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"malibu film society" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

Hollywood Unscripted

08:27 min | Last month

"malibu film society" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

"Welcome to Hollywood unscripted yet. Another stuck at home edition. I'm your host Scottsdale. All of the Malibu Film Society and today our guest is Broadway and film producer writer Director Hedge Fund Manager Sports Team owner. James D Stern whose moose film as the Sundance Audience Award winning giving voice. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you for so stuck at home and knowing your passion for Sports. This has got to be the worst. There's nothing on TV except old games. Yeah it's tough you know and I'm here with my son who's his biggest sports fan as I am? So it's definitely been challenges. I think we've been watching a lot of the show. Survivor because at replicates sports about as much as anything right now and I were watching last Which for me is like watching home movies. Because I'm Nina steeped in the bottles and I made a movie the same time as swell so you did a documentary on Michael Jordan of Eric didn't I imax film on Michael. Which is the reason. Why last dance got flushed? Which is on his story. But I was approached by some nance cheers to produce some Kodak Film and I went to the NBA. And this will already doing only doing this year while the different markets and they said well you know what you're right if you guys. The last five games of the regular as tasks and show it to us will mix. We did that and the NBA said you know what? This is really timely. In let's go with Amex WanNa let's put the other one on ice for bed and that's what we did and then less ends comes out during the Obama can contrary so it's funny the way these things all out. Yeah so how? Are you actually coping at home? Which keeping you busy. Well I right which keeps me busy and I love projects which are in the process of either being finished or preparing or you know so in fine. Us folks not happening we didn't I didn't Miss Fischer net flex servers successful with Adam Sandler Job Rams and we hope one day to do another one but the timing of is obviously going to get impacted by this but other than that I got lucky is giving Moyes was about to start at South by South West the Sundance it would have had a bigger impact on me. Fortunately for me and for my team the film did go at Sundance. That did win the festival. Favor war the distribution is now in finalized. So I I guess less enacted than some art talk to us about what's happening distribution because right now it's anybody's guess as to what's going to happen with eaters reopening at what does it look like the path is going to be. I cannot say yet. What the distribution apple be but it will be finalized in the next week and It's a place where we it helps to be. But it's look a very dear friend who were on the phone for two years. That was premiering a southbound new just got obliterated yeah it was like at night up in the area to catch the people who had finished films and what happens hundred comeback from this. I think that film will easier Timothy Broad. We will have a very very very hard. I'm developing a Broadway musical of the film civil line playbook very excited about. I think that fortunately far enough wrote go. The by the time ready should be okay but I keep on thinking. How would you feel if you were girl from the North Country? Which just got his glowing fabulous reviews if the favorites win the Tony Award a huge Ron. It open basically a week or two weeks before it. An show gets down. I mean that's going to be very and you know you look at Broadway. And how much impacted by tourists meet New York addition to people need to be able to set within those proximity to each other and the purpose of or difficult industry so that seemed our citizens are very the film world. You know I think that if you're ahead of the curve in terms of working with streamers okay if we had sold our film for instance getting boys to a distributor that was not a streamer. That deal had already been done right. So let's talk about giving voice because this is a film that Mary's you're too big passions filmmaking and Broadway yes that's as documentary and while you've produced a lot of features when it comes to documentaries you like to step behind the camera. Yes I direct the docks. I started director period. The reason why I started going towards To Fall I was that I was asked to do that. Michael Jordan which I had a particular knowledge about Sloughs Ersan. It was funny because I found that I was quite good at it. Although my background than all right I come from the Edwards everything so I started doing when I when I started. My Company wouldn't right for me to go off for nine months unchecked and direct feature plus as raising tickets so the combination of those things mentioned mccracken's down on what I could do was documentary where I could go shoot back. I said of an edit facility in the office so I could be producing futures allows dry docks like it so much but if it comes as far as giving voices concern you know that was glorious situation. We got a call from Istanbul Romero who was August Wilson's widow and she had seen prior to mine called every little stout which was shortlisted as the Oscar which was on the creation of the show of course long when she asked if I would like to come up to Seattle and talk to her about doing a documentary about the competition. Thousands of kids compete every year to earn a monologue of August. Wilson's all the country and they compete for the troops that Rodway Sanctuary. I was intrigued. Ios Big Fan of artists work on new two plays and I went up and we just talk for a long time about how I could do something like that. That would not be a competition. Samba competition competitions film but also film talked about what the process writing was process of giving voice to people were now need different time period than one place and we decided to go. Forward and Endeavour condoms graciously stepped up to raise money up with their own money. And once we got by Davis stepped up and Denzel Washington your view and then John Legend ultimately saw the gentleman. Wrote this Gorgeous Amazing Song for which I think is going to be the amp your call number Brian. Which is yet speaks to so much more than just trying to be on stage at Song. It's going to be everywhere of actually for you after University of Michigan and then Columbia for the NBA. It was Broadway before the movies so Broadway you did the original stop and then some revivals sound of music the producers hairspray little shop of horrors legally blonde just to name. A few revivals was originally mean sonnen. Music's reliable produces original airspace and original noon based on films. But that set the original right. But then you did make the jump. Film by producing and directing all the rage and the cast alone for a first time director. We're talking Joan Allen Jeff Daniels Robert Forster Andrei Brower Anna Paquin. David Schwimmer Josh. Brolin January Jones and her first film before Madman. Gary sinise Giovanni Ribisi. I mean this is really crazy. I mean a genius of Mary. Renew MY CASTING. Director of course went on to become as big as directors world. I I look back. It's really a WHO's WHO and It was a film was very important to me adaptation for that but over the station I directed it and I think the Gary sinise no sat me down after watching you for about two days. I WanNa take teach d'arrache and he did. He was so great and I'd stayed. You know very very good friends with Joan with Jeff. Daniels worked with several times since it was difficult. Laureus crazy situation. I think that because I had done as much as I had done on stage I had sort of a certain amount of credit and I think that because the film is about even back them. You know the proliferation of guns huguenots comedy of the spouting rock hands laid people also want to so into combination. In one of these days. I'll go back in lottery. Watch it I haven't seen one. But it was a real trial by fire. Real baptism to filmmaking. It was a trial by fire. But one thing I will say is I really really knew how to work with actors from all my time with ear what I did not know was filmed but I really knew to right and I knew how to work with actors and I'm very very natural in so head all that going for me I didn't know damn thing about what shots.

NBA Joan Allen Jeff Daniels Broadway Michael Jordan Malibu Film Society Director Sundance Mary Scottsdale Sundance Audience Award Sports Hollywood James D Stern August Wilson Gary sinise Director Hedge Fund Manager Sp Us Amex WanNa Tony Award
"malibu film society" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

Hollywood Unscripted

07:14 min | 3 months ago

"malibu film society" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

"Originally this had been announced under the title. Molly yes when did that change and why it changed partly feedback from distributors here in the US Because Street? Who said do you realize molly is the name of a street drugs that everybody is? GonNa think this film is about drugs and I kind of resisted dot feedback for awhile but also some other feedback. I got was that it didn't give enough of a clue really about what the film was going to be about. It didn't help people into it. It was a female name. And as you know man at the center of it but then fought for me. Her right to her name. Molly is important. Because although we're in his head she's the one who's holding it together emotionally on the fact that at the end of the story. He suddenly remembers hunt name and says it is an incredibly moving of the stories so there was good reason to call me but there was also very good reason to not call it molly and so finally decided on this title. That would at least give people clue that when we're seeing we'll be on the lives of the guy had these are the roads not taken. These are the life you didn't live. I saw an interview with you. Where once said ideas are to a penny? Yeah how do you know when the idea is the one you wanNA pursue when I'm still passionate about after euro two it has to withstand the test of time because you have to live with for a long time so it can't be something you're GonNa get bored with or or wish that you'd never taken on in the first place so it's like that if I'm still really intrigued by occupying I think one of the things that I've learned from talking with. So many filmmakers over the years is that every film you make ends up affecting you in some way. What's your takeaway having completed this project? Having completed this project is. I'm really looking forward to doing comedy next on my four D. written it so I think it's good to deal with subjects that have sadness or loss lisa part of life but will so there are other ways of dealing with this subject. I didn't feel it's Don's right from one subject to the next one way of telling the story to the next. I never want to repeat myself. I'm not interested. I feel I've had the experience not moving onto something else where there's something else new to learn here and not very much at the beginning of its life. Its trajectory in the world on. So I don't yet know how who's GonNa welcome it how it's going to be received. You never do. No I was just talking to a Spanish speaking journalists somebody from one of the Latin American countries and I was very interested to know how it was for him. And how it might be received by the Latino Latina community and it was very gratifying to hear the him. It was a great relief to hear some Spanish spoken a length. Not just like Papa my mouth or whatever and the Spanish speaking characters were not made or chauffeur's they were very complicated. Rounded human beings have been interesting and difficult transition. But it's very early days. I I'm finding out whether someone is GonNa loud in people's hearts and minds who's going to want it who's GonNa find themselves it who's going to recognize it. I don't know yet but has the process of telling this story changed you in any way. Yeah film I feel like I go into a universe. Somehow University of my own making in I start with a blank page and then it ends up. Kinda world on the film these people in it and inhabiting it doing things and speaking in it you know. I can't blame anyone myself for what exists up there on the screen. But I think I became through making it even more interested in whether cinemas a medium movies on on not like a doorway into the mind on minds of so mysterious. If you could put a recording device inside your mind and listen to watch sports in there it would be much more complicated than this film. You know the way off saw stance. From Associati from one thing to the next day memories the imagination the thoughts the visions Minds our new universes of such complexity and since the very beginning of making films. I've kind of wondered if we could have a Mak- film that function like the mind in a way so it's part philosophical part practical question but that's punishable. I was attempting to do this one. So you said you kind of move from style to style that you've tested one boundary and you're looking for the next. What drives you from style to style. Well it's interesting. You should ask that because I actually never think of it as a style really. It's like I think. Of what form does this story need or idea need in order to be told so? It's a consequence of things much deeper in the idea or in the story and then I try and find the necessary form for that so I don't think of it as something adding on to the top of the subject matter so just being how you know many things over. His style is kind of interesting if you like but rather as something that is it must be told this way on the has ended on with it looking palms if I'm exploring different genre and different ways of telling things rather than having one signature thing signature way of making films but for that reason because I'm trying to find out how must be told. What shape does this? Some need comes out of that. Feeling of necessity. And when you're developing that how does a movie tell you how it should be told? I suddenly meditates on it and I think I work out. You know I try this try that I tried to think that the first thought is not always best. You know what would be. Another way of. Doing this would be doing that. I look a lot of stuff. I look at photographs and look at other movies. I listen to music and I gradually find it. I I always loved the matter of the scope to look a block of stone and sees what form is waiting inside that block to be found and I experience making a film a little bit like that. It's like I'm finding something I'm not necessarily inventing it but I'm finding something that was hidden and that to be found. Thank you so much to our guest. Today Sally Potter Who's written and directed the roads not taken and also to our producer for joining us. Jenny thank you so much for calling in Sally Syndrome. Nice talking with you. Thank you very much. Hollywood unscripted is created by. Kurt comb media and presented in cooperation with the Malibu Film Society. This episode was hosted by Scott to law CO hosted by Jenny. Curtis with guest. Sally Potter produced and edited by Jenny. Curtis sound engineering by Michael Kennedy. The score for the roads not taken featured as the music. This episode was composed by Sally Potter and provided courtesy of Sony Music. Entertainment the executive producer of Hollywood scripted. A Stuart Halperin the Hollywood unscripted theme song by Celeste. And Eric Dick Please. Rate Review and subscribe to this podcast for more conversations with top industry professionals discussing the entertainment. You Love Creek. How media.

Sally Potter Molly Jenny Hollywood US Curtis Sony Music Latino Latina community Love Creek University of my Stuart Halperin Don Malibu Film Society Papa Eric Dick executive producer Sally Syndrome Mak Kurt
"malibu film society" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

