35 Burst results for "Malaysia"

What's Next For Metal Gear Solid

Kinda Funny Games Daily

03:09 min | 3 d ago

What's Next For Metal Gear Solid

"Series is hitting P. C.. J.. Gabe at Gamespot, the military series is hitting. Via Gog. Konami has announced previously only a select few games in the franchise were available outside of consoles the. Games hitting the service either MELA gear bill you're solid and bill your saw to substance were already to in. Taiwan, prior to the official announcement. Malaysia solid and substance actually had come to before and your saw five was also released four PC. But this should give those who never played playstation or xbox a chance to experience more of the Franchise Miller you're solid for to the Patriots remains a PS three exclusive. The new offerings don't seem to have any enhancements and you're getting the original metal gear solid rather than the Gamecube remake which I personally prefer I prefer the original not necessarily the game remains what I'm saying substance dot clear. Yeah. Substance does feature has an extra content not found mill solitudes original release. Releasing as the as collector's series, also be able to get five Castle Dania N. Contra. Games. Including Super See Dracula's curse and Simon's quest these games originally released on the s along with the series along with the Melody Games. The total cost for all titles is thirty two dollars. Tim is very exciting stuff for people who WanNa play these Games on. My one question is, when are we ever going to get your solid for? That's the thing anywhere else anywhere besides the playstation three it's bizarre. I am utterly shocked like back for all the young ones out there which is crazy at this point like even that era, there's probably of people listening to this right now that don't know what I'm referring to but when melanie solid four came out, it was the mean game of when's IT GONNA come to three sixty and it's like, oh, man, how many disc? On. Like nine there was like photoshop shops like xbox three, sixty cases with like that stick. With metal gear solid four on ten million discs But the fact of the actually never came out on another console is really weird and I think a lot of it has to do with the whole Kojima. Konami situation that went down around MCS five, but even then the fact that four wasn't. Like ported at some point. Di Around. With the architecture of the game because I know the game was advertised as a PS. Four game or a PS three game, it was kind of synonymous with. The launch of that console envier to some extent feels very built into like when you're transitioning from chapter to chapter, I remember getting the loading screen of. Solid Snake Smoking, the cigar and you. Believe. There are like tips in there to be like, Hey, you know take a break like the which took awhile. This. Going to take awhile I. Hey, you know relax take a break between sessions all that stuff that stuff seem. Very built into like the PS three system as far as at least like how this stuff look like it looked like a PS three like installation screen as opposed to just an in game thing. So I wonder if there's something about that game in particular that it's tough to port.

Konami Castle Dania N. Contra Gabe TIM Patriots Malaysia Taiwan Simon Melanie Official Photoshop
Palm oil labor abuses linked to world’s top brands, banks

AP News Radio

01:02 min | 4 d ago

Palm oil labor abuses linked to world’s top brands, banks

"The two international an Associated latest farms government Olympic Press developing investigation committee figures president cope show has with Thomas an the unusually nineteen found Bach vaccines high delivered an number invisible a pep of say Americans talk workforce pharmaceutical to Japanese are still some companies government of the seeking poorest are officials trying unemployment corners and to local give of organizers aid the Asia public as much toilet about the information in labor the the palm reschedule department as possible oil says industry twenty eight about hundred twenty the testing seventy one many regimes Tokyo of them thousand and during games as drug various people makers in Bach the U. forms talked S. and filed about public of exploitation the reason health for jobless for officials the postponement benefits including last child seek the corona to week boost labor virus confidence pandemic a high that figure rights any he approved slavery that says proves the vaccine vaccines the corona and will should viruses be allegations be safe ready for still the games of squeezing AstraZeneca rape next many summer CEO businesses in there Pascal Malaysia will be hundreds Soriot and including Indonesia I'm of Paul millions restaurants Stoffels these airlines workers of chief doses and hotels scientific tend the heavy officer of reddish the Johnson number being orange and of Johnson people available palm who are oil continuing say already fruit that they recognize to in that the receive makes first the unemployment its half corona way into virus off benefits emergency the for supply chains demands dropped all for increase of to many twelve the transparency iconic point next six food million year from bokeh and that banks total cosmetics few and developers details is steadily companies to but declined ensure said the that IOC over the like public many Unilever has months has faith been in contact in l'oreal the an end indication with the product World Nestle that Health some Organization of the and unemployed Procter they stressed other and experts or however being gamble rehired that there an are limits unnamed Gemma to and the tentacles that pharmaceutical information others the they have rainforest can used release companies up their action jobless because we're sitting they network must aid protect together about says patient in the half industry one confidentiality of the vote jobs has been that built were initially on and the backbone the integrity lost the of human when only the corona of thing trafficking the virus we scientific have to struck do not expect research always have set they'll been talk recovered to roll back sorry buying it says of my modern camp ultimately slavery in in the Washington same the direction public and will it's have surveys been to built trust show on the a back majority regulators buying of Japanese all around of these companies the world companies and the public and being the independent out don't of violate think the experts Olympics human will rights happen that norms next oversee year left or drug should right and trials center happen with I'm no consequence a Donahue there is shockingly London it's virtually impossible to avoid often disguised on labels as an ingredient listed by more than two hundred names I'm sorry shockingly

Palm oil labor abuses linked to world’s top brands, banks

AP News Radio

01:02 min | 4 d ago

Palm oil labor abuses linked to world’s top brands, banks

"An Associated Press investigation has found an invisible workforce some of the poorest corners of Asia toilet in the palm oil industry many of them and during various forms of exploitation including child labor rights slavery and allegations of rape in Malaysia and Indonesia these workers tend the heavy reddish orange palm oil fruit that makes its way into the supply chains of many iconic food and cosmetics companies like Unilever l'oreal Nestle and Procter and gamble Gemma tentacles the rainforest action network says the industry has been built on the backbone of human trafficking expect they'll talk back buying of modern slavery and it's been built on the back buying all of these companies being out of violate human rights norms left right and center with no consequence it's virtually impossible to avoid often disguised on labels as an ingredient listed by more than two hundred names I'm sorry shockingly

Rape Malaysia Indonesia Nestle Procter Gemma Associated Press Asia Unilever
"malaysia" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

