20 Burst results for "Malcolm Gladwell"

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Anna Faris Is Unqualified

Anna Faris Is Unqualified

04:25 min | 7 months ago

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Anna Faris Is Unqualified

"Rai with special wheat. Creating a new type of bourbon. You know today. As maker's mark but margie's contribution didn't stop there. She was also responsible for everything that distinguishes the makers brand the name the label. She even had the idea to hand dip every bottle in the iconic red wax. Something maker's mark continues to do to this day well. The taste of maker's mark has always stood out from the crowd. It said that margie. Samuels is why you pick up your first bottle in two thousand fourteen. Margie was inducted into the kentucky bourbon hall of fame as the co founder of maker's mark and a symbol of the industry's focus on women as leaders consumers and pioneers. So ladies remember to pour yourself into everything you do and to reach for a bourbon. That's made with a personal touch the next time you pour a glass of maker's mark raise a glass to all of the remarkable women in your life and remember maker's mark crafts bourbon carefully. And they ask that you enjoy that way. I don't know when the air force was established officially established nineteen forty seven. And i wonder if in a progressive post-war environment if that kind of set the tone for being more progressive institution in terms of how we think about. I think that's absolutely. It was very much when they were starting. Therefore we're starting from scratch. We'll building a modern military organization. And we're gonna put all of this history behind us. That was very much a part of their ethos at the beginning. Here's a lot of snobbery towards both snobbery in contempt towards governments titians in our society. I think what. I really got from this. My immersion is that there are profoundly important examples of how to do things right to come from government. And i don't know why in america we've decided that government is just kind of backwater because i think the opposite is true in many respects. I want to believe malcolm what you believe in. I do think it's interesting. The implementation of like donald duck as part of getting people to pay federal tax. Or like something. Like smokey the bear preventing forest fires. And if we had a similar government idea around the built a sense of community something with our current situation with covid. I wonder how i guess. The idea of government propaganda can be very useful. But malcolm i'm getting into territory. That i don't know anything about..

margie kentucky bourbon hall of fame malcolm donald duck Samuels co founder america
"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Anna Faris Is Unqualified

Anna Faris Is Unqualified

04:23 min | 7 months ago

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Anna Faris Is Unqualified

"I would make the case. It's not too late. I'm a little bit fascinated by william bar at this point google. He doesn't seem like philosophically likely pawn. But perhaps so it feels like. There's definitely a deeper mystery there. Anyway maybe you can solve it malcolm. He's one of a number. Pompeo is the same way these are people who had very kind of shiny establishment credentials and were respected by people in the kind of quote unquote establishment. Everyone thought that when bar went to work for the trump white house he was going to be the voice of reason. Same thing with pale and these guys they get there and then they turn into something unexpected. That's also super fascinating. Cypress is force field around trump and you get drawn into it and suddenly. You're different person. That's also super interesting. He does have this kind of weird dark charisma. I mean knowing has drawn into the mike pence force. Feel right you know but he happens with trump. These guys just kind of lose their marbles when they step in a room with him. I thought michael cohen spoke about that seduction of the celebrity of the glamour. The ladies the party's whatever. But i don't see bars means seduced by that necessarily but who knows malcolm i still want to get like tune embarrassing book. You must have them somewhere. Oversee book will Different books i can reference till i wanna hear jeff like sweet valley high looking this focus that you're familiar with sweet valley high. I have tons and tons and tons and tons of airport thrillers. Are you fascinated by in of itself or aviation in combination with weaponry. Eight in of itself. Something that i didn't do anything about until in doing this season's vicious history. I was telling the story about the bombing of japan. And i'd known a little bit about the air force in about will were to before but not a lot. I went to this crash course and started hanging out with his air force people and just found myself hooked so is it pretty new fascination. i've always loved planes. But the idea of like bombers and fighters is out of new thing. I wasn't one of those kids who was playing war games as a child. But i actually sort of fell in love with the air force for a number of reasons. Now think of research. I think it's because particularly now. The idea that there would be in american society and incredibly well-functioning meritocracy is kind of weird a novel when it's the institution like the last two secretaries of the air force had both been women. The current staff air force is an african american. The head of the air force academy is an african american. I keep going if you look at the leadership structure of the air force you will see more diverse than any other major american institution can get into the idea of what. Set that precedent. I think it's because they were real meritocracy for the two things. I will say one. Is that the military is further. Along than i think many other institutions in society in getting rid of the kind of and barriers that lead you to overlook talent. They really think if you're good we want you. And then whether you're a man or woman are whether you're black or white or whatever is a secondary consideration that's part of it and to because they've had that historic role that they have ever. Since the second world war they had to confront race in the second world war generation before other stations did and a third thing..

william bar air force academy malcolm sweet valley jeff google mike pence Cypress Pompeo michael cohen japan
"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Anna Faris Is Unqualified

Anna Faris Is Unqualified

05:21 min | 7 months ago

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Anna Faris Is Unqualified

"Hey good morning. Hi how are you hi great. How are you malcolm good. I'm good hey. I can't thank you enough for doing this a long. That'll be fun. I hope so. I hope it's fun. So malcolm first of all where are you do you my masking i in upstate. New york hudson valley you right so you work pretty much in solitude. Have you learned anything about yourself during core team my is not been that much different than it was before because i was living up here largely most the time anyway and my routine is pretty much the same as it was. I don't travel as much as really the only difference in my life. And we've been relatively unaffected appear so life's been pretty normal malcolm. I meant to start this interview out by complimenting you you can start irate i will i will well. I'm a huge fan of yours. I'm a huge fan of the subject of curiosity in general and i love your podcast. I think i picked up tipping point years ago at an airport and it comforted me in a way. I think that was unexpected. In which i think a lot of your work does which may be goes back to what. I've learned a little bit about myself. Which is embarrassing during quarantine. I was very dismissive of puzzles before. Quarantine a thought. Puzzling was an idiot. Waste of time. You're putting pieces of cardboard together. I've completed maybe thirty. Six puzzles nora. Yeah you've gone puzzle nuts. I comfort myself because it does feel like a complete waste of time. That frustrates some of the people. That i love her like. What what are you doing was. But i like to think my justification is that i'm trying to make order out of chaos and that's a very simplistic way to sort of frame what you do. But i love how you connect to seemingly obscure random ideas and find patterns within them. Would you describe that as kind of an accurate assessment of malcolm. Can you put these in your own words..

malcolm New york hudson valley
Michael Lewis in Conversation with Malcolm Gladwell and Jacob Weisberg

Dell Technologies Podference

03:00 min | 1 year ago

Michael Lewis in Conversation with Malcolm Gladwell and Jacob Weisberg

"I was asked to moderate a panel with two of my oldest friends. Malcolm gladwin jacob weisberg. We've known each other since the nineteen eighties when we were all young writers in the magazine. Business malcolm jacob for now the co founders of pushkin industries. The company that produces against the rules which is now underway by the way pushkin also makes a bunch of other great shows like malcolm zone revisionist history and the happiness lab with dr lori. Santos i've been watching on the sidelines over the past year as malcolm and jacob started the company so i was really happy to have an excuse to ask them all kinds of nosy questions about what they've learned about running a business together and the challenges they face and the challenges right now in our quarantine world will those are unique. You'll get to hear a little bit about that. Here's our conversation. 'cause i don't actually know the story so i would love to know how you decided to start pushing shake right. It was jacobs a star. Well i'd started one podcast company already. Which was panoply which came out of slate but as things evolve panoply turned into a technology company. I thought i was starting mainly a content company and one of the shows we'd started with revisionist history With malcolm that show was doing really well and there were some other shows. I was really interested in doing so was sort of when the earlier company under Ceo i'd hired. Who i thought was making a good decision. Wanted to make a pivot that i said. Hey maybe it's time that document. I started our own company and only do what we wanna do. I was on holiday with my family in. Can't remember where. I was somewhere in your italy in italy and jacob was in some. I think if i can tell that you truly horrible health live the villain said and he said he said that he he summoned. We do something crucial when you talk about says. I drove halfway across italy. Show up in this horrible house but road and then he likes sat outside a little chairs and had coffee and he said i wanna start a company. That's out began. What did you say yes right away. Yeah struck me as well. The backstory about this is that jacob has been. I've known jacob for thirty five years and through for some significant portion of this. I would always say jacob. I don't know why you wanted a journalist. You'd be a really great businessman. if you just. This is what you could make a huge amount of money. We could all get rich. Jacob forgotten but i would always worry that if i when i said that i was insulting him because what he really wanted to be was a writer which was saying was a bad writer and i thought better business fan

Malcolm Gladwin Jacob Weisberg Malcolm Jacob Pushkin Industries Malcolm Zone Dr Lori Jacob Malcolm Pushkin Santos Italy Jacobs
Malcolm Gladwell: I Am

Toure Show

04:40 min | 1 year ago

Malcolm Gladwell: I Am

"Malcom gladwin is a stone cold genius who loves A grade sports argument. I went onto bill. Simmons podcast and I had this totally ludicrous thing that I want to talk about. Which was I was like? Could a basketball team made up of Nigerians? An all time basketball team made up of Nigerians be the greatest basketball time and then I ended it. I amended until as I said all right I have to corollaries one is. I'm going to add west Indians because almost Indians not all mostly I'm Jamaican. Where am I what am I people from? We're from originally like I'm Ibo right most Jamaicans cable so I add the Caribbean and then I said and just refund. That's also add the rest of Southern Africa and then I construct the students. Tony Ridiculous Caribbean so busy. I say out can Africa and the Caribbean put together an all time team. It's better than an african-american team a euro team at a white American team. It's the third one. Maybe not. The answer is yes. We don't have time to do this but I will convince you. I can't convince you to Africa and the Caribbean in basketball. All Time team and also your co you qualify by or Nigeria. Will I started? I start with all of ethnic did not all? I'm only adding. I added Southern Africa. 'cause I WANNA have Steve Nash and Joel Embiid on my team. Wade Steve Nash. Born in Johannesburg. He's Canadian. No my rule is that you. Are you qualify? Virtue of your parents. Place a birth. So get all of Steve. Nash Who Play Thompson. Really? He's Bamyan are are are taking. Tim. Duncan Tim Duncan Hang Hau Kim Elijah Akeem Joel Embiid Yoenis Clay Andre iggy Dow Victor Depot Drink Igwe Dolla. Where's he from Nigeria okay? He's full on your deal and Steve. Nash I got a back court of Nash and Thomson. I got a frontcourt of Dunkin embiid. Jaanus Patrick Ewing forward a okay. Right right right right from the islands. This really is in the island. This team is insane when Patrick's coming off the bench. But how just doesn't matter but Kim Jaanus and but sure but but the other team has Lebron Kobe. Japan Michael I know. Just for starters and Steph curry just restarting Potanin Wilt Chamberlain and Bill Russell. Just just try go ahead. That's the African American teachers. Try Playing Lebron Jordan. Notice what we doing that thing ooh together. Thomas can't come in and Magic Johnson coming in. Can I read this out rushing your your appetite? Engineer Crushes Team Sport Play. You cannot Jordan Jordan and abroad and Kobe on the court at the same time out of your mind. You have all centers you have one forward you have you have guards and a bunch of centers. You got a problem with that because the modern game nobody in the known you already. Janis on Lebron an WHO's covering Jordan who's covering stats got covering step. I got clay and Andrea Diallo. Who in their day or two of the greatest lockdown defenders of the last twenty five years in the NBA? I got a clay and national or two of the pure as shooters and I have argued with the greatest defensive front court in the history of basketball. I Have Yoenis Hekim Akeem Patrick embiid. I mean I have wilt Bill Russell Shack. It's close by. Queen is not close if I had if I was restricted to white Americans. Then maybe may point so I do it as long ludicrous. It's ludicrous ludicrous. And you're right I'm wrong but so what is it that there are people took offense. How on Earth? What is they were like? Oh you know you Kim like first of all all the things to get worked up about in two thousand eighteen in America about race. This is the thing you have said about