Hollywood Unscripted

10:42 min | 3 months ago

"malibu film society" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

"Welcome to Hollywood unscripted. I'm your host. Got To law of the Malibu Film Society. Joining me today in the studio is our producer. Jenny Curtis Hi Jenny. And this is our final episode of the season. Our guest today is Sally Potter. Who has written and directed the roads? Not Taken starring. Javier Bardem L. Fanning along with Salma Hayek and Laura Linney welcome. Thank you very much indeed. Over the past several years we've had a steadily increasing number of films that have been dealing with dementia and I know you've had some personal experience with it. But what was the new territory? What was the difference that you wanted to get across with your story? I wanted to explore really the mystery of the mind. The sale is not necessarily only a really difficult and tough tragedy. Although there's often great difficulty involved but the fact that we don't really know what goes on in the mind when somebody seems to disappear. I ASK MYSELF THE QUESTION. Or maybe they're going somewhere really interesting. Not gave if you'd like a doorway into thinking differently about the mind about lives not adverts not taken us the title That somebody might be slipping in and out of different kind of a win. Says even of power lives the lives. They could've lived existing at the very least somewhere within the mind so it was using it not so dementia is not like the sum total of the stories. Not just about somebody with dementia but rather somebody in a state of mind in relationship with in this case of Dourson taking care of him and we're exploring that state of mind also through her is to know that you did. Dedicate this to your late brother. Nick and that he severed from frontal lobe dementia. Yes from a young onset dementia. He was very young when he got something. The symptoms took him over quite. He passed on within two years. As I understand it you were very involved in his care. Yes I was. So how did that inform the story that you wanted to tell me? It was accompanying him. If you like has his kind of witness and keg it there were other people carrying for him to but but being responsible for his car and going with him opened my eyes to many many things first of all how badly somebody in that condition is often treated as if they're becoming less than human song and I found that I became incredibly protective of ten. And also the people say as more and more hard to communicate with somebody in this state. Well I found. It was not the if I went into. Let's say his speech patterns and treated them like poetry and wrapped with him and stay in these fractured language. Other people couldn't understand that we could understand each other perfectly well also that we laughed alert through the you know sometimes humiliating experience. He was having. I tried to turn them into a joke into a kind of human comedy rather than human tragedy so I learned a great deal. Of course I was deeply deeply saddened by his loss and booze grieving and so on but I wanted to find a way of telling a story that might by transposing it and transforming it into something else might first of all be useful for other people who've been through similar experiences. Carrozza whatever semi off different questions about the mind the mysteries of the mind uncertainty from all the neurologist. I talk to all the specialist so that period I gradually realized there is still a great deal to learn about this and many other mental states and a great deal more respect owed to the people who are living with this illness but I didn't want to a portrait of him so the character portrayed in his from heavy. It couldn't be more different. Touch Lee is very different. The story is held by a father daughter relationship siblings so it went through many processes of transformation. But that's where it sprung from. The father daughter relationship is obviously the core of this film and the character portrayed by Al. The daughter is so incredibly sympathetic to what her father is going through to the point of sacrificing everything else about her life. It seems. Well it's left open at the end. Exactly what she is prepared to sacrifice. And what isn't but what we see is that she's split. We see the consequences that so many women face in their lives whether that's mothers caring for their children. How can they also have a life a guilt free life following their own trajectory and she is a doors trying to do the right and loving thing for her father's the guy she loves? She loves her father and Heart is kind of a King Fan and for his suffering but she also loved her and work on. She wants to do that for the very end. We see a signal that she's trying to do both she's trying to do both wants to an intends to do both. Did you start creating the story while you were caring for your brother know afterwards while I was coming from I was actually making another film so I know exactly what it's like when you're working and answering the phone and rushing out of the late at night is early in the morning to deal with crisis or something? I know not speeches like at first time but no when I was in the middle of it was kind of overwhelming so it was only later when I started to do all right. Just do which is transformed some of the biggest expenses they fought in the life and starts work with it and see what you can do it. Put it back out into the world in a way that will make sense others but at the time no. I couldn't now separate from the making of the movie. There is the business side. Was this a hard sell to either investors or to the actors that you approached it was very hard sell to investors not such a hard sell to the two because they could see in it the potential to explore an incredible range of profound human experience really even in the smaller parts like Salma. Hayek you know it's small but every good actor knows there's no such thing as a small part and for her. It was really interesting to play a Mexican woman that she recognizes as a total human being and not stereotype and so on so no. The actors were very enthusiastic and eager. Hardworking and intent I think for investors. It was difficult to see how this might work. Because it's quite a complicated structure to run. These kind of power lives into weaving through the mind of this but also because the subject of dementia or mental illness is kind of taboo. You know there have been some films. Yes but it's still a difficult area that people don't we want to look at and this was coming out in such a different way. It's not really the main focus of the thing. It's not dementia. The main focus of this loud. The many faces of love adores for her father. An ex wife. I somebody who she still loves. But it's no longer responsible for and so on and so forth so yeah I think it wasn't self-sided but there were enough. People who were finance who passionately committed to it from the very beginning core finances and then others came in late and talk to us a little bit more about the casting. Yeah but you want to know was how they are. Your first choice. Who WERE OTHERS CONSIDERED FOR? This role did consider others now conveniently forgotten once. I've ended up with somebody. How could I even thought if anybody else on that? It's often like that. Sometimes it takes bit of trial and error and kind of figuring out and initially I was thinking of somebody English speaking and it took a while for me. It was like a Eureka moment when I thought no this will be much more interesting. If it's a Latino person who's not only looking at life through the filter of this illness but looking at it through the filter of another language so in a way the issue of translation between the mental state and how people understand the more communication difficulties the feeling of a border line if you like a physical border between Mexican America and the United States but the border inside the mind between one state and another one thing became a metaphor for another. And I've thought many of the performance is that have you done in particular how he was in in your research foam beautiful which I think is an extraordinary film. How in it so I approached him with the script on T. was IGA take it on with some trepidation that he was eager to take it on. Vr BARDEM and Selma Hayek. They know each other in real life. Did that affect their casting or the way they interacted onset. She's very very close friends with penelope. Who Dare is hard to? But they made a decision early on while they were on such a while we earn Russell and working together the they would create a kind of professional distant as if they didn't know each other outside. But I think there was joking and sense of humor and kind of the rough and tumble of the fact that they do already know each other. That probably be helped shelley the ease with which they worked together and because SAMA is Mexican and she's playing Mexican and he's playing Mexican. He was looking to her for example to make sure his accent was correct and that everything he did aside was authentic to her as a Mexican individual. That was very helpful for me to so yea they worked off each other very well and in a very short space of time you know. We shot all of those things together in three days but we prepared for months beforehand and those people who like to prepare. Of course ELLE FANNING. You had worked with on. Ginger and Rosa eight years ago and she is outstanding performer. An outstanding professional young twenty one year old now Thirteen I I work with her and she brings a dedication and infuse the ousman lightness to to a role and is able to imagine herself into the shoes of others experiences. She's not hot directly herself. She somehow manages to empathize with and imagine in an incredible sunset way. And she's Joyce who was used as an extraordinary form. Did you have in mind when you're creating the character? When I was writing the script I was deliberately not allowing myself to imagine any particular actors in the row but rather let the characters themselves come to life under my pants so to speak to find out who they were. Now that's partly. Because if you get fixated on a particular actor. Will you know writing? And it doesn't work out for one reason or another show delaying or you know whatever you disappointed whereas if you allow the character to come to life and then start to think well who could play. This might take this car during the different direction. That can be very enlivening and now what I usually do. Once I've got somebody committed to the pot in principle I then what with them find out how it fits retailer it slightly to fit them more precisely to sit in that qualities. Whatever and so to the point where then I really content much? Anybody else.

Salma Hayek Sally Potter Javier Bardem L. Fanning frontal lobe dementia Jenny Curtis Malibu Film Society Hollywood producer Laura Linney Dourson ELLE FANNING United States Nick Lee Joyce Heart Vr BARDEM Russell shelley T.
"malibu film society" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

Hollywood Unscripted

04:55 min | 4 months ago

"malibu film society" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

"Known since your audience is young adult. Do you feel responsibility with the messages of your films or is it the other way around where the audience is telling you what they want. And you're giving it to them. We try to learn and listen to what's going on pop culture and I used to watch as a kid. Jeffrey Katzenberg is friends with his son. David and Jeffrey would never stop reading. It'd be the New York Times directly in Time magazine. And so I think if you stay close to pop culture of what's really happening then you have a chance to kind of develop your projects in the right direction. I'm definitely not the one choosing. I'm just trying to be a good listener. So then. How does that affect the way? You develop your films. Something that I really connected with but wanted to show in a different way which we did in the script as was is a lot of voiceover expedition to get out because you have to understand how the characters feeling and I think young people especially or so in their head especially nowadays you have social media and like someone's having a party and you're not invited and how much that would probably hurt kit. So he said. How do we do that in a way? That feels unique and as silly as it sounds. I remember thinking back to that movie. Drop Dead Fred when I was a kid and this imaginary friend comes out so we said well what have large and to all the boys actually has these guys in her room and she's talking about and so that it's almost like we're getting her anxieties out but you get to watch the scene. But of course they're not there so I think those kind of fun devices can often be a fun. Extra element add so. How much of the film did you develop new scenes for versus? How much did you pull from the buck? We tried to stay true to the book. And of course not. Every scene in the book can make it to the film in either scenario but we took creative license in aesthetic moments. And I think in some of the Laura jeans anxieties in terms of how we visually show them but other than that like we try our hardest because again credits Jenny Han. She wrote books. That were beloved. Are you an all surprised to see how popular your content is with even demographics that we in the industry can refer to sometimes as sixty five just this side of dead? It's all over the board. Yeah it's funny I kinda got a lot of firsthand experience in my life from from friends and people around me that were on like those. Cw shows and you'd always think they were like twelve year old kid watching it and in reality it was like a thirty five year olds or forty year old mom of two and so. I think there has been something fun to watch of the reaction that it has kind of brought people back because I think again as I said like. We went through ten fifteen year period where these moods working made and so a lot of people in the thirties and forties still. Remember those John Hughes Movies and it's still fun to watch and he surprises along the way chorus everything I think to all the boys was a surprise. I think of course we're passionate what we're making and I loved the book and I love the idea of telling a Korean American girls story as she was going through this fun adventure but did I think it was going to become what it has become. I had no idea. Can you spell any secrets about three? I'll say that I think we really want to focus in the third movie on large gene and her growth. She stumbled into the situation because her sister sent out the love letters in the first one she had to deal with it in the second one she had to kind of deal with her past her present and the anxieties about her future and the third movie. It's about what do you want and I think we all kind of start to grow up and make choices and then you've got to figure out yourself so we really wanted to focus on Laura Jean. Her needs her discovering herself. In a way that was not just about the poison. Learn from your movies. I think I learned how to become a better filmmaker. Each movie we make. I think God I made some really bad decisions early on in my career but I take a lot of pride and trying to find great mentors and learn from our mistakes and every time we make a movie or developed the script I think afterwards we have a post mortem to understand why we think that character connected. Or what choices would we have made differently in and then it's like listen to your audience. It's really fun to be able to have made the second to all the boys and to see some of the feedback and most of it is positive but the parts. That aren't positive. I want to deliver on that for the fans. I think it's a huge responsibility for all of us that we want to do right by these Uber Fans. Thank you Jenny for joining us today and Matt. Thank you so much for coming appreciate. You guys haven't thank you. Let's Hollywood unscripted is created by Kurkcu Media and presented in cooperation with the Malibu Film Society. This episode was hosted by Scott to law with guest. Mat Kaplan additional guest. Jenny Curtis produced and edited by Jenny. Curtis sound engineering. By Michael Kennedy. The executive producer of Hollywood unscripted Stewart. Halprin the Hollywood unscripted Song is by Celeste. And Eric Dick Please. Rate Review and subscribe to this podcast for more conversations with top industry professionals discussing the entertainment. You Love Creek. How media media.

Laura Jean Jenny Hollywood Jeffrey Katzenberg Jenny Curtis Jenny Han New York Times Love Creek Michael Kennedy Time magazine David Mat Kaplan Eric Dick executive producer John Hughes Kurkcu Media Celeste Malibu Film Society Stewart
"malibu film society" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

Hollywood Unscripted

07:15 min | 4 months ago

"malibu film society" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

"Cases in two thousand fifteen which is a zero. Nothing to see what we can do. We're up to six hundred cases now and his albendazole inspired Super Pale superlight. Great morality sounds like a July nineteen eighty-five degrees. Yeah Little Wind is blowing. Yeah that's the sailboats. Are just coming in. After a long day. Exactly right perfect we could be showing a screening of Tesla. Good works to Seattle. Tesla might go better with baby bear his Sarah now sa- rise one of my favorite names. It's hard to make a bad Sarai. Adding is their egg going in there. Nothing at all metro is straight. The Robert Mondavi way of let the grape speak for themselves speak and they speak. I started that particular wine in two thousand eight. My son Callum was born in two thousand eight hence the name bear we started with perceived by bear. We went to baby bear. Rosa was GONNA be blushing bear. Because I'm barely now and I have two new wines coming this year. One is called twin bear. Which is a little bit of an is two twin peaks very small production solely. Walla Walla. Av and then I is an entry level wine and this one is called bear cub. And it's this same barrel profile some of the same vineyards but just a little different Approach so you've joined a group of interesting people Dennis Hopper Johnny Depp David Bowie Joni Mitchell. Jim Carey Johnny Cash. They found in artistic outlet with paints on canvas. But you create sculpture glass. So tell me how does the wine making make you feel This is such a departure from my day. Job Working as an actor and yet it's still creative. It's still involves a group of people and now I have a larger group of people that I work with that I adore and I love that process. I love being able to sit down and work through problems ideas inspiration with this core group of people that I have around me now that I've curated all the idea that we're going to attempt to make the great wine every year and a great number of so I've started with a Cabernet have moved to the Sahara. Two Thousand Eight IANNA THE SARAH. Two Thousand Fifteen. But you don't make much less than five hundred cases though. They're very small production. I you know I miss slow mover. This is a labor of love and we don't make any money on this. Actually we'll probably lose money but this process to me is it's a pleasure. It's again a Labor of love so your dream next part. I don't know it's the same thing I want to work with. Creative people. The people that have fun people love what they do. It doesn't matter. You like being evil. Do you like being. Do you like being funny. Do you like being complex needs to be complexity of it's evil. It has to have some good. If it's good it has has some evil you know. It's the Yin Yang of character of a person of people to be real as real. There are no heroes that without flaws villains without heroic qualities. So when you dream I dream you know. See I dream all the time. Okay do dream as the character or do you. Just do you ever wake up and have had an experience that one of your characters would've had depending on what I've had to drink before I go to bed influences. The dreams are crazy and that was a bizarre question. Alan if you've dreamed and character get so deep into something. I assume that you really live it right. And so you know your brain takes over it. Does it does creep in. Have you ever had the actor's nightmare? Oh Yeah Oh yeah. Yeah what is that for the rest of us? It's like you. It's the day of the show or the day of the shooter. Whatever and you haven't read the script you haven't read your lines and you go out there and you're trying to figure it out and no one helps you and yeah it's such a cliche but I think everyone who has ever acted has had that dream at least one. It's bizarre yes without question. Okay so what was your most embarrassing moment while acting? Oh my most embarassing moment. Oh Man I'm what had a lot of them. I remember way back. In the beginning I was doing Dune and there was a scene where I was fighting the sky and killed him and then I suppose to stand there and then I'm supposed to cry and I was like not crying and crying. And so they come in and they give you the mental in your is it helps sort of get your tears were going and so I got this and I felt so bad and that was like It was frustrated nicer to rub. My eyes like don't do that and I just rubbed the blow the mental name. Would they put a little bit? Bigger danger gets awful. It was awful and I look back on that and I'm like why couldn't I you know I can. I do and I was like well. Imagine you have just had a mortal Kombat okay. That's hard to imagine that you've actually slain someone. What state are you in? You're in the state of of of heightened relief and maybe relief and like you're overwhelmed. Your adrenaline is running. You know are you in a state where you're going to not cry. It was the situation that needed to happen for the script. It was truncated moment. Twenty four hours if you've had time to sort of think about it and you've recovered and you're relaxed and now you're in front of a group of people and you're expressing what the death of this person means to you to the tribe to everything. Now that makes more sense but as a young actor I was like Oh my God I need to do this and so it was a great lesson that I didn't really figure out until much later. There is a natural sequence that has to happen and if it doesn't then you can't force that it's not going to work. It's not going to be real not to you or to the audience. I didn't understand it at the time. So the great thing about wine is with a really good wine you can talk about just about anything as we've got our engineers in the back going by these still still we want to go home and we're sitting here and we're talking about everything that's because we have a really wonderful wine pursued by bear created by an amazing amazing actor who were honored to have here. Kyle mclachlan And checkout pursued by bear wind dot com and kyle join us again. Please be my pleasure. Thanks thanks for coming in cow. My Gosh Scott's gone to the water missing all right. Good night everyone. Hollywood unscripted is created by Kurt commedia and presented in cooperation with the Malibu Film Society. This episode was hosted by Scott. Tal With guest. Kyle mclachlan additional conversation with Kyle. Mclachlan Scott to lull Jenny. Curtis and Bill Curtis produced and edited by Jenny. Curtis sound engineering by Michael Kennedy. The executive producer of Hollywood unscripted Stewart Halpern the Hollywood unscripted theme. Song is by Celeste. And Eric Dick Please. Rate Review and subscribe to this podcast for more conversations with top industry professionals discussing the entertainment. You Love.