07:56 min | 2 weeks ago

"malaysia" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Head around with must felt like Yeah and. Again. We have to be careful here right because you can. You can see already that there are competing explanations for this phenomenon but. There is something happening and it has been happening a fact. leur other cases from schools in two, thousand twelve. The factory workers stuff you mentioned Matt I believe there were other incidents of that as well. Dating to the nineteen seventies and the eighties something is happening and whatever's happening appears to be something bigger than an isolated incident at a single school. A second big point here is that secular and spiritual experts are grappling with the root of this phenomenon as well as the best ways to address it. So we have two answers or two. Guests proposed frames of thought through which we can view this. Profoundly disturbing phenomenon. we could categorize them as the secular answer and the religious or spiritual answer. And they both have a lot to bring to bear here. What are they have to say we'll tell you after word from our sponsor. Powerful ancient, they exist right alongside us in their own dimensions, own tribes and their own kingdoms. Some say they are the eternal mortal enemy of mankind others say they're so similar to us that we can befriend them. Like us they're born and they die they fall in love and have children they hate and destroy. But in truth they are nothing like us. Invisible but as real as a smokeless flame that they're created out of they are the Hidden Jin. Brought to you by Iheartradio an Aaron Make Grim mild and written and narrated by me Robbie Ituri, the new podcast, the Hidden Jin journeys into a world that few may be aware of, but has existed since the dawn of time. The Hidden Jin once worshiped and always feared join me to find out why. Binge all the episodes of the Hidden Jen on Apple podcasts the iheartradio APP or wherever you get your podcasts. The goal club was the top Strip club in Atlanta in the Nineteen Ninety S. a twentieth century Balkan all for the rich and famous with patients like Dennis Rodman Michael. Jordan. Madonna. King. People from all over the country. Everybody came took a gold club and it was the spot to go the goal club's owners. Steve Kaplan was able to make almost four times. The amount of other strip clubs with three hundred, fifty dollar bottles of Dom Perignon, private rooms, and the sexiest entertainment and the South I would chain up a girl and dragged through the club drager across the stage. It was kind of an SM and the guys loved it. But in two thousand and one, the club was put on trial charges a prostitution extortion crime card fraud racketeering, and an affiliation with the mobs like a festering cancer. You're going to allow it to to grow and prosper. You're going to have a problem going forward. I'm journalists, Christina Louis, and I'll be taking you behind the scenes of the gold clubs scandal from the Budi and bubbly to the DC courtroom drama. Listen to racket inside the goal club on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcast. And we're back is secular answer. Concerns group psychology it may sound mundane at first, but there is a fascinating somewhat disturbing phenomenon a play here depending on who you ask if you ask someone like Robert Bartholomew. Medical sociologist based in the US and a a longtime scholar of. This phenomenon specifically Malaysia. Then he will tell you this is mass hysteria or mass psychogenic illness. The rapid spread of genuine physical symptoms. Among a large group of people with no plausible organic hawes imagine a headache that is contagious. The way cold is but spreads much more quickly. Yeah. berthiamue refers to this pretty cleverly as a software problem like a glitch describing the condition as a collective stress response prompting over-stimulation of the nervous system and he I don't know this is a little divisive maybe over-simplification year but he calls Malaysia the quote mass hysteria capital of the world. According to his research Colloton is the quote religiously conservative of all Malaysian states end quote with a perfect storm of social factors that can lead to this kind of mass hysteria and that's kind of what we're talking about a little while ago just how you would react to this and how you would maybe allow yourself to be swept up in this kind of fervor. And he says, this stuff doesn't happen overnight. Instead the environment leads to a mass hysteria outbreak. Kind of in the way, a pressure cooker might with building up of stress in a group until it just POPs. It. Hits that breaking point and can't contain the pressure anymore. We certainly appreciate the words of. Mr Bartholomew. By. There's still a bit of. Controversy I would say about just this concept of mass hysteria. How begins what the causes actually are there's not a ton of understanding about it. There's been a quite a bit of observation of events that appear to be mass hysteria certainly. So you can study it right. But if you look at the the manual that is used for psychology both students practitioners, everyone alike, the DSM, it is not listed mass historic mass hysteria is not a thing that is in there which that doesn't mean it's it's wrong. That's a that is a tome that is constantly being updated and it is always evolving. So who knows maybe in the future, it will be listed in there as we learn more. Yeah Yeah. That's a really good point because we have to remember the the DSM is not somehow sacrosanct. It's had some. It's definitely had some evolutions that had to encounter I believe for times when check me on this wasn't homosexuality listed in the DSM. Hind NAP shot. Of How imperfect that that is and that's not a ding on science either it's just saying we still we haven't figured everything out right and. What I like about The point you're making here is that we do not fully understand. Right? You're absolutely right. There's there's a bit of a black box here here with what we call mass hysteria. An even hysteria is self is a little bit of a loaded word if you know the atom Olivetti so it's a jihadist misogynous routes, right? Like the idea of hysterical woman or like Wandering Womb Syndrome and all that kind of stuff, right? Yeah. The wandering uterus as Yeah. So the atom apology of that.

Hidden Jin DSM Robert Bartholomew Apple Malaysia Matt Steve Kaplan US Nineteen Ninety Dom Perignon Jordan Robbie Ituri Iheartradio Christina Louis Dennis Rodman Michael hawes headache Budi
Almost 300 Rohingya found on beach in Indonesia’s Aceh

BBC Newshour

04:01 min | 3 weeks ago

Almost 300 Rohingya found on beach in Indonesia’s Aceh

"Rohingya Muslims who have been stranded on a boat on the and, um and see for six months have landed on a beach in the Indonesian province of There were 800 of them who set out from Bangladesh in March and the people smugglers split people up into smaller vessels. Another group landed in Indonesia in June, they had endured terrible conditions. They're nearly more million refugees in camps in Bangladesh who fled Myanmar three years ago when the Burmese army launched a campaign against them. I've been speaking to Chris Leela, who is Thebes actor off the Arakan project, which advocates for advocates for human rights protections for the Rohingya Muslims. I asked her first How did it take six months for this boat to land? Yes, it's quite extraordinary, isn't it such a long time when they left in March, they encounter problem deism back in Malaysia or even the whole region, especially at the time. It was shortly after the pandemic was declared so many country closed their borders and actively prevented People like to linger to enter into a Malaysian waters, fakes and multi waters and stood in addition to all the problem related to the credit crisis is also the fact that smugglers of course we're keeping these people at sea until the family paid the ransom. So when when you say they were waiting for the families to pay a ransom that suggests that these people were being held hostage? Well, yes, exactly. That's why I use that term. In some cases. I mean families have paid a while ago, but the smugglers insisted that all of them would have to pay. So many of them were women as you know, and also some Children, So this's the combination off to different issue at the same time, it's created this situation that the last Oop have bean six months at sea. The earlier group that disembarked in June had been living at sea in the most appalling conditions. What's known about the conditions of thes 300 people When the first group that arriving June they say that 30 off the passenger had already died. By the time they were able to design back also that there has been some act of violence, especially beatings on the boat by the smugglers. The group here We haven't been able to talk to them yet, but they also talked to other People in that city and mentioned similar things. Based on what happened in June with the people who disembarked Then has there been any consequence it all for the people smugglers. Not as far as we know, and we know the survivors are still detained in Malaysia. Those who arrive in June then and then those who arrive in June in Indonesia also kept in camps in province but We don't know anything about any smugglers or traffickers being arrested from some of the pictures that we're seeing of thes refugees. There were many women and Children on this particular boat. How common is that? That it would be many women and Children? Yes, that is something quite different from about five years ago, when we have a major crisis in the Andaman Sea. Many off them are young women, some of them, of course, they decided to go on a boat in order to try to reunite with their families in Malaysia because the husband had moved there some years ago. And as you know the ruling a state less so they don't have documents. There is no other way for them to travel than taking this illegal journeys. But also we see a lot of young women to send them as rights to Malaysia to marry other growing gum in there. That

