22 Burst results for "Malcolm Gladwell"

The Spirit to Soar: Lt Col Barry Bridger's Story of Hope

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:11 min | 3 months ago

The Spirit to Soar: Lt Col Barry Bridger's Story of Hope

"A book's been written called the spirit to soar. And it's about the true story of former orphan and POW lieutenant colonel Barry bridger, U.S. Air Force, retired, colonel brazier, I am also a lieutenant colonel in the United States Air Force as well. Finished it got 20 years and so we'll see if I make it that way. Then you got Jim, Peterson. Jim is with us, and he is on that other blue, a little bit darker below the navy side, which I actually started in. But I spent more of my time with the green guys down at camp Pendleton when I was there as a chaplain, but folks, guys, it's good to have you all with us. This has been an exciting I got to look over the book. And let me just tell you, Jim for riding it, but Barry for sir for you and what you've been through. Thank you both for service and I'm looking forward to some discussion here. So am I let it rip? Here we are too. I love it. Well, let's start off jam almost start off with you on the riding of the book. You ride in the book about why you started it, but you chose it to be a biography, but also a lifeless and explain that a little bit. Well, you know, Malcolm gladwell wrote a book called outliers. And he talks about people who do extraordinary things. So started out, I've observed very known very over 30 years now. And I've observed him in the things that he does, I knew a story, but I didn't know it all that well. And once I learned his story, I told him, one day I met a writer biography in that process. I opened up the discussion of this biography saying that berry's been an inspiration in my life. I've learned so much and so a publicist said, it's a life lesson book. So we put out 17 life lessons that I've learned from Barry's life. And he's had a tremendous impact on my life.

Colonel Barry Bridger Colonel Brazier JIM U.S. Air Force United States Air Force POW Camp Pendleton Peterson Navy Barry Malcolm Gladwell Berry
"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Optimal Living Daily

Optimal Living Daily

04:53 min | 5 months ago

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Optimal Living Daily

"The mortgage lending crisis in that way only gladwell can. A captivating story that borders on conspiracy theory, but appears to be founded on research and investigative journalism. The audience was enraptured. The man is a master storyteller. At the end, gladwell took questions. My friend David raised his hand and said, I worked in the company you're talking about, and the facts you have are wrong. I wasn't there, but I imagine the attention was palpable. I know what it feels like to be contested in public on a stage and it's not something I would call pleasant. But instead of being defensive or argumentative, gladwell seemed delighted. Shall we grab coffee? Gladwell wanted to know everything. Hungry for where his facts were incorrect, curious as to why and grateful that my friend David pointed them out. He devoured the reading my friend gave him and ended up revising the ideas he was working on to include the new information. And the two parted ways glidewell gets a lot of flack for his storytelling. He's either praised as a genius or write it as a fool. I like him, and I'll tell you why, but it requires jumping back a few years to when outliers came out. In the book, gladwell cited a study that he claims that 10,000 hours was the magic number that got you to mastery. If you spent 10,000 hours playing piano or singing, that's when you go from good to on believable. Allegedly. The details, the least interesting part of the book, in my opinion, but a lot of people clung on to this particular point because it appeared to be evidence of the American Dream. It's not a matter of talent, you just got to put in the Everyone in their moms started citing the study and debunking natural talent. And my circles it became the rally cry for toxic, hustle, culture. Get in your hours, hustle. We all know now, it's not true. The 10,000 hours rule is false, or rather incomplete. Business Insider was one of a bajillion media outlets that profited from character assassinating gladwell for it using fun headlines like new study destroys Malcolm gladwell's 10,000 rule. On theory is no big deal if new research debunks all the research. In fact, that's the point. That's how the scientific method works. In gladwell's case, he allegedly took some liberties with what he found in the research, and that is a legitimate problem, but your job is not to take everything you read as Bible, even what I write. Challenge, contest,.

gladwell glidewell David Gladwell Business Insider Malcolm gladwell
"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Solvable

Solvable

01:46 min | 8 months ago

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Solvable

"Our executive producer is mail Labelle. I'm Ronald young junior. Thanks for listening..

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Solvable

Solvable

04:32 min | 8 months ago

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Solvable

"The way we intended. So get ready, charge up and feel the thrill of the road. It's all made possible by LTM, a revolutionary new EV platform from GM. Built for power, flexibility and range, ensuring you keep the good times going. Isn't it time for everybody to feel good about driving a vehicle they love? Discover the thrilled that awaits at GM dot com. Everybody in. Can you think of some examples of times where community successfully went from I to we in ways that we can learn from and trying to do that in this moment now? Yeah. Well, there's a bunch of examples, but one simple one would be one of the things that turns the corner on smoking is the introduction of the idea of the dangers of secondhand smoke. We've been telling the smoker for a generation that they are endangering their own life, and we had very limited success in getting people to stop smoking under those circumstances. And then the conversation shift, and we literally stopped talking about not talking, exclusively about the smoker, and we started talking about the people around the smoker. And it became a matter of collective responsibility. I'm old enough to remember when you could smoke in the back of an airplane. They had a smoking section, the back of an airplane. That stopped, not because we were trying to prolong the lives of the people smoking in the back of our airplanes, but because everyone said, oh wait a minute. What about all the non smokers? It's about creating a safe environment and congenial environment for them. That was a huge shift and really successful because, you know, it was a way of reaching smokers and just say you can smoke, but you can't smoke in the back of the airplane. They may have fell invulnerable when it came to the individualized risks because most smokers do not die of. Lung cancer, a lot, too, but not most of them, right? So it's for most people, it's a pretty remote. Do you think that that messaging is the only way to truly win the war during this pandemic? Because again, the majority of us have experienced remote misses, but now we're all making personal decisions as to how we're going to engage with the community and how we're going to be protective of those around us. So I guess the big great question I'm asking is, how do we take this information and use it to end the war on COVID? Yeah. We stop and to my mind the great frustrating thing in public discourse in this country around a whole series of issues is we've fallen so in love with the language of personal freedom and responsibility that we forgotten the power of collective appeals to community. We don't use that language anymore. No one ever says. It's not about you. It's about your service to others. Since we're being charged today, the whole, the whole message of the New Testament of is about do unto others as you would have to do. I mean, not even the New Testament, the Old Testament too. The whole message is about some awareness of your place in a community, right? It's not about you. That is the single most powerful message in human history. And we've suddenly get into these arguments where it's on one side saying, well, it's my personal choice and freedom. And the other person, the other side of saying, well, you need to be a rational actor. Stop with the eyes already. Like enough with I love it. I love it run when we get churchy. Let's get Churchill every time we do these. Don't mess with me, man. I'll cover you with scripture every time, man. I'm the one who in the script you're not you. I was waiting for you to come back at me. I'm like, I'm doing low do I walk to the valley of the shadow of death? I got crickets on your end. Malcolm thank you so much for being with us again. It's always a pleasure to have you on the show. Thank you, Ronald. I was a pleasure. Malcolm gladwell is the author of David and Goliath and the cofounder of pushing industry. He also hosts one of our sister podcasts here at pushkin, revisionist history, available everywhere you get podcasts. And you should check out his new audiobook, the bomber mafia. Solvable is produced by Jocelyn Frank. Research by David jah. Booking by Lisa dun. Our managing producer is Sasha mathias, and.