Steve Nash Tim Duncan Hang Hau Kim Elijah Basketball Southern Africa Nigeria Caribbean Lebron Kobe Yoenis Hekim Akeem Patrick Emb Jordan Jordan Malcom Gladwin Patrick Ewing Joel Embiid Bill Russell Shack Simmons Johannesburg Kim Jaanus Jordan Tony Ridiculous Bill Russell NBA
"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

10:20 min | 1 year ago

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"And longer no my neck is always my neck size and and then the skin is getting stretched and then causes a wrinkle Okay clean this theory is good as any other. I guess I what do I have any you have none of this big protruding Adam's apple. That's a tiny bit because you're just sitting sitting in a little crunch crunch a you. Don't have any wrinkles on my neck anywhere. No I have them on my face. Sure where over over just look at my face. No wrinkle watch on blesses mess with me and I'll point all of that out for you in I'll show you all the things on their awry now a symmetrical and now ill ganglion. Do See and Marfan reads very Marvin. Listen you look like a little boy. Okay thank you know. Look I'm doing fine for forty four. I got a guy can't complain. You can't complain four year old. John Bless you some idea not just two years older than you. I know. He's older than me. Will you look like you're twenty four. Thanks Twenty Six. You're okay then what's row house route. Forty Two oh my goodness no. He's so young he doesn't have any wrinkles. Mac Pop did it just crack. Okay Rob is the next morning Nice. He doesn't wrangles very smooth. Okay youthful okay. I have some sad news okay. One of my facts got deleted Bono. And I don't know what it is. It's the lost Fach Jack. A boy sell so there was just one more fact. And it's gone. There's more oh there was one in the middle and you don't remember the top undo do on. It didn't work drowsy yes did not work. Didn't work wasn't meant to be Percentage of people who do sports in high school who ended up making a career out of it is point. Zero zero one is what Malcolm said in the statistics fewer than two percent of NCW student athletes go onto professional go on to be professional athletes in college. Yeah yeah so I guess that's not even right and then how many gene nice. I guess they can't even really test that I mean they could but they'd have to check. Every single student athlete will no. I think it'd be very simple. They would They'd take the total number of student. Athletes should be easy to get and then they'd take a total number of career positions in professional sports awards. Go It's three hundred to one. That's the math I would do. That would be the fat if you gave me this as a project got it. That's what I would do but but what about like student. Athletes is such a range You could be on. Varsha could be on Jayjay freshman get Over a you're not a student athlete. If no if you're listening in your freshman stick with it you could beat the odds. Yes yeah sure. beat the odds. You're you're employed is Entertainer that's almost impossible. But I'm not a professional cheerleader. Well or are you. Are we defining cheerleader. Thinking that on the drive here I was thinking about some of the stuff I used to do with your body. Yeah in cheerleading. And how I would just never ever do do that now. Even attempt to do it right and I'll add to if someone caught you by the Pussy. Now you'd probably be very aware of it. Yeah sure whereas in the past you just shrug that off. I was still aware when it happened. But in and not aware way right like like someone brushed your shoulder. Yes but you just don't really have time to focus on your in a routine but now if you were just doing a recreational Ian someone caught you by the pussy like that probably I think it would just be a little different probably especially the Amos they call you. I think really wake you up now. Whereas part of it like Oh? That's intentional mentioned. Sometimes you know the butt cheeks. Yeah but chic sorry certainly someone's finger stabbed your butthole at some point point in that long career I'm GonNa say probably not because you're wearing bloomers and shorts the catch you have most of your cheek in their hand but then their their their fingers has taken out and they just poke is that like they inserted. It's just gotTa quick blow to that probably happen right and then you're like whatever you don't even I'm like it'd be offensive even talk about it. You know what I'm saying like. Oh sure what a waste of time even out of embarrassment just want to get get over. No Oh I know no one. Why would you bring that up? You're busy performing performing. But now don't you think you've got a quick jab to the butthole with someone's index finger and your ring finger or middle finger. For that matter you would be like whole. I do think that is the case. Yes it. Unless they're saving my life when they're sticking their finger up then and I probably wouldn't notice still. Oh Oh well that's good to know case. I arrive to rescue you and I'm like why would catch but I'm afraid I'm GonNa Poker but with my index. Stop Yourself. I won't catch you more worry about the rest later. Okay so you know we talk about this all the time the the article about how papers don't WanNa put black people on the cup a home and you always were from New York Times and I'm trying to find it and I can't find it and I'm just nervous because we keep saying New York Times and I don't know that's that's very fair and also all add my point stands regardless Louis of whether it's that the the point is they're they're underrepresented and is that a an indictment of racism or is an indictment of empathy. Who Buys the paper? Yeah that's the that is the point. There are facts in there that you're throwing in I don't know are true or not. I'll try to figure out if I can and I know I'd love to drink. rousson reconfigure kristen. She doesn't know okay. So you said that my dad moved from India to Atlanta. But he didn't he move from India to Chicago to Kansas City to Atlanta world. Tour the Midwest. Wow Yeah okay. Hey so you said you're a mid level comedian And your No I am no. You're not by all measurements. My my movies were measure mid the mid level successful in my TV shows are mid level. Success I am mid-level comedian. Now not do this doc martens and get Outta here K. I just think of top level. You've got your Vince. Vaughn's your will Ferrell's you know anyone. When I'm leaving out your Seth Rogan's I apologize like all you you know? They're they're they're like the top tier comedians. You know you're in there. Well God bless you you are you worked with all those people what even saying. Why do you hate yourself? Dont appraising myself as mid levels a very healthy perspective. Unlike Robert Ory Oh boy I'm in the NBA. I want the MBA. You're not mid level. Robert Ory is not the mid level basketball agree well not nationally speaking but in the NBA. He's upper mid level. I think if you are in the NBA MHM you're already the top top top top level. Then I guess within that if you WANNA rank you could okay but that's acquittal into what's happening here guy will then. I agree with that argument. Yeah all right John that's it. Yeah Oh okay well. My God Malcolm glad well birthday came early for me the want him since day one. Now thank you Adam Grant for hanging out Adam you beautiful son of a gun thing here and I've begun emailing Malcolm about cars. Oh mercy if I can't get something Bruin and what does that mean just friendship wise fun. I wouldn't mind seeing that Geza. His playfully dance across my face a few more times. Yeah you in love is I. I do now on back to walk like an Egyptian. Do you know. There was also a popular song when I was younger. she's got Bette Davis Yeah I know that one and my father was nice enough to explain to me what that song man now. This is his interpretation but you know the they were saying the the woman was very coked up that she'd big is a big round pupils. Bette Davis also. Oh so it's actually a song about drugs about gale being all jacked up like that as much. It's less romantic uh-huh you'll get. That's my dad's impression. I don't I don't stand by that. Don't sue me. who have a robot SOLAREX? It's him kearns. Okay there's verse. She'll tease you. Schilling easy you sounds like coked up. Yeah he's got Bette Davis A seductress. Show expose you. When she snows? You snows powder outer wait. She says she's got Bette Davis. She's a hoover breath okay. Blessings to Malcolm yes since to you is Praise be under his I this is I mean. It's almost Christmas time. Yes yes I wish. I had my jingle here on but we don't have your mouth jingle bells sound like possibly as good okay all right well. Merry Christmas.

Bette Davis Malcolm Adam Grant NBA John New York Times Robert Ory Marvin India Atlanta Midwest Fach Jack Seth Rogan Bono Rob Varsha Schilling Ian
"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