Malaysia Bangladesh Indonesia Andaman Sea Burmese Army Chris Leela Myanmar
Lawyer: Families of MH17 victims want reparation for damages

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

00:44 sec | Last month

Lawyer: Families of MH17 victims want reparation for damages

"The chute shut down of a Malaysia shoot down that is of a Malaysia Airlines jetliner over the Ukraine from a missile fired by pro Russian rebels. The families of the victims are now suing for reparations. Respondent Vicky Bucker reports. A Dutch lawyer representing the family said a Russian disinformation has only compound did their grief more than 300. Relatives of those who died on MH 17 plan to seek unspecified damages from the four suspects in the attack. The three Russians and one Ukrainian are being tried for murder in the Netherlands. But all four remain at large, and only one has even sent a lawyer to the trial. Russia has repeatedly denied involvement. Despite evidence the missile wass trucked in from a Russian military base. Authorities

Malaysia Airlines Vicky Bucker Ukraine Malaysia Murder The Netherlands
Lawyer: Families of MH17 victims want reparation for damages

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | Last month

Lawyer: Families of MH17 victims want reparation for damages

"Lawyers for relatives of victims killed when Malaysia airlines flight seventeen was shot down over Ukraine in twenty fourteen since the families want damages as a recognition of the justice they suffered loyal olive shines spoke at the resumption of the Dutch trial in absentia of three Russians and Ukrainians charged with offenses including mass murder for their alleged involvement in the downing of the plane she urged the court not to lose sight of the suffering of the hundreds of people who lost their loved ones as she addressed the judges or legal questions linked to families rights to claim damages it's not yet clear how many families will submit compensation requests and to trial or how much they want to claim I'm Charles de Ledesma

Ukraine Murder Charles De Ledesma Malaysia
The great laptop shortage of 2020

Talking Tech

01:57 min | Last month

The great laptop shortage of 2020

"Have you tried to buy a Laptop Lali Yep It's another victim of the pandemic, but there's more to the story. I'm Jefferson Graham, you're listening to talking tech. So the pandemic which sent everybody to work at home and learn from home also sent many people out to buy new computers for their kids or from themselves and most of what they bought where the cheap models you can buy really cheap laptops or three to four hundred dollars. They're not very good but they are cheap and they. If you don't tax them too much will do the job now they're gone and. Coupled with that is the Chinese tariffs. That the trump administration put through. So making it very hard to get those computers into our shores, the companies like Lenovo and Dell and HP have been scrambling to try to move their manufacturing out of China to countries like Malaysia in. Vietnam. And they're getting there but it hasn't happened totally yet meanwhile. You need a laptop. What are you GonNa do well forget about the cheap ones you're going to have to spend money. You're probably looking at six to eight, hundred, six, hundred, eight, hundred dollars says Tim Baharan a longtime analyst with creative strategies he recommends against buying a used computer because technology has moved on and they will not last. You doubt long better that you just spend the money I did some tests on Amazon and best buy and other sites and You can still find laptops you just GonNa pay a little bit more for them the windows computers. Again six to eight hundred dollars Max start at one thousand dollars for the MAC air go way up from there and Microsoft service is around eight hundred dollars for the entry level model. You will find a laptop just no, it's going to take a lot more work than it might have taken last year.

Jefferson Graham Tim Baharan Lenovo Vietnam Microsoft Amazon Analyst Dell Malaysia HP China
Israel and the UAE: why now and whats next?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

06:05 min | Last month

Israel and the UAE: why now and whats next?

"Is the greatest advancements toward peace between Israel and the Arab world in the last twenty, six years and it marks the third formal peace between Israel and an Arab nation. The diplomatic, Reproche Mon to nounce between Israel and the United Arab, Emirates last week is not in and of itself quite as big a deal as its orchestrators wished to claim the two countries have never been to war with each other the official hostility to Israel such as it was usually sounded pretty phoned in done for foresake when other Arab governments let fly with the fire-breathing choruses of condemnation in Israel's direction. The were generally very much in the back row of the quoi royal mumbling vaguely along hoping to be noticed. Israel and the US you have. Long. Dealt pretty, easily with each other Israeli ministers have made official visits to the Emirates. There are plentiful commercial ties between the countries Israel had already been invited to exhibit at Expo Twenty Twenty in by the intelligence services of Israel, and the have also long cooperated. The first official Israeli visited to the after the deal was announced was Yossi Cohen, director, of Masa Truly historic moment not since the Israel Jordan peace treaty was signed more than twenty years ago has so much. Progress has been made towards peace in the. Middle, East? By United Jew of America's closest and most capable partners in the region something which said could not be done. This deal is a significant step towards building a more peaceful secure and prosperous middle. East US President Donald Trump is claiming credit for brokering this agreement but suggestions by his proxies and flunkies that this is somehow worthy of the Nobel peace prize he frantically desires. somewhat optimistic granted that President Trump's predescessor barrack Obama was just given. One is a sort of housewarming present but an exchange of ambassadors between Israel and the U. A is just not a seismic recalibration comparable with the peace reached between Egypt and Israel in Nineteen, seventy, eight or Israel and Jordan in nineteen, ninety, four, I say to the people of Israel and Jordan. Now. You must make this peace real. To, turn no man's land into every man's home. To take down the barbed wire to remove the deadly minds. To help the. wounds. Of War to heal. However via the normalization of Israeli, Emirati relations may not be big deal. It may portend things which are indeed it's the fact that it isn't a big deal which may be the really big deal here. Israel's only two previous such agreements with countries as referenced above were with Egypt and Jordan neighbors against whom they fought wars. They were extraordinary responses to extraordinary circumstances. The agreement with the UI founds a diplomatic relationship which seems more or less remarkable than say, a diplomatic relationship between Denmark and Malaysia Will Senegal and Peru. It could have a domino effect. There are already suggestions that some other Arab, states including. Bahrain and Morocco a coming around to the U. I-IT's way of thinking where Israel is concerned and from there, what else might be possible Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has already spoken of hope that the direct flights which will shortly link Israel and the could be allowed to cross the skies above. Saudi Arabia. The prospect of an Israeli embassy in Riyadh might not seem exactly likely just yes. But nor does it seem any longer like a completely demented fantasy? I've Alanine Adam first of all. In our opinion this action is incorrect wrong one hundred percents. And it is a betrayal of the Palestinian. People and the will of Muslims and the will of quotes. Villas in autumn on Amazon one. Zero. Two significant shifts underpinning this realignment one is that in recent years Israel and the Arab states have discovered something they agree on Iran which regard as some combination of nuisance menace and existential threat. The other is that Israel and the Arab states have discovered something that they no longer disagree on at least old that much Palestine, which the rest of the Arab world seems less and less keen on pretending to care about a much ballyhooed component of the Israel you deal was Israel's promised to suspend its plans to annex the West. Bank. But it is difficult to believe Israel was ever entirely serious about that. Indeed it sounds in the light of the agreement exactly like the kind of mad idea you float. So you can make a big thing of agreeing not to do it as part of a subsequent diplomatic negotiation. News of the Israel. You a deal was very much not greeted by widespread dancing and celebrate tree hooting of car hoons in Gaza and Ramallah. There have been from Palestinian sources grim mutterings about betrayal by their fellow Arabs. Unfortunately, nowadays, most of the Arab is looking after their own interests at the expense of the Palestinian course. The wretched reality is that it's nothing. So sinister, it is simply that Palestine is increasingly regarded in Arab capitals as yesterday's cause and as a baffling boring headache one of the hardiest diplomatic truisms is Lord Pompton Quip that nations have no permanent friends no permanent enemies just permanent interests right now to the UAE and other Arab states which may follow. Israel seems a much more interesting ally than