Kyle mclachlan Tesla Mclachlan Scott Bill Curtis Walla Walla albendazole Seattle Robert Mondavi Sahara Hollywood Jenny Callum Dennis Hopper Rosa Johnny Cash Eric Dick executive producer Celeste Jim Carey
"malibu film society" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

Hollywood Unscripted

11:03 min | 4 months ago

"malibu film society" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

"Welcome to another edition of Hollywood unscripted. I'm your host Scott. Allow the Malibu Film Society joining us today. An actor winemaker and the pride of Yakima Washington a man who has been in movies that have collectively sold one and a half billion dollars in box office which you feel. I'm sure completely underpaid. I feel completely underpaid and giving key on a run for his money no I had no idea ladies and Gentlemen Con McLaughlin. Thank you for joining us. Agreed to be here. Thanks you did start in Yakima talk to us about why and how you got into acting because I know your mother was integral in that process. She was my mom was involved in a lot of things a lot of community based things but the theater was something that was one of her passions. She believed strongly that our teenage group of people that was running around with should be involved in the theater and so she was instrumental in creating a theater. Company just call the team theater in fact and I was less enthusiastic about it because it seems sort of goofy to me but there was a fantastic social component to it. Which meant you me evenings from. Let's say six to nine six ten. I had to be in a space where there were a lot of young girls around and I was young man at the time and so that seemed like a pretty good idea to me right. Have a reason to be around that pretty girls so that was That was the impetus that start at me in the theater world because she had gotten involved in. I guess classical singing and piano and all study piano when I was a kid and I moved into voice when I was in the choir in high school in jazz choir in fact and then I continue with my choir in college at the University of Washington also studied voice with Gus Paulie alone guy at the University of Washington. I was going to school. Music was always a part of my life. I guess you know it was pretty clear early. On that was adopted teacher. That opera was not going to be a place where I was going to make my mark but I thought it would be helpful for musical theater. Which was kind of my focus in fact when I was in school and then I took a road less traveled. I guess when I was cast in my first film which came out of the blue and the musical theater has been on the back burner but you never know it could come back. But that first film was no small film it was doing and you're cast in the lead is Pala treaties. Was I was? I Wasn't plucked from relative obscurity. I was plucked from complete obscurity in Seattle working in a equity waiver theater doing Performance of Tartuffe. The casting director actually didn't see me in the performance but I was in Seattle. And she was there to meet with unknowns. See if they might fit the bill for this role of Paul in. What was that experience like? Well as you can imagine something completely outside of my comprehension. You read the books. I was a huge fan of books. In fact I read it the first time when I was in fifteen given to me by my very good friend Dr Jim Lumber glad who I mentioned from now and time again and he tossed me the book one day when we were hanging out and said you should read this and the took me about three or four times to get past paid sixty because it's quite complicated and there are a lot of things going on so many characters world two names and ideas and I just I was like I gotta go back to the beginning and start again bid I stuck with it and I was a huge fan I really. I know the books new the books I should say now backwards and forwards and not that necessarily helped me in the audition process but David Lynch and I hit it off when we met. I met him down at Universal Studios in Los Angeles and there you go and after that it was no small jump to Blue Velvet. No it was a little bit of a jump to be honest. David Pass descriptive blue velvet while we were filming Dune to take a look at this. I'd like you to play. Jeffrey and I read the script. It was my second film script that I'd ever read Dune being my I had no idea but it seemed really compelling and and kind of exciting and a little disturbing and a little a little. Yeah okay a lot disturbing but I was really drawn to it and resisted initially because you know some of the subject matter was pretty intense but I trust the David and ultimately said we should do this together and thank God. I did not only to keep the working relationship with David Alive but it also gave me an opportunity to try something completely different than the politicians role but then your next role in hidden. I mean that's kind of set an interesting trajectory characters. Chili's yeah Yeah Jack Shoulder directed that I auditioned for Jack. And he he said to me. You know you weren't really the best audition but we hired you. Jack was kind of guys. I just couldn't help but say exactly what he felt. But that was the kind of out of place sort of slightly unusual guy who doesn't really fit in. I borrowed a lot of Buster Keaton on and that kind of comedy comedy of discovery and I had a really good time with it and felt like I actually really got to know Lloyd. Gallagher was the name of the character. It's one of those movies that not a lot of people have seen. It was a new line release. They didn't really know how to sell it at the time. In fact in conversations with Bob Shaye who ran the company at the time? I've seen him since then and he always says you know we didn't really know what to do with that movie but it's great rental. Michael Nouri myself are kind of COP buddies alien slash. I Dunno action adventure kind of picture but it's a lot of fun. It's really interesting. I guess because in those three roles I remember seeing the the rolling stone article that described you as the boy next door if that boy spent a lot of time in the basement. I don't know if that's accurate or fair It was a bit of a stretch. I mean it was. I grew up pretty straightforward normal household suburban Yakima. Two brothers and myself through boys we ran around had a great time. It wasn't that unusual in my mind. You know what I mean. It was pretty straightforward. I appreciate the writer on that. Trying to find a way into my work with David Lynch primarily. You know I know that originally when you were just starting out in high school. Your parents broke up. Yes so it's actually in seventy. I think it was when I just I was about to move. I was going to college. I was leaving high school. Am I done the plays? They're done musicals. Aero I'd done choir jazz choir and everything and I was on my way to the University of in Seattle. It's nineteen seventy seven doesn't seem that long ago but in fact what is a long time ago and really intention was to go to school and try to find a career job. Whenever it was acting wasn't something that was on the list to be honest and I got their fish out of water. Really unprepared for college. Took an acting class felt very comfortable very at home but realized that that really was not where I should be focusing my attention and dropped out of school after two quarters. I want came back to Yakima. I work in a factory. Cutting lumber for about three months swing shift not a great time but I was making money because I had an idea that I would go to summer. Stock and have this Apprentice experience in North Carolina and flat rock North Carolina and indeed. That's what happened and while I was there I was cast as the lead in their summer. Theatre Extravaganza look homeward angel and every year an apprentice. Such as myself was cast in elite. The young Eugene Cat and And with me and that was my first real quantity professional experience because it was an equity house and a really talented director so I guess it was sort of my first professional experience and I loved it and that's all it took. We'll visit this later but eventually you'd bought into a winery was actually good friends. With and Bill Kurtis knows as well and Coggan as a friend and And Fill Curtis happens to be the owner of Kirk. Oh media and our distributor of this podcast. He's sitting at this table. Putney shall remain quiet ono. He wants to speak he wants. I can see it. I can see it in his face Anyway and is a friend and I was inspired by her story and how she made short canary wine and now she's just created inning amazing powerhouse called sellers husband Joe under and it inspired me to actually consider doing wind up in Washington state. You felt that acting wasn't going to be the thing. Why did it become the thing I it was just the unknown. You know it's like in high school. I recognize that I had an affinity for I was good at. It was good at something and in high school. Of course everyone is looking for something that they can be identified with that they can sort of stand out with. It certainly wasn't my grades or my school work. Certainly wasn't my athletic ability. So you had to have something and that was it for me but I figured it would stay there in highs and I would go to college and I would find something and then I would go on and I would work and P. R. Communications or something like that something kind of undefined. So that's what I intended to do. And along the way you have all these options and I sort of said L. try an acting class and the first boss I tried was actually very strange. It was a strange adding class with a teacher and we were sitting around in a circle listening to each other's breathing and I thought this is a little weird for me. One of my classmates had known you. GotTa go in with Ruben. Sierra Ruben. Sierra's a teacher. You want us to Finland okay. So I signed Ruben Class. And that was. Yeah now I understood kind of what we were doing but they were opening up all sorts of doors. I never took an acting class before. I just did it when I was school. And suddenly it was like Oh this is really interesting to me and I really find this compelling and I feel kinship to it but I still said something that you don't use as a career. I had nothing to base that on. I mean my parents were not actors. It wasn't until I got accepted into a training program that also happen to be at the University of Washington trained professional theater actors for Repertory Theatre. And that's what you intended to do. I said this is what I wanted to. I finally knew my dad was like well. Okay what you should at least take one economics course which I did and I think I passed barely. Somehow just really. Wasn't your dad at the time was stockbroker. Yay and And I just didn't. This is just not meet that. My youngest brother is a stockbroker and money manager. But I said I just doesn't compute now. Of course I wish I'd had a better sense of business as well because it's the wine thing that we were discussing but at the time I said it makes no sense to me but the acting on. That's what started it. You know. I've heard other actors talk about the fact that they got into it because I couldn't live doing anything else. Is that the case for you May Be Yeah. It was something that made sense to me. I guess something about taking a part of character and figuring it out. It's like a puzzle and putting myself in someone else's position and shoes and what that experience is about. That just appeals to me. I'm really don't know why I didn't grow up with that. Wanted to be an actor. I wanted to be on stage at nothing. None of that. It just sorta came to me and it made sense as I was doing it and I was intrigued by it. Wasn't the attention or being in front of people or whatever stardom whatever it was just really the process that I was intrigued about sort of discovering about why. This person does what they do. You know those kinds of things and for some that made sense to me then early on. You're not only cast your cast in the lead of Dune and then you go onto blue velvet. Go onto hidden and Oliver. Stone's calling you and asking you to take roles which was surprising. Actually yeah why did you turn them down on platoon? I was young and I didn't have really great advice at the time. And you know. Oliver Darted anything yet and I thought that the end you know when Charlie Sheen's character which would have been yours mind kills Tom. Berringer's cared I was like. This is a Renault redemption there. It was like sure and in hindsight it wasn't my best moment..

Yakima University of Washington Seattle Jack Shoulder David Lynch Sierra Ruben Blue Velvet Washington director Dune Oliver Malibu Film Society North Carolina Hollywood Scott Bob Shaye Buster Keaton Michael Nouri Gus Paulie Universal Studios
"malibu film society" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