GM Lung cancer Churchill Malcolm Malcolm gladwell Ronald Goliath David Jocelyn Frank David jah Lisa dun Sasha mathias
"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Solvable

Solvable

07:54 min | 8 months ago

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Solvable

"They can not be heroes, or they can be chumps. While our responses to the fear of an impending battle and its immediate physical threats may be quite different from our responses to the fear of a global pandemic, there's a way in which they're actually kind of similar. Community approach. We've fallen so in love with the language of personal freedom and responsibility that we've forgotten the power of collective appeals to community. Here's my conversation with Malcolm gladwell. We're going to examine the parallels and intersections of fear, vulnerability, and responsibility when it comes to war and a global pandemic. Malcolm welcome back to solvable. It's great to have you here once again. Thank you. So I want to tell you about the my earliest introduction to you. It was in 2013 and you were on the Ted radio hour and you're giving an interview with guy Roz about your book. David and Goliath because you had just done a TED Talk on that. Do you remember that? I do, yeah. Great. I liked it because, you know, as a self proclaimed church guy, you gave it very different definition to David and Goliath the battle would actually happen. And I love this book. I bought it, it's one of my favorites. I think it's, you know, a lot of people talk about blinking outliers and other books you wrote, but David and Goliath is by far my favorite. And I bought the book, thinking I'm just going to get all these, you know, insights about other dogs and bisf fits and all that, which I did, and I thought it was going to be purely based on David and Goliath. But then I got to one chapter and it was chapter 5 and a Canadian psychiatrist who wrote this book called the structure of morale named JT mccurdy talks about the bombings in Britain. Can you recap that? Yeah, so this is, by the way, thank you for the kind words about David and glad. David glad happens to be my favorite of all my books as well. So this is something that has always not just fascinated me, but puzzled people for a long time, which was, at the start of the Second World War, the British knew that the Germans had a fleet of bombers, and they also knew the state of their defenses against polymers were such that there was nothing they could do to stop the Germans. So the first thing they did, of course, was they a lot of children who lived in London were moved to the countryside. The second thing they did was they got the fire trucks ready for what would be, you know, all kinds of all kinds of the normal things. More than that, they became convinced that the devastation would be such that the population of London would panic. And so they did things like they converted a whole series of buildings on the outskirts of London to psychiatric makeshift psychiatric hospitals because they figured so many people would be traumatized. They assumed that some incredible percentage of the population of London would flee the city. They really worried that the war would be over. Panic and London would be such and would spread the rest of the country and people would see that the Germans could just come and bomb at will, and they thought, you know, this could be this could be it for us. They were terrified. From top to bottom. So the bombing comes in the fall of 1940, the famous blitz, right? And it lasts about 8 months and the Germans come not every night, but there's one stretch where they come for 57 consecutive nights. And they drop tens of thousands of tons of high explosive bombs on London. They damage a million buildings. They wipe out much of the east end. And the panic never comes. And nobody can believe it. They're like what happened? Why is everyone? In fact, not around is a panic dot com. But like, after a little while, people get so over it that they start going back to their business. And, you know, they go to work. They go to the pubs at night. They party they do all the things. Young people are on the streets. And as you can imagine, every psychiatrist, social scientists, psychologists and England at the time, is like driving around London saying I am witnessing something that makes no sense. Right? We've terror. The Germans have terrorized the population of London. And there's like kids playing football on the streets and there's couples like going dancing at night and there's people dancing drinking in pubs and the bombs are falling. It's this completely bizarre event to kick off the war. And so this British psychiatrist comes along JT mccurdy, the guy you mentioned at the top. And he tries to explain what happened. And I think that's what that's the thing that sounds like the drew your eye to that chapter. Yes. Yes. And that's what gets me because when I read this, I thought about it all the time when I first read this and this was back in 2013. I thought about it all the time. And I remember he divided them into three groups to direct hits and those are the people that are dead. People that just didn't make it through the bombing. Then there were near misses. Those were people who were experiencing the devastation of the bomb but did not experience death. Or even people who were close to someone who experienced the devastation of the bomb family member, whatever. Then there were the majority of London experience what he called remote misses. Yes. Which is me. You heard about the bomb a few feet over. You felt the rumbling, you felt the building shake, but you didn't experience any devastation. And what are the quotes that you wrote the book was that the morale of the community depends on the reaction of the survivors? Because the majority of the community is experiencing remote misses, they have this experience of feeling invulnerable as opposed to the people who experience near misses who they actually have a higher sense of fear or a highest sense of actual danger when the bombs fall. Yeah. So yeah, he does this thing, which is in retrospect, I think it's incredibly brilliant. He says that your reaction to a traumatic event is a function of your proximity to it. So, you're right. There's the people who are most proximate to a traumatic event are the ones who are killed by it. They're presumably the ones who are the most terrified in the moment before they died, but they're dead. Right? Yeah. They can't spread. We don't know how they felt. They can't spread their feelings. They have no impact or gone, right? Second group, near misses, they're the ones who the bomb drops in the other room, and they crawl out of the wreckage. Those people have traumatized. There's no doubt about that. That's like, that's like you're in a car accident and your car is totalled and they take you out with a jaws of life. That's your near miss, right? That'll stay with you. Has that ever happened to you by the way? You're in a car accident. Not like that. No, I have not either. I know some people who have and man that stays with you. That's like some serious. I actually have a personal near miss story, which is, I, when I was a kid, and funny enough, this is not traumatic vapor traumatic for my father. When I was a kid, I was hiking with my father in the winter on this gorge when Canada. And I'm about 7. And there's sheer sheet of ice down the side of the gorge that runs all the way to a frozen not a frozen over, but a freezing cold, fast moving river. I slip,.

Goliath London David JT mccurdy guy Roz TED Talk Malcolm gladwell Malcolm Britain England football Canada
"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Solvable

Solvable

02:10 min | 8 months ago

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Solvable

"I'm Ronald young junior. The rational response to being asked to fight in a war is to go crazy. That, of course, is the voice of pushkin cofounder, Malcolm gladwell. And I invited Malcolm back to solvable because I've recently been thinking a lot about something I read that he published back in 2013. His book, David and Goliath. The subtitle is underdogs misfits and the art of battling giants. It's a book that takes a closer look at events in which one outcome is greatly favored over another and discusses why sometimes those outcomes don't turn out as expected. This episode is a little different from our typical solvable and that we don't exactly solve a problem here. But in the spirit of the show, we're very optimistic in our discussion of a big idea. And as you listen, you'll begin to get a sense of exactly why we chose now to have this particular discussion. Imagine you're living in Britain in the late 1930s. Germany is preparing to attack your country. It's the start of the Second World War. The military is mobilizing, preparations are being made for mass casualties. You're debating whether or not you should stay in the city or move to the countryside until the dangerous past. The British military command does a kind of projection of what they think is going to happen. And they think they're going to have 600,000 dead. 1.2 million wounded and mass panic, they think that no one's going to go to work, which means that all of industrial production in England will cease. They think that the army will be useless because the army will be spent all of its time trying to keep the civilians like from going nuts. They really think it's over. The fear and uncertainty in the air are palpable. But what are you going to do? Can you still go to work? What about Friends and family? Will they be safe? What is going to happen to all of you? And I know these questions may feel.

Ronald young pushkin Malcolm gladwell Goliath Malcolm British military command giants David Britain Germany army England
"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on The Breakfast Club

The Breakfast Club

02:50 min | 11 months ago

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on The Breakfast Club

"And then of course music career big fancy dropping bombs for riyadh yelling. Never get new. He wanted exactly why she knew. Wave third time slumming away damn studio okay. Just for fun right. Fleas of big fifty. What you call okay. All right now daddy. Let's talk about him for a second. Yeah remember when the internet was questioning how did he knew fifteen roaches on his face and people were saying come on now. Stop it because he had posted one day. When i was going up. I woke up and they was fifteen roaches on my face. At that moment. i said hell no. I refuse to live like this work. Hard believing you're crazy dreams and never settle people really zoned in on the fifteen roses on his face. How did you know it was fifteen. They didn't believe him. Well he actually told vanity fair. The story are logo around like fifteen roaches on my face. People how you know. Mr teams i was like fifteen roach on your face. You would notice it was around fifteen on your face outside no man. I'm not doing that. I wish i would argue with people. About how many roaches are on my god. Damn face at if it matters you know you know black. People love the exaggerate all. I'm trying to tell you the bunch roaches on the face. What what bugs or are they. Smaller variety of roaches is dome. No way fifteen water bugs. We don't we don't know you weren't like the scariest thing ever 'cause they fly to a lot. That's all right. Don't you think that all the roaches. What bugs the worst if you had to put them on a scale they all the same to me. I don't even know the different room. Flag flying cockroaches flying water bugs disgusting coasted air jump on the all getting crying. Fifteen of them. You can't even kill it if it's on your face because you got squash it on your face. I right now. Nice has shared his track listing of kings disease to you know that is coming out on friday and featured on the album eminem and ep. Md apm to a buggy. Lauren hill charlie wilson Hit boy is also on the album. So yes should reduced though. Is it like the last kings disease. Were hit boy produced it all. We know that. I think boy produced producer majority of it. I believe that's his guy. I right and you know that is also supposed to come out on friday so we shall see Showtime has dropped the chairlift with that rick. James documentary bitching the sound and fury.