Israel Israel Jordan United Arab Expo Twenty Twenty United States Jordan Official Egypt Reproche Mon President Trump Saudi Arabia Palestine Riyadh America Adam Barrack Obama Yossi Cohen Gaza
How To Grow From An Accidental To Intentional Business Nomad

Accelerate Your Business Growth

07:09 min | Last month

How To Grow From An Accidental To Intentional Business Nomad

"My guest today is Kyle Hegarty. Kyle is the managing director of Leadership Nomad, a division of tesl marketing where he focuses on helping companies such as IBM Lufthansa. Jess. An Oracle expand globally. Kyle looks at how companies connect with their customers while focusing on communication sales marketing and management leadership. He has trained thousands of executives is a faculty lecturer for Singapore Management. University. Is a frequent speaker business management conferences around the world. Kyle is the author of of the accidental business. No Matt thanks so much for joining me today. Kyle, thank you so much. You put a lot of pressure now on all of the great guests that you've had in the past so. It is pretty high bar to live up to, but I don't think you'd be here if I didn't think you are going to be able to so. It's all good. Thank you for inviting me absolute. so This whole concept of of being business nomad is interesting for me and. And how you help companies expand globally and one of my questions is really around. A cultural differences. And how a business owner or business person who's starting to to sort of go out there how do they navigate? What seems to be like an invisible language of cultural misunderstandings. Well. That's the big question that I that I try and address in this book and. By the way I'm here in Singapore. So I don't know how many time zones away from from you I am but about fifteen years ago I moved from the United States over to Singapore to help Western companies figure out how they're going to expand cross Southeast Asia and over and over again what I kept seeing was regardless of company size, it could be startup it could be a small business all the way up to the very large companies but all of them seemed to wrestle with some of these invisible cultural differences that you mentioned and I myself did as well APP. In fact, I'm I'm exhibit A.. In terms of making all of these mistakes and I'll give you just one example great showed up hired somebody locally. And was thought we were all on the same page. She spoke English I was speaking English. We signed a contract. and. Then on day one, she just didn't show up. And on to she didn't show up and then day three she dead and this was not an entry level role. This was like a pretty you know I mean, it wasn't a super senior but still you'd think that on day you'd think you shopped the job. And again, it's not the same that people in certain parts the world down do that but it was crystal clear right from the get go. That things were different in different parts of the world expectations were different. What I thought was crystal clear was not crystal clear to other people and that was something that just kept happening on repeat I could I could that this book at Twenty Times the size it is I simply chose a couple of of handful stories here and there, but these obstacles continued to pop up. Even. Companies that are doing the travel most are are a bit stuck these days. We can't get on airplanes as much. We're still facing this stuff because we are on the zoom calls on skype calls we are trying to do these partnership deals. We are expanding potentially into new markets and what I think is absolutely clear communication what the way I approach of business relationship. To me makes perfect sense and what I find over and over again is that that's not the case in other parts of the world. So I wrote this book to tell those stories and to start going down that path to get hopefully to help people avoid these mistakes that just keep happening over and over again. Okay so You gotTa tell me why didn't she shut up what? What was that? What ended up being the story? In this case, she had a sick relative in another in Malaysia. This is in Singapore and Malaysia. You can get over a bridge to cross over to Malaysia. And I love I'm not going to put words into your mouth but. She. Essentially, her excuse was that this obviously, you know family takes precedence which shaw absolutely fine with that. But to me, you would have communicated that and she she showed up and three thinking everything was fine like. This you're not you're fired. And she shot absolutely shocked. Absolutely. Shocked. Another another fascinating example, which is actually really sad We had a whole team in Philippines and this woman would be hired I. Think she was we hired her at a entry level and just when somebody has it and you you just know it I mean this this person was just she was on the ball she just got everything done clients loved her every I mean she was just in a small company she stood out and she got Promoted, and she moved up the food chain very quickly we had plans to actually get her ownership status in and to kind of put her into a managing director track we're invest. We're ready to invest in all this stuff. Storm came through Philippines and knocked the roof off of her family house where she and her mother lived. These monsoons are unfortunately coming in greater frequency. There and the mother decided that this was an almond and forced the entire family to move into the country province where she came from. And without. Second. Thought our point of just up and quit she. I think she gave us a day notice of because. At the age of thirty two, you do what your mother tells you to do, and that was the end of it. And I would bet you today that she is living in a you know in A. I needed third world is is kind of a past term but I mean, you know that she she went in a very different direction because of that and you know where where does that come up in the in the business school lessons?