Hollywood Unscripted

09:44 min | 4 months ago

"malibu film society" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

"Hollywood end scripted. I'm your host Scott's along with Malibu Film Society joining us today. Jeremy tonsure a filmmaker who has gone where no other filmmaker has ever gone before you actually got to shoot a feature film inside Olympic Village during the Olympics. Yes thank you for having me Thank you for joining us. You made this film with your wife. Alexi it's such an interesting genesis because I understand. Alexi is a dual citizenship. Greek American and she ran in the 2016 Rio Games. Yes or what happened from there Alexi. My wife competed in Rio and addition to be an athlete. She's a writer and filmmaker. I am not an Olympic athlete but just a writer and filmmaker and where creative duo so when she went to run real we adjust premiered an indie film that we made called track town which was a blend of fiction. Reality kind of exploring the emotional journey of trying to make it to the Olympics trying to achieve a goal. And you don't know if you're going to get it or not. So when she had this experience of competing Rio and feeling like you achieve a goal that you've worked for for so long now what that feeling combined with the insanity of being inside Olympic Village and what that looks like at that time when she was competing and just had finished we were like it would be insane to be able to bring a camera in here and making indie film in the Olympic Village. But obviously that would be impossible but then two years later. That's what we did and I understand that the head of the IOC was on an airplane young movies to watch on a long flight and one of the movies. He watched track town. That is right so as with many indie films. Every film has its own. Genesis story hours for Olympic dreams was that the president of the Olympics was on a flight distributors. Track town had done an airline deal which sidebar airline flights founder where a lot of people sit and watch indie films. I don't know why that is but whoever is in that ecosystem. I just WANNA give a shout out to because there's always really great indie films on long-haul flights and not only did the president of the Olympics. Track town on an airplane which led to this invitation to go do a project in the village which unfold for you in a second. It's also aware Paul Thomas Anderson saw track town and mentioned it in an interview and we later connected with him and he became a mentor to on Olympic Dreams and I actually got to show him a rough cut in workshops some scenes with him which was an incredible experience. I'll bet yeah so. Shout out to airline film programmers. You're doing a great job now. Originally this was going to be artist in residence. Kinda grant just a series of shorts but then the head of the Olympic channel stepped in. Yes so after seeing track town and realizing that Alexi was actually an Olympic athlete. The president of the Olympics reached out to us because were starting artist in residency program effort to combine the arts with the Games more and opened opportunities for athletes to do projects at the Olympics. You know coming from the Mumbai Record Indie film. I feel like we came of age looking up to the Joe Swartberg and do foster brothers like we knew that. Give us a camera. We can make a feature film in the Olympic Village. Like no put us in coach. Let us do this. But of course to people not familiar with microfilm making that seems like an impossible thing so what we landed on. What are we going to make a short film in the Olympic Village? And if there's enough footage will turn it into a feature. That's where it started and from that point we developed. The idea would be so we knew that it would be. Alexi and me and we'd be able to bring one other person that's all the security clearance that we could get. We knew that we would pull in athletes and real people to clave fictional roles but the two main actors. What's the film you can make so lost in translation became our biggest inspiration and we unashamedly adapted slash stall that conceit of two people? Lost Souls at a transitional time in their life coming together for this transformative period of time are backdrop was the Olympics. I knew that we would be able to capture enough footage for feature so I kinda planned it all out with the hope that we'll be able to pull this off and Nick. Kroll came on board to be the third leg of our three person team. Doctor E yes Dr. Ezra volunteer dentist because in Rio and Alexi competed. She met a volunteer doctor. Who asked her out. Of course we were engaged at that time and she politely turned down his offer but that was the spark for this idea. We had a whirlwind three and a half weeks shooting. I was a one man band so I shot did sync sound directed at the same time. Alexia nick did each other's makeup and Mike themselves up and I had a feature films worth of raw footage and I cut the short films like retroactively from that. So many five shorts that are more avant-garde like visual and once those were received. Well we got the go-ahead to cut together. The feature which is now being distributed by IFC films and Olympic Channel. Yes it premiered at South by southwest and IFC came in to do our distribution and the Olympic channel is a new entity within the IOC the International Olympic Committee. It's actually an exciting group. They're like a group of folks from the entertainment world who now work for the Olympics to try and do cool collaborations like this and this is their first narrative project there's microfilm making and then there is being a one man band because you were director cinematographer and did one hundred percent of the sound. Yes which is unfathomable for a lot of narrative filmmakers. A lot of doc filmmakers like of course what other ways to do it but yes first of all we wanted to keep a really small profile second of all we could not bring more people out with us so what I did was put together at the time the most advanced one man band rig that we could get we wanted to have a cinema quality is fair to say I was shooting like a verite documentary style but it needed to be sound quality and picture quality that would let you suspend your disbelief for a narrative film so I worked with my sound designer Nathan rule and some texts from Panasonic to design this rig. That would enable me to well okay. There's no way to like not be ultra gear nerdy about this. So let's just do it. So what we did was actually knew. We needed to have a Panasonic camera body because they have deal with the Olympics so I had to but it was also cool because I knew if something were to go wrong there be tex around I use the evil one which is like their Pro Sumer Camera. It has e F mount so you could use. Dsl are lenses which brings the cost down the weight down like honestly cost is not a factor with the quick weight so I tried the camera. That's one step up from the evil one. The very cabinet was simply too heavy for me to deal with on my own. I knew like I'm GonNa have three weeks of picking this thing up one hundred times a day so starting with that e f Mount Lenses and then we had a sound devices sync sound rig that I had to sling over my other shoulder which was then jam sync hardwired to the cameras so that there was no need to slate. If I just hit record it started recording the lobster fed in and then there was like a boom attached to the camera and I use the. Mono pod and we made friends with the team. Usa bobsled chiropractor. Who would adjust my back every day after you were done shooting. Yeah so that's how we hold it off. Pretty wild now. You talked about lost in translation but I know that you have some other. Inspirations on this film before sunrise of course. That's funny that I feel like Richard Linklater's influences so baked in for me that I don't even think to say it but yes I mean. I don't think he was the first person ever make a movie about two people meeting random place and following them for an extended period of time. But certainly that's what people associate that setup with is Rick linklaters movies a cool moment was I had a chance to meet him and then he came to watch the film at South by and has since become a mentor and friend at we got to do a Q. And A. Together after one of the screenings and most filmmakers are super impressed with this one man band thing that we had to do but he i. That's how I made slacker. I don't see what's such a big deal out doing that now. Speaking of two people who met totally at random you and Alexi were at Dartmouth. Yes but there's a difference of opinion. I understand because you claimed that you met when you were filming concert on campus. And she came up to dance onstage. Yes that she says that you met at a party a semester prior. Here's what I'll say about that. Alexis and Olympic athlete but there was a period of time when he wasn't running when our lifestyles could intersect. Like the first time I ever went to a track meet in my life was after we had been dating for a year and I was probably twenty one twenty so I'm not surprised that the memory of maybe our first meeting is a little bit hazy. I think she and I both became much more like serious people about pursuing our goals like after we met each other. I think she helped me kind of commit to becoming a filmmaker even very concrete. When I was trying to figure out how to put together my first movie she helped me write. Grant applications forged. This is something you could really do. And I think I did the same really believing in her path as again an athlete and a writer and for that very first film you ended up winning an Oscar nomination for best student film a Student Oscar. Yeah the Student Academy Awards for documentary. So I've made a short doc when I was in college and I went back to that area village in Senegal. I'd known this group of students since I was a student myself and they acted as fictional versions of themselves and that was tells the Baobab Tree. I fill.

Olympics Alexi Olympic Village Olympic Channel International Olympic Committe Rio writer president Malibu Film Society Alexia nick Rio Games Jeremy tonsure Hollywood IFC films Scott Paul Thomas Anderson bobsled Academy Awards Richard Linklater
"malibu film society" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

Hollywood Unscripted

08:41 min | 6 months ago

"malibu film society" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

"I was GONNA ask originally. Are there any stories that surprised and now I have to ask how many of I mean they all did. They all surprise me. Part of what surprised. Me was the permissiveness. In terms of public outrageousness ourageous nece in misbehaving was just way out of measure with what I had imagined and with what it is now. I mean that these stars would pass out and super bowls and end up naked in pools with this regularity and did they were fine. They had reputations maybe but their careers didn't implode and they weren't torn torn apart in the press for it and they weren't not getting hired back and uninsurable or whatever that's different than it is now but I would imagine in large part that head to have contributed to the founding of the Hollywood coat both on screen and off. I mean onscreen. They were limiting. What could be shown in film but the exploits were certainly the talk of the town? Yeah Yeah I think so and I think that there was a kind of puritanical tightening up of how they wanted people to behave and how they wanted them to be represented in. The code was was enforced to do that. We talked earlier about how the start of talkies meant that. Suddenly you had scripts. You had to have lines that had to be memorized memorized. And well. That's another point to which I didn't bring up is that you did have to do more work in preparation and remember your lines and that also maybe put some limits on the revelry But what other changes happened over the years in terms of how Hollywood was partying. Well I mean I think a big change that happened was people shooting on location much more and the of moving equipment and the desire to go to different locations and film in some ways that started early and chaplain was doing that and people were doing that but for for a lot of the years it seems to me. The first half of the last century so much production was happening in town on studio lots so kept all the actors in town. They lived here. They worked here. And in that way they went out to these places Chasen's and Romanovs encierros and the Polo Lounge and Brown Derby. They were just places were they knew they would be sort of welcomed and protected and also seen and then they would find each other there and so in that way. I think it was a hard charging community that it it may be became less so over time when people could live in different places and when worked for months in New Orleans or in you know Atlanta arm wherever aside from personalities you talked about the places that are now institutions but back then were not you mentioned garden of Allah a famous famous hotel. Yeah and the Beverly Hills Hotel which when it was built was almost a disaster for the owner because nobody was living in Beverly Hills what he did he couldn't get people to come out that far. I I mean one of the things that was interesting for me and moving to Hollywood in writing about these places was looking for ones that were still around and not so many of them are I mean the Beverly Hills Hotel L. is and Musso and frank grill is but there's a lot of other places you know carneval as not cock and bull like different ones and yeah these contributed to partying being in it was an important ingredient in making it all happen. The book does talk about different places sometimes the case of the Brown Derby which had a cocktail the Brown Derby and whether they invented the cocteau himself so it was invented and named after them which is one of my favorite cocktails which is bourbon grapefruit juice and honey syrup or the cock and bull which he's credited with inventing the Moscow mule and had to do with the fact that the owner of the cock and bull was making and distributing his own brand of ginger Beer and he found himself saddled with too many cases of SMIRNOFF and he had a surplus of his own brew that he was hoping wouldn't go bad and so in this sort of desperate Britt did he kind of poured it all together. He decided he often just mix my remaining ginger beer with this vodka and added some lime and served it up and he served served at actually in the copper Mug and one of the actors who hung out. There was a great character actor Roderick Crawford who is through giant man and a big drinker and he apparently was the first customer former to give it a try. He liked it a lot. He said it had a bit of a kick to it. So that's how the Moscow mule was born the drink with the velvet kick before we wrap any other stories stories that you want to share with us. Well I could read a fun. One about Ava Gardner. There's a lot of men who were hard drinking and big screen personalities. In that way but there I also a lot of women who were having their own fun in wild time in Ava Gardner has perhaps my favorite quote in the entire book. A party isn't a party without a drunken bitch lying in a pool of tears which may be configured for your New Year's party probably not a good goal to shoot for now when I think about it though. The story and Ava Gardner all region that we had a wonderful time. That was all she would say. Ava Gardner during Frank Sinatra had met before years ago at Macondo back when she was still married to Mickey Rooney Sinatra had led with soft open something to the effect of wishing he'd gotten to her. First Gardner found him charming. They bumped into each other a few times thins at various nightclubs. There's even been a dinner date once after. She'd left Artie Shaw. They kissed a bit at the end of the evening but Sinatra was still married to Nancy and had kids so she hadn't let it get too far. This time though is different. They were at Daryl's Gerald Xanax. House in Palm Springs for a party. It was fall. Nineteen forty nine Sinatra. As usual was flirting with her crazy she put up with it for a while then reminded him once. He got too pushy that he was still married now. He insisted he and Nancy were finished for good in seeing as he was now available would he be interested in going for a drive. Gardner grabbed a fifth of whatever for the road. While Sinatra quite famously had a predilection for Jack Daniels to garner the tape of booze hardly mattered. It all tasted like hell to her. Anyway so bottling hand. She climbed into Sinatra's Cadillac convertible in the two of them sped off into the desert night. swigging all the way by the time they came to it was stop in the little town of the streets were deserted Sinatra pulled her clothes they kissed and kissed and at some point during their escalating passion Sinatra reached into his glove compartment in pulled out a gun scratch that he pulled out two guns both Smith and Wesson thirty eight naturally. They began to shoot up the street lights hardware store window several rounds that ended up who knows where Sinatra hit the accelerator and they kept on shooting all the way back to the highway. It was a few hours later. When Sinatra Actress Publicist Jack? Keller received a phone call from the police station. They had a story that hasn't yet reached the press. Not just a story about frank. Sinatra's drunken arrest but a story of his drunken arrests while out with famous actress who wasn't his wife in if Keller wanted to keep it under wraps he would need to get to India fast. The police back then were so much more. Amenable Keller immediately called a friend who managed the Hollywood knickerbocker hotel borrowed thirty thousand dollars and took a charter flight out of Burbank. By early morning he paid off anyone. You want who might have been inclined to talk the cops. The hardware store owner some poor drunk schmuck who'd been grazed by one of the bullets Sinatra and Garner were released without further incident Gardner for her part denied. Any of this ever happened. When she returned to the house he was renting in Palm Springs and her older sister Baffi asked how her night with Sinatra had been all she would say was? We had a wonderful time so I guess the bottom line is for our whole show have a great time on New Year's Eve. Just oh get caught. The book is Great. I do recommend it is available on Amazon and elsewhere of all the GIN joints stumbling stumbling through Hollywood history Mark Bailey. Thank you so much for joining us on this special New Year's Eve episode. I'm thank you you know. Thanks fun to tell these stories stories and I think New Year's is a good time to go out and have some fun and let loose a little bit. I recommend it quite like these folks did but you know I hope everybody has a good time. Fine thanks for joining us. Hollywood unscripted is created by Kurt commedia and presented in cooperation operation with the Malibu Film Society. This episode was hosted by Scott to law school. West Bailey producing edited by Jenny. Curtis Sound Engineering Nehring by Michael Kennedy recorded at CO media's Malibu podcast studios the executive producer of Hollywood unscripted is Stuart Halperin. The Hollywood unscripted the theme song is by Celeste. And Eric please rate review and subscribe to this podcast. Thank you for listening and have a happy new year.

