just it looks it looks like a lot of green pencils all glued together. They'll put in with their many. Yeah. Okay, many many many sticks. Okay, and it's another great plant that like as long as you got some sunlight you can forget to water it for. Yep. For weeks at a time and it'll just YouTube you guys because you're getting me holding the phone up and perfect. I won't set a bonsai tree. Have you ever thought of you ever done any reading cuz I haven't ever had one. I feel like I wanted one when I was young cuz I remember there was a bonsai kiosk in arm off like I want one of those and my mom would be like what your ten you can't I'm not buying you a plant. Like I think I was Thirty and I killed it in a week and yeah, they see him delegate Jewell. Yeah. Yes. I'm very and but very pretty it was it was gorgeous and sadly kind of like I feel like when I see them and maybe this is because I only associate them with the kiosk in the mall selling a very specific job. Laughter style but like it almost felt like they had a whole scene to them. Like well the pot like it looks like like that one side umbrella kind of situation where the world shirt where the truck is on one side and then they've they've they've curved it to make it look like sort of a shade or an audit. Yes, and I guess I don't know what kind of tree it was. All I know is the guy who made it home and he gifted it to me. I killed it immediately and I felt really bad about it. He was like, that's all right. I do I make a lot of them and I was like, okay right off. And.

Nickelodeon YouTube Thirty Jewell one Apophis one side a week Spike
"mall sell" Discussed on The Manic Pixie Weirdo

The Manic Pixie Weirdo

06:23 min | 1 year ago

"mall sell" Discussed on The Manic Pixie Weirdo

"And he had no fucking workers benefits. I i live in my car. Basically like i work probably like ten hour days at work every day. Necessary to our recreate have no time. But at least if i could take forty five minutes i can help deal with some of these health problems because it gets bad. Enough did not even worse because our healthcare in this country is a fucking scam. Holy shit designed specifically rather a when comes to hospitals their pricing. It's designed to deal with insurance companies not individuals the sheri- just fucking destitute. God oh my god. I have family members in the healthcare industry and one of my my dad. Who's in the healthcare industry. He like Worked at like a clinic and he quit that job. Like working at a clinic. He couldn't do it because it was just like depressed him because he had to fill out all the paperwork and then like he had to sign all the insurance bills and stuff and it just got to the point where he was like i. I no longer feel like this. Is you know the. I took an oath to do no harm kind of thing and this is a version of harm. I did not sign up to do and it was. Just i mean say what you will about the nhs in the uk by at least. They've got something that works for a very large group of people i mean. I'm sure there are problems. But that's what the that's what the conservatives in government only speak to go you'll alarm universal healthcare. There's all these issues. Yeah you know. One of the issues isn't you go. Poorly died because he can't afford food or housing. Like i'd rather like. Oh no maybe have to wait a little longer for treatment. Or i don't get necessarily the doctor. I want right away but they do that than have like a hundred thousand dollar bill because i have cancer. Tonelli have cancer and crippling debt rate. That's i'm on my mother. And i like to do this thing. Where like occasionally will like look at what the lottery like the texas lottery has got up to and back when it was like a bill. You know it was that nuts like a billion dollars powerball zhang and we will do what would you like. What how do you know. What do you do with it like if you want you do everything and i remember my mom saying does this was back when i was still like living with irish enough to be living with my parents and stuff and they were like my mom's like well number one. You open an account and you use and you put like one hundred thousand dollars in that account immediately and all that goes into that account the only thing that you take out of that account for emergency health emergency healthcare because it's not the Like the illness they devastates families. It's the it's the debt it's the medical debt that devastates the families. No coming back not only have to begin with. Then they're like oh we also want interest on top that you can never outlive something with education beckwith education. You could actually work through college with like a job like that. My mom did that. She works college at a job at like the mall selling clothes. And they're talking of george bush. Junior comes through deregulates. Everything now the fucking colleges can charge whatever the fuck they want. So one semester on average is about ten grand. It's much education is. It's not like the doctor like my cousin. Jewish new york. She is a nurse and she actually went through a couple of degrees. She was a journalist. I than she was tech and then she actually went through a us like fast. Nursing program pinch nursing like crazy like three months or something like. Oh my gosh. Wow quick her. Wow inch a she got a job. One of the best hospitals in the country and then she actually went to nick. You a special. Like especially nick. You pass the the bar. He he can practice over new york. The amount of debt that they collected even between like their household income is probably something nuts. Something insane like three hundred and fifty thousand four hundred four hundred thousand dollars. You're not talking nuts. Like millions of dollars like not in billions is not even here. It's not even millions of dollars nuts. it's like hundreds of thousands of dollars nuts and win. Hundreds of thousands of dollars seems like an insane amount of money. I feel like there's like we need to do something like what's the point of being a doctor. A lawyer there. They each have a professor in the medical field and the other is a lawyer and they still with those two incomes would never outrun their educational debt agent. I know it's it's nuts. It's absolutely not. I mean. I know this used to be true. This was true. Probably about ten years ago so i don't know i'm i'm sure it's changed since then but about ten years ago if you wanted to become a doctor in the state of texas And you just went to like a public division. One school like university of texas. Texas am texas tech You know like those are. Those are public universities in the state of texas. If you went there it was going to cost you for all four years of medical school now. A lot of people don't know this so you do four years of medical school and then after you graduate you do what's called residency so once you're done with the four years you're not done. You still have more to do. And that can last up to ten years depending upon what field you want to go into but if you were to go to medical school ten years ago for four years and then you did a three year residency just a three year residency fellowship. Meaning you specialize in something just a residency. It was going to cost you half a million dollars or those years before all this got irregulatities like it costs even two years ago. Let's go back.