riyadh Mr Lauren hill charlie wilson Showtime rick James
"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on The Breakfast Club

The Breakfast Club

08:21 min | 11 months ago

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on The Breakfast Club

"Advice or any type of advice call e mail. Is the breakfast global morning. What you know. Baby mamma issues. These words of wisdom up now for ask eight hundred eight five one. Oh i want a breakfast club. Long relationship rice personal advice. Just real advice. Hold up now for morning everybody. J. envy angelini. Charlene the guy. We oughta breakfast club. Good morning it's time for ask ye hello. Who's this quarter caught. Good morning man. Every agile i gotta ask you of course you. My best friend than fifth grade tea is marianne. A guy. I'm into wedding. The guy's gay ooh that i ain't gonna lie. That happened to me one time but okay so go ahead. How do you know he's gay for shore so there's actual video because me. It was just a person who told me that this guy was gay. But i don't know if it's too or not and so i was like let me mind. My business marriage select. The guy was gay. But i don't know if he is so i'm minding my business because people say things sometimes but you're saying you saw actual video year. Yeah my one of my friends. Who's a mutual friends and his brother's been a video to be as you know your your best friend is very a very all right. Well i think you should talk to the guy. I and give him the opportunity to talk to her. Because i'm sure you know that's a difficult one because like they always tell you not to out somebody. If they're not ready to be out by marriage is such a serious thing and you also don't know if she knows or not because this this could be ovidio she could have known that he has dibbled and dabbled or that he's bisexual or whatever so you don't know what their conversations are like so wonderful mama business and but i'm like ooh i think you should talk to him and tell him that. Look this video exists. She's going to find out if she doesn't already know and i'm going to tell her unless you do i. Okay okay i'll go through okay. No problem all right. What if what if the woman is full and you say what if she's fully aware she already hotel him she already knows but the thing is that. Obviously he saw the video other people have seen it. Something that's circulating so they con- conversation should be. Hey you know. I just want you to not video your man out there like this as opposed to. Hey your man's gay yeah. But as i'm telling him he should go to her man. I let him have the conversation with her and tell him that. This is what's known and if you haven't told her she isn't aware you know then we have to let her know that this is happening because sends video from from national now from from somebody else's phone just so it just pops up so that way he knows that it is and she's not embarrassed at now. Somebody knows that if they don't want you to know. I think that he should let him give her the abbot. He should give him the opportunity to have the conversation with her. I if she doesn't know okay that's the best way to go about it and if he's not gonna come forward and she doesn't know and she's not aware because there is video one thing when his hair say it's a whole another thing when there's evidence ask e eight hundred five eight five one zero five one. If you relationship advice call announced the breakfast morning the real which advice with it's eski morning everybody is. Dj nv angelie shallow. The guy we oughta breakfast club. We're in the middle of ask. E who's this. Bring me a mama wish. Of course the fee. So i'm in a brand new relationship. Wave an amazing guy And the only issue. I have is in hidden all right. So what is bad like. What's bad about it. Is it that his pianists mall which can't be fixed. Is it that the rhythm is that he can't make you orgasm what what's bad. His team is every okay. he hasn't been able to make me more. He's kinda filthy to me. Have you told him no. He can't read your mind are you pretending to have orgasms okay so And listen. I've had experiences where when i first got with somebody. It wasn't good but it got better as we got to know each other's bodies more because you know different things work differently on different people. Some guys. I think that what worked before work with you. Some guys aren't used to being told. This is what i need you to do. In order for you to orgasm and things like that when you can tell a guy what to do it can turn him on also and it also helps you and so that's when it's time for you to really speak up and let them know what it is that he needs to do. I think he will receive. I'm doing. I don't think it has to hurt his feelings though. Because you can always give that advice in a positive way like while you're doing it you can tell him like real sexy like i really want you to do this. I love when you do that or keep doing this. Or you know what really make me or a gas and if you do this and you just gotta be real nasty and dirty about it. I wanted your really like it when you orgasm ahead to trust me. It's gonna make sex better for both of you like you said. He's a sweet guy. If he's asked he went to see you get off he edgar. He's asking you so that's when you gotta you know. Tell them this you right right right get it no problem all right ascii eight hundred five eight five one five one. If you need relationship advice you can hit. E now now we got on the underway. Let's talk about daddy. People were questioning him. Having fifteen wrote is on his face and he clears it up. All right. we'll get into that next. Is the breakfast local more. This thrilling the team. This is the rumor report with angela on the breakfast club. Okay so yesterday was black. Women's equal pay day august third. And what does that mean well. That's the day that they celebrate. How black women must work into twenty twenty one to finally catch up to what white non hispanic men earned in twenty twenty over the last year. Women have left the workforce in unprecedented numbers because a kobe nineteen so they said if you are black or brown women chances are things. Were even worse and harder for you. They said black women must work an extra two hundred and fourteen days to catch up with white. Non hispanic men made in twenty twenty alone across industries. Black women make Sixty three cents for every dollar made by white men according to studies well with all that being said about yesterday we also found out yesterday that angela bassett has led the way with a major bump to four hundred and fifty thousand dollars. An episode for fox's flagstick drama flagship drama nine. One one so what they are saying is that they believe that is among the top salaries on network television for any act of male or female and it could be the highest ever for an act of color on a broadcast drama series. So congratulations to angela. Bassett setting the standard weiner angela. Bassett deserves it all overcharged imf snubbing you at the oscars for what's love got to do it. All those years ago damage goosebumps angela. Bath the male lead on the show. Peter krause he gets by the way he got a raise also he gets in the low three hundred thousands per episode so while she's getting four fifty that's what he's getting. She definitely deserve that. And let's also talk about arianna. This news broke that she is now officially a billionaire. She's worth one point seven billion dollars according to forbes estimates. He's the wealthiest female musician in the world and second only to oprah as the richest female entertainer and it's not necessarily because of her music clearly the bulk of her fortune which is an estimated one point. Four billion dollars comes from the value offensive beauty. They said she owns fifty percent of that. And some of that is Savage fantasy which is worth two hundred seventy million also.

J. envy angelini ovidio Charlene marianne angela breakfast club edgar Bassett weiner angela angela bassett Peter krause fox oscars imf arianna oprah
"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on The Breakfast Club