11:06 min | 1 year ago

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"And this book is written. This was the first book talking to strangers written since I started doing podcasts and it was written in a very different fenway than my previous books because all of the chapters I started with the story. The book is framed. Around the story of Sandra Bland. One of the most high profile of those cases that began again with Ferguson. I just heard that case. And watch the Dash Cam video of the whole incident of her arguing with the police officer. As that. This this is about what I'm talking about right right. This is what I what I wanted to extract from it. I didn't know I just knew that I wanted to tell a story about what happened by the side of the road when this cop pulls over this young black woman and things go awry and then the story. You mentioned about the Cuban spy how I run across a long time ago. There was just something about it. That was so awesome unbelievable that this woman was the highest levels of the American intelligence eating or mating. FBI Yeah and she's a spy the whole time for Castro and nobody knows she has a fucking Shakespearean quote on honor at her desk is basically saying I'm a blagent. I'm a double agent but those and then I began to realize oh those it's sort of the same story it's about our inability to comprehend so in that case you you were aware of and you're like this has some significant somewhere right and the more pieces I start adding the more stories I see. Oh they fit and I can tell a series of what I wanted to do is to tell people with walls you right like like a like you would write a college paper is there. Is there like a whiteboard. How are you managing these stories chapters? Different chapters is sometimes. I'm not sure where they go an assemble them over time but I met him. Go back and revisit. You know in rewrite and rewrite and rewrite but but they kind of fall together like the Montezuma stories out at the very end okay when a friend of mine but the book and just said well. Where does this begin? Where what is what is the first great talking to strangers story and of course the first grade talking to strangers stories Cortez Meeting Montezuma in Mexico in in a nutshell Monica? Just he points points out that if you look at the The wars that happened in the thirteen hundred fourteen hundred zits M- largely neighbors fighting neighbors. And then all of a sudden you have this as a Spaniard. Spaniard goes to first Western go to Mexico meets the Aztec King and they have this conversation and they have no idea. They're working through so many layers translated by saying they completely misunderstand each other cortes gets Montezuma one hundred percent wrong ends in one of the great tragedy genocides. Besides up to now do you. Do you get the same. I sense that you get the same level of frustration when you see a problem presented the public in the two options. You recognize immediately. That's not getting to the source of this problem in. We're going to expend money time. Resources sources chasing two avenues. That are not far enough upstream to fix this problem uniquely maddening when I observe as bean. Here's one that I've been thinking about and I might do an episode of revisions history on it so my brother is a elementary school principal in Canada Ontario and every year where he goes down to the big international principles conference. It's all over North America and he always comes back and he says it was so weird. You go to these conferences things like this all of these sessions for principals on teacher retention on the great problem of trying to keep teachers in the workforce because they all leave he's like my brother's uh almost sixty principal for like thirty years. Whatever say I've only had one teacher quit on me my entire time and they came back next year? So he's like I don't understand a system system where how do you have a profession is revered as teaching everybody who once they start wants to leave. He says the answer is really simple in Canada. They don't do that because we pay them properly. Operative and is it a huge. Why are you guys spend sh so much time agonizing over the problem of teacher attention when all you have to do is take a step back them properly and pay them properly because we don't want to like make it a job people would compete exactly? He's eight years people lined up outside the door. Would it be teachers different. I mean it's it's candidate. It's not like another planet. It's like just up there and they had cut banished to conceive of with this problem in a very different way and we're still struggling decades later with doing everything but pay people enough to want to stay in the job right. It's so so obvious. It's it's obvious. Can I throw one at you because this is one that bumped for me recently this thing cycled through my liberal silo that I live in move around through and I'm married to a fellow liberal right and she forwarded me this thing and said Oh there's this disturbing and it was a story from a photo journalist who I started working in New York in early in their career. They were taking pictures of Black people who had Either been killed or crime scene stuff and then the editor I think of the Times they said a friend said look. Stop taking pictures of black people. That's never GONNA at best. It'll make the fifth page of newspaper. So that's clearly well documented documented. And I know I have no issue with that but the conclusion of this was look. How racist the paper is in my thought was? Let's also think that this may be more more a problem of empathy. The readership of the New York Times is predominantly white people. Identify with people that look like them on the front page and if they don't see someone that looks like them damn there might not buy. The paper are the. I don't know that we hung the the issue on the right problem. I mean clearly let me just say I think it goes without saying it's absurd word. That black people's lives should make the front page. That's clearly a problem. We need to fix my issue is just how do we fix it and address it if we just say pay. Hey this is racist. Stop being racist will result. Will we get the result we want. I'm more concerned about the danger of every time. African Americans Arkansas represented in the mediators in the context of of some criminal event right like the percentage of African Americans who are criminals. Tiny by the most black people are as solid citizens as anyone else. Yeah you have to weigh that if all you did. If you were a Martian coming down and all you did was watched the news and movies and the newspapers. You would think that there was the criminal population. This country was entirely black and Hispanic right. Concerns me more. So maybe Eh. If they're replacing these these dark pictures with a more balanced portrayal of black peoples lives. Then I'm all in favor of it. A little restraint on the subject of associating black people exclusively with criminality as I think of this has the image of young black men been so polluted by this kind of selective media attention. They're just everyone's just assuming these kids are thugs. They have to deal with this stereotype as young black men every day and it must be so corrosive to be someone who is a professional architect and then you step out of the office of a sudden. You're people consider you as like like that. I don't know. Have you read whistling Vivaldi or heard of that book. There's a book about race relations in America. It's called whistling aldean it starts. It's with a kid leaving. Maybe like Colombia or something a kid in school and he realized when he was walking down the streets going home home at night. And you know he's a kid. He's wearing a Hoodie. Like any eighteen year old is that people would cross the other side of the street keep their distance from him and so he started whistling. Vivaldi assume and no-one crossed like once they you know they placed him in a different realm then they felt at ease. It's so fast. And he's the same person the whole time. Yeah it's really interesting. Interesting is okay there with the. I've never read questions. It's very impressive. So you've me. A titter serious homework was done. I fucking love you. It's it's rare that I worship people but you are an small it's you and Jay Z. And who else my Bill Murray. Okay what is your goal for this book. One of the things I thought of while listening was man. Our communication is so subjective. It's so steeped in cultural cues that minimally we should hope to recognize that. Other people are communicating with us through tons of layers is the golden ultimately. Be Patient and sympathetic to other people. Is that part of it. That's the whole thing. That's the whole thing. I mean. The whole idea is of talking to strangers. There's is that when you talk to a stranger as I say in the end to be cautious. NB humble don't be in a hurry chances are you're getting that person wrong. You're attending ending to the wrong cues. You don't understand the context in which they are speaking to you. I could go on and on and on. Yeah just give yourself a chance to revisit that set of impressions on that person then. Yeah I think it's also helpful to recognize like yours. Absurd to them as they are to you like there's an equal amount in both always in both directions of kind of miscommunication in probably mostly good faith but gone sideways. You know I kept reading it going. I'm sympathetic to everybody in the story. Like no no one has the all-knowing spear in their hand you know we're all as equally confused generally. Yeah Yeah but I wish list of questions do you he the UK sees. Do you think it's possible for people to really overcome their collection of bias sees that we accumulate over time like in those seconds you have with the stranger. No I mean I think there are people who are better at it than others there. That's true of everything that we do. The problem is it's impossible to accumulate all of the necessary information in that period of time. So if I'm talking to you right now and and you look profoundly uncomfortable that either. Because I'm making you uncomfortable or you're uncomfortable for some reason that I don't know they may never know and that you don't WanNa tell me or that is is deeply personal or and I have no way of knowing which and there's a vast difference you may really enjoy talking to me but something happened this morning right in your life that you're struggling with and so at that level. If you and I were siblings this would not be a problem right. I would know no the context in which you're from because we are strangers. Yeah there's just too much ground to cover and in that example I just gave was always amazing is our default all is always. Oh it's about me right. We're projecting all of our own stuff on it to whereas I would argue that probably ninety percent of the time it's not about it's not about at it's about something you know I in the grand scheme of things. Is that infinite list of things that could be driving your moods. There's a great I don't put it in a book but my great example.

Mexico principal Vivaldi FBI Sandra Bland Ferguson officer New York Times New York North America Canada Castro cortes Cortez Canada Ontario editor UK Martian
"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"The door dash asked us what you want to eat in your food will be delivered to you wherever you are not only is your favorite pizza joint already on door dash over three hundred and forty thousand restaurants in thirty three hundred cities so you might find a new favorite to with door to door delivery and all fifty states in Canada order from your local. Go choose or choose from your favorite national restaurants like chipotle lay Wendy's or the cheesecake factory. Don't worry about dinner. Let dinner come to you. Adore Dash Right now armed. Jerry can get five dollars off their first order of fifteen dollars or more when you download the door dash APP and enter Promo Code Dax. That's five dollars off your first order when you download load the door dash APP from the APP store and enter Promo Code. Dax Don't forget that's Promo Code Dax for five dollars off your first order from door. Dash Armchair expert is supported by masterclass. Who is offering special limited time offer when you buy an annual master class all access pass you get a second one free Monica? There's no other way to get access to these folks even our guest today. Malcolm glad well teaches you how to write on masterclass my goodness I wanNA take that. Yes us in up. You know what one I'm really excited to watching and watch over the Christmas break is Natalie. Portman teaches a class on acting. What's isn't that Crazy Academy award winner? Natalie Oh yes. The Art of magic by Penn and teller get sixty different instructors across tons of categories. There is literally something for everyone so masterclasses an APP. You can access on your phone the Web Apple. TV now offer classes on a wide variety of topics. Ulta by world-class Masters at the top of their fields. Each class is broken. Out into individual video lessons. And downloadable downloadable materials all of which users can explore at their own pace the all access pass membership charging only gives users unlimited access to over sixty classes in two hundred hours of lessons taught by the world's best. The best part is if you buy an annual master class all access pass right now you get a second one for free okay right now with over sixty five wide ranging class offerings. There's something for everyone to easy way to give a gift. That's personal and meaningful a- limited time when you buy one annual masterclass Sir class all access pass for yourself. You'll get another one to gift for free go to masterclass dot com slash DAX to get started with this limited time offer by one all access pass and get one free gift at masterclass Dot Com Slash Dax.

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"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Are they? Are they divine. Do you know like I've always been obsessed with which of these rules. Should I be following. What should did I ignore? And I don't know if I'm unique in that or whatever but I just every time I read you I I think yes. Here's somebody who would take the most basic premise. We all ascribe to in question it. I also WANNA point out for people because I think it's really encouraging you were kind of shitty student right like you. You got out of University of Toronto and you couldn't get into to Grad School is that is that story. Apocryphal or real. Shitty is too strong. I mean I never went to class. Okay well then I would say shitty ladies Dude. And who doesn't attend in the courses that I cared about. Okay so I once again. I didn't go to university to sit in a lecture hall and listen to somebody that's not my definition from university. My definition was going to the library and doing stuff on my own and then talking about it with friends. I wanted the kind of social experience of learning inning and the access to all those resources but I wasn't there. Listen simply be listening to this day. The notion of going and listening to someone talk is he's. It's just not my cup of tea. I can't sit see now me as they dyslexic. Who couldn't get anything from the written word? I love people telling me stuff like I love it. It's like Oh my I can retain so much From listening to somebody more than say reading often so I have such different relationship with it but you kind of already answered my question but I I was just wondering if being that driven and focused at such a young age. was that isolating at all. I have an armchair theory that may be your desire ear to challenge the status. Quo could've been because you're observing status quo that didn't include you in. You got critical of it. I mean this is like very cheap psychological assisting never thought about this before. It's funny. I suppose formerly I was something of an not an outsider. But a kind of I mean when I went to college I was two years younger than my peer group. You graduated early. So candidate has thirteen years of in those years. Thirteen years of high school so I was sixteen and my peers where eighteen sixty and eighteen is enormous around the difference between Twenty One and twenty three. Yeah so in that sense I did feel I suppose a little bit on the outside for social reasons but I never felt that I was isolated. Now some people clearly have that kind of chip on their shoulder or that perspective is on the outside looking in and maybe it was because I was A. That's one of the gifts of being an athlete. If you ask me at fourteen or fifteen what I was I would have said I. It was a runner right. I wore Dogar. That's an identity as a young. Yeah Yeah that was sufficient for me. Yeah do you think you subtract that. It's a very different. It's a different story. I think I think is so interesting. In retrospect to look back back from adult hood at how enormously central sports are this thing particularly.