Mickey Rooney Sinatra Ava Gardner Hollywood Beverly Hills Hotel Keller Palm Springs Moscow Nancy Jack Daniels frank grill Beverly Hills Artie Shaw Hollywood knickerbocker hotel Brown Derby Atlanta Roderick Crawford Romanovs encierros
"malibu film society" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

Hollywood Unscripted

11:30 min | 6 months ago

"malibu film society" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

"Welcome to Hollywood unscripted. I'm your host. Got To Lalla the Malibu Film Society. It's our New Year's Eve episode and for that we have a very special special guest. He's produced and written more than a dozen feature length documentaries which have collectively won one primetime emmy and been nominated for four others plus one academy award. He's he's also written three books. One of which seems like the ideal selection to talk about on New Year's eve of all the GIN joints stumbling through Hollywood history. Mark Bailey. Welcome welcome to Hollywood unscripted. Thank Scott thanks for having me. Let's talk about the book. What inspired you to write of all the GIN joints? This is sort of a follow up to an initial book. DOC which was a book about hard-drinking writers and that I did as I did this with my partner at Hemingway who's an illustrator and the name is not a coincidence. He is the youngest grandson of Ernest. He is I think that the first idea for the book came from him and was born out of that sort of family circumstance. He had this idea about his grandfather end. Father and writing about well known highly regarded hard-drinking writers that was called Hemingway in Bailey's bartending guide to great American writers. It was a great book to to work on. It had a lot of cocktail recipes and they were sort of from the classic era and these writers were Eugene. O'Neill and William Faulkner Scott Fitzgerald and the stories were wild in cast back to a different era where there was a different social norm Anna Different Code of behaviour and we tend to look back and think that the pass was somehow more innocent or pure but it was really anything but that in so then that book came out and did pretty well and we were looking to follow up with another book walk in. We thought well you know how about Hollywood and it happened that after we sold that book I moved out here and wrote the book out here and he illustrated at back in New York uh-huh and we sort of worked together across the country so that was how the book came to be and it follows the same format. I mean. It's a delightful mix of these incredible stories and cocktail recipes recipes. The first book was a little bit more of a bartending guide. In this the subtitle is stumbling through Hollywood history and I like to think of it as sort of social film film history through the bottom of a whiskey glass. That's great description. It really seems like that of the writing is tremendous I absolutely love your storytelling. Oh thank you. We'll come back to the questions in a minute but one of the stories with us. Sure I think that I'll kick it off with a story about Humphrey bogart since it's the Humphrey Bogart line. That is the title title of the Book of all the GIN joints and the way. The book is designed and built around anecdotes. Rabat different stars so this is about. I'm free Bogart in. It always leads off with a quote. The bogart guard quote is the whole world is about three drinks behind me. The other bogart quote that I really like and it was a bit of a toss up. We're BOGART's last words. which were supposedly? I should never never have switched from Scotch to Martinis so if you're thinking of doing that this new years. I don't know bogart would argue. Otherwise so here's a story about Humphrey Bogart. It wasn't a joke but it damn well should have been certainly began like one so Humphrey bogart walks into to a bar with two stuffed. Panda Bogart was by then in September. Nineteen forty nine the biggest movie star in the world and he was out in New York with an old drinking buddy named L. Semen they'd been carousing since early. The two of them in bogies wife Lauren. Bacall but she'd gone back to the hotel hours ago. After Mrs Bogart left the men found themselves themselves in need of a standard that might scare off would be home records and drunk. Somehow it emerged that a nearby delicatessen sold a historically random nonfood item as delicatessens have a way of doing stuffed pandas. Not just any stuffed pandas. Mind you each of these weighed in at more than twenty pounds in set you back twenty five bucks a pop perfect bogart. Semen bought a couple of pandas and hopped a cab to Morocco. Were they requested a table for four two seats for them to for their there date seated in that was supposed to be the end of it. Getting seated with two panda's unfortunately for Bogart the real end would take four days to arrive in. It wouldn't be over for drinks with his friends. It'd be in court. Here's the thing. Bogert was a gregarious man with a keen sense of humor but he was only comfortable among friends and his social circle. Go with tight knit. The rat pack later so closely associated with Frank Sinatra was in fact bogart's creation with Bogart at the center. The mission of the group Bogart said Ed was quote. The relief of boredom in the perpetuation of independent bacall was a member of course so Sinatra. Judy Garland Spencer Tracy talent. Alan pagent Irving Lazar. There were all part of the original RATPAC. You might see them out at Romanoff's or on rare occasions in Las Vegas drinking and carrying on but if you weren't part of the pack you're an outsider and you weren't welcome which brings us back to the Pandit if you were to spy Bogart at a nightclub. In the wee hours of the morning propping up an oversized stuffed animal. You might think that it was a not so subtle message about the company he preferred to keep in. If you knew anything about bogert which you might since he was more or less the biggest star in the world. You wouldn't consider yourself in on the joke. But a young model name Robin Roberts thought she was special as young models often do she approached Bogart's table on our way out out laughed and picked up one of the panels in Bogart. Given the number of drinks he had put away by. This point happened to be feeling very protective of this panda. So he naturally pulled the panda close to him and told me his Roberts to leave him alone for he was a married man and then the woman fell over. She said he shoved her. He said she lost her balance. Four days later he was is in a Manhattan courtroom facing legal action. The panda fiasco immediately hit the tabloids with Bogart protesting his innocence. Every step of the way one reporter asked OPTIMA feet struck Ms Roberts. He said he would never hit a woman there too. Dangerous another reporter asked if he was drunk at the time of the incident he replied. Isn't everyone at four. AM fortunately for Bogart. Judge presiding over the case founded as ridiculous as heated. Throwing it out after the first hearing it turns out being left alone. And when you're the biggest star in the world requires a lot of people that's great. I remember doing research on Humphrey Bogart when we were celebrating the seventy fifth anniversary of Casablanca which is a remarkable film in so far as almost none of the people who made it originally scheduled to make it and they were all brought in after changes and they started shooting before the end of the movie had been written right? Do you know who Humphrey Bogart was in real alive. And what his background was he was a preppie or prep school kid. His Dad was the most prominent obstetrician gynecologist in New New York. His mother illustrated children's books and had studied under Whistler. It is interesting that in a certain way not surprising. Because Bogart is I understand. At least the studios were looking for his persona for a while before he became the Bogart that we know of Casablanca. The Maltese Falcon or The hardboiled oiled bogart. He laid villains. He played sort of altogether different types and then he kind of got traction with the hard edge right but that didn't necessarily surly speak to who he was. And this is one of the things I think in this book and when you look earlier actors like John Gilbert in later actors maybe like Dennis Hopper. Let's let's hair. You know where the roles or the persona bleeds into real life. The presumption offscreen is that you're much like the type that you play on screen and he began to live at a bit more Brian. So if you're wild and out there and Edgy onscreen you take that into your personal life and you kind of see that happening a lot with different actors. The other part is there are guys. He's like Lee. Marvin who's a big world war two hero and you know stormed over twenty beachheads. Seems like he genuinely was a stone. Cold Bad ASS US in. That is who he played right. Mitchum was a kid in the depression riding the rails at age fourteen on his own ruin. Mitchum was a hard tough guy. Hi that is who he played. You know it's remarkable to me that the onscreen Bogart was a hundred eighty degrees from who he started out as offscreen. I have a funny when I could read. Yeah I mean just since you're talking about Casablanca Casablanca. It seems crazy that you say that particularly that they were in production before the script was done because it seems like such a tight film and when you wonder how these giant hugely finance movies go pear-shaped and who let at that happen. I often think it's sort of as the rush into production and you're trying to accommodate actors schedules and you have them in. You have to go in. The script is and ready and then it comes atom model. But let me read you one. This is beat the devil which is a nineteen fifty three John Huston film than he did with Bogart. One of the things that the book has is we also talk about a number of different film sets that were particularly wild or dysfunctional. And this one taps into some of that and has some fun folks John. Houston's beat the devil with a total disaster almost from the start maybe a total disaster is a little strong since by some miracle. Nobody actually ended up dead the film directed by Houston Featuring Humphrey Bogart Jennifer Jones. Peter Lorre in Gina. Lollobrigida was to be shot largely on location and in a little town called Ravelo in Italy a picturesque mountain village. That's high up on the Amalfi coast. There were some early warning signs. I The sexy Italian. An actress Lollobrigida had never been in an English speaking film before this most likely was because she could barely speak English like not almost second traveling traveling Inter Avello the Italian chauffeur driving Houston and Bogart got into a car accident. John Huston was fine but bogert was pitched forward cracking some teeth in badly gouging his tongue so even before shooting commenced the female lead couldn't speak English in the male lead. Couldn't speak at all in third to complicate things even further further. Neither Lollobrigida nor bogart nor the rest of the cast had yet to see any of their lines. The reason being that Houston had thrown a party the weekend before for the start of principal photography during which he tore up the entire script. It was tearing up the script party. Apparently the original draft had run into trouble with the the motion picture production code and nobody liked it very much anyways Houston decided to fly novelist Truman capote over to Italy to write the new script on a day-to-day basis as they shot capote would work through the night in pages would be handed out to the cast in the morning. lollobrigida would learn her lines. Phonetically bogart art until his mouth. Healed would mime his lines. which would later be dubbed conceivably could've worked had only the cast and crew not decided to embark on a bender of legendary very proportions capote cozy as Bogart had begun to finally call him soon began to feel that bogert in Houston? We're trying to kill him with their dissipation. He described everyone is half drunk all day. Dead drunk all night noting that once believe it or not. I came around at six in the morning to find king for Ruch doing the Hula Hula. In the middle of BOGART's bedroom it seemed Houston had not created a very productive work environment in Yiddish folktales. The Russian city of how is depicted as a city of Fools Fools Jennifer Jones character and beat the devil.

Humphrey bogart Bogart Hollywood Houston Bogert emmy Malibu Film Society John Huston William Faulkner Scott Fitzger Hemingway Mark Bailey Bacall Casablanca Lollobrigida Jennifer Jones Ernest partner Italy New York
"malibu film society" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

Hollywood Unscripted

08:24 min | 6 months ago

"malibu film society" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

"Welcome to another edition of Hollywood unscripted. I'm your host Scott till all of the Malibu Film Society joining us today is playwright actor screenwriter and producer. Tracy let's welcome hi. How are you good? I saw that in doing some research. Let's see your dad. Dennis was an actor and your mom was a college professor and novelist but both my folks were English teachers. I grew up in a small town in southeastern Oklahoma called durant. My folks taught at a small college. They're called southeastern Oklahoma State University and then they both took early retirement from schoolteaching in their fifties had surprising second careers. My mother is a novelist and my father as an actor actor and I saw that one of the quotes from your mom. If I get this correct was that she tried to be upbeat and funny but in every one of your stories everyone everyone gets naked or dead. My mother had a terrific sense of humor and a sense of irony. I don't know there may be some truth to that. At least there was when she said it. What's it's funny about that? Is that my mother's stories. Her books though they were real crowd pleasers and in some ways seem light. The truth is there's a lot of darkness in my mom's books which is well so she was a caution. Well that's really where I wanted to go is I wanted to find out. Where does the darkness come from in your work? You know whether it's bugger. Auger killer Joe or certainly August osage county. There's a lot of darkness there I mean some of it is just my natural inclination. I've always lean toward the macab Or the strange. I don't know I've always had an attraction for that kind of material. Truth this to that family history you know August till state's counties not autobiographical percents. But it's based on real events in my family. My mother's father committed suicide when I was ten years old by drowning himself in Fort Gibson Lake in Oklahoma. My Grandmother then descended into years of Downer addiction and have a huge impact on my family. So there's also some darkness is baked into the family. But I don't know what family doesn't have stories likes that not that story but everybody's got some darkness in there somewhere. Yeah but that had to be pretty intense for a ten year old. Well it was. It was very impactful in my life and then thirty years later I wrote a play about it and I remember at the time I was writing i. It was asking my dad a lot of questions about that time. I was using him for research. I tried to recall some of the things from that period and he finally asked me. So why are you writing about this and I said well if the events of that time always wanted me. They've stuck with me for thirty years and he said they have. He was rather surprised. Taken aback I think the kind of been packed that it had on a tenure. My folks they were great wonderful. Funny Mercurial curious wickedly smart people and they were great parents in love them that I miss him like crazy but events like the suicide of my grandfather are moments where sometimes families. They kicked their eye off the ball. You know yeah I I think. Maybe they weren't noticing just kind of impact. It was having on a ten year old insensitive kid but for your particular. She was obviously dealing with a lot of issues on her own at that point. Yeah yeah dealing with a lot of stuff you know when she first read August osage county. I was nervous about her reading it because I knew it would impact her that I was even writing the story and when she first read it and sat down to talk with me about the very first thing she said was. You've been very kind to my mother referring to the mother in in August who's pretty monstrous figure really but not as monstrous as my grandmother so even my mom seemed to recognize that. Did you know your grandmother. Well I mean were you close to them at all. I knew him quite well. What was the family reaction? Were they supportive. When you said that you wanted to pursue acting play writing all very much? I think they wanted me to get the hell out of Oklahoma and I think they wanted to make sure that whatever I did I felt a passion for that. I didn't wind up with a boring job. Our house was filled with books and music and movies and conversation and interesting people and so I think they absolutely I loved that I went into the arch because I've had a I've had a lot of ups and downs as an artist but I wouldn't trade it for anything. It's been an amazing interesting journey for me so I think that's what they would have wanted from me. I'm sure of it when you look at why you got into the arts at such such a young age and you look at. What motivates you now? How has that changed over the years for you or has it? Oh it's changed a lot. It's changed an awful lot. I think most artists artist especially actors will tell you that when they first get into it. If they're honest they'll tell you that when they first get into it. They're looking for some kind of acceptance approval attention attention. They're looking for some personal strokes they need that in their lives. And then hopefully you grow you mature you need those things less and less and you begin to consider yourself storyteller. You Begin to see that what you do is not about what you get but rather rather is about what you are able to offer and once you've become steeped in the language of storytelling. You take that on and you can sort of walk through the world and you say I am an artist and I am a storyteller and this is my purpose. This is my function. This is what I have to offer and to share. Yeah the reasons you do it. Change dramatically take that is such a public experience being an actor especially on stage whereas play writing. screenwriting has got to be one of the loneliest jobs in the world true. Talk to us about both if he will. They use different parts of my personality. I think there's a part of me. That's very private and that's feels introverted perverted and Chai in some ways. More who I am. But there's another part of me that craves other people and interaction social interaction. And I I was in love with movies as a kid. I was a movie buff and I just love film and all the possibilities of film but once I fell in love with theater that that experience sharing space with other people the awareness that we're all in a room together. There's this contract made where the audience is going to watch this story that we tell and that we're all living breathing. Vulnerable people in that moment. That social interaction is something. I absolutely need long four the war and it's the real value of theater. I mean the exchange that happens between an artist and audience in the theaters. It can actually be very profound and exchange when I was doing the promotional tour for Ladybird actually and I got flustered with a question like this and I said something like plays. They're better better than movies and movies are better than TV. And Greta got very excited because she said it's true she said it's proven true. The reason you can prove it is because you think about the most profound experiences you had in the theater or a movie theater or watching. TV At home and they'll always stack up the the most profound experience you've had is watching live theater. I mean it can also be soul crushing and boring but when it's great. There's nothing else quite like like. I crave the social side of performing in a theater but I also very much crave the solitude of a writer and and then you add to that which are able to do in both TV and film I mean this year alone Ford versus Ferrari you have such a presence that just POPs and you you you know. It's a great script was a great opportunity. I was thrilled when it came my way. I get asked to play a lot of those guys. A lot of heads of state or senators or for Titans of industry what the Coen brothers referred to as the man behind the desk. I get asked to play that stuff a lot. I look for the stuff that makes it different an interesting interesting. I guess I get asked to play that stuff because I don't know because I'm a big guide because I have big boys Theater backgrounds some physical awareness baroness physical presence. But the thing that makes it interesting for me is whatever is just beyond that. I mean Titans of industry you've seen it in thousand thousand. TV shows and movies and it can all feel Kinda the same. So I look.