The Breakfast Club

07:24 min | 11 months ago

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on The Breakfast Club

"Algorithm will penalize any school that chooses to educate kids from privileged backgrounds. And any school. That doesn't have a lot of money in the bank in any school. That doesn't meet the kind of conventional definition of a high prestige. School noah school the dozen. Look nice have famous alumni all kinds of things so yeah a lot of other a lot of prominent widens students get penalized as well But i think the penalty falls heaviest on. Hp sees that are choosing to their students from some of these s prebisch and he's white institutions. Really suck me. Got high is the who go there like do they really know johnny skulls and what they're actually doing a good job at providing education. We're just judging them. That much. A sane it's going to be about education should be your son. No are we got more with author malcolm glad when we come back door movers. The breakfast club. Good morning everybody. Dj envy angela. Yee charlene's guy. We oughta breakfast club was still kicking. Malcolm glad well show me. And what do you think can be done to make huge. We have to get rid of the ranking system. I think we have to and i think. Hp's are starting to do this. They have to explain to people what they're doing. And what makes them special. There is a real flourishing. Right now of. I think of hp see us on a number of you know prominent people you know. Kenya bears allows who Who shows i love. He's g he's genius. He cares about what you think so much feelings. Mutual with him. But as a whole you know this is a whole class of really prominent people in this country who've come out of that. This is an opportunity for hp to stand up and say you know we're doing something different something special and providing An educational environment and a culture that is not available elsewhere in there in the ed school system and if they can make that argument powerfully and publicly. I think there's going to be there will be shift. You know people will starting to happen. People are going to give money to the schools. The starting to get the recognition. They deserve gave a million forgotten. Can you hear a million and one east. we see. He went to one of the atlanta schools. He went to not clark. Did he go to car or yeah. He went to one of those in the you know. The morehouse more squadrons filming in that area. Yeah yeah let me ask you. Do you think with everything. That's going on with with The fact that players have to go to college for one year to go into the league. You think that's going to affect any of this at all because now you know you know colleges are built on sports and now the fact that these players might not have to go to college anymore. I mean that money is going to be there anymore. They can't rape those artists and just make money off. they can go to the g. League immediately get five hundred thousand dollars that will affect ranking it all. That's really interesting. I hadn't thought about that I mean it creates a problem for schools. That have you know. Think of a school like duke which you know used to be a kind of forgotten. School and south now is considered to be one of the crown jewels of american higher. Ed they part of that was built around there. Right so You know when basketball doesn't matter a school like duke. What happens to do. I don't know the answer to that question. I i mean it's an interesting thought. I mean maybe basketball means something at these schools. Maybe it's all like for your kids and the quality of the plays a little less but we get to enjoy it in a different way. I don't. I don't think the i'm sort of i'm in favor of the of these changes in the g. league in particular. I think maybe it's time to separate the elite players. Everybody else and just enjoy college. That was way hugh's a do a lot better as far as ranking in kids wanting to go if light. Let's say let's say you're star basketball play. You play high school. You know you to hugh nine hundred. Ten people are not gonna see. Yeah that's right so you go to school like duke or florida and you know you will get that airtime mazda. They get a look that can get you into the league so yeah until they changed that and we find a way to change that maybe b. e. t. aaron some of the hp you games. I think we'll always have that from. Yeah yeah no. I'm in imagine if lake kevin durant had gone to morehouse instead of texas. I mean like that's that would that would really have changed the national equate. I sort of think. I mean your kevin durant spoof. You only need kevin union anybody else if you just give him four other guys and it's fine by the way of these guys are only going to go to college for you go to. Hbu now you can make money off your jersey and stuff like that like it would be an room but more than that and you could have an experience an imortant experience a real educational experience and maybe go back and finish your your degree when you're done playing like this like my last question on abc news but aside from the ranking list. How do you think people view. Hpc's on a grand scale in america. Well there's a difference between the way they were historically cause remember. Their their roots are in a period where where the schools were were segregated. So you know they were they were they started as kind of also-ran where Where after americans went because they couldn't go to other schools not also ends is the wrong word but that's the way why people viewed them right I think that like i said before. I think that attitude is now changing and people are becoming more aware of what is special and powerful about experience of going to these schools And i think people are the other thing is we're getting. I hopefully think we're getting away from a model which says That is the those kind of one-size-fits-all notion of quality right. It's you know the my real problem with rankings. Is it assumes that you can say that one school is number one at one. School is number two and that holds true for anyone who wants to go to those schools. Just not true right. We got go back to an idea that says there ought to be fifty different kinds of schools that served fifty different kinds of students. That fifty different kinds of cultures. And you need to find the one that matches. What's good for you. I want to ask you about Books real quick that even worth putting out hardcover books anymore. Because i look at the number you did for talking to strangers audio. Isn't even worth it not for you. I mean you should be. You should be doing. These kinds of menu already have an audience. That wants to hear you. Listen to you right. That's used to listening to you that i and you have You know things to say. I mean i think for. If you're if you're writing a history of the roman republic i would say that's a hardcover book But if the stuff you wanted to talk about and given your position. I think in your you should be an audio first-person atmosphere books all the time. You would listen to it on your book. I honestly i can't believe she's i mean as be wise great books. Look i because. I have libraries every room in my house like i have bookshelves and everything and i collect books like art you know and i like to have them and i like to get them like signed and keep them like.

Hp prebisch Yee charlene basketball kevin durant hugh malcolm kevin union Malcolm angela johnny Kenya clark atlanta Ed mazda aaron Hpc abc news
"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on The Breakfast Club

The Breakfast Club

08:09 min | 11 months ago

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on The Breakfast Club

"Who already have everything. I think it's hard for some people to even admit that they have privilege because if they admit that they have privilege and they feel like maybe i'm inferior and i'm not getting what i'm getting just because i'm good are talented. I think that's why. I you have to admit that you even have privilege is hard to do. But i don't think they care. I went to a predominantly white high school right They didn't care. It was the black state at the black table. The black parked when blacks park the blacks played basketball on this field. That's what it was italians on this on. One side the asians on one side and all african-americans. All the black people on the other side. But that's what it was. Nobody cared until it was basketball. Game time other than that. Nobody cared until i went to. Abc you wouldn't Yeah yeah outta. What all are we got more with. Author malcolm glad when we come back. Don't move is the breakfast club. Good morning morning. everybody is. tj envy. Angela charlemagne guy. We oughta breakfast club still kicking it with malcolm. Glad well show me yo. How do you think. Rich white kids could could benefit from attending hvac. You would also benefit the b. c. you by attending positive way. But how would it make the rankings of the hughes. Go oh you know. The biggest rankings is the reputation some so a college president gets to rank all the other colleges in the country scale of one to five. If they see a lot of rich white kids at school they just assume it's a good school and they give it a five if they see a lot of kids at a school. They assume it's a poor school and they give it a two right. So i was joking in my parks by saying look if a school dillard all of a sudden had lots of white students they get a better reputation score because people would see all this. This rich white kids there. Let's give them a higher. It's literally that it's live. It is. I am not wow. I'm not being sarcastic or ironic. Here this is exactly the way it works so questions like let's say in the future like you know all of these you know black people who have wealth now in their kids are rich and they start going to these. Hpc us will not make the reputation score go up or is other matter that they're rich to still depends how strong you think. This kind of racism still lives in his country. Is it possible for a lot of Wealthy you know white college presidents to look at a school that educates black people and think it's a quality institution you. How how optimistic are you sean. This curriculum curriculum. You've not in these rankings. Should this i mean that's not what interests us now. The game's about right now. What was your interest in looking into. Abc's because a couple of reasons one is i you know i have is ongoing fascination with how screwed up american higher education is so i started out by saying you know when i talk to People who went to. Hp's us they say exactly what you said. They had this overwhelmingly positive variants. And then i looked on the us news rankings. And i saw that. These schools are at the bottom right so my first question was how is it. A school can do such a good job. Educating its students do they come away saying that was one of the most important experiences of my life and simultaneously ranked at the bottom. Right does two things. Don't there's something wrong with that. Was one reason. I wanted to to look at it. Too quiet resolve that That contradiction right if but surely if the students who attend a school love their experience that means the school must be good. Like that's just about the most important thing that matters but more than that The more subtle ways in which discrimination persists country that you know it's I think what's been happening over. The last couple of years is it were finally As a country waking up to the fact that they're layers upon layers upon layers upon layers of discrimination in all manner of different realms. We got a spotlight finally on police violence summer. But i mean that's been two for one hundred years right but like it takes a long time for people to focus on it and to start to peel away the layers and say you know it doesn't solve the problem if you just hire a couple of black police officer or you have to look closely in it. That's why i want to look at the. Us news thing because that was an example of a highly discriminatory practice that persists because people don't understand the assumptions. That drive it. So that's kind of. I think you have to be actively engaged in Peeling back more and more layers of this. You can't stop and say we're done. That's the thing that always drives me crazy as people who stop and say we're done gotta keep working at it. What what flaws in iowa. Everybody to go. Listen to you. Know the project dillard podcast revisionist history. What flaws in the algorithm. 'cause historically black colleges the ring solo a couple. The two that we've talked about are the critical ones. Three one is that there are a number of different ways in which your ranking the school depends upon how much money you have And you know schools that serve predominantly african. american population are going to have less money than you know ivy league schools. Right just look school. Like dillard's got down to one hundred million dollars. Harvard's got forty some odd billion right. So you get penalized for that to you. Get penalized for Lower graduation rates and graduation rates are not a function of how good a job. The school is doing it. Educating students they are a function of the economic circumstances students. If you choose to educate students from poor backgrounds you will not have a ninety five percent graduation rate. It's not going to happen right. So that algorithm rewards you for having a high graduation rate which means it rewards you for educating the kind of kids who can afford day for four years and not have any family or whatever who aren't working like you've talked to a kid at dillard you just ask them. Do you have a part time job. Some of to partner heart is you guys. I mean you know how hard it is to stay in school if you you leave in every day at three o'clock to work on one of your two jobs and you're working on weekends. You can't do your homework. Do you know how many kids at you know princeton. I've got heartful got part time jobs when they don't right so that fact alone it's a lot easier to graduate ninety five percent of your students. None of them are part time jobs. And you can't do those Free internships to when your family has money. You can travel and go if you live somewhere else. You know. Go to another city to be able to do internship whereas if you don't have that advantage of that privilege you have to pay job in the summer. Doing whatever you can know. It's we're not so. These rankings are not acknowledging the reality of kids from less-privileged pacmans black or white right. It's like it is a struggle to afford your tuition and stay in school. If you're in the bottom half it is easy. If you're in the top right so you don't give points to a school just for enrolling all the easy kids right. This is the thing that drives me nuts. If you're educating a bunch of kids who went to the finest high schools in the country and you have you. Have you know a ton of resources at your disposal and on and on and on you job is really really easy. It's not that hard. Right like the the i mean. It's like you shouldn't be. We shouldn't be patting you on the back right for that. We do to so many times. It's like pat people on the back for like you know catering to rich people. I'm sorry it's like that's the easiest thing where you're going to go to school. Sometimes you have to choose. Maybe a school that is offering you a financial support as opposed to school. That maybe you wanted to go there but it's too expensive. It's just amazing to me. How miracle finds a way to middle finger to the poor on every level every level not enough to algorithm affects the ranking of abc news. Is it affecting. The ranking of good predominantly white institutions. That are that are popular it will. The.