Grad School University of Toronto
"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Are they? Are they divine. Do you know like I've always been obsessed with which of these rules. Should I be following. What should did I ignore? And I don't know if I'm unique in that or whatever but I just every time I read you I I think yes. Here's somebody who would take the most basic premise. We all ascribe to in question it. I also WANNA point out for people because I think it's really encouraging you were kind of shitty student right like you. You got out of University of Toronto and you couldn't get into to Grad School is that is that story. Apocryphal or real. SHEEDY's to strip off. I mean I never went to class. Okay well then I would say shitty ladies Dude. And who doesn't attend in the courses that I cared about. Okay so I once again. I didn't go to university to sit in a lecture hall and listen to somebody that's not my definition from university. My definition was going to the library and doing stuff on my own and then talking about it with friends. I wanted the kind of social experience of learning inning and the access to all those resources but I wasn't there. Listen Sim telling me listening to this day. The notion of going and listening to someone talk is he's. It's just not my cup of tea. I can't sit see now me as they dyslexic. Who couldn't get anything from the written word? I love people telling me stuff like I love it. It's like Oh my I can retain so much From listening to somebody more than say reading often so I have such different relationship with it but you kind of already answered my question but I I was just wondering if being that driven and focused at such a young age. was that isolating at all. I have an armchair theory that may be your desire fire to challenge the status. Quo could've been because you're observing status quo that didn't include you in. You got critical of it. I mean this is like very cheap psychological. Sierra interesting never thought about this before. It's funny. I suppose formerly I was something of an not an outsider. But a kind of I mean when I went to college I was two years younger than my peer group. You graduated early. So candidate has thirteen years of in those years. Thirteen years of high school so I was sixteen and my peers where eighteen sixty and eighteen is enormous The Difference Between Twenty One and twenty three. Yeah so in that sense I did feel I suppose a little bit on the outside for social reasons but I wear never felt that I was isolated. Now some people clearly have that kind of chip on their shoulder or that perspective is on the outside looking in and maybe it was because I was A. That's one of the gifts of being an athlete. Show if you'd asked me fourteen. What are fifteen what I was I would have said I? It was a runner right. I wore Dogar. That's an identity as a young. Yeah Yeah that was sufficient for me. Yeah do you think you subtract that. It's a very different. It's a different story. I think I think is so interesting. In retrospect to look back back from adult hood at how enormously central sports are this thing particularly.

SHEEDY Grad School University of Toronto Sierra
"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

09:41 min | 1 year ago

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"You know enough about music but yeah I guess you're right. Kristen knows if something's correct. Yeah you see if you're hearing whether something sounds good or not but what policies people want to push through or what they care about is more subjective. I would say but it still leaves the question wide open of whether that subjective judgment you're making is helped or hurt by being able to look at the person right totally. Yeah I think it's just it's just making an already subjective decision hopelessly subjects that you're getting confused over the fact that someone's sounds good looking and it's really useful to go back for years to the last presidential campaign and read through a mainstream publication like pick one hundred newspaper articles from the New York Times about Hillary Clinton at random between Twenty fifteen twenty sixteen during the race for the nomination in and the presidential campaign and look at how many references there are two the way she looks Or to some extraneous factor. But the fact that she's a woman some and you realize what if we didn't know what to look like or that she was a woman How much easier and clearer would our choice have been? We wrapped ourselves in knots talking about her hairstyle articles about her hairstyle. Oh sure sure sure how how well in talking to strangers and let me first say I prefer to read books. Even though I'm a big consumer of audiobooks I love listening to them at night as I fall asleep but but your books I'd like to read with my I because I feel like I retain more of it and I'm constantly citing incorrectly as we're learning today but I would urge people. Someone urged me like Hey I know you wanna read it but try the audio book which I've gotten so fun to listen to because I don't know why you're the first person I've I'm malware. That's done this so anytime that you you're going to quote somebody in the book in the Audio actually exists of the person you'll play the audio during audiobook or if there is the traffic nick. Stop where someone gets shot and there's dashboard footage will hear it and becomes kind of multimedia experience in it's profoundly more enjoyable than just hearing someone read the book so first and foremost I love it you know. We rely since a song from Genomic DNA. That's the theme song had scoring and we had and the result all is until very recently. I was selling more audio books. Then physical books and now normally it's like ten percent audiobooks it's really of the overall. I'm around fifty percent while which is unheard of. I mean it's like it's so it's like it's crazy new thing that I really made an audiobook. Yeah and prior to this one coming out what had been. You're just assume as an author who sits down in types on a keyboard. You kind of want that read with the is. Do you have any actually dispossessed writer. People listen no Ki- well I I agree Because you guys have done it so well produced and it just. It's so much more. Engaging seem to hear the people you're talking about like your own limits of empathy ME HERE IN UTAH versus hearing the woman during the traffic stop is yeah. It's night and day. There's so so many good examples but there's one chapter chapter we're talking about torture and I'm interviewing the guy from the CIA. Who did the waterboarding? Oh it's really important to hear him. So I'm not paraphrasing him or escorting him you hear him in his voice at his own pace. Describe to you what happened. And I think that's really crucial. Because it would be very easy for me to caricature his position or in some way to slant it or sectarian oh I would like the reader the listener the whatever. The audience consumer to to get a clean impression of disguise. Because I think he made some I ultimately do not agree with his position. But I don't dismiss him either. I have an enormous amount of respect for someone who tried to serve his country. Country is faith police he could. He ended up doing things I like. I said I would disagree with but I don't do not in any way doubt his intentions. It is really important. Anez a listener that you hear it. In his words his voice you detail situation where judges who are evaluating whether or not to grant bail to people apple or set bail or who. They're gonNA let out who they're going to put behind bars in you say that the created an AI. Algorithm that evaluated all these cases that these judges had done in that in general they were twenty five percent better at predicting who wouldn't commit a crime or who would be good person to not the Algorithm Algorithm was better than the judge on the Superior Twenty five percent which is very significant right. I think in a Jonathan Height way. I really believe that we as individuals are just terribly on objective but that we do create systems that are pretty darn objective orb significantly more objective than us and so I have this kind of belief in systems systems and I have some. I'm scared about just humans making decisions so this. Ai Thing is interesting in that we are nearing a time when we could probably deploy AI As judging that kind of thing in all kinds of stories in medicine that they're better at identifying cancer and whatnot. Here's my question because you love challenging system so much and I'm drawn to that as well I invite. Ai Making those decisions. But do you think having I make these decisions for US could lead to us not challenging anymore breaking paradigm pushing things forward because we're just off loading or outsourcing that thinking and we would just shut off all together our evaluation nation of that. How good the system is yeah? I'm not a someone who thinks we should turn over enormous chunks of our crucial decisions to machines To the contrary I think that that would be disastrous. The point of that chapter in talking to strangers was not to celebrate how good the algorithm was at deciding which defendants deserve zurve bail. It was two point. How bad human judges are So Algorithms have all kinds of other problems the spe- clear okay. What's important to note here simply as a judge unaided by any kind of tool who is asked to make a high stakes decision about how dangerous the defendant is in a bail? Hearing in ten seconds does not do a good job. That's what I wanted to show to prove so someone who is trained and whose job it is to size up strangers does a terrible job change. Yeah what that says to me is not. We should throw out the human and replace them with a computer. It says that we have to get better as humans right machines cannot make consequential decisions about whether people deserve their freedom or not. That's crazy writing the only away. We'll accept the legitimacy of the legal system is if those high stakes decisions are made by human beings. So there are two competing things their Accuracy and legitimacy they are not the same accuracy and legitimacy are not the same thing not the same so the my willingness to accept the judgment of some institution is based on two factors. One is how accurate are they rendering judgments do they appropriately tag. The guilty inappropriate tagged the innocent. And secondly how much credibility do they have. Are they people who I believe in Ria as a kid I would respond to scolding from my mother. I would not respond sculling from a stranger in the street. Even if the change of the street was correct right it has no credibility they will standing in my life. Why would I do what they say? My mom has enormous credibility. Even when she's wrong I would submit to her authority because she's my mom right so that's credibility over accuracy so the judge has all all the credibility the I has the accuracy the answers to combined them. Yeah to train and help judges to use these tools tools to improve the accuracy of their decisions while maintaining their human credibility. That is the the ultimate solution when we discuss these things. There's just way okay too much either or won't that's what is going to say that I love most about your books which I feel like they are always investigating on some level. which is all these things that we would love of to be binary are just simply not binary and so often were pursuing two conflicting ideals that at best will be some compromise or some mm-hmm position on the pendulum? Right that we all feel good about when I say I believe in systems that the thing that I think detailed so perfectly is the Korean air example. which is my? Hi My favorite chapter in your book all the time we talk about it just the notion that this pilot co-pilot relationship how effective it is at preventing disaster And how much culture plays a role in the dynamic in between that relationship. See to me. That's an example of a really great system system that has been devised in win. You detail how they were able to go into Korean air change the culture change how it works and get this amazing outcome that gives me so much hope for humans. There's so many things you could get discouraged about but taking a system that complex where they've had five disasters in the Erin. They're about to lose their right to fly through Canada. All this stuff could be a worse scenario that they that people went in there and actually figured out what was broken and fixed it. I just find hugely encouraging for us us as little monkeys. Stay.

Hillary Clinton Kristen New York Times CIA writer UTAH US Ki apple Canada
"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