Oklahoma Oklahoma State University Hollywood Tracy Malibu Film Society Dennis Scott professor Fort Gibson Lake producer Auger writer Chai TV. Joe Greta Ford Ferrari
"malibu film society" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

Hollywood Unscripted

08:37 min | 7 months ago

"malibu film society" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

"And the I've worked out how to do that now. As a director you know I go for the emotion version and I push push and carve and create my stories using everything words pictures music to get you to a point where I really want you to calve because these are people that you probably think you have nothing in common with on the screen and my point is to say see how would like we will see Europe set now on the but wait a minute. I'm going to bet you love to give you a minute and I'm GonNa make you laugh and then I'll come back and say oh you're right. There did not an idea that because I want you to be involved in the film and I want you to have that emotional experience which is what I always look for those. The film's I respect and love is the ones that I get emotionally engaged in those the ones that I love to me one of the things that really helps make that happen is the music. And while you have the music of Bruce Springsteen you also have the score in this film by robots well. Ar is the king of emotion. His School for Viceroy's House. I think is just masterful if you watch that movie and just watch it for the school alone. It's an incredible the piece of work so that much to do on this film because so much of the music was bruce and of eighties tracks. But what little he did. He pulled doubt the emotions which is what scoring Dow's. He sent me a message yesterday saying that billboards picked out his one song as one of the songs to watch which for the original song agrees he was very happy about that Standing and then you had been Smith from Downton Abbey as cinematographer Short Viceroy. I have as well and yeah. He's a grumpy old English bloke and his crews of in complaining about these grumpy but for me Oman gods are Gal with him or anything and he was very excited making blinded by the light just precisely because it was the opposite of Downton Abbey and the opposite of that kind of a plush English period costume drama you know here was a gritty looking film about Britain in the eighties but what we went for was amazing. The graphic look is that was what the eighties was about. There's lots of lines lots horizontal lines versus lines in all the the show's shopfront always shooting the estate. Where Javid lives or buildings? You know there's a lot of graphic imagery three in the film that convey well that shows. The harshness of the period is very eighty s mainly as the hard lines concrete lines factories blue-collar architecture as opposed to plash beautiful Victorian. Whatever period English? Mich- that often you get. I mean this in the best possible way. Does it help to be a control freak to do what you do. I didn't think good directors are control control freaks. If you're a control freak thing you can get the best out of your team. I think what you have to be to be a good director is to be a good good communicator and actually have some humility with what your team is going through. What you're actors are trying to achieve? What your heads of departments trying to achieve what you cruise strategy for you and then your job is to help them do their best work for you? Everyone's there for you. You shout to get people is just going to totally undermine the process and lose respect and then also controlling to the point where you're not listening to varian pert. I think undermines the process because you know has people saying film is a collaboration and everybody's creative imports are important. If you're fighting is because you haven't communicated enough during prep that might not have been the best choice of descriptive and especially when you are producing and directing in writing. It's all yours. That singular vision that comes through. Yes but that doesn't mean that you appreciate other people's work in helping you achieve achieve that vision. Some people find it quite hard when I jumped from different roles but people were with me understand the I do it and I'm quite good at when I'm the writer I am the writer and I will write as a writer and then suddenly when I'm the director I will look at that script and go. Who wrote that scene is dreadful and pull all say you wrote that seem like well? It's good can you change. And he will you wrote it and I'll go. Yeah but you're the writer to kids so I'm able to different hats on and then the same isn't producer so when money is tight or we can't do something that we need to do as a director of fight for it and the producer will say. Well it's GonNa come out of your production Fi. You're hurting yourself and I'll go arden in cash as its rector. I need but then as a producer when something goes wrong on a film set. That's where I jump into produce a mode when was shooting not before that before the I helped get all the money in. I secure the big finance because of my relationships and then I have other people that come in with me to sort of take it to the next level when I become a director but when things go wrong that's what I have to jump him and that's when I become a producer director and all of it all at once mother. Psychotherapist you name it. Don't the films that you've made. Although they originate from a commonplace are all very very different stories. It's at the end of the day. You Finish a project and you reflect back on it. Do you find that you are finding some sort of different completeness after each one well they're all going to come from the same place because they will come from me and I'm about and it's true. I think directors make the same film over and over again the themes. They're obsessed with at the beginning. Stay with you but I think the wonderful part surfing attractor is that you can do films in different genres and in different ways that allow you to use your writing skills. But you're still kind of say the same thing and my starting point. The reason I involved in the media was is to combat racism and make us visible and I continue to do that with every film might make in different ways in different genres but you can always produce every film on my bet on one thing at the end of this one at the end of the day what's your takeaway on this film. Might take on the end of blinded by the light is I. I really enjoy working with music and I know how to to use music in a good way in terms of storytelling and that also also I can be Marshall touch an audience in a very human way and that is why bring at. She is my bring emotion to project superficial awesome fish oil would like to thank you so much for coming and joining US Kingwood unscripted. It's not often that one gets the opportunity to open up and talk about the combination of your thoughts. What you think is the meaning of life and the purpose of life and combine it with your craft and I think all those things are definitely connected and I've got to a point now in my career where I just feel very empowered by by the fact that I've learned to not measure myself on what do against the standards of the industry that I'm in and take my successes in my valleys as through other means and I think that's been a very liberating thing for me? Actually say thank you for giving me the opportunity to talk about that. I thank you for joining us. Yes the producer director screenwriter blinded by the light during Dicenta out now on home video. Hollywood unscripted is created by Kurt commedia and presented in cooperation with the Malibu Film Society. This episode was hosted by Scott to law with guest girl. Chadha produced and edited by Jenny. Curtis sound engineering by Michael Kennedy Executive Producer of Hollywood unscripted Stewart. Halpern the Hollywood unscripted. Theme Song Is Celeste. And Eric Dick Please. Rate Review and subscribe to this podcast for more conversations with top industry professionals. Discussing the movies movies. You Love.

director producer Bruce Springsteen Downton Abbey Ar writer Europe Oman Hollywood Malibu Film Society Javid Dow Mich varian Short Viceroy Chadha Eric Dick Executive Producer Halpern Scott
"malibu film society" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

Hollywood Unscripted

03:57 min | 7 months ago

"malibu film society" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

"And it is is so important for people to recognize that. We're all seeing him as a hair out mean. He is a conservation hero now and the scientific community. He's got our attention. This way of filmmaking is so important it does have a hard time really telling our stories. We need storytellers to get involved and help put put everything in our brains on the screen and into words and help us get there and make us feel comfortable in doing that. This is such a good example of a storyteller Taylor being completely invested in the outcome and being there to make sure the story is accurate and compelling and seen and so I appreciate appreciate what he says about us which is of course very meaningful tall of us but thank God for him and for the film team and for their courage and I hope that more films sounds like this are made because we need them. The planet is in crisis and he just walked right into the middle of it and he told the story so bravo to him to Richard. And the and Tame thank you. I'm blushing but I can't help myself Jack. How did your family react? I mean you're young kids still I mean and you gave gave up a career in aerospace engineering any push-back at all from your family. First of all my family didn't really know what I was doing. I said I was sailing on a yacht so until they saw shadow. You got to take the film and they were sort of like you're grounded. Ah No more fighting the cartel but secondly in terms of looking back. I mean we have a massive problem with our planet right now. We've a problem with climate Lima Change. We have so many of these things that need our attention that for so long have been ignored to the point now where kids do not have a stable future. Sure like we are at a turning point in history where we're not sure if our species is even going to survive where at such a point where people need to do everything and especially my generation and and young people need to look at what's going on and and sort of realize that we don't have a reliable planet to live upon like I'm in the business of ships and if I killed all my engineers my ship would sink and we are doing that to our planet right now. We are killing. Its life support system. We need to realize if the oceans nations die. That's pretty much our entire source of oxygen. If the oceans die weet will die and we need to take a serious look at conservation realize that we cannot live the way that we have been so far. You're the whole system needs to change. I don't have any regrets looking back and having left like no. I need to do everything I possibly could for the planet and I think lots of people are so now thinking the same way. Is Your family onboard. They've seen it they are. They're very proud my father whenever we did the premier's like Oh. It's like the graduation that you never never had well. I WanNa thank today's guests here. Hollywood unscripted WanNa thank Richard Lot. Connie honey the director of Sea of Shadows Dr Cynthia Smith and certainly Jack Hutton. You guys have been great. It goes without saying keep up the good work and we look forward to the next film. Thanks so it was great being here. Thank you Hollywood. UNSCRIPTED is created by. Kurt come media and presented in cooperation with the Malibu Film Society. This episode was hosted by I Scott to law with guests. Richard Lead Connie Cynthia Smith and Jack. Hutton the audio clips from C. of shadows were provided courtesy of National Geographic. Hollywood unscripted is produced edited by Jenny. Curtis sound engineering by Michael Kennedy. The executive producer of Hollywood unscripted is Stuart Halperin. The Hollywood unscripted theme song is by Celeste. And Eric please. Rate Review and subscribe to this podcast for more conversations with top industry professionals discussing the movies. You love.

Hollywood Jack Hutton Richard Lot Connie Cynthia Smith Taylor Malibu Film Society Stuart Halperin Kurt Eric executive producer Celeste Dr Cynthia Smith Curtis Scott National Geographic Michael Kennedy Jenny director
"malibu film society" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

Hollywood Unscripted

05:12 min | 7 months ago

"malibu film society" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

"Talk to Hollywood unscripted. I'm your host to law with Malibu Film Society and we have some wonderful guest today. Scott Zebra earns the director of the writer producer Multiple Films One. We're here to talk about. Today is the report and joining us for that. Conversation is producer Jennifer Fox. Welcome thanks we're coming to you today. From the beautiful bungalow number one at one of the best hotels on the coast the fairmont Miramar Hotel and bungalows and Santa Monica Classic Old Property. My wife and I just spend our anniversary here earlier this year. It's a wonderful place and we're delighted to have them as our host today. The report has an interesting history because it didn't start out where it ended talked to us about that. Well it started on an airplane ride on the way up to sundance a number of years ago and I and I had a conversation with D'Amato who is running films at. Hbo and I told him that. I had found this article that details SORTA the origins regions of the CIA's enhanced interrogation program and land was really interested in and we made a deal and I decided I would write it there. MM-HMM AND DIRECTED AND JAN joins us. But it didn't wind up there now. At some point after a couple of years they were in the middle of a acquisition in with a t and T and although I don't know that the content of the movie had anything to do with their decision not to make it it may have just been that they didn't have the funds to make another movie that you're so I can't really hypothesize on the decision itself but Lenin called me after a few years and said I don't think we're going to be able to get this movie made and I WanNa make sure you get a chance. And he did something. People in Hollywood almost never do which is help us get our movie back and we went out in the wilderness looking for money now the original budget. I mean this was going to be a big budget film. Well bigger still modestly budgeted but considerably more than we ended up. Laugh right and what you ended up with. There's this kind of sense in Hollywood. Sometimes that if a movie has been released by one studio yeah yeah I mean there is sort of tradition. That movie is somehow dinged up. If the last person didn't make it I think that's less true now than it used to be because now there's more buyers and there's a lot of reasons why someone might not make a movie but for us. It was a big shock to the system and we were at. Hbo We were going to be about an eighteen million dollar movie with a shoot and forty or fifty days and we ended up being eight million dollar movie with twenty six days. Shoot so it was was it was a different world but I think a blessing in disguise because on HBO it would not have had a theatrical life and so at the point that they came to us to say this and Scott was devastated. I was saying no this was meant to be because we are big screen movie and I was excited to have it. Come out that way and was confident we would be able to draw the level of talent that we did to make it. It's an insane cast in this film. I mean starting with Adam driver Annette Benning and it just goes on from there. But you're now dealing with a different budget. You're dealing with the different shooting schedule. Everything has to be scaled down first of all. Let's talk about how that affects the script. Well there are things that you have to start looking at. If you know you have a finite number of locations then you have to go back and could this scene also work in a location that we've already the established or if you've fallen in love with the location but it's a two hour car ride from Manhattan is a really good idea to spend that much of your shoot day travelling so there are a lot of very logistical practical kind of concerns and we had the best line producer and all the world carrier and helping US Navigate Gate New York City. You just need to come up with a game plan that works for your budget. You can't pretend you still have eighteen million dollars if you don't so we all had to work together in come up with a look for the film and schedule an aesthetic that we could accomplish in two thousand six days and Jen. How did that affect things on your end well again? I think the blessing in disguise that it forced us to have a kind of rigor to the filmmaking and to be super precise and Scott looked looked back to films of the seventy s that had incredible tension but people talking and rooms when you can use cranes and all the bells. Awesome whistles that you have today. That they didn't have before. There's a temptation to use them. And I think that in a weird way even things like the fact that we couldn't do to have the Dianne Feinstein really kind of do the things that you see in other films that people can do to change the look of their actors instead. We had Annette Benning become Tom Dianne Feinstein in her performance and to us it feels like wow we could have fallen down the trap of something that we thought would be a benefit but in fact act would have been a hindrance and so it was exciting to see her body language in her tone of voice truly becoming.