white high school Angela charlemagne malcolm basketball Abc sean Hp dillard ivy league iowa Harvard us princeton abc news
"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on The Breakfast Club

The Breakfast Club

08:33 min | 11 months ago

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on The Breakfast Club

"Eight five one zero five. One hit us up right now. Is the breakfast slowing the breakfast club. Proof point changing the game by bringing real. Mr celtics and i don't know about you but finding out that proof point is taking things up a notch by using real spirits makes the weather warming up so much. Better you can try so many flavors rumps out. So what mango pineapple. Whiskey seltzer with blackberry. Lemon to kill us out. So what grapefruit and bacchus aware line. Now i have had some already but my next choice is definitely the rum. Sell to a mango. Oh yeah i can definitely see myself right now. My backyard with the sun on me and sipping awesome proof points out at five percent. Abc and one hundred calories proof point literally keeps one hundred and will keep up with your hustle. All that's left to do is taste the proof yourself. Try all four proof point spirit today. Visit proof points out says dot com to find proof point near you. That's proof points out. Says dot com celebrate responsibly. 2021 cam by motion caused beverage company warnke wisconsin distilled spirits and his continued support a social equality. Riedel's is building on last year. Amplify black voices campaign with the launch of solid black a new ongoing initiative to provide resources and a platform for black change makers who use innovation and boldness creative and community endeavors. Solid black celebrates up and coming leaders in the black community follow along on dorito social channels to hear their stories every friday starting with anthony and unique edwards the founders of eat okra an app that connect forty the local black owned restaurants is part of their mission and support black business owners and culinary trailblazers the forest brown junior the musician offer at the head of the make techno black again movement that embraces the heritage and innovation of black artists electronic music and eric williams and entrepreneur and the founder of the nacho bang restaurant in baltimore who is using his success to give back to the community and the teach financial literacy young people learn more about what motivates them in the solid black initiative at doritos dot com forward slash solid black. The planet i go by the name of charlemagne to god. I want you to. Please help me welcome. Houston's berry own entrepreneur businessman mark davis. Okay the spirit and entrepreneur mastermind behind hotspots the breakfast club and reggae hud cafe. He's been serving up some of the best food in houston since two thousand and one tell about jay experiences like a black up. Incoming ship got drafted into this business name by my father who wasn't educated by passion. I mean by profession and a chef And a musician passions and so at about eight or nine years old we had a small catering business and i was drafted his prep team. My brother's an ad to be his His setup team to be his cleanup team may let us serve and we made a little money too. So that's how. I got started in the business in vienna fifteen. I decided to. I wanted a job told. My mother wanted to govern. I called around fine Who would hire fifty start working in the mall and that was my entree into the into the foods. Now i know you got a partnership would've with pepsi pepsi again programs. Tell us more about that. What is what is pepsi. Digging pepsi began is pepsi's initiative to help right the rome after american restaurants are We start behind eight ball access to capital Access to information to knowledge connections to network of knows all things that that we go up in in an oppressively to deprive front and so pepsi recognize. Ed realized that inside of the one who something about that so they made a Dedicate resources to afghan-american restaurants. Most admittance Being everything from technology to even kaplan want you elaborate. A little bit more on on The pepsi digging passport. That's that's now alive. It's a website where people can find you know black restaurants in their local neighborhoods and uploading every feature counted against pepsi's a hundred million dollars digging goal right exactly so the passport is to quantify the work that we're doing in order to represent a goal. We want to do one hundred dollars in sales and black owned restaurants into boats digging website. You get your passport and you prompt You chronicle your participation in the process you know this whole thing. Kids is it worst generational wealth right in order for african americans to change the dynamic of wealth disparity. We've got gotta be entrepreneurs and gotta be in. Business and pepsi has decided to medicate themselves to the restaurant hospital portion of man. Well marcus thank. Thank you my brother. thank you man. I appreciate it. Thanks again to my mash up. Mark davis for his wise words. Make sure you all blind support your favorite black restaurants. Then upload your receipts to the pepsi digging passport at dig in passport dot com. Click on. Wake up you can't man. We want to hear from you on a breakfast. Hello who's this morning morning morning. Gang was happening wreck Man i'm gonna cover him flags wrapping all them first and from all that tension for mobile day half last night i listened to nothing forty plus year old fans like fan base at home watching what yeah is going on watching you still be. I'm telling you telling me to shut up. But i hadn't he one last night. That was different after name in the book. A hall of fame for rapper. I mean he was already there but what is what a s allowed last night. Yeah i mean that was k. s. one level. Mc and from jada kids last night on that stage shielded. He did a good job. You remember all of those rhymes always say that when autism hold to like. How do you remember that catalog of of continuous albums mix tapes and all that. But that's what they do they call it bravo. Hello who's this one on jordan. What's up bro. get it off your chest. Seattle need the versus from last night. Man yeah man it was just like they just you can just tell that the locks with actually a group and they've been doing this for a long time because they was just together and it was like you know i'm a big fan and if there was more organized they were and you know i it would have been a lot better I think it was all over the joe going crazy. I need to relax. They just needed to prepare stage. Show that's all and then show it would have been better. That's all the locks a major station. You think for real at any point yes. I'll man time we've got a little one time with styles p was wrapping in cam side. Kick him though shoe off at that. We got down altuve with gills. Ben dan off those wells do to the flow like it might get a little crazy. But that's the that's that's the locks that i remember waiting for. Smd it felt like an sm was coming at any moment it was. It was just one moment with jada. And i think cam was going back and like your. Smd coming bro. They shut the f. Up as that. But at the end they said You know we promise that we would invite anybody top body parts. They did say that in the baby that was put out there to you. Know what else i like. The fact that they were were edited themselves. 'cause you know a couple of choice words flu. That wouldn't fly in twenty twenty one. But didn't they edited themselves later. Yes all right. Get it off your chest. Eight hundred five.