Kyle Hegarty Singapore Managing Director Malaysia Singapore Management Oracle Business Owner Lecturer IBM Lufthansa Southeast Asia Philippines Twenty Times Matt United States Skype Shaw
Pitcher Plant Symbioses

In Defense of Plants Podcast

04:48 min | Last month

Pitcher Plant Symbioses

"You know is a big group, florist speaking Southeast Asia is insanely diverse, but then just even think about it from symbiosis specifically like there's already a laundry list of possibilities in there. So how do you even begin to start to sort through where you can make your mark on the science because as part of it as as like a young eager scientists in trainings to be like, okay. Where do I fit in here? Very. True. Yeah. That that was that was quite a process. The first two possibly even three yet mostly the first two years but Essentially what I did is I took a strategy to to find that niche I, kind of just tried everything. Works but. I will say. I did start wanting to focus on the symbiosis between the plants and the the frogs which marina them. That such, a an unusual niche interaction with barely little known about it. So I I thought of that is oh, that would be a nice place to. State my claim but. There there's a reason why some things are not so while studied. In this case, the interaction is not so common as her interactions with insects. Amazon permits again is is is a key thing. So apparently, there's at least one region insider walk in Malaysia which it's not so uncommon to find it but then getting the permits and work, there is another hassle but. As I mentioned like the the more I read about the group and just seeing I just had so many questions and still. Have so many. Questions A on. The first chapter is not one that I anticipated really. So while I was working on trying to. See if I can find breeding frogs in in Singapore I. Wasn't really getting data on that and but I noticed this color polymorphism of the the the common species there nepenthes. Priscilla's. Added on that. But by first chapter ended up looking into coloration. Fees and. Studying that from evolutionary perspective and then also teasing apart what are the possible adaptive benefits of the differences in Ignatius that you see. So even within a species, there's variation between red and green editors and you could see within any individuals species but that was not a question that I went in with right and that's important to realize is how much of this is informed budgets being out there walking around being curious you know that's part of it to kind of have to enjoy what you're doing and and enough to kind of have that relaxed state of mind as they like. My notice that there but not there that's this color not over here and even on the same individual and it's cool that those can then just creep up into your work and become a big part of it without ever really realizing it. But that's where you know having the passion for the system kind of comes into play because God forbid you sent her on something I didn't want to do that and I should have said that in the meeting kind of thing. But Again. You're in the super bio diverse area. You're studying a group of plants that are super charismatic in also diverse themselves and you mentioned you know these Priscilla's a common species in that area and and as that another limitation to the work to as you mentioned, just finding frogs breeding in pitchers alone is difficult but you don't want to stay your entire PG or really. Any research on an organism, you might find maybe two of in your entire time surging or have to climb repel into all this crazy stuff just get to it So is that a big motivating factor to is just being able to work with species where you can get enough data and ask the kinds of questions to to even start investing the sorts of stuff Yes definitely. and. That's A. That's a nice thing about nepenthes actually. So all although. It's this some exotic species from. Our perspective from coming coming from the West sides difficult. Get there bought once you're there once you're in those places, they're usually locally pretty abundant. You can usually get a lot of plans when when you're in that site. Let's really encouraging in also again, if you're like us, living in the Americas, no experience with any of the tropical pitcher plants outside of maybe botanical garden or a nursery like Oh that must've been a sight for sore eyes just walking into an area that is dominated

Priscilla Southeast Asia Amazon Singapore Americas Malaysia Ignatius
Who was Einsteins first wife

Science Friction

05:13 min | 2 months ago

Who was Einsteins first wife

"Tashin. Mitchell here this week with a controversy that just will not be put to bed. What do you think Russia language of science? Form Language asked me are the narrowly and a fan figura. Can you guess who this is? How is it that fantastic difficult language if international think of wild wiry hair and dark penetrating is he's arguably one of the greatest original thinkers of all time and certainly in science in strive for. An outdoors. And clarity of. concepts. got. Their. Mutuel. Relation. Anti correspondent who sensory date it's L. Dan Stein yes. predicted the behavior of black holes and their immense gravitational pull through his general theory of relativity, which visualized gravity is warping of the fabric of the universe or space time around objects. But have you heard of a woman called Malaysia Malaysia Marriage Johnston to babies sauce she was his first wife and a promising scientist in the making in her own right when they met and fell in love. Now, there's been a vocal malivert fan club in recent years. It says she was fundamental to Albert's early scientific success, even a key collaborator on his theories and that her legacy was hidden. Will a brand new investigation strongly contests this climb and over the next two episodes I'm going to drilling into that evidence to let you decide buckle up. It matters just to know the truth I and Stein is portrayed as the great hero of Science and N Stein is seen as a god and you don't touch demand. For some people is just like attacking the the Cohen that the Bible, you don't touch those things. We try not to make up stories. And this story appears to be largely the hopeful story people hoped it was true they it was true but it doesn't seem to be true. She. Helped in a great. Measure. That Einstein became what he became. I. Have Serious doubts that he would have got where he is. If he did not have her supporters, he needed someone to discuss them. He needed someone to calculate them. Compare them. So she left us a genius that's her gift to the world. It's important that the truth be told when stories are based on very unreliable evidence. When you start to examine the sources, the stories just aren't hold out. And stories that matter. Mathematical abilities rivaled on stands that she co-authored on Stan's early research that they worked late into the not together blazing a trial for quantum physics. Malivert and our wits relationship really on the came to be understood at all in the nineteen eighty s when early letters between them were found in a family bank faulting California very little other material evidence remained then and physicist Dr. Pauline. Gang Gagnon believes they could a reason for that. Two people were really adamant that this story would not come out about manage. These were Helen Ducasse the personal secretary of Albert Einstein and these are two. Nedam. Both of them became, but they were the executors of his estate and these people were adamant that this story will not come. Polling is a particle physicist now retired in Germany she spent much of her career investigating dark matter at the European Laboratory, a of particle physics soon, and at Indiana University she's taken up. Malaya's 'cause and explains that even elbow full story was with health for a long time. The first biographies came out more than twenty years after the death of Albert Einstein the reason was that do not end for example, not allow anything in writing unless he would be righted himself. The everything that was in the possession of Albert Einstein was cleaned up it has to do with the fact that auto. Natan after the death of militia marriage. In. One, thousand, nine, hundred, forty, eight, or two thousand came to Zurich to her apartment. To search the apartment and probably took everything that he could fine of scientific merit. So these people made every effort to clean up what was there and to erase any trace of market right?