forty five minutes millions of dollars three months hundreds of thousands of dolla one hundred thousand dollars ten hour three year One Hundreds of thousands of dolla three hundred and fifty thousa one semester half a million dollars billions ten years ago Tonelli nick two years ago Texas billion dollars new york
"mall sell" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"mall sell" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"And radio. I'm David Westin. There is news breaking across the Bloomberg right Now there's a vote going on in the Senate to confirm Tony Blinken is the next secretary of state, although that vote continues, they now have enough votes. So Tony Blinken will be the next secretary of the United States. In the meantime, let's turn to that, while dry that Gamestop's had markets have been captivated since late last week with the phenomenon that is Gamestop and the battle between short sellers and a group posting on Reddit With stacks shooting up in fluctuating wildly, and the Chandler is here now to bring us up to speed on the drama. That is game stuff. So Emma is quite a story. It is quite a story. It is quite a drama. David is keeping everybody entertained. I think as a lockdown in many parts off the world, let's start with a few numbers 32%. That's how much a stock popped at the open today. 400%. That's how much it's up this year close to 2000%. It's up in the past year. It is the story that doesn't seem to die. And as you mentioned that in the introduction, it seems to be a battle between short sellers who were heavily short the stock. Let's talk about the revenue. The revenues of the Talking falling. It was a dying company, You know, physical stores in mall selling games, People thought that it has had its day. And then, as you mentioned there's a bunch of retail trade is using Wall Street bets a forum on Reddit to talk up the stop saying that there are some good things about the fundamentals and also playing a game. It seems trying to be The short sellers, And that is perhaps why we've seen such a huge rally in Game stock Stop Gamestop stock over the past few days, weeks and in fact, over the past year also, David so Emma speculate with me here a bit. We're not supposed to do those journals but speculate with me. We've had social media before, like, Read it right. It's been around for quite a while. We should have had short sellers for a good long time. Come. These two came together in this particular stack at this particular time. That is, That is a very good question. David and a lot of people are pointing to the founder of Chewy. That's the company that sells pet food online that he's now a board member off game. Stop it. Someone who started to build a position in the stock back in August of last year, saying that their ways for this company to turn around that it could become more of an e commerce company that it could be one that dealt with games that a downloadable, which is of course, at the direction of travel we're seeing in that. Particular sector on once he got involved Ryan code That's when a number of other those retail need retail investors started to get behind what he was doing on. That's why we might have, And that's perhaps why we have seen this big change or this big rally on this big focus on Gamestop, but for a spectator's We love a good short squeeze. When Cohen comes along, I have to say thank you so much to Emma Chandra for that report on Gamestop Coming up Raytheon earnings beat today We're going to speak with CEO.

David Westin Emma Chandra Gamestop Tony Blinken Reddit Senate secretary United States Bloomberg Emma Ryan Cohen Raytheon CEO founder David