09:41 min | 1 year ago

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"You know enough about music but yeah I guess you're right. Kristen knows if something's correct. Yeah you see if you're hearing whether something sounds good or not but what policies people want to push through or what they care about is more subjective. I would say but it still leaves the question wide open of whether that subjective judgment you're making is helped or hurt by being able to look at the person right totally. Yeah I think it's just it's just making an already subjective decision hopelessly subjects that you're getting confused over the fact that someone's sounds good looking and it's really useful to go back for years to the last presidential campaign and read through a mainstream publication like pick one hundred newspaper articles from the New York Times about Hillary Clinton at random between Twenty fifteen twenty sixteen during the race for the nomination in and the presidential campaign and look at how many references there are two the way she looks or to some extraneous factor. But the fact that she's a woman some and you realize what if we didn't know what to look like or that she was a woman How much easier and clearer would our choice have been? We wrapped ourselves in knots talking about her hairstyle articles about her hairstyle. Oh sure sure sure how how well in talking to strangers and let me first say I prefer to read books. Even though I'm a big consumer of audiobooks I love listening to them at night as I fall asleep but but your books I'd like to read with my I because I feel like I retain more of it and I'm constantly citing incorrectly as we're learning today but I would urge people. Someone urged me like Hey I know you wanna read it but try the audio book which I've gotten so fun to listen to because I don't know why you're the first person I've I'm malware. That's done this so anytime that you you're going to quote somebody in the book in the Audio actually exists of the person you'll play the audio during audiobook or if there is the traffic stop where someone gets shot and there's dashboard footage will hear it and becomes kind of multimedia experience in it's profoundly more enjoyable than just hearing. Someone read the book so first and foremost I love it. You know we rely since a song from Genomic DNA that's the theme song had scoring and we had and the result all is until very recently I was selling more audio books then physical books and now normally. It's like ten percent audiobooks. It's really of the overall. I'm around fifty percent while which is unheard of. I mean it's like it's so it's like it's crazy new thing that I really made an audiobook. Yeah and prior to this one coming out what had been. You're just assume as an author who sits down in types on a keyboard. You kind of want that read with the is. Do you have any actually dispossessed writer. People listen no well I I agree Because you guys have done it so well produced and it just it's so much more engaging seem to hear the people you're talking about like your own limits of empathy ME HERE IN UTAH versus hearing the woman during the traffic stop is yeah. It's night and day. There's so so many good examples but there's one chapter Chapter I talk about torture and I'm interviewing the guy from the CIA. Who did the waterboarding? Oh it's really important to hear him. So I'm not paraphrasing him or escorting him you hear him in his voice at his own pace. Describe to you what happened. And I think that's really crucial. Because it would be very easy for me to caricature his position or in some way to slant it or sectarian oh I would like the reader the listener the whatever. The audience consumer to to get a clean impression of disguise. Because I think he made some I ultimately do not agree with his position. But I don't dismiss him either. I have an enormous amount of respect for someone who tried to serve his country. Country is faith police he could. He ended up doing things I like. I said I would disagree with but I don't do not in any way doubt his attentions. It is really important. Anez a listener that you hear it. In his words his voice you detail situation where judges who are evaluating whether or not to grant bail to people apple or set bail or who. They're gonNA let out who they're going to put behind bars in you say that the created an AI. Algorithm that evaluated all these cases that these judges had done in that in general they were twenty five percent better at predicting who wouldn't commit a crime or who would be good person to not the Algorithm Algorithm was better than the judge on the Superior Twenty five percent which is very significant right. I think in a Jonathan Height way. I really believe that we as individuals are just terribly on objective but that we do create systems that are pretty darn objective orb significantly more objective than us and so I have this kind of belief in systems systems and I have some. I'm scared about just humans making decisions so this. Ai Thing is interesting in that we are nearing a time when we could probably deploy AI As judging that kind of thing in all kinds of stories in medicine that they're better at identifying cancer and whatnot. Here's my question because you love challenging system so much and I'm drawn to that as well I invite. Ai Making those decisions. But do you think having I make these decisions for US could lead to us not challenging anymore breaking paradigm pushing things forward because we're just off loading or outsourcing that thinking and we would just shut off all together our evaluation nation of that. How good the system is yeah? I'm not a someone who thinks we should turn over enormous chunks of our crucial decisions to machines To the contrary I think that that would be disastrous. The point of that chapter in talking to strangers was not to celebrate how good the algorithm was deciding which defendants deserve zurve bail. It was two point. How bad human judges are So Algorithms have all kinds of other problems the spe- clear okay. What's important to note here simply as a judge unaided by any kind of tool who is asked to make a high stakes decision about how dangerous the defendant is in a bail? Hearing in ten seconds does not do a good job. That's what I wanted to show to prove so someone who is trained and whose job it is to size up strangers does a terrible job change. Yeah what that says to me is not. We should throw out the human and replace them with a computer. It says that we have to get better as humans right machines cannot make consequential decisions about whether people deserve their freedom or not. That's crazy writing the only away. We'll accept the legitimacy of the legal system is if those high stakes decisions are made by human beings. So there are two competing things their Accuracy and legitimacy they are not the same accuracy and legitimacy are not the same the same so the my willingness to accept the judgment of some institution is based on two factors. One is how accurate are they rendering judgments. Do they appropriately tag. The guilty inappropriate tagged the innocent. And secondly how much credibility do they have. Are they people who I believe in Ria as a kid I would respond to scolding from my mother. I would not respond sculling from a stranger in the street. Even if the change of the street was correct right it has no credibility they will standing in my life. Why would I do what they say? My mom has enormous credibility. Even when she's wrong I would submit to her authority because she's my mom right so that's credibility over accuracy so the judge has all all the credibility the I has the accuracy the answers to combined them. Yeah to train and help judges to use these tools tools to improve the accuracy of their decisions while maintaining their human credibility. That is the the ultimate solution when we discuss these things. There's just way okay too much either or won't that's what is going to say that I love most about your books which I feel like they are always investigating on some level. which is all these things that we would love of to be binary are just simply not binary and so often were pursuing two conflicting ideals that at best will be some compromise or some mm-hmm position on the pendulum? Right that we all feel good about when I say I believe in systems that the thing that I think detailed so perfectly is the Korean air example. which is my? Hi My favorite chapter in your book all the time we talk about it just the notion that this pilot co-pilot relationship how effective it is at preventing disaster And how much culture plays a role in the dynamic in between that relationship. See to me. That's an example of a really great system system that has been devised in win. You detail how they were able to go into Korean air change the culture change how it works and get this amazing outcome that gives me so much hope for humans. There's so many things you could get discouraged about but taking a system that complex where they've had five disasters in the Erin. They're about to lose their right to fly through Canada. All this stuff could be a worse scenario that they that people went in there and actually figured out what was broken and fixed it. I just find hugely encouraging for us us as little monkeys. Stay.

Hillary Clinton Kristen New York Times CIA writer UTAH US apple Canada
"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

10:50 min | 1 year ago

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Of cut off for. Insignificant is in country size so Canada's with candidate thirty a two million or something. I forgot less or on par with California's a stage. There should be like below a certain point and people should just be like you consider you want if the Dutch say something terribly upset because it's the Dutch yes. Some liechtensteiners comedian says something. We're like okay and you know if someone from a German says something Germany is consequential you upset so similar between deduction the Germans. I feel like there's a line I would like to stay on the bottom end of that line so it becomes a great asset to have these this kind of outside perspective but then at the same time it could imagine that also would come with. Let me first say when my favorite chapters of yours is on dyslexia 'cause I am dyslexic. And I had a horrendous time through K.. Through five but then found my away in junior high and then became a good student later but I had grown up with the knowledge that Oh yeah. You're twice as likely to go to jail if you're or be imprisoned if you're dyslexic but then you revealed revealed you're also twice as likely to be a CEO. Can I get a ruffling with your conceptually that is correct the wrong so it's a curve. It's like dyslexic are overloaded at the tails of the curve. More of them in prison. More of them super high achievers whereas non-dyslexics are normal bell curve with most of the people in the middle and I found that to be very comforting and wonderful therefore as a dyslexic. In that story you articulate what you system so happy that you're here because you talk about this stuff all all the time you are getting it wrong and so glad. We're GONNA get all the answers but I think what I interpreted. That point was struggles. Struggles and coping mechanisms and having to strengthen other aspects can be of great value in your life. Yeah right challenges so my friend David Epstein. Who wrote this brilliant book called range uses the phrase in his book? Strategic Difficulty in David and Goliath. I talk about desirable difficulty. And they're both these similar notions of if it's too hard it's a problem shift too many problems. You can't get ahead and if you have no problems it's a problem them right you. What you want is something that that in the course of being challenged the right amount yours forced to be resourceful full? You will learn things in a more profound way. You will investigate your own strengths and weaknesses more aggressively. There's all kinds of good things that happened from and I feel like the reason that such an important point is that a lot of people think that what preparation for excellence is is the removal of difficulty. Right I want to give you. The very best. Endowed overly resource environment imaginable obstacles. Don't want dad you you WanNa have something that you have to wrestle with and I think a lot of parents like myself. We are incredibly privileged. So we're now in this bizarre situation where you're almost trying to manufacture obstacles or challenges for our kids. You know my wife and I as having two little kids and we have money and we have time and all those things and it's Kinda I'm like. Oh I got up figure out like what is you know. How do I make sure? I'm not robbing of them of the opportunity. To develop these coping mechanisms and skill sets it's Kinda challenging but whereas is moving to Canada. What were you six? Yes went to Canada from England when I was six in. A Dad was a mathematics professor Martin Gordon and mom was a psychotherapist. Yeah and a writer and mom is from Jamaica Mama's Jamaican yes so again. Even within that little bubble mom has a different perspective factor. Probably right as a different perspective. She does yes he does. I'm only laughing because my lovely mother who is very very much with us she does. She has the benefit of many many. Different perspectives raised in Jamaica. You know educated in England. meriden Englishman moved to rural Canada I mean yeah and then also there's an H. thing that's kind of fasting. My mom was born into a house in the middle of nowhere in Jamaica with no electricity. You know indoor plumbing known car and then ends up in in the early forties or late was born in nineteen thirty okay and then ends up in twenty first century modern candidate and like. I don't think all of US newsroom. See I doubt will not see that much. Technological Technological and social movement in our lifetimes free us from zero electricity to an iphone is kind of a lot it is it might might be the sweetest spot of that transition everything you know. We're always patting ourselves on the back. Because we're the generation that will witness the most is like. I don't know I sort of think going from no electricity to the iphone is the most imagine a perspective someone of her generation and has on top of all the geographical and cultural movement. This crazy thing of like you know growing up with horses and buggies and now taking jets across Europe Europe could thing yes and then landing in point up your phone and then a car pulls up in front in you get an and go anywhere you want. I mean we're really. My mom hasn't gotten to return to more of a live person. Well I just mean more and more like we travel a bunch for this show and I always say like we're getting close to teleporting. I mean we're are really getting close to like you wake up somewhere you know in the morning and you go to the airport and then you can really be anywhere. And it's I try to be conscious of it like it is an incredible accomplishment accomplishment that we can be anywhere on the globe now. It's really exciting. What I find that you point out often and it seems to be a theme through many of the books is how bad? Our intuition is quite often. How counterintuitive results of studies generally are? Then I think you often question a a lot of assumed things which I really like and I was trying to think about what causes that and I was wondering. Do you think US using all this technology that has been amassed over centuries give us a false sense of our own intelligence like is that part of the problem because I was an anthropology major primatology he specifically. That's what I was interested in in the difference between chimpanzees intelligence ours compared to a chimpanzees in a mouse. It's not that big of a deal. We're just fractionally SMARTER SMARTER THAN Champ. Right but other people have created all the stuff that gives us kind of this bolstered sense of our intelligence that part of why we think were so we are. I mean and we are massively. Overconfident and a lot of modern psychology is simply the attempt to catalogue the degree to which we are. Overconfident are over overly in all of our own abilities. My most recent book talking to strangers a big chunk of that is trying to dismantle this degree. The of self confidence is like you think that you can sum up a stranger you know usefully inaccurately in the space of one encounter chances are you can't yes. Yeah thank you can tell a liar no you. Can't you know you all these things that we need to be reminded that we're not good. At these fundamental social tasks it moreover the proximity to the person actually can be more misleading than space from like you you cite different examples. Where the the people who met? Hitler generally trusted him and the people that never met him face to face. Were more objective in better at knowing who he was yeah. We're really really built to do in. Social Interactions Human beings is date this assay. All of our systems are optimized for romantic encounters choosing Zing mates for figuring out and in that realm. Were pretty good. It's it is possible to know very quickly whether you're attracted someone right. Yeah that's we have that down. That's what we've been optimized for but when we try and transfer that to non-romantic settings we get in trouble like you know I am Constantly amazed by thing. We're in the middle of you. Know a process of choosing our presidential candidates the mythology that surrounds choosing presidential. The candidates is the mythology of dating. Really when you think about people phone does trump was saying we will. I want this person. Why because what they're saying is that's the person I would date right and you really dating the president in fact if you would you imagine a more perfect selection process yes it will be one in which you never met any of the candidates? It is not useful to know that Pete Buddha judges five eight to know that Elizabeth Warren is a woman to know. Then Joe Biden is you know eighty years old or however old is none of these fax really help you. I mean. Just because someone's eighty doesn't mean that they they are more or less impaired than someone who's seventy or sixty. I mean you can be a wide range of eight year old and the fact that if you look at the history of American presidential candidates I did this one since super obvious analysis. He go back one hundred years. Every single person who has ever run for president with four exceptions has been a middle aged white Protestant male over six feet in height right there in the last hundred years. Jimmy Carter was short John F. Kennedy. He was Catholic. Barack Obama was black and Hillary Clinton was woman. Everybody else was the same thing. What are we choosing from the same incredibly narrow because we you can see them you know? We want to date the Togo student. white-haired right. Then I try to figure out. What percentage of the American population appellation is a white Protestant guy? And it's like it's less than ten percent so choosing the most important job the world ten percent of the population well and you made. You made the point brilliantly. I can't even remember which book but it but starting to audition orchestra players. There's Bhai a blind audition sheet between the musician and the people judging them and how much that change the outcome Oh additioning so similarly early like the music. They're playing has nothing to do with what they look like it. Nor does the president's ability to guide the nation or set policy have anything to do with what they look like. Yeah yeah but that's a little more subjective than music.