Albert Einstein Johnston Physicist Helen Ducasse Tashin. Mitchell N Stein L. Dan Stein Russia Zurich Natan Gang Gagnon Cohen Stan Malaya Malivert Scientist Indiana University Germany Secretary
"malaysia" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

03:46 min | 2 months ago

"malaysia" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"We already talked about the doll which I like at the top of the hill people will tell you about Tia Chow Chendrol in downtown Georgetown I would skip that that's always touted as the best friend on the island but it is not in my opinion and many locals feel the same way it's more kind of a touristy thing now. But the best all get it at the top of Penang Hill or down where we talked about where to get the Penang Lacson Ir Tom There's some good in that area to. Another place to go really good to try out while you're there you're gonNA have lots of time to eat is Nazi Kandahar. So Nazi Kandarr is, do you remember when you came to Singapore? We went to that place. We ordered the different foods you stood in line and you got your rice and then they put different stuff on the. So Nazi candor is very similar. Nazi, Candar is often run by the Indian population. You'll see them as the ones that are operating these stalls or stands. There's one place down in the George. Well, there's lots of places in the Georgetown area in that little India area of. Penang island of for Nasi Candar. Again, you can google it many people like place called line clear L. I n. e. and then clear there's also Hamadeh. There's Rafi Rafi is over right where we used to live longer need drive all these places you can go and for ten fifteen ring it and there's even a place up on that Gurney Paragon food court there's a place in their even you can get some Nasi Candar. And you'll get a plate of rice. When you first step up to the counter, they'll give you some rice on a plate and then you kinda point at these different curry dishes or pieces of fried chicken or whatever they want, and they added to your plate. And then they'll put extra sauce. If you say I want more more the curry sauce, they'll put it all over it, and then you go and you check out and the guy kind of looks at what you have and it gives you a price and I'm sure he gives tourists a higher price..

Tom There Penang Hill Georgetown Rafi Rafi Penang island Nasi Candar Tia Chow Chendrol Candar Kandahar Singapore Gurney Paragon google India George
"malaysia" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

04:31 min | 2 months ago

"malaysia" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"On the island that whole area there is one particular place you can go to that's kind of alturas out I would go in just a little simple shop. Bernie were around and just ask if they have Pinang Luxa and get your opinion locks. So there, it'll be different from the LUXA that you might get in Singapore is Singapore's Coconut milk and there isn't coconut milk in a Tree Pinang. It's very good. It's a little bit Kinda Sour, wishy and fishy. If you don't like fish, she probably wouldn't like it but I think it's quite good and then there's the national dish of Malaysia, which is Nazi lamach Nasi means rice lamach fatty. So the reason they call it fatty rice is because it's rice cooked with coconut milk and that's doesn't sound very interesting in itself and it wouldn't be except that they add things to that. So you'll get your Nasi lamach, your fatty rice with different editions usually. Some symbol symbol is a fiery hot red colored accompaniment or SAAS. It's not really a Saas because it's usually pretty thick, but it's traditionally Malay- and it's fishy because there is a fish component to it and chilies and some sugar, their Ghulam Laka they add to it and some Tamarin. So it's got all those components together into this fiery sauce and so that always comes with your Nazila mock, and then usually you'll get some Friday anchovies and fried peanuts that come alongside this as well as fried. Egg. and. Some cucumber slices and that's a pretty good representation of Osceola mock and -cational. You'll get chicken served with it as well. But the best Nasi lamach on the island in my opinion and in a lot of people's opinion. Is Down On. Beach Street in Georgetown at Ali Nazi. Lamach. L. I.. And it's very cheap. You can get a little banana leaf to wrap packet of Nasi mock for one point eight ringgit. So almost nothing. Twenty cents or something like that. Twenty fives. Yeah. No more than that. About fifty cents fifty cents. Yeah and it's I usually get to because it's it's it's a pretty small kind of dial back version and NAS Lamach, but it had they have different ones you can order you can get. The rice with the sauce and a piece of egg or the rice and the sauce and some squid or the rice in the sauce and some little dried fish..

Pinang Luxa Singapore Tree Pinang alturas Ghulam Laka Bernie Georgetown Malaysia Osceola
"malaysia" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

06:14 min | 2 months ago

"malaysia" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"Welcome to the amateur traveler. I'm . your host Chris Christensen. . Let's talk about paying. . I'd like to welcome the show ruth from Vancouver and that's not the one in Canada but the one in Washington and that's the state of Washington. . DC. . WHO's come to talk to us about Penang? ? Malaysia Ruth Welcome to the show. . Thank you. . Glad to be here and some of you met ruth. . If you traveled a with me to Morocco ruth was one of the people on that trip and we're friends from long before that and you have spent the last. . Three years up until the coronavirus down in southeast. . Asia's that have I got. The . timing writer was longer than <hes>. . Well, , we had three years in Singapore. . And then we were into our <hes> just pass our first year in Penang when the covert virus and I actually was here in the states and got stranded here as the <hes> movement control order went into effect inning and I wasn't able to get back into the country. . So we're now home back in the state of Washington and <hes>. . Yeah. . But Penang was our home for about a year. . Will, , and when we get to the point where we can, , why should someone go to Penang? ? Penang is just a very interesting piece of as. . You have three distinct people ethnicities who make up panning opening is one of the thirteen states of Malaysia. . It's the second smallest. . It's the only one that has a island plus mainland components, , and the island is the part that we are familiar with. That's . where we lived. . We lived in Penang Island Penang. . Island. . Has Like I say three different distinct groups. There's . the Chinese, , which are about fifty percent, , which is more than the most of Malaysia, , your Chinese percentage, , and then you have forty percent Malay- and about nine percent of the Indians who are mostly Tamil speakers so there from southern. . Yup and then we have the expert groups and in particular, , there's one large group of experts that now reside in Penang as a result of Malaysia's M. M.. . Two H. Program, , which is Malaysia my second home. . So quite a few people have actually retired they've made it their permanent home. . So it's a very eclectic group of different ethnicities and different cultures and they do not intermixed very much. . So you really do have these distinct. . And distinct foods and distinct ways of living and languages, , and you can do it all in a very small space and people have been to Singapore Penang. It's . about the third of the size of Singapore. . And only has about fifteen percent of the population of Singapore's on the island about seven hundred thousand people that makes it much more spread out. You're . not just in these big crowds of people and yet you're experiencing the same kind of cultural mixing and interaction that you might get in Singapore. . I like to think of Penang sort of like Singapore before Lee Kuan Yew came in and modernized and sanitized. . Everything, , so Penang gives you that old feel I think of what Singapore would have been like. . Before everything was cleaned up and so and not to say that it's dangerous or unhealthy to be there but you just get that kind of older. Feel . you have people cook it on the streets for food and things like that. . So the I highly recommend going just because it's different than a lot of other places you might go in Asia will in terms of Malaysia we're on or just off of the mainland portion of Malaysia in the. . West Coast in the north. . So we on cow before we're south of that which is way up by the border with Thailand and then we`re Two thirds the distance from Kuala Lumpur up to the type border. . Yes yes. . Like you say we're to the west of the mainland and very close actually up. . I think there's only one one state may be two that are above pinning on the mainland before you get to. . Thailand. . So it is still pretty close to time. . There is some influence of Thai Culture Thai food. . In. . What is in Penang Yeah I? ? Think you're forty miles from Thailand. . <hes> yes. . Yeah and what's interesting about pinning to is, , and we'll talk about this a little bit more but you came and visited us when we were in Singapore and we went to the parental museum to remember that in singer. . So Penang is one of three places in that Malaysian Singaporean area that has Parana Akin Chinese or also called the Straits Chinese also called the bubble Nokia's so they are located in Penang Malacca and in. . Singapore. . So I've actually been to all three places. I've . been to the museums in each of those places and it's a fascinating culture. . People from that culture came from China from mainland. . China many years ago. . treaters remember correctly yet and they came in and adopted many of the Malay Practices and cultures, , and some of the foods and sort of turn them into their own. . They were usually very very wealthy and their homes were extravagant and their furniture was lavish and carved, , and they also incorporated some of the colonialism of the British. . So they had fancy dinner ware and fancy glasses and mirrors and their homes were just beautiful and in Penang you can go onto Church Street, , which is down in Georgetown and there is a Paranthan Museum there for Twenty Ringgit. . which is almost nothing that's four ringgit to a dollar. . So it's five dollars you can go in and get a tour of the product museum there, , and it's fascinating. . It was owned actually by a gangster. . A Chinese gangster and his family I and <hes>. . It's now part of the state I believe as a museum and they do try to preserve this product can culture because it is only really in these three distinct places. .