pepsi Mr celtics Whiskey seltzer forest brown junior nacho bang restaurant pepsi pepsi eric williams Riedel mark davis Abc edwards wisconsin anthony baltimore berry vienna jay
"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on The Breakfast Club

The Breakfast Club

07:40 min | 11 months ago

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on The Breakfast Club

"I'm in here is burning. Whose late watching versus because you know the locks in the dip set have no respect for their forty plus year old fans which is ninety percent of us still think dip at one. No saying he was gonna win. Well i thought it was going ring off more but they did not and you know what i realized last night about versus Not versus outside. It's all about the live performance because deep set this simply got out outperform last night. The lots better showman esp- especially jaded tropical jd. 'cause lord have mirth like i said that was one of the greatest performance in madison square garden. Evelyn and you will read when he limped out jordan when he dropped fifty five forty five. Not forget. you Frazier when he beat alley. Okay reggie miller when he thought no no no no reggie miller when he scored nine points in eight seconds we talking about the top performances and msg. But that's what jd shrinks. Definitely he definitely killed in i. I'm not gonna lie. I thought dips it. Had it until i was in atlanta about a week ago when i ran into styles p cousin is name is bart bart houston manager. Bow out yet styles because they know that so. He came and sat at my table. He was like we were talking about. He said look. You don't understand. He said the lock have been put practicing for the last three weeks into serious thing. They're not playing their acting like this is their last show ever. He was like they're gonna win. And i tell you i said i feel like. They're going to be more organized than about preparation. And i said in the beginning. I was i. They've been getting together. If you know the last you know how serious they are about this shows performances. And that's exactly what happened. And then louis busy busy busy but you can you can be a does not have great stay show the locks elevated station and then the dj dj technician digitization jaded kits was running the pick and roll all night last night all night just songs. They could go up against each other. It's going to be all about how you play wasn't even there and it wasn't even about music. News was literally just about the live performance. And and that's that's versus is going to be going forward because since everybody's outside people are going to have to have the alive shell game. Goodness gracious they killed that last night was such a great job. Shelter set shelter the locks. I mean which i pulled off. Last night was amazing. There was a couple of times. Where i it got a little scary Didn't make me miss outside now. Didn't make me nuts outside. It's like that. And i see no the old styles he'd come back and i got nervous called vegan vegan. Eum that meat last night. Goodness seven hundred and fifty two people on stage. For no reason delilah palooza recap rumor report. Now that was agreed versus now it was a very intense versus as well. Great way that set off a tour right. Yeah good luck with that talk. Goodness gracious. Well let me going got these already national fact all right well we have Also joining us this morning. Malcolm glad well. He's been on the show on numerous times. He's back up here this morning. More often global is just a thought leader. Okay perfect way to say it. Offers such great books outliers and talking to strangers and the tipping point and blink. What the dog saw david and goliath. I think pretty much everything. And he has his own podcast network. Little podcast network. Yes he's got an own very successful. Podcasts revisionist history on season six. Yes so he'll be here to discuss the new season revision history amongst other things all right. Well let's get to show a cracker front page. Knows what we're talking about well since talking about last night. Let's discuss new york city. What the requirements will be go to restaurants indoor entertainment venues and gyms and clearly. It hasn't kicked in yet. All right we'll get into that index. It's the breakfast club morning. Everybody is the envy angela. Yee charlemagne's guy. We oughta breakfast club skins front page news the. Us women's basketball team defeated australia. Seventy nine fifty five. The us Women's team will play serbia in the semifinals on friday. Graduation women's team asia wilson. Eight three all day plan on northey d'amato's inside with the bulls camello. Anthony signed with the lakers in andrew. Andre drummond sign with the seventy sixes and the modules said. After two days ago. They said he. he was called to the knicks. I don't know how true that one. But they also said. Melanie be coming back to the knicks to but he went to the lakers as well. So what's his versus. Last night. To mellow was ever so they call me before they went. You know an. And i'm sorry new yorkers but if mellow gets a ring is gonna feel like the knicks guttering to me. Yes it is. I will get a ring. Nam serious is such a new yorker to me in new york did mellow so dirty. I want mellow to get people in many people from new york guy rings that plan nba. Okay knocking dirty. He deserves it since. We're talking about new york city. They going to require proof of vaccination to get into restaurants fitness centers and endure entertainment venues announced this yesterday. The city will start enforcing this program on september thirteenth. So according to the mayor about fifty five percent of residents are fully vaccinated. And that doesn't seem very high but it's higher than the total vaccination rate in the us which is about fifty percents. Here is the blasio. The key to nyc pass will be a first in the nation approach. It will require vaccination for workers and customers in indoor dining in indoor fitness facilities. Indoor entertainment facilities this is going to be a requirement. The only way to patronize these. Establishments indoors will be if you're vaccinated at least one dose time for people to see vaccination as literally necessary to living a good full and healthy life long gone less well the start september thirteenth and broadway theaters have announced that they will require vaccinations for the audience and for the staff at least through the month of october one of businesses. And start pushing back against that of his stars. Impacting business like if there's just not enough vaccinated people to sustain a good business pushback. I don't think i. I mean i don't think even if they do i don't think it matters. I mean i think they're gonna require it. It is what it is at this point and having at least one shot matter because i got a home who got one shot and he going through it right now a code. I mean this is saying the requirements are does. Protect you someway but vaccinations again even if you're fully vaccinated. It doesn't fully protect you. Six i write the. Cdc has also announced that they are gonna have a limited targeted eviction moratorium until early. october till october third. So this new moratorium comes in. It's gonna apply to areas that areas of the country with high or substantial transmission co. vid according to the announcement this will cover eighty percent of us counties and ninety percent of the us population and so biden's aides have been saying that he lacks the legal authority to renew the existing moratorium because of a supreme court. Opinion by justice. Brad kavanagh that said another extension would require congressional approval. So this is different right now. And so now they're saying this is from the cdc so it's targeted vixen moratoriums until early october. That's if you have a high or substantial transmission of covert in that area. The people need that right now in crisis and a housing crisis simultaneously. And that is your front page news. All right get it off your chest. Eight hundred five eight five one. Oh five one. If you need to vent phone lines a wide open eight hundred five.

reggie miller bart bart delilah palooza knicks Yee charlemagne madison square garden Frazier asia wilson Andre drummond Evelyn lakers jordan new york city atlanta houston blasio goliath
"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on The Breakfast Club

The Breakfast Club

02:39 min | 11 months ago

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on The Breakfast Club

"Summertime is coming up in the people. No one of the best beverages. The partaken ourselves improve point takes things up notch by using real..

Author Malcolm Gladwell Stopped Running at 16 and Started Again at 50

The Running for Real Podcast

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Author Malcolm Gladwell Stopped Running at 16 and Started Again at 50

"You know you. You have been a lifelong runner I think. I think i might start with something that i feel is Interesting and actually my husband. Who's a college age picked up. Which is the You've been nine to say often that you knew at sixteen you at in the five percent that we're gonna be piano be successful and i'm curious one how did you. What did you think he knew. That limit was when you obviously wanted. The mileage will make you were that you could have potentially reach your body. Maybe it wasn't developed to where it would be. So what gave you the the the the confidence but the decision tonight at when you had semi running is ahead of you and do you. Would you change it now. Russia would change it now. Because i now realize what colossal mistake at a not. Running prime years basically stopped running sixteen and never raced again until i was fifty so that seems crazy up but i don't think i was wrong. There's no way would put it in a world class runner from iran against someone who later turned out to be a arrogance. Two guys who later turned out to be three fifty three thirty five it would like to contemporary running. It was clear to me at the age of thirteen fourteen. Fifteen they were even though i could beat them that age. I had no confidence that i would be able to beat them. Beyond that age is is in clearly superior to me you. You're you're very at that age. I feel like we're all very very or students of these minor gradations ability and you're doing this small in multiple layers of your life here have decided in math class. Whether you're someone was pursue math right you're deciding whether you're all these things you decide you can quite closely at night. I also didn't feel. I was still globally temperamentally suited to labor which just not a very good