Canada president US Jamaica David Epstein California CEO Germany Togo Europe Barack Obama Martin Gordon Joe Biden England. meriden writer professor Hillary Clinton Elizabeth Warren Hitler
"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

10:49 min | 1 year ago

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Off for. Insignificant is in country size so Canada's with candidate thirty a two million or something. I forgot less or on par with California's a stage. Yeah there should be like below a certain point. People should just be like you consider you want if the Dutch say something terribly upset because it's the Dutch yes. Some liechtensteiners comedian says something. We're like okay and you know if someone from a German says something Germany is consequential you upset so similar between deduction the Germans. I feel like there's a line I would like to stay on the bottom end of that line so it becomes a great asset to have these this kind of outside perspective but then at the same time I could imagine that also would come with. Let me first say when my favorite chapters of yours is on dyslexia 'cause I am dyslexic. And I had a horrendous time through K.. Through five but then found my away in junior high and then became a good student later but I had grown up with the knowledge that Oh yeah. You're twice as likely to go to jail if you're or be imprisoned if you're dyslexic but then you revealed revealed you're also twice as likely to be a CEO. Can I get a ruffling with your conceptually that is correct the wrong so it's a curve. It's like dyslexic are overloaded at the tails of the curve. More them in prison more of them super high achievers whereas non-dyslexics are a normal bell curve with most of the people in the middle and I found that to be very comforting and wonderful therefore as a dyslexic. In that story you articulate what you system so happy that you're here because you talk about this stuff all all the time you are getting it wrong and so glad. We're GONNA get all the answers but I think what I interpreted. That point was struggles. Struggles and coping mechanisms and having to strengthen other aspects can be of great value in your life. Yeah right challenges so my friend David Epstein. Who wrote this brilliant book called range uses the phrase in his book? Strategic Difficulty in David and Goliath. I talk about desirable difficulty. And they're both these similar notions of if it's too hard it's a problem shift too many problems. You can't get ahead and if you have no problems it's a problem them right you. What you want is something that that in the course of being challenged the right amount yours forced to be resourceful? Pull you will learn things in a more profound way. You will investigate your own strengths and weaknesses more aggressively. There's all kinds of good things that happened from and I feel like the reason that such an important point is that a lot of people think that what preparation for excellence is is the removal of difficulty. Right I want to give you. The very best. Endowed overly resource environment imaginable obstacles. Don't want dad you you WanNa have something that you have to wrestle with and I think a lot of parents like myself. We are incredibly privileged. So we're now in this bizarre situation like you aren't. We're almost trying to manufacture obstacles or challenges for our kids. You know my wife and I as having two little kids and we have money and we have time and all those things and it's Kinda I'm like. Oh I got up figure out like what is you know how do I make sure. I'm not robbing of them of the opportunity. To develop these coping mechanisms and skill sets Kinda challenging but whereas is moving to Canada. What were you six? Yes went to Canada from England when I was six in a dad was a mathematics professor And Mom was a psychotherapist. Yeah and a writer and mom is from Jamaica Mama's Jamaican yes so again. Even within that little bubble mom has a different perspective factor. Probably right as a different perspective. She does yes he does. I'm only laughing because my lovely mother who is very very much with us she does. She has the benefit of many many. Different perspectives raised in Jamaica. You know educated in England. meriden Englishman moved to rural Canada I mean yeah and then also there's an H. thing that's kind of fasting. My mom was born into a house in the middle of nowhere in Jamaica with no electricity. You know indoor plumbing known car and then ends up in in the early forties or late was born in nineteen thirty okay and then ends up in twenty first century modern candidate and like. I don't think all of us newsroom will not see I doubt will not see that much. Technological Technological and social movement in our lifetimes free us from zero electricity to an iphone is kind of a lot it is it might might be the sweetest spot of that transition everything you know. We're always patting ourselves on the back. Because we're the generation that will witness the most is like. I don't know I sort of think going from no electricity to the iphone is the most imagine a perspective someone of her generation and has on top of all the geographical and cultural movement. This crazy thing of like you know growing up with horses and buggies and now taking jets across Europe Europe could thing yes and then landing in point up your phone and then a car pulls up in front in you get an and go anywhere you want. I mean we're really. My mom hasn't gotten to turn to more of a live person. Well I just mean more and more like we travel a bunch for this show and I always say like we're getting close to teleporting. I mean we are are really getting close to like you wake up somewhere you know in the morning and you go to the airport and then you can really be anywhere. And it's I try to be conscious of it like it is an incredible accomplishment accomplishment that we can be anywhere on the globe. Yeah now it's really exciting. What I find that you point out often and it seems to be a theme through many of the books as how bad? Our intuition is quite often. How counterintuitive results of studies generally are? Then I think you often question a a lot of assumed things which I really like and I was trying to think about what causes that and I was wondering. Do you think US using all this technology that has been amassed over centuries give us a false sense of our own intelligence like is that part of the problem because I was an anthropology major primatology he specifically. That's what I was interested in in the difference between chimpanzees intelligence ours compared to a chimpanzees in a mouse. It's not that big of a deal. We're just fractionally SMARTER SMARTER THAN Champ. Right but other people have created all the stuff that gives us kind of this bolstered sense of our intelligence that part of why we think were so we are. I mean and we are massively. Overconfident and a lot of modern psychology is simply the attempt to catalogue the degree to which we are. Overconfident are over overly in all of our own abilities. My most recent book talking to strangers a big chunk of that is trying to dismantle this degree. The of self confidence is like you think that you can sum up a stranger you know usefully inaccurately in the space of one encounter chances are you can't yes. Yeah thank you can tell a liar no you. Can't you know you all these things that we need to be reminded that we're not good. At these fundamental social tasks it moreover the proximity to the person actually can be more misleading than space from like you you cite different examples. Where the the people who met? Hitler generally trusted him and the people that never met him face to face. Were more objective in better at knowing who he was yeah. We're really really built to do in. Social Interactions Human beings is date this assay. All of our systems are optimized for romantic encounters choosing Zing mates for figuring out and in that realm. Were pretty good. It's it is possible to know very quickly whether you're attracted someone right. Yeah that's we have that down. That's what we've been optimized for but when we try and transfer that to non-romantic settings we get in trouble like you know I am Constantly amazed by thing. We're in the middle of you. Know a process of choosing our presidential candidates the mythology that surrounds choosing presidential essential. Candidates is the mythology of dating. Really when you think about people phone does trump was saying we will. I want this person. Why because what they're saying that's the person I would date right and you really dating the president in fact if you would you imagine a more perfect selection process yes it will be one in which you never met any of the candidates? It is not useful to know that Pete Buddha judges five eight to know that Elizabeth Warren is a woman to know. Then Joe Biden. Is You know eighty years old or however old is none of these fax really help you. I mean. Just because someone's eighty doesn't mean that they they are more or less impaired than someone who's seventy or sixty. I mean you can be a wide range of eight year old and the fact that if you look at the history of American presidential candidates I did this one since super obvious analysis. He go back one hundred years. Every single person who has ever run for president with four exceptions has been a middle aged white Protestant male over six feet in height right there in the last hundred years. Jimmy Carter was short John F. Kennedy. He was Catholic. Barack Obama was black and Hillary Clinton was woman. Everybody else was the same thing. What are we choosing from the same incredibly narrow because we you can see them you know we want to date? The Togo. Didn't white-haired right. Then I try to figure out. What percentage of the American population appellation is a white Protestant guy? And it's like it's less than ten percent so choosing the most important job the world ten percent of the population well and you made. You made the point brilliantly. I can't even remember which book but it but starting to audition orchestra players. There's Bhai a blind audition sheet between the musician and the people judging them and how much that change the outcome Oh auditioning so similarly early like the music. They're playing has nothing to do with what they look like it. Nor does the president's ability to guide the nation or set policy have anything to do with what they look like. Yeah yeah but that's a little more subjective than music.

Canada president Jamaica David Epstein California CEO Germany Togo Europe US Joe Biden England. meriden writer Barack Obama Elizabeth Warren Hitler trump England Pete Buddha
"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