Penang Penang Island Penang Malaysia ruth Washington Chris Christensen Fast Board Asia Morocco DC Singapore writer Canada Vancouver
Travel to Penang Malaysia

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

06:14 min | 2 months ago

Travel to Penang Malaysia

"Welcome to the amateur traveler. I'm your host Chris Christensen. Let's talk about paying. I'd like to welcome the show ruth from Vancouver and that's not the one in Canada but the one in Washington and that's the state of Washington. DC. WHO's come to talk to us about Penang? Malaysia Ruth Welcome to the show. Thank you. Glad to be here and some of you met ruth. If you traveled a with me to Morocco ruth was one of the people on that trip and we're friends from long before that and you have spent the last. Three years up until the coronavirus down in southeast. Asia's that have I got. The timing writer was longer than Well, we had three years in Singapore. And then we were into our just pass our first year in Penang when the covert virus and I actually was here in the states and got stranded here as the movement control order went into effect inning and I wasn't able to get back into the country. So we're now home back in the state of Washington and Yeah. But Penang was our home for about a year. Will, and when we get to the point where we can, why should someone go to Penang? Penang is just a very interesting piece of as. You have three distinct people ethnicities who make up panning opening is one of the thirteen states of Malaysia. It's the second smallest. It's the only one that has a island plus mainland components, and the island is the part that we are familiar with. That's where we lived. We lived in Penang Island Penang. Island. Has Like I say three different distinct groups. There's the Chinese, which are about fifty percent, which is more than the most of Malaysia, your Chinese percentage, and then you have forty percent Malay- and about nine percent of the Indians who are mostly Tamil speakers so there from southern. Yup and then we have the expert groups and in particular, there's one large group of experts that now reside in Penang as a result of Malaysia's M. M.. Two H. Program, which is Malaysia my second home. So quite a few people have actually retired they've made it their permanent home. So it's a very eclectic group of different ethnicities and different cultures and they do not intermixed very much. So you really do have these distinct. And distinct foods and distinct ways of living and languages, and you can do it all in a very small space and people have been to Singapore Penang. It's about the third of the size of Singapore. And only has about fifteen percent of the population of Singapore's on the island about seven hundred thousand people that makes it much more spread out. You're not just in these big crowds of people and yet you're experiencing the same kind of cultural mixing and interaction that you might get in Singapore. I like to think of Penang sort of like Singapore before Lee Kuan Yew came in and modernized and sanitized. Everything, so Penang gives you that old feel I think of what Singapore would have been like. Before everything was cleaned up and so and not to say that it's dangerous or unhealthy to be there but you just get that kind of older. Feel you have people cook it on the streets for food and things like that. So the I highly recommend going just because it's different than a lot of other places you might go in Asia will in terms of Malaysia we're on or just off of the mainland portion of Malaysia in the. West Coast in the north. So we on cow before we're south of that which is way up by the border with Thailand and then we`re Two thirds the distance from Kuala Lumpur up to the type border. Yes yes. Like you say we're to the west of the mainland and very close actually up. I think there's only one one state may be two that are above pinning on the mainland before you get to. Thailand. So it is still pretty close to time. There is some influence of Thai Culture Thai food. In. What is in Penang Yeah I? Think you're forty miles from Thailand. yes. Yeah and what's interesting about pinning to is, and we'll talk about this a little bit more but you came and visited us when we were in Singapore and we went to the parental museum to remember that in singer. So Penang is one of three places in that Malaysian Singaporean area that has Parana Akin Chinese or also called the Straits Chinese also called the bubble Nokia's so they are located in Penang Malacca and in. Singapore. So I've actually been to all three places. I've been to the museums in each of those places and it's a fascinating culture. People from that culture came from China from mainland. China many years ago. treaters remember correctly yet and they came in and adopted many of the Malay Practices and cultures, and some of the foods and sort of turn them into their own. They were usually very very wealthy and their homes were extravagant and their furniture was lavish and carved, and they also incorporated some of the colonialism of the British. So they had fancy dinner ware and fancy glasses and mirrors and their homes were just beautiful and in Penang you can go onto Church Street, which is down in Georgetown and there is a Paranthan Museum there for Twenty Ringgit. which is almost nothing that's four ringgit to a dollar. So it's five dollars you can go in and get a tour of the product museum there, and it's fascinating. It was owned actually by a gangster. A Chinese gangster and his family I and It's now part of the state I believe as a museum and they do try to preserve this product can culture because it is only really in these three distinct places.