Russia Iran
"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Kickass News

"We can hit while we wanna hit. He would accept the risk of that makes waging war more acceptable and say that's a small price to pay for the fact that we can put the days when we leveled entire cities behind us. You know if you think about it if there were to be a kind of full scale conventional war between china and the united states. we're both sides. We're sending bombers over each other's countries. Neither side would level entire cities. It's not gonna happen anymore. Just not the way wars fought. And i think i think cancel would say. That's that's what progress looks like on a lighter note or a little bit of a lighter note you got to have dinner with the air force chief of staff and hang out with all of his generals what sounds like a pretty interesting group of what was that experience like. What did you learn from them. I got to know the previous a guy named General goldfine and then gentleman who's replaced by general brown Midway through writing this book. And i got to know both to the outgoing and the incoming chief of staff of the air force and i found them both credibly. Impressive people I came away with really renewed respect for the american military. I mean these are people who understand the moral dimensions of what they do who are steeped in history of their service. Who are committed to keeping america safe. I mean i could go on good general goofy just before he left Invited me to dinner at his house at the house on. Fort myers just across the potomac from Capital which is where the head of the air force lives on a street. We're all these top military live. And i had dinner at his house and with his wife and then afterwards we had drinks in his backyard and he invited over. You know the vice chair of the joint chiefs and couple of other senior air force guys in We had a conversational. Never forget just to kind of casual conversation about what it means to be in charge of the world's most powerful air force you know. It's just a was really an amazing moment. I'll never forget it. Sounds like an incredible experience. Well i mentioned at the top of this book is sort of the vanguard of a larger effort by your company pushkin industries. You're really going all in on immersive audio books before we go. Can you tease any of your other audio offerings to come. We got a million coming for example. We have one coming up with a pulse. Simon singer-songwriter based on and we begin with about forty hours of conversations with him and have combined that with with him playing and talking and arguing and we combine now with historical tape and produced and all kinds of theater housing and interviews with other prominent musicians and the result is something. That's kind of amazing That should be national. That's almost unknown but we got we got a big pipeline of stuff coming well again. This book is called the bomber mafia. A dream a temptation and the longest night of the second world war. Malcolm glad well thanks for talking with me. Thank you ben. it's been really fun. Thanks again to malcolm. Glad well for coming on the podcast border. His new book the bomber mafia. A dream attempt tation and the longest night of the second world war on amazon audible or wherever books are sold. And i especially encourage you to listen to it as an audio book. It's very very well produced in really immersed as you in the story. Follow malcolm.

amazon Malcolm Simon second world war both sides both malcolm american Fort myers potomac america million couple ben about forty hours goldfine one each china general
"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

05:40 min | 1 year ago

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Kickass News

"That and i think the may would have had contempt for france and they have showed the book is all about a showdown between the two of them. At the end of the war in guam and It is one of the kind of most morally consequential moans in a war. Yeah and they ran into some major setbacks in the bombings over germany and then later in their attempts to rent precision strikes over japan. At that point. I guess lemay was still not sold on precision air bombings but was assigned them and kind of with pursuing some effort to I guess bomb..

two germany japan guam lemay one france
"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Kickass News

"It's interesting because the they didn't just meet resistance from the us military but also from the british military leaders in world war two up to and including winston churchill himself a what was churchill and his teams preferred approach to aerial bombing and the resistance to this idea. Churchill and senior british brass. The bar mafia were nuts. They they just thought this whole thing is nonsense. There's no way they can hit where they can hit. There's no way it's all a dream. What the germ. The british thought was. The only way to use airpower was to flatten your enemies cities. You go in you drop as many bombs as you can. You don't worry about where they're gonna land you just figure if you drop enough of them they will do such damage and kill so many people that your enemy will surrender so they have then off are all about precision and using the smallest amount of force possible. The british are about the opposite. They're like who cares about precision. Who cares about you know surgical strikes who cares. Just go in there and like open up the bombay. Just let it all. Go and don't worry about where it's landing just. If you have enough planes in enough bombs you'll do so much damage to something. The trinity will give up. All of this begs the question. I wonder how much of the british preference for area bombing or morale bombing as they called. It might have just been straight up designed to inflict maximum.

Churchill winston churchill world war two churchill british
"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

07:41 min | 1 year ago

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"I was like we got one in this case i kind of love. I guess. I guess. I'm black trademark ended. I know there's no one has ever called me blackish before it's kinda great. I have to say all right coming up in this encore chat with malcolm. Glad well the two of us talk about something very sensitive. Some folks might want to skip ahead. We discussed rape and sexual assault on college. Campuses might be hard for some listeners. An officer pins sixteen year old to the ground and punches out his teeth. But are there any consequences for the cop for the first time we take you inside the secret investigations that show how police protections in california shield officers from accountability listened on our watch a podcast from npr and k. Q. e. d. The whole premise of this book is that we don't know how to talk to each other especially strangers. But isn't that a problem. That's been with us since the beginning of time you'll out examples throughout history. Do you think it's worse now than it's ever been. Yes so obviously is worse because for most of human history you you rarely encountered strangers you lived entirely within the world of manley clan community And then it shows sort of shift in the modern era where all of a sudden you're the world is opened up and you've confront for the first time people for whom you have no frame of reference and. I think this is really the kind of crisis that i'm describing in the book. Which is that the strategies that we developed over the course of hundreds of thousands of years for dealing with people that we know really well Don't work when we're dealing with you. We don't know so the concert example would be as human beings. We use people's body language and facial expressions as a way to interpret their emotions. And when dealing with someone who. I know very well that works. Because i have a whole body of experience and know all of the particular idiosyncrasies that make up your emotional presentation so there's a storyteller my book about my dad. Here's my mother scream. He's in the shower and he comes out of the shower naked. He's seventy five years old big bushy beard and might someone has a young man as a knife mother's throat and my father naked. Seventy five points at the guy says get out now and the that'll do it and the guy leaves now. Oh oh there. He leaves for number reasons. One is unexpectedly terrifying to see naked. Seventy five year old englishman but to jamaican could have been different to the second reason is a which was given to me by on the breakfast club by angelie. Who said her excellent. Oh nobody wants to fight a naked man. And i was like. That's so true you don't wanna find a naked man data next book. I thought that was fantastic. And so it's like wait a minute. So if i'm threatening situation i should just take off my clothes. She's just take people just going to back up. she's not worth it. But no but the reason that's relevant to this is. My father was someone who emotion negative emotions did not show his face so the and that was one of his peculiarities. And if you know my father you would know that you would know that. When he was terrified he would have been in that moment. You they would be zero tehran's but the dude with the knife doesn't know that sees what looks like a stone cold killer like winning at say she's also nude runs right but if you don't know so if you don't know my father fundamentally misinterpret him in that moment right so there is a classic example. I talk about this. What i call the problem of transparency. Which is with strangers. We are reduced to to the assumption that facial expressions are a authentic and reliable representation of internal emotions and the single powerful factor. Human beings is that that is not true is in you know. We all think that when we are angry our jaws drop our remember. When we're angry our brows furrow in surprise our jaws dropping arise grow widening. That is not the case like that is a fiction is perpetuated by actors on in hollywood movies but in real life all of us have incredibly a incredibly diverse array of ways of representing emotion. And when you and we can mask them very easily yes yes and so when you're dealing with strangers you're gonna make mistakes unless you have some understanding of the context in which behavior is happening. Not just the immediate context but the historical context. Unless you've read your books. Let's have some appreciation for the cultural nuances of america. You cannot make sense of a stranger this description for this book. It's called a challenging and controversial excursion through history psychology in scandals. I found the controversial to be particularly true. There are some stories that you take a second look at in this book that i think a lot of folks would say maybe. Don't take a second look at that because we know exactly right and wrong and this is bad and that was a bad man. I'm talking specifically about the rape case if you discuss in the book Lay out the case and why you wanted to revisit that when it seemed like a thing when i saw it on the news i was like. That's pretty simple and straightforward him. Lock him up. You know what i'm saying. So i was interested in conversations that go awry between strangers and so i was thinking about what are all the kind of relevant categories and police stops will be one but i also thought the campus sexual sell cases clearly. Belong here Because they differ. From if you so. I began to read accounts of campus sexual assault cases and focus on for this book. It's the stanford so they get to that in a moment. But i began before that happened because many if you read these and there are. There are tens of thousands of documented campus sexual assault every year. So this is a voluminous body of these things and if you start reading accounts many of them begin the same way which is they are to a man and a woman at a party and they are engaged in some kind of thing that people engage the two parties. Getting to know someone who you know. Didn't over the course of the evening. Something badly wrong right so they so. I wanted to say i wanted to understand okay. Is there something here that we can understand and make sense of so. I began to talk to people who studied these cases and every one of them said the same thing to me which was well. You can't talk about these cases unless you talk about alcohol..