09:03 min | 1 year ago

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Now if I were you I'd be suspicious of the claims. I'm about to make but I can tell you. Nobody has been referenced more on this podcast than you I bring you. I don't think I make it through a single episode of the show without referencing. One of your books. I am very touch. I think you you and Jon Krakauer or or my all time favorite nonfiction writers. The you have such an amazing gift you put it in such a delicious rapper. That there's something about your structure that I'm I'm able to retain a lot of what you write. I read tipping point a ten years ago. I still remembers all the stories was such detail. I've been dying for this happen and I just WANNA appropriately. Fluff your pillows. Because I really look up to you and I think you have such a unique gift. So we're very flattered. Did you hear. And we'd like to publicly thank Adam grant for arranging mess. Yes yes. He told us that he was a giver and he his is give her any delivered. Yeah massive giver is my favorite Adam. Grant exercise is to email them and count the second doc and he's so busy and yet he still is able to do it. He's on it yet but I have to give you a lot of credit. 'cause he put us on a joint email my assumption Chen was. I bet at best. I'll hear back from him in about ten days like you'll go shit. I should probably respond. And that'll just ruminate upstairs for a week or so and finally finely will do it but you're right on top of it as well. The respect here flows both ways and be with Adam ways in the prudent thing to do is to respond immediately. I just do it. Adam says that I figured that pretty much always works out well to use your own terms. I mean he's kind of the ultimate connector is inning wing. He is thinking what Atom Archie perfectly happy to talk about. Adam Sandler adamant that is absolutely the case. Yes but then you realize oh. He's actually a really really brilliant academic and serious academics take him very seriously. And then you discover some other aspect and then I discovered I. He hates talking about it but he was like a world class diver as a yeah. He's all American diverse however as a as a kid I feel like the further you prob- the more accolades you uncover with him. Yeah of course minimized his diving expe- always minimizes. Then do you see. He posted some youtube video of him diving like two weeks ago. Oh No oh they said it was very impressive because everyone fears it all aging and aging jock. Yeah we all feel that. It's all gone away away. Evidence the only more impressive one was I was wants talking to the dean of the business. School Columbia who is a very -CCOMPLISH Te Serious Jamaican Guy In his I WANNA say late forties early fifties and then you go on Youtube and you see him dunking on some as a grown man. Not In his heyday fifty year. Old Knees he he he pretends it's a great effort at. He's like exhausted. But you can tell I feel a you're a jogger or not a jogger. Your runner who never I'm so ha I mean that's that's like I can't in the air you just made is that's communicated unforgivable disposed to accept that. Yes you are a runner. You broken four minutes. It's in the fifteen hundred so long ago. What were you fourteen or fifteen or something? I would have broken four minutes as an eighteen year old okay but close to four minutes as a fourteen year old. That's radical. There is a certain personality type. Would you agree that that does drawn to long distance. Running you mean plotters. They're human beings they're kind of plotters which averted. Yeah you can spend a lot of time with yourself you write right. Your own thoughts are a comfortable place to be because you're in them sometimes for six hours or something at a time these crazy marathon runners terrible continuing genuine any for extended periods. You have to be not afraid of your own company would like to be a or any endurance. Sport requires choirs cyclists around for a lot longer than renters they make it very social rights pack and you draft people right and there's teamwork work. Yeah so but runners. Yeah you're off by yourself for extended periods of time and it's not just the solitude it's also I have to imagine in your head. You're like quit quit no. I'm not going to quit now. I'm going to do like there's a battle going on. Is there not to keep pushing yourself well. There is if you're running flat out but not really because if you're in serious training you never push yourself to the point of utter exhaustion. That's a mistake right. You're always stopping shy of that point So if you are in a situation where you're seriously seriously weighing whether to quit going too fast right right except in a you know in a race sure but in training you should always be capable love doing another repetition or another mile or cry. If you if you doing it properly right there might be a little bit different of a mindset. Because when and I'm jogging and God knows I can only jog about three miles. Okay and one of the miles. The third mile is just an absolute court case in my head whether there is should continue on or stop it's maddening. It's a mind game running. I think that's what separates like real runners and then uh joggers others draws slowly daughter joggers. Though you're saying I believe a call us. joggers jog on a treadmill. Maybe once a week three miles and I mostly lift weights. Yeah thank you for noticing I see these are popping out US wearing a tight t shirt in straight to sort of show it up by firing put the car cover. I my favorite thing about. La is driving down you know like ocean the Navajo whatever. It's called in Santa Monica. There's always this the dude with a perfectly cut torso who is jogging. You know in forty five degrees with his shirt off Charlotte say is it. Are you really under in such a hurry to show the world that you will now Monica's been with me and what's interesting. Is I identify with straight male. But Monica's van was when we see a guy jogging with his shirt off. I am like an eighty sitcom crane my neck to watch over my goodness Monica. Look at his quads and look at us. I'm like no no no no no no no. I just tried to look fine when I take my shirt off on TV. That's really the whole and I've said many times I've no desire to be strong. I just WANNA look strong. Yeah you're in a world which places a premium on those kinds of yeah presentations. I mean you don't have any choice voice. And as much as I fantasize about lifting a car off somebody it's never presented itself. I've never really found that. I need superhuman strength yet. And I'm forty four so I don't know so far. I think I've picked the right lane. I am most generally interested in why people find their way to the path. They did more than I. Maybe even him the pather on so you have kind of a unique background that I'm gonNA theorize gives you a fun one perspective on people Americans in general Specifically but the fact that you were born in England and then you were raised in Canada. And then you've lived in New York so much and then as you just said Said you're out here a lot. Do you feel like your background has given you in the way that. There's a Lotta Great Canadian. COMEDIANS and I believe it's because the understand us so well yet they are on the outside so they have this great take on us. They can observe Yeah well there's another factor about why so many Canadian comedians is is that you can get away with things because you're not a threat so not only do you have your the outside perspective really important things strike you as odd that the people who are native to that situation just miss but more than that. You're from a little tiny country that no one's scared of so like you can say the most outrageous things in who's possibly going to be threatened by. You're right so this freedom that comes with being an outsider if you're Russian or one of the perceived threats we probably wouldn't. I think it was that funny that you're mocking US right now. Well yeah if it was the Cold War yeah and you were you know some yes exactly. That would be an issue. I feel like there should be a general agreement about what the kind of cut.

Adam Sandler Monica US Jon Krakauer Santa Monica Youtube Chen Archie La School Columbia Canada New York England Charlotte us.
"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

09:03 min | 1 year ago

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Now if I were you I'd be suspicious of the claims. I'm about to make but I can tell you. Nobody has been referenced more on this podcast than you I bring you. I don't think I make it through a single episode of the show without referencing. One of your books. I am very touch. I think you you and Jon Krakauer or or my all time favorite nonfiction writers. The you have such an amazing gift you put it in such a delicious rapper. That there's something about your structure that I'm I'm able to retain a lot of what you write. I read tipping point a ten years ago. I still remembers all the stories was such detail. I've been dying for this happen and I just WANNA appropriately. Fluff your pillows. Because I really look up to you and I think you have such a unique gift. So we're very flattered. Did you hear. And we'd like to publicly thank Adam grant for arranging mess. Yes yes. He told us that he was a giver and he his is give her any delivered. Yeah massive giver is my favorite Adam. Grant exercise is to email them and count the second doc and he's so busy and yet he still is able to do it. He's on it yet but I have to give you a lot of credit. 'cause he put us on a joint email my assumption Chen was. I bet at best. I'll hear back from him in about ten days like you'll go shit. I should probably respond. And that'll just ruminate upstairs for a week or so and finally finely will do it but you're right on top of it as well. The respect here flows both ways and be with Adam ways in the prudent thing to do is to respond immediately. I just do it. Adam says that I figured that pretty much always works out well to use your own terms. I mean he's kind of the ultimate connector is inning wing. He is thinking what Atom Archie perfectly happy to talk about. Adam Sandler adamant that is absolutely the case. Yes but then you realize oh. He's actually a really really brilliant academic and serious academics take him very seriously. And then you discover some other aspect and then I discovered I. He hates talking about it but he was like a world class diver as a yeah. He's all American diverse however as a as a kid I feel like the further you prob- the more accolades. You uncover with him. Yeah he of course minimized his diving. EXPE- always minimizes. Then do you see. He posted some youtube video of him diving like two weeks ago. Oh No oh they said it was very impressive because everyone fears it all aging and aging jock. Yeah we all feel that. It's all gone away away. Evidence the only more impressive one was I was wants talking to the dean of the business. School Columbia who is a very -CCOMPLISH Te Serious Jamaican Guy In his I WANNA say late forties early fifties and then you go on Youtube and you see him dunking on some as a grown man. Not In his heyday fifty year. Old Knees he he he pretends it's a great effort at. He's like exhausted. But you can tell I feel a you're a jogger or not a jogger. Your runner who never I'm so ha I mean that's that's like I can't in the air you just made is that's communicated unforgivable dispose that yes you are a runner. You broken four minutes. It's in the fifteen hundred so long ago. What were you fourteen or fifteen or something? I would have broken four minutes as an eighteen year old okay but close to four minutes as a fourteen year old that sing radical there is a certain personality type. Would you agree that that does drawn to long distance. Running you mean plotters. They're human beings they're kind of plotters which averted. Yeah you can spend a lot of time with yourself you write right. Your own thoughts are a comfortable place to be because you're in them sometimes. For what six hours or something at a time. These crazy marathon runners terrible continuing genuine any for extended periods. You have to be not afraid of your own company would like to be a or any endurance. Sport requires choirs cyclists around for a lot longer than renters they make it very social rights pack and you draft people right and there's teamwork mark. Yeah so but runners. Yeah you're off by yourself for extended periods of time and it's not just the solitude it's also I have to imagine in your head. You're like quit quit no. I'm not going to quit now. I'm going to do like there's a battle going on. Is there not to keep pushing yourself well. There is if you're running flat out but not really because if you're in serious training you never push yourself to the point of utter exhaustion. That's a mistake right. You're always stopping shy of that point So if you are in a situation where you're seriously seriously weighing whether to quit going too fast right right except in a you know in a race sure but in training you should always be capable love doing another repetition or another mile or right if you if you doing it properly right there might be a little bit different of a mindset because when and I'm jogging and God knows I can only jog about three miles. Okay and one of the miles. The third mile is just an absolute court case in my head whether there is should continue on or stop it's maddening. It's a mind game running. I think that's what separates like real runners and then uh joggers others draws slowly daughter joggers. Though you're saying I believe a call us. joggers jog on a treadmill. Maybe once a week three miles and I mostly lift weights. Yeah thank you. For noticing I see are popping out US wearing a tight t shirt in straight to sort of show it up by firing. Put the car cover. I my favorite thing about. La is driving down you know like ocean the Navajo whatever. It's called in Santa Monica. There's always this the dude with a perfectly cut torso who is jogging. You know in forty five degrees with his shirt off Charlotte say is it. Are you really under in such a hurry to show the world that you will now Monica's been with me and what's interesting is I identify what straight male. But Monica's van was when we see a guy jogging with his shirt off. I am like an eighty sitcom crane my neck to watch over my goodness Monica. Look at his quads and look at us. I'm like no no no no no no no. I just tried to look fine when I take my shirt off on TV. That's really the whole and I've said many times I have no desire to be strong. I just WANNA look strong. Yeah you're in a world which places a premium on those kinds of yeah presentations. I mean you don't have any choice voice. And as much as I fantasize about lifting a car off somebody it's never presented itself. I've never really found that. I need superhuman strength yet. And I'm forty four so I don't know so far. I think I've picked the right lane. I am most generally interested in why people find their way to the path. They did more than I. Maybe even him the path or on so you have kind of a unique background that I'm gonNA theorize gives you a fun one perspective on people Americans in general Specifically but the fact that you were born in England and then you were raised in Canada. And then you've now lived in New York so much and then as you just said Said you're out here a lot. Do you feel like your background has given you in the way that. There's a Lotta Great Canadian. COMEDIANS and I believe it's because the understand us so well yet they are on the outside so they have this great take on us. They can observe Yeah well there's another factor about why so many Canadian comedians is is that you can get away with things because you're not a threat so not only do you have your the outside perspective really important things strike you as odd that the people who are native to that situation just miss but more than that. You're from a little tiny country that no one's scared of so like you can say the most outrageous things in who's possibly going to be threatened by. You're right so this freedom that comes with being an outsider if you're Russian or one of the perceived threats we probably wouldn't. I think it was that funny that you're mocking US right now. Well yeah if it was the Cold War yeah and you were you know some yes exactly. That would be an issue. I feel like there should be a general agreement about what the kind.