Scott Zebra Hollywood producer Annette Benning Hbo Malibu Film Society Dianne Feinstein CIA Jennifer Fox Tom Dianne Feinstein Miramar Hotel Lenin sundance US D'Amato director Manhattan Jen Santa Monica
"malibu film society" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

Hollywood Unscripted

16:15 min | 8 months ago

"malibu film society" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

"Welcome to Hollywood unscripted. I'm your host Scott to Lal from the Malibu Film Society and today we're going to do something something a little different. We're going to talk about. This shockingly true untold story of the national enquirer from its earliest days in an association with the Mafia to present day connections to president trump all exposed in a sensational new documentary scandalous with us to talk about it director. Mark landsman Kamarck. Thank you so much Scott. Glad to be here sorry to be so over the top but kind of in keeping with the whole team here. It's a slightly over the top subject. So ooh why national enquirer you know the sort of earliest inception to this project. So the earliest ideas I came from just being a person in a grocery store or in twenty fifteen being aware of what was in my visual. I line and sort of noticing that things were strange and unbelievably imbalanced. And that was just. The first thing was just sort of discomfort. I was feeling with the racks at the front at the counter. At the time have language for I just knew that it was strange. But you've been on Shopping Ping centers before why two thousand fifteen suddenly. Well I think we probably all many of us regardless of where you are in the political spectrum realized that something was different about our grocery grocery stores in two thousand fifteen leading to the election. There was an increasing amount of political propaganda. You could say in your face on the covers of our supermarket tabloids Loyd's and that was unprecedented certainly for me but then in twenty seventeen around the holidays. My wife's best friend called and said Hey my dad is coming into town. And why don't we all go out for dinner. So we went. And after a couple of rounds of drinks at the cheesecake factory. He starts telling us about his early days. As a reporter and articles editor at a rising publication called the national enquirer and stories. were nuts off the wall. I mean espionage checkbook. Journalism resum bribery disguises bottomless expense accounts global. Glamorous travel all kinds of ethically blurred tactics. It sounded like the Ocean's eleven movies to be honest with you so I thought well this is fantastic and think too much of it. And then in April of Twenty Eighteen Ronan Farrow Story Broken The New Yorker her and about about catching kill and about am is relationship with then candidate. Trump once ronin story broke in the New Yorker which I thought was just first of all just just an astonishing piece of journalism. This idea of catch and kill was sort of top of mind but nobody quite understood it. I called my friend's father again in his name is Malcolm Balfour and he said we'll just so happens. I'M GOING TO BE IN LA next week. Why don't you come have some drinks with me in some of my former inquirer buddies and so I of course said absolutely and I you did and I sat very quietly while they regaled each other with stories they talk the way that war buddies talk from the trenches? You know these these unbelievable stories and and it was at that point that I knew that we have film and I talked to Malcolm a little bit more and I said you know. Would you be interested in being the first domino in this project. And he said yes. Yes and that's how that sparked the project. Did you at that first dinner understand. What the film was going to be from beginning to end? No No. That's the amazing thing about. But a documentary is that it's a wave you catch the wave but you don't quite know where it's going to take you and it was impossible that points to know what would happen in terms of current events. I mean no one had a crystal ball. Nobody knew the degree to which anything was going on. And it's only in retrospect that you really see there are some fundamental questions that we wanted to answer namely how the Hell how did we get here. How do we get to a place? where the very notion of a fact in journalism is a debate that? There's a question about that that the public doc is getting their information from such diverse polemic camps. How did we get to that that we had a reality Star who previously had been tabloid darling sitting in the most powerful in the world? How did that happen? And what role if any did this quote Unquote Sleazy supermarket tabloid have in that process so it was really kind of wanting to understand history and wanting to sort of connect the dots. A lot of us were just baffled by what was going on. And so that was the impetus for the film. You've described the film as the Classic Fifties Horror B movie talked to us about that analogy. I love the US that question. So I loved those movies right the creature from the Black Lagoon. Goon Frankenstein the where wolf the mummy. The blob does a great films. King Kong is my ultimate favorite. So what happens in those movies right. Originally there is this creature that in the beginning is fairly. I'M NOT GONNA say docile but is not the terror that's about to eat Manhattan right and so the enquirer. Choir really felt similar that I sort of mad. Scientists was many Generoso Pope Junior and he was quite a genius savant he gone to Mit. She was all he was the son of the most powerful Italian American in New York City generous senior who owned colonial sand and cement which poured the cement for for the empire state building among other places he also was the publisher of Il Progresso which was the most powerful and influential Italian American weekly in the country so so he was incredibly influential. Desai was genius his son and he was the mad inventor who created the national enquirer back in the early seventies. His idea for what what that paper would be was very very different than what it would become many decades later under the current leadership. So that's why like in this whole thing to a B. movie. Initially Shirley Frankenstein is not out to kill small children and terrorized the village but the monster becomes that largely because he becomes agitated and he transforms so we wanted to look at how this publication started in one iteration morphed over time and became something ultimately that was deleterious. You've you've just touched on four points. I want to follow up on First among these generals of pope senior engineer or the rumors true well you know. I don't think they're really rumors as much as historical fact. I mean you know. Look either one of them was quote unquote in the mob. And I want it very much. Respect Italian Americans. Who are? You're listening to this podcast. Because I think it's easy. It's just kind of lowbrow to be like oh well powerful italian-american must be in the mob. But it's indisputable that the money that launched what would become the national enquirer came from Frank Costello who was the head of the Gambino crime family and it's undeniable. The general soap senior was the most powerful or false and politically influential Italian American in New York and possibly the United States at that time. So I don't have any other facts beyond that so I can't substantiate journalistically realistically what people say including General Pope's own son was at the paper was mafia related back in the day. So how did that influence surly content if at all well I don't have influenced early content as much as I think that it inspired pope's unbelievable determination and drive if this is a man who truly had an anything for the stories ethos and he didn't take no for an answer and I think that's because he witnessed his father. They're not taking no for an answer. He didn't have to take financer I. It's not an accident that the call him the godfather of tabloids. He's a corleones character. He straight out of the movies and that was another reason why we wanted to make the movie. Because he's a larger than life American character Vito Corleone and he kind of ruled the enquirer like that people were in off him and they were terrified of him. People felt incredibly fortunate to be in his employment and no one bought a car above like a Pacer because it might not have had a parking space on Monday. There was no job job security. He kept you running. He kept you on your toes. He kept you competing with your desk mate. So you're constantly looking over your shoulder. It was not an easy environment to work again and I think a lot of that might have come from some knowledge of how other organizations work. So what are the key turning points in the publication during the Generoso. Also pope years. I think the first key turning point was going to go. We're talking about headless bodies and topless bars that kind of thing that kind of Gore. So when general pope acquired the New York enquirer in the early fifties. It was a racing rag. It had a circulation of under twenty thousand local news news and bats and basically he was really trying to look for a way to boost circulation. How is he going to get eyeballs to this paper? His is father had been ridiculously successful in publishing and he thought okay. I want to step out of my fathers gigantic shoes and I wanted to make a name for myself. And the story goes that he was driving on one of the New York parkways one day in the late fifties and he came across a head on collision and what he noticed was all on the sides of the road. There were hundreds of rubberneckers Angling to look at the carnage and this was a very bloody car crash. And he had an epiphany in that moment and said that's what I WANNA do. That's what I want for my papers. He basically went to crime photographers. He got access to police reports all of this and he began to publish the most graphic the most most violent really the most disgusting photographs. You can possibly imagine man Dr Spike through head. Women's stops child baby burned a lot like horrible all stuff and it was gross but circulation shot through the roof so that was the first big benchmark. Was He understood the American's psyche and at that time the lowest hanging fruit for him was car collisions and murder scene. There's a big transition from that to winding up at the cash register because that's alright grocery stores don't want that at the cash register. That's exactly right well. He wasn't thinking grocery stores at the time that the circulation pop to a million in the fifties it wasn't until the sixties when Americans were sort of going to the suburbs and the classic newsstand when the newsboy extra extra. That was all going away so he was realized. We've a problem on our hands here. Because where are people going to buy our paper and all of our readership is flocking to the suburbs so he and the enquirer leadership at the time identified defied. The one place where they knew that Americans would be several times a week without a doubt and that was the American supermarket and not only did he identify that it was the supermarket where he can get his captive audience but he identified this very interesting untapped piece of real estate which was at the front of every single supermarket checkout counter so he was a bit of a marketing in Kenya so in some ways like a bit of a nostrum we are the magazines typically your grocery store back in the sixties there all the way back by the toothpaste in some weird. I'll that maybe you don't even go to. But he said why would they be there. I wanted to point to purchase and I wanted to be I level in this guy went to mit briefly and was an engineer. So he basically designed the racks the Brexit you see at the front of the supermarkets. That was generous. Oh pokes idea. And you design the racks. So that you would have family circle Reader's Digest. TV Guide but right in the center her front and Center I level in the largest slot that was the national enquirer. And that's win. It just took off but had this bodies and car crashes were not doc GonNa go over well with Mrs Smith in Kansas City. Buying her milk and Cheerios so he had to drastically change his editorial content in order to cater to exactly exactly what she would want. And that's kind of his second big epiphany and his second big genius was who's my reader and he identified her as this woman in Kansas City called her missy Smith and and she was the average American woman he called and he knew everything about her from a marketing research standpoint. He knew we're she shot. He knew how many times a week she she knew what she bought. He knew what she would want to go home and hand her husband to read he called it. Hey Martha the woman would really give it to her husband. He'd be reading it. Would yell across the Room Room. Hey Martha can you believe that they found another UFO in Roswell. He also knew that she went to the beauty parlor x number of times you know a month and at the beauty parlor. She would want to gossip with with her girlfriends about celebrities psychic phenomenon medical cures miracle cures fad diets. So this was kind of a bit of genius because nobody was doing this and so that was the next big movement was getting to the grocery stores and give Missy Smith in Kansas City. Exactly what she's craving and then the next huge moment was the death of Elvis Presley. That's when they realized that they could not only sell a million copies a week. They could sell seven million copies a week and it was said that for every one copy that was bought. Three people read it. So you're talking about you know. Nearly twenty five million Americans.

national enquirer New York missy Smith Kansas City Shirley Frankenstein United States Scott New York enquirer Malcolm Balfour Mark landsman Kamarck General Pope Hollywood Generoso Pope Junior Ronan Farrow Martha LA Malibu Film Society Elvis Presley Manhattan
"malibu film society" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:26 min | 1 year ago