two two parties angelie Seventy five points Seventy five year old seventy five years old america california tens of thousands one hundreds of thousands of years second first time malcolm sixteen year old One one of his peculiarities jamaican second look every one
Michael Lewis in Conversation with Malcolm Gladwell and Jacob Weisberg

Dell Technologies Podference

03:00 min | 2 years ago

Michael Lewis in Conversation with Malcolm Gladwell and Jacob Weisberg

"I was asked to moderate a panel with two of my oldest friends. Malcolm gladwin jacob weisberg. We've known each other since the nineteen eighties when we were all young writers in the magazine. Business malcolm jacob for now the co founders of pushkin industries. The company that produces against the rules which is now underway by the way pushkin also makes a bunch of other great shows like malcolm zone revisionist history and the happiness lab with dr lori. Santos i've been watching on the sidelines over the past year as malcolm and jacob started the company so i was really happy to have an excuse to ask them all kinds of nosy questions about what they've learned about running a business together and the challenges they face and the challenges right now in our quarantine world will those are unique. You'll get to hear a little bit about that. Here's our conversation. 'cause i don't actually know the story so i would love to know how you decided to start pushing shake right. It was jacobs a star. Well i'd started one podcast company already. Which was panoply which came out of slate but as things evolve panoply turned into a technology company. I thought i was starting mainly a content company and one of the shows we'd started with revisionist history With malcolm that show was doing really well and there were some other shows. I was really interested in doing so was sort of when the earlier company under Ceo i'd hired. Who i thought was making a good decision. Wanted to make a pivot that i said. Hey maybe it's time that document. I started our own company and only do what we wanna do. I was on holiday with my family in. Can't remember where. I was somewhere in your italy in italy and jacob was in some. I think if i can tell that you truly horrible health live the villain said and he said he said that he he summoned. We do something crucial when you talk about says. I drove halfway across italy. Show up in this horrible house but road and then he likes sat outside a little chairs and had coffee and he said i wanna start a company. That's out began. What did you say yes right away. Yeah struck me as well. The backstory about this is that jacob has been. I've known jacob for thirty five years and through for some significant portion of this. I would always say jacob. I don't know why you wanted a journalist. You'd be a really great businessman. if you just. This is what you could make a huge amount of money. We could all get rich. Jacob forgotten but i would always worry that if i when i said that i was insulting him because what he really wanted to be was a writer which was saying was a bad writer and i thought better business fan

Malcolm Gladwin Jacob Weisberg Malcolm Jacob Pushkin Industries Malcolm Zone Dr Lori Jacob Malcolm Pushkin Santos Italy Jacobs
Malcolm Gladwell: I Am

Toure Show

04:40 min | 2 years ago

Malcolm Gladwell: I Am

"Malcom gladwin is a stone cold genius who loves A grade sports argument. I went onto bill. Simmons podcast and I had this totally ludicrous thing that I want to talk about. Which was I was like? Could a basketball team made up of Nigerians? An all time basketball team made up of Nigerians be the greatest basketball time and then I ended it. I amended until as I said all right I have to corollaries one is. I'm going to add west Indians because almost Indians not all mostly I'm Jamaican. Where am I what am I people from? We're from originally like I'm Ibo right most Jamaicans cable so I add the Caribbean and then I said and just refund. That's also add the rest of Southern Africa and then I construct the students. Tony Ridiculous Caribbean so busy. I say out can Africa and the Caribbean put together an all time team. It's better than an african-american team a euro team at a white American team. It's the third one. Maybe not. The answer is yes. We don't have time to do this but I will convince you. I can't convince you to Africa and the Caribbean in basketball. All Time team and also your co you qualify by or Nigeria. Will I started? I start with all of ethnic did not all? I'm only adding. I added Southern Africa. 'cause I WANNA have Steve Nash and Joel Embiid on my team. Wade Steve Nash. Born in Johannesburg. He's Canadian. No my rule is that you. Are you qualify? Virtue of your parents. Place a birth. So get all of Steve. Nash Who Play Thompson. Really? He's Bamyan are are are taking. Tim. Duncan Tim Duncan Hang Hau Kim Elijah Akeem Joel Embiid Yoenis Clay Andre iggy Dow Victor Depot Drink Igwe Dolla. Where's he from Nigeria okay? He's full on your deal and Steve. Nash I got a back court of Nash and Thomson. I got a frontcourt of Dunkin embiid. Jaanus Patrick Ewing forward a okay. Right right right right from the islands. This really is in the island. This team is insane when Patrick's coming off the bench. But how just doesn't matter but Kim Jaanus and but sure but but the other team has Lebron Kobe. Japan Michael I know. Just for starters and Steph curry just restarting Potanin Wilt Chamberlain and Bill Russell. Just just try go ahead. That's the African American teachers. Try Playing Lebron Jordan. Notice what we doing that thing ooh together. Thomas can't come in and Magic Johnson coming in. Can I read this out rushing your your appetite? Engineer Crushes Team Sport Play. You cannot Jordan Jordan and abroad and Kobe on the court at the same time out of your mind. You have all centers you have one forward you have you have guards and a bunch of centers. You got a problem with that because the modern game nobody in the known you already. Janis on Lebron an WHO's covering Jordan who's covering stats got covering step. I got clay and Andrea Diallo. Who in their day or two of the greatest lockdown defenders of the last twenty five years in the NBA? I got a clay and national or two of the pure as shooters and I have argued with the greatest defensive front court in the history of basketball. I Have Yoenis Hekim Akeem Patrick embiid. I mean I have wilt Bill Russell Shack. It's close by. Queen is not close if I had if I was restricted to white Americans. Then maybe may point so I do it as long ludicrous. It's ludicrous ludicrous. And you're right I'm wrong but so what is it that there are people took offense. How on Earth? What is they were like? Oh you know you Kim like first of all all the things to get worked up about in two thousand eighteen in America about race. This is the thing you have said about

Steve Nash Tim Duncan Hang Hau Kim Elijah Basketball Southern Africa Nigeria Caribbean Lebron Kobe Yoenis Hekim Akeem Patrick Emb Jordan Jordan Malcom Gladwin Patrick Ewing Joel Embiid Bill Russell Shack Simmons Johannesburg Kim Jaanus Jordan Tony Ridiculous Bill Russell NBA
"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

Power 105.1 FM

03:10 min | 3 years ago

"malcolm gladwell" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

"Good brother Malcolm Gladwell who we had on the day man Malcolm Gladwell said in our allies practices in the thing you do once you good is the thing you do that makes you good. we are done. so. by the young you know. about my whole.

Malcolm Gladwell
Jacob Smith sits down with Malcolm Gladwell to talk about his signature approach to storytelling

Family Ghosts

06:00 min | 4 years ago

Jacob Smith sits down with Malcolm Gladwell to talk about his signature approach to storytelling

Jacob Malcolm Jacob Smith Producer Nick Markevic Bela Lugosi Boris Karloff Corinne Hollywood Bella Corinna Manhattan Karina Corrine Nakal Personal Assistant Ireland Longworth Italy