Adam Sandler US Monica Jon Krakauer Santa Monica EXPE Youtube Chen Archie La School Columbia Canada New York England Charlotte us.
"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Your your seatbelts Malcolm. Glad was here. Malcolm glad well of course is the author of five New York Times. Bestsellers is unbelievable podcasts. That Monica I obsess with with revisionist history. You know him he's had a million bucks five referenced him The most on this podcast. Monica will dispel that. At the end. In fact check he was included on the time. One hundred most influential people list and touted as one of the foreign policies top global thinkers he wrote the Tipping Point Blank Out Liars. Here's what the dog saw David and Goliath and his new book which is phenomenal. And honestly you should listen to on audible is talking to strangers. It's such immersive wonderful experience. Malcolm glad while I love you thanks for coming. Please enjoy the genius from up. North Malcolm glad well we are supported. Hey by Chrysler. PACIFICA the coolest van in the marketplace. It's pretty sexy. It's a very sexy miniature van and you know we just put this thing to the task. When we went to Disneyland boy? We had that thing packed to the Gills. You don't has is these under floor storage compartments under the second row. That's cool jobs space in there. Wow it's like Mary poppins bag. It was not unlike Mary poppins bag listened. The PACIFICA is the best vehicle. especially if you have kids got the you connect theater system back with dual ten-inch HD touchscreen built in games and APPS. You Name IT BLU ray player dual HDMI inputs. Wireless has headphones. PACIFICA is a two thousand nineteen. IHS Top safety pick. You can get thirty two miles on a single charge with the hybrid and a driving range of five hundred and twenty miles. I've got the package boys. It's forty twenty inch wheels. Try Pain Panoramic sunroof also Pacific a hybrid. It's eligible for up to seventy five hundred dollars in federal tax credit plus any state and local incentives Chrysler is offering armchair expert listeners employee pricing now available on twenty twenty twenty model year Pacific Gas models if you're interested in the hybrid model visit Pacifica Index Dot Com to receive a one thousand dollar and cent of offer offer on a Pacific hybrid model. That's P. A. C. I. F. A. and D. A. X. dot com. He's.

North Malcolm PACIFICA Pacifica Index Dot Com Monica Mary poppins Chrysler New York Times Pacific David Pacific Gas P. A. C. I. F. A. Goliath twenty twenty twenty
"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

12:20 min | 1 year ago

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"My question is is looking at this case. Through a ratio frame Rehm a useful way to make sense of it and I have become increasingly convinced that the racial perspective on these kinds of crimes is increasingly problematic. We use it as a way of shutting down discussion and dismissing cases and saying the Guy Dudes racist. And then you shrug and you say what are you GonNa do. And then that's why you quoted that thing about how my worry with these cases that we had all moved on. I didn't want to move on. Why do we move on? We move on because the way we make sense of it. Oh this is just a racist. COP doesn't permit any further exploration or it's a conversation stopper and That idea that personalizing problematic encounters and making them all about what's lies in the hearts. The participants is a way of avoiding bigger issues and that idea has been a central part of a lot of of really profound arguments commits within the civil rights community. A lot of brilliant essay by a black historian called The whole United States is southern which is one of the most profound found things I've ever read about race in America. And he makes his argument that the southern the argument of the white sudden segregationists in the sixties was. They wanted to turn in every racial question into a matter of interpersonal relationships. They wanted to personalize everything they wanted to say. The real problem problem is that we don't love each other. We don't look each other in the eye. We don't treat each other right. They wanted to make it about one on one. And if you can solve that one on one than this this whole racial thing in south is going to go away and his point was that's an invasion. The issue in the South is not that black people white people. Don't look each other in the eye. Fine you know and shake hands and sit down have coffee. The issue is there is a series of institutions and structures and laws and practices that fundamentally enshrined the principle of prejudice and inequality. And what's going on in the hearts irrelevant. It's like what matters is what's going on. In a law infrastructure infrastructure the fact that black people are denied opportunities in can't vote on her in second class schools and on and on and on the point of the SAS. The sudden segregations tried to change the subject. They tried to turn the conversation from a discussion of institutions and structures into a discussion action about hearts and minds. And he's like and they want because you look around the world. How do we discussed this now? We discuss it in terms of hearts and minds so when I read that essay it was incredibly radicalizing experience. I was like you know what I'm not gonNA. I'M NOT GONNA play that game. I'm going to discuss this case and I don't WanNa bring up the what's going on in the heart of of the officer. I don't want to talk about whether he's a racist or not. I want to talk about the structures and institutions and practices that made it legitimate but for a police officer to pull over a perfectly innocent woman on a street in the middle of the day in rural Texas. That's what I was interested in. I'M GONNA ask Askew to weigh in on something that's been very controversial. I ended up going into a rabbit hole of sorts just investigating watching the video tapes. Really really trying to understand this particular case and from what I understand. There's quite a lot of controversy of whether or not Sandra Bland killed herself for whether she was murdered in jail wondering if you have a point of view on that well you know. I don't talk about this at all my book because I'm my interest interest in the book is why did it even start. How did it come to pass? The police officer would pull over a woman for no reason in the middle of the day so the day new mom. The Case Tragic Dana Mar.. Her death in the cell is something. I don't even talk about now. Do I have an opinion on this. Do I have looked into the of course I. Of course it in a book I looked into the watch the documentary and looked into. I just. Don't find the argument that she was murdered to be particularly convincing and And I have two other reactions to a one. Is The you know the notion that this middle of nowhere small town country police department would have had. Its Act together sufficiently that they would murder someone in their cell and leave no traces sort of hard for me to imagine there. It's not that let's slick and to the allegation or the suspicion that there's some deep dark conspiracy that led to her. Death is exactly what what my book is arguing against. Because it's another attempt to say. Oh this is all about. There's a sinister group of people in this little Texas town. Who did did something absolutely? Outrageous and opened in my book is neutral. It's not about a sinister group of people in a little town in Texas. It is about the way law enforcement is conducted across this country at the highest imaginable level. The police officer in this particular case Brian Insignia is remarkable. Not because he's a racist. Bad Apple orchestrated the deaths trained. He's he actually was doing what he was trained to do. That's the scandal right my way way way bigger scandal than saying. Oh there's a couple of murderous bad apples in small town Texas so that whole narrative is again a way way to change the subject. The problem here is the strategies of law enforcement that have been enshrined in law enforcement across this country. The the problem is not two or three conspiracy minded malefactors in small town Texas. I hadn't experienced today. That made me think that I'm turning into one of those paranoid people that you talk about in the book where the person locking themselves in their room with guns. Because I've been so involved involved in the book for weeks now I was walking to the school and there were two young teenage black boys fighting really screaming at each other on the street street right up in each other's faces calling each other's each other names. They both had group of boys behind them. That were supporting either side and it looked like it might get worse and I'm walking across. The street was twenty Third Street and Eighth Avenue and something came over me. And I'm like guys guys. You've gotTa Stop Cops Are GonNa come and you're GONNA get shot. This is what they love and they stopped like they were in each other's faces about to come to fisticuffs. And I said you guys could get shot and they stopped so interesting and and I was floored by the fear and I if the last year has been dating an African American woman and I can't even even begin to tell you the amount of racism I net witness on a day to day basis. Because I've been living in this sort of white girl privileged world for as long as I have and it's terrifying them that particular story. There's so many things going on. There is a there is the issue of race and the idea that every a young black person not as young but every black person but particularly young black penn boys carry around that constant fear in there in the back of their head that they are targets. Right there's that element the other element equally important though is it's about teenage boys. which is is that teenage boys are of all kinds are a little crazy? And we've always known that he needs to do and as a society. We have grown intolerant of the excesses of teenage boys. As opposed to simply doing what you did just say. Hey Hey stop it. Like they were shocked to right. The wrong response is for the you know the cops to come along and kind of arrest people and make too big of a fuss. It the fact is that teenage boys of all kinds since the beginning of time. Go crazy again and the right thing to do is step step in the middle of them and just say Jaap stop it. Go back to like look. We don't have to escalate. Every single hormone driven teenage encounter to the level of some major crime. You know and that's what we've you know. That is what we have done in this country is we have pretended that a sixteen year old boy is an adult in the same sense as a thirty six year. Old Man is. It's not true right. You're crazy at sixteen presumably. You're not crazy at thirty six. So one would hope you delve into myriad historic situations and modern events. And you state this in the book and all of these cases the parties involved relied on a set of strategies to translate one another's words and intentions and in each case. Something went very wrong long. Welcome how did you settle on the cases that you present in the book you have. Jerry Sandusky and Penn State Bernie Madoff as you mentioned demand and knocks the suicides of Sylvia Plath and Anne Sexton was it hard to settle on specific cases. Were there others that you eliminated. It's a very very imperfect process. You have a story story. You'd like to tell my case I wanted to give an alternate explanation for what happened to Sandra Bland and in the kinds of stories. I like to tell the stories. Is that our digress. Until the middle part of the book is that is a one digression after another on various themes of that encounter and so I chose all all of those cases that you mentioned because illustrated various parts. I thought various parts of the story I was telling and I'm still not sure the right. You never know whether you've I chosen right ones. This book is very emotionally intense. There a few moments of comic relief is look. It's not a lot of happy endings. Actually I don't know that there's any there may not be any. It's super dark and I worried it was too dark. You know I was always thinking of this as an audio book from the beginning and when you understand stand that and you understand how powerful audio is And how emotional and how moving and how. I really did begin into worry that. What the experience of eight hours of delving into I mean there's a chapter on tortures to pedophile represented I have Socia- pass Galore? I have there's a lot of sexual assault in this a lot of yeah that Brock Turner case and I. I did wonder what would happen if you sat down on and devoured this in a single setting and I've I've talked to people who doubt they tell me they have to stop. It's a lot to do in especially when there's the real real voices in the Brock Turner Chapter both voices of Emily Joe and Brock Turner are actors Although it would have been interesting getting to to find out if now that she'll Miller's come forth and introduced herself to the world if her voice would. I didn't realize until my book was done that that this is the the victim in the in the Brock Turner case grew was she was anonymous until Then all of a sudden in late summer right. He's learned that she was initially published. A book has has done very well very good book. I'M GONNA be talking to her on the show as well really. Yeah interesting You've said that you believe is that the surge of interest in podcasting and audio in general is foretelling of the death of social media. Yeah you know what I was saying before about this sort of bifurcated you I was. I ain't GonNa go on Joe Rogan's podcast in. That's going to be fun. So normally Joe rogan listener. So now I've been listening to Joe Rogan and and you know he's enormously good at what he does but those are two and a half hour. Sometimes Tim Ferriss also scramble like this whole to my point like where did you get this idea that we have a short attention span to the contrary.

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

Power 105.1 FM

03:10 min | 1 year ago

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

"Good brother Malcolm Gladwell who we had on the day man Malcolm Gladwell said in our allies practices in the thing you do once you good is the thing you do that makes you good. we are done. so. by the young you know. about my whole.

Malcolm Gladwell
Jacob Smith sits down with Malcolm Gladwell to talk about his signature approach to storytelling

Family Ghosts

06:00 min | 3 years ago

Jacob Smith sits down with Malcolm Gladwell to talk about his signature approach to storytelling

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