"malibu film society" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Are flawed complex. Okay. That was a little hard Spiderman Black Panther invisible woman and others challenged the status quo of superheroes and helped make the marvel universe. The movie empire. It is today. Ancient Limbaugh NPR news abroad sell off in the tech sector sent large swaths of the financial markets lower to start the new trading week. The Dow was down six hundred and two points to twenty five thousand three hundred seven the NASDAQ fell two hundred and six points that's down two and three quarters percent. This is NPR and you're listening to WNYC. I'm Jamie Floyd, mayor de Blasio is ramping up pressure. On city council speaker Cory Johnson pass legislation that would allow him to raise money to cover extensive legal bills. The mayor owes hundreds of thousands of dollars to a private law firm that represented him in several federal investigations into his fundraising practices, and he wants the city council to change rule that caps donations to legal defense funds at fifty dollars per donor. Politico reporter. Rosa Goldensohn says that would allow the mayor to avoid using taxpayer money for his legal bills. But would raise new questions on the other hand opens up even more concerns about the exact thing? That's one thing. That's it for this question of donors to see favorable treatment is their pay to play federal investigators never brought charges against de Blasio. Democrat Mikey Cheryl was elected last week to represent New Jersey's eleventh congressional district flipping that district from red to blue. She says there's a need for more veterans and government because she says there's not enough Frank discussion about the wars the US engaged, Shannon. It's how little there discussed how little people outside of our military realize these wars are going on or the cost of these words, and how these wars are really being fought on the backs of the portion of our population. That's just not always franchise that we don't always hear much from Cheryl is a former US navy helicopter pilot answer. Served in the Middle East and Europe and Jersey City is recognizing transgender awareness week for the first time this year. The jersey journal reports the city is partnering with the Hudson pride center to recognize awareness week. It starts today. Runs through next Monday leading up to transgender day of remembrance. That's November twentieth. The transgender day of remembrance was founded back in nineteen ninety nine to honor people killed and acts of anti trans violence and to draw attention to continued prejudice against the trans and gender. Non conforming community tonight. Rain starting overnight currently forty six degrees. Partly cloudy in central park at seven oh six. Support for NPR comes from zoom. Zoom offers cloud video conferencing, online meetings and a video conference room solution in one platform, featuring digital video and audio was screen sharing. Account registration and more at zoom dot US. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Ari Shapiro. Nelson. Chain in California authorities faced the grim task of searching for the missing and dead as wildfires continue ravaging communities at both ends of the state one of the fires. The campfire has killed at least twenty nine people and has destroyed the town of paradise which is ninety miles north of Sacramento, and there are fears the death toll there could rise as sheriff deputies combed through neighborhoods reduced to scorched earth and burned out homes and cars, Ken Pimlott is the head of California's firefighting agency Cal fire yesterday. He said, the high winds aren't cutting the thousands of firefighters any slack fire conditions will continue to exist. Until we get some sort of appreciable rainfall precipitation to change that she joins us now from Sacramento. Welcome. Thank you. So I remember speaking with you on the show just this past summer when your teams were maxed out they were working around the clock trying to contain some massive blazes. And here we are again. Absolutely. And I remember at that time we were talking about breaking records. We we had the largest fire in the state's history. And now we're talking about the most destructive and the deadliest. So give us a quick update. What are you hearing from your teams from where you are right now? So you know, the campfire obviously continues to be up concern. Although the winds have died down a bit in northern California. We still have very very dry, weather and don't see that changing at all within the next week. And so the fire, although it's not actively burning structures in the community. It's really moving up onto some more rural areas, but it continues to be a large fire, and and it's really just working through the overhaul of what used to be paradise. And it's really now just the clean up as you mentioned is the continued search for over two hundred people that are missing, and we certainly hope that account doesn't increase, but we know there. There's a strong potential for them. You explain how the continuing winds are complicating efforts right now. Wins. Just drive fire and you can see in the in the fire in southern California. It is the Wolsey is just continuing to accurately burn. We've got sixty to seventy mile an hour offshore Santa Ana winds blowing for the next several days, and those are just they're deadly. And if weather conditions don't improve could we see even more fires start. Absolutely. We are in very critical conditions, particularly in southern California this week and particularly San Diego riverside San Mateo county's. We could easily see more fire start in the next few days. Now these fires they've been more aggressive in recent years there there hotter. They're bigger there faster. How has your firefighting strategy changed in the past few years with these more explosive kinds of fires? Now, we continue very aggressive initial attack policy. There's forty million people in California we can't afford to let these fires escape. You know, our goal is ninety five percent of them to be contained at ten acres, and we meet that goal. But when the fires escape that initial attack under these conditions. They are becoming explosive and so it's for us. It's looking at where we can contain them in areas where maybe we couldn't before before we look at ridge lines. And unfortunately, the focus really has to be on protecting lives and property. That's always our first priority. And when you're engaging in doing that like we did in paradise literally spending the first day saving lives, you can't work on perimeter control. You can't work on you know, containing the fire. And so these fires just again, they're they're going gonna get bigger on average. We're we're seeing more and more one hundred thousand acre fires each year. Those used to be the exception to the rule. How are your firefighters holding up? They're not getting any breaks these days. Right. They are. Firefighters are tired. We had a short break between the the summer fires in before this false each started. But this this is going to be occurring until it rains, and may of our firefighters and law enforcement and other public safety officials have lost their own homes and continue to work fire lines helping other people so it's a it's taxing on. Everyone Ken Pimlott is the director of the California Department of forestry and fire protection. Thank you very much. You're welcome. Thank you in southern California. Wildfires have forced about one hundred seventy thousand people to evacuate from Los Angeles, and Ventura counties NPR's mandalit del Barco has been talking with people who had to flee the fire, and she has this report looking north to Malibu from the will Rogers state beach today, you can no longer. See the red glow from smoke and the fire you could over the weekend. Jamie tol has lived in Malibu for more than twenty years. She's still in shock over the fate of her Spanish style home with a tile roof. We've found out Saturday from a few people that did. Evacuate that our house had burned completely to the ground. Totally destroyed. We've been discount surfing with friends. And so here we are just trying to figure out where we can end up this morning. She was at a catastrophe response unit. Set up on the beach by farmers insurance to law who works at the Malibu times newspaper and her husband who heads the Malibu film society stopped by to give the agents information about the belongings. They lost silverware photos their grandparents China with only minutes to evacuate. They took. What they could you got out with your dog. We did. So that was lucky at least we saved the dog we managed to grab a few things. But there wasn't a lot of notice. The so called Woolsey fire has consumed thousands of acres to people were found dead in their car in Malibu. Some people who ignored the mandatory evacuation now face having no power, dwindling, food and supplies. Hot dry Santa. Ana winds are driving the wildfire. Even more last night. The sunset I found a few residents trying to get back to their homes sneaking in by boat or car our houses, fortunately, fine. We just did a tour through the neighborhood, and it was brutal. Greg Brock left his home on point Dume on Friday. I mean, they entire streets are just leveled. And there was at one point. There was a huge diesel truck, and is Multan just a flow of molten metal behind.

California NPR Malibu Ken Pimlott Cory Johnson Politico Sacramento Mikey Cheryl Ari Shapiro Middle East Jamie Floyd jersey journal US navy de Blasio mayor de Blasio US Multan
"malibu film society" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:14 min | 1 year ago

"malibu film society" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Until you are noticed that it's okay to do. So and also be aware more evacuations will likely come and we need you just be aware and be alert and be ready to go. When those warnings come local and state officials said they are doing the best. They can with fire personnel. Fighting multiple blazes across the state dwell. Lee psycho NPR news Malibu or Republican Senator from Mississippi is facing sharp criticism over comments she made about a public hanging. NPR's Debbie Elliott reports Cindy, Hyde Smith who is white is facing a black democratic challenger in a Roth election at the end of this month in a video posted on Twitter. Hyde Smith is seen complementing a supporter by saying, quote, if he invited me to a public hanging. I'd be on the front row Hyde Smith is in a run off with democrat. My guess be a former congressman who is African American Hyde. Smith says her remark was quote, an exaggerated expression of regard, and that any attempt to turn it into a negative connotation is ridiculous Espy's campaign caused the comments. Reprehensible Mississippi has a tortured history of racially motivated killings. According to the end, double ACP, Mississippi had five hundred and Eighty-one lynchings between eighteen eighty two and nineteen sixty eight more than any other state, Debbie Elliott. NPR news. It's well known that movement promotes physical, fitness and health, but how much movement is enough. That's what's being addressed a new guidelines issued today than American Heart Association conference in Chicago for adults. The advice remains get at least two and a half hours of exercise a week, including aerobic exercise, lifting weights and other muscles, strengthening work ammo, breads, Wasi assistant secretary for health and human services and says that shouldn't be too difficult. I'm very excited about the guidelines in this tradition. Because what we found out is that it's actually easier to attain the health benefits than we thought before in the health benefits are so much greater just omitted. Just twenty percent of American adults. Get enough exercise children are also expected to get more exercise at as young as age three abroad. So often the tech sector sent large swaths of the financial markets lower to start the new trading week. The Dow plunged six hundred two points, the NASDAQ was down two hundred six points. Today. You're listening to NPR and this is WNYC. I'm Jamie Floyd. There's still no winner in the race. In New Jersey's third congressional district democratic challenger. Andy, Kim leads Republican Congressman Tom McArthur by about four thousand votes. If MacArthur loses the state would be left with only one Republican House member and St. assembly Republican leader, John Bremner, Nick says election day was already a bloodbath for the New Jersey GOP when you lose four or five congressional seats. It's obvious that voters lashed out against the Republican party. I saw towns in my district that have been Republican for years and went democratic so yes, it's a bloodbath. Absolutely bram. Next says the midterm results are a reaction to President Trump's divisive rhetoric and the GOP tax plan and mourners are marking the seventeen th anniversary of. Deadly plane crash in queens. American Airlines flight five eighty seven was headed from JFK to the Dominican Republic when it crashed on the Rockaway peninsula back on November twelfth two thousand one the crash killed two hundred sixty five people including five people on the ground who were attending. A nearby funeral for victims of the nine eleven terrorist attacks investigators said the planes tailed attached after a co-pilot responding to turbulence put stress on the rudder at a memorial for the crash mayor de Blasio praised the heroism of first responders on that day. And Stanley the legendary comic book writer who passed away today at ninety five had an outsized effect on his fans as a writer for marvel comics Lee helped create characters like spider man, the fantastic four and sent many of his stories in New York City comic book fan Zach Girardi says this helped him connect to the characters when he was a kid. My uncle had this big collection like from the beginnings as firemen on. So I remember reading the old comics feeling, oh, hey, I know where that is a native of the Upper West side Lee helped revive the superhero genre back in the nineteen sixties. Currently, it's forty six degrees. It's partly cloudy at five oh six support for NPR comes from zoom. Zoom offers cloud video conferencing, online meetings and a video conference room solution in one platform, featuring digital video and audio with screen sharing account registration and more at zoom dot US. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Ari Shapiro. And I melt the chain in California authorities face the grim task of searching for the missing and dead as wildfires continue ravaging communities at both ends of the state one of the fires. The campfire has killed at least twenty nine people and has destroyed the town of paradise which is ninety miles north of Sacramento, and there are fears the death toll there could rise as sheriff deputies comb through the neighborhoods reduced to scorched earth and burned out homes and cars, Ken Pimlott is the head of California's firefighting agency Cal fire yesterday. He said, the high winds aren't cutting the thousands of firefighters any slack fire conditions will continue to exist. Until we get some sort of appreciable rainfall precipitation to change that chief Pimlott joins us now from Sacramento. Welcome. Thank you. So I remember speaking with you on this show just this past summer when your teams were maxed out they were working around the clock trying to contain some massive blazes. And here we are again. Absolutely. And I remember at that time we were talking about you know, breaking records. We we had the fire in the state's history. And now we're talking about the most destructive and the deadliest. So give us a quick update. What are you hearing from your teams from where you are right now? So, you know, the the campfire obviously continues to be up concern. Although the winds have died down a bit in northern California. We still have very very dry, weather and don't see that changing at all within the next week. And so the fire, although it's not actively burning structures in the communities. It's really moving up onto some more rural areas, but it continues to be a large fire, and and it's really just working through the overhaul of the of what used to be paradise. And it's really now just the clean up as you mentioned. This the continued search for over two hundred people that are missing. And we certainly hope that this talent he doesn't increase, but we know there. There's a strong potential for them. You explain how the continuing winds are complicating efforts right now. Wins. Just drive fire, and you can see in the in being fired in southern California is the Wolsey is just continuing to accurately burn. We've got sixty to seventy mile an hour offshore Santa Ana winds blowing for the next several days. And if those are just they're they're deadly. And if weather conditions don't improve could we see even more fires start. Absolutely. We are in very critical conditions, particularly in southern California this week and particularly San Diego riverside San Mateo county's. We could easily see more fire star in the next few days. Now these fires they've been more aggressive in recent years. There are hotter. They're bigger there faster. How has your firefighting strategy changed in the past few years with these more explosive kinds of fires? We continue a very aggressive initial attack policy. There's forty million people in California, you know, we can't afford to these fires escape, you know, our goal is ninety five percent of them to be contained at ten acres or less than and we meet that goal. But when the fires escape that initial attack under these men of conditions, they are becoming explosive and so it's for us. It's looking at where we can contain them in areas where maybe they couldn't didn't before we look at ridge lines. And unfortunately, the focus really has to be on protecting lives and property. That's always our first priority. And when you're engaged in doing that like we did in paradise literally spending the first day saving lives, you can't work on perimeter control. You can't work on you know, containing the fire. And so these fires just again, they're they're going to get bigger on average where we're seeing more and more one hundred thousand acre fires each year, and those used to be the exception to the rule. How are your firefighters holding up? They're not getting any breaks these days. Right. They aren't they. Firefighters retired. We had a short break between the the summer fire fires in before this false started. But this this is going to be occurring until it rains, and may have our firefighters and law enforcement and other public safety officials have lost their own homes and continue to work on the fire lines helping other people so it's it's taxing on. Everyone Ken Pimlott is the director of the California Department of forestry and fire protection. Thank you very much. You're welcome. Thank you in southern California. Wildfires have forced about one hundred seventy thousand people to evacuate from Los Angeles, and Ventura counties NPR's mandalit del Barco has been talking with people who had to flee the fire, and she has this report looking north to Malibu from the will Rogers state beach today, you can no longer. See the red glow from smoke and the fire you could over the weekend. Jamie Tal has lived in Malibu for more than twenty years. She's still in shock over the fate of her Spanish style home with a tile roof. We found out Saturday for a few people that didn't. Evacuate that our house had burned completely to the ground. Totally destroyed. We've been discount surfing with friends. And so here we are just trying to figure out where we can end up this morning. She was at a catastrophe response unit. Set up on the beach by farmers insurance to law who works at the Malibu times newspaper and her husband who heads the Malibu film society stopped by to give the agents information about the belongings. They lost silverware photos their grandparents China with only minutes to evacuate. They took what they could got out with your dog. We did. So that was lucky at least we saved the dog we managed to grab a few things. But there wasn't a lot of notice. The so-called. Woolsey fire has consumed thousands of acres to people were found dead in their car in Malibu. Some people who ignored the mandatory evacuation now face having no power, dwindling, food and supplies. Hot dry Santa. Ana winds are driving the wildfire. Even more last night is. Sunset I found a few residents trying to get back to their homes sneaking in by boat or car our houses, fortunately, fine. We just did a tour through the neighborhood, and it was brutal. Greg Brock left his home on point Dume on Friday. I mean entire streets are just level than there was at one point. There was a huge diesel truck, and is molten just a flow of molten metal.

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"malibu film society" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"malibu film society" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

"He shuffles the cards around shuffles again he does this for three of the most and it's a podcast so i can't do any justice to goes on for three minutes which after a minute or less your parenting the table whatever he's doing your laughing so already saying nothing he's clearing his throat at the three minute mark three minutes of that of saying nothing other than clearing throat and other sounds he then goes furthermore he was just brilliant just brilliant george might have a copy of that if you check with them we had george harold check with them and i would love to see that he does link about that saves everything three yes you worked on one of the great comedy films the in laws oh thank you i agree that was a classic wonderful thank you and tell tell us about alan arkin and peter falk to let me say first of all opole risers a friend and he had an occasion to do the malibu film society thing where normally you come in you do a movie that you're in the certainty could have done the movie he was in with peter falk he did a movie within there was that was good and he was very good npr's as always great he chose to show instead of movie he was not in paul reiser did called the in laws and i hadn't seen it.

alan arkin peter falk npr paul reiser george harold three minutes three minute