Penang Penang Island Penang Malaysia Singapore Penang Singapore Penang Malacca Ruth Washington Asia Thailand Chris Christensen Thai Culture Thai Morocco DC China Canada Writer
Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

The Vergecast

48:04 min | 2 months ago

Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

"So, this hearing just going to say it, it was six hours of chaos. So. So many things like individual moments of pure chaos happened this hearing. But because every member of Congress was only given five minutes to ask the questions in and they moved on, no one could process the moments of cash. So here are some things that happened during this hearing. Jeff. bezos just started eating nuts on his call. That was just a thing that you started snacking for the first ninety minutes. It appears that basis had tech issues was operating in some kind of delay. So we didn't hear from him. They just answer any questions and they'd take a ten minute break Jeff. bezos could fix his computer. Amazing. Jim Jordan, who McKenna pointed out. On the show last week is always sort of chaos element. Try to talk over several members of Congress got yelled to put his mass back on floated. Just elaborate conspiracy theories. was when I say was chaos I. Don't know if there's any other way to describe it. I. Think that led a lot of people to think the hearing itself didn't accomplish its goals, but I think in many ways it did. But Kennedy you WanNa Kinda go through what the committee was trying to accomplish the themes they were pointed at in. How hearing played out, right. So okay. First off. Harkening back to last week I mentioned Jim. Jordan's mountain dew obsession. Definitely drink a handful those throughout the hearing I took notes in screen shots. So, I, called it. But regardless of their pores soda choices, there were a lot of lawmakers who definitely did their homework and I think that was really apparent throughout the entire hearing and when I look at. The picture that they tried to paint I think that became really clear in chairman Sicily's opening statements. So this is the guy who liked. And spearheaded the entire investigation from the beginning, and in those opening statements, he pointed out that yeah Apple Amazon Google facebook. There are different in a lot of ways and they exhibit anticompetitive behaviors potentially allegedly and a lot of different ways. But what they tried to pull together and was a story, and it's really hard to tell a story and five minute fragments. But what happened yesterday was Sicily. Ni, and a lot of the Democrats on the Committee wanted to point out that these companies they become bottlenecks for distribution whether that's information or just like APP stores marketplace's they control what gets distributed in how what was really key to the investigation was how? How they survey competitors. If you have so much control dominance over a market or a specific part of the tech industry, you have a lot of insight into your competitors and you can do a lot of dangerous things with that, and then lastly, after that dominance has gained, it's how they abuse it. Right? How they abuse it to make harder for small businesses in competitors and I think that's exactly what Cellini pointed out in the beginning and I think they did a poor job that storytelling throughout the process. But I think that's also our job. Right is to pull that evidence together and tell that story for them in a way that isn't like. Yes, no yelling at CEOS and like stopping them and I think by getting that in the evidentiary record doing all this questioning, I think they really did achieve their goal in the end. Yeah. I mean, I think the thing that happened sort of next to the hearing was that they released a bunch of documents from these one point, three, million documents of clutch. Over the past year, they released pretty targeted selection documents for every company showing some of this stuff, Casey, I wrote a story about. facebook. INSTAGRAM. My I'm going to frame this email or mark Zuckerberg. Literally one sentence, no period. The Andrew says I need to figure out. I'M GONNA buy instagram like I would love to just be in a place were sending that email like super casually like I got this thing to figure out and it's not like am I gonNa buy the model of the car. It's like instagram. I've been thinking of the text messages where so and so says that Mark Zuckerberg's didn't go destroy mode on instagram ever since they got that up. Case she this to Kevin and right that text was. Yes. Well, it was Kevin. System was talking to an investor and Kevin said to the investor. If we don't sell well, mark, go into destroy mode on us and the investor side probably. Of course, stray casual. So there's just a lot of documents and I think one of the functions of hearing was to get those documents into the official congressional record to make the CEO's account for them. That did not seem very successful to me. Is like a takeaway people should have from this hearing, right? No. I think a lot of people that go into these hearings are expecting like these big Gotcha moments and expecting like a lot of news and all this stuff. But it really, it wasn't oversight hearing. You know it wasn't. They didn't come. They came at this like in a report last earlier this week that they came out at as investigators. They didn't come at it to make a big show horse and pony show out of it, and yet I think the CEO's didn't. The record well enough to the extent that they could have. But there was definitely, I was expecting them to do a lot less evasion and I expected a lot less room probation with the documents, but it's just the process of a Congressional hearing. It's. It's hard to do that in a congressional hearing. But if you put those documents out there, you get the CEO's on the record a little bit who does excite this excites the FTC. J, and that's who can take this next and then it's also congress. You know they can't break up a tech company, but they can regulate going forward and it's those three key themes that I pointed out earlier that they could regulate. You know what I mean. They could legislate to forbid companies from surveying competitors and things like that, and that's where this goes. So the format of the hearing, every member and five minute chunks, it seemed very clear that the Democrats had some sort of coordinated evidentiary strategy, they would start and. And they would say, I, want to read this email to you. What did you mean by this email and then Jeff bezos would say something like I have. No idea is on works. I. Was real pattern that developed was basis really not doing or claiming he definitely knows claiming not really no way Wayne is under the thing they did or they would ask sooner Pichai about the very granular add deal google made by an ad product, and soon I, would say I'll get back to you, which is basically all responses. So the Democrats seemed like they were coordinated to move through their documents. The Republicans seem to be doing something else that also seem coordinated intentional, but what was their focus because that seemed clear split my takeaway from Jim Jordan who? We got into earlier, he he was interviewing. As if they were all Jack Dorsey. And as we talked about like, yeah, he invited Jack Dorsey to testify, but he doesn't sit on the antidote subcommittees. Anything. He says, it just doesn't matter. So it sounded to me as if he prepared questions Jack Dorsey and then it was like, oh, he's not coming I'll ask Tim Cook the same questions. Another completely crazy moment that happened just seen by and five minute chunks is that. Represented Sensenbrenner from Wisconsin Dear Sweet Wisconsin. Definitely. Asked Mark Zuckerberg why the Donald Junior was banned from twitter and mark. Zuckerberg was happening on twitter facebook and there was just like a moment of confused silence, and then he tried to move on and that just sort of floated by in the river of chaos to tell you how much chaos there was kneeling. When you started to tell that story, I thought you were going to tell the story about when Jim Jordan asked him cook if the famous one, thousand, nine, hundred, four, Apple Super Bowl, AD was actually about twenty twenty cancel culture, which is another thing that really happened. I think that's out of context. He didn't ask him. He said clearly, this is. That's definitely what Steve Jobs was thinking IBM is canceled culture and Apple's going to break it with hammer and Jeff. Bezos said that social media is a nuance destruction machine and all this crazy stuff from that. It was a wild will that that particular question when Jim Jordan asked, do you support the cancel culture mov, you could see the CEOS like. 'cause they went in order. He asks them all in order. So First Tim Cook just like basically muttered nothing. Here's like I don't. I support speech whatever. The iphone a keyboard like that was his answer. Sooner per child also, just like muttered, right? He's like Google has always supported free expression Zuckerberg like saw the opportunity and took it and the forces of liberalism I rising I, and then basis was like I cannot. I cannot do in like went for it, and that was just totally insane moment. But it also seems like the Republicans were intentional to try to create their own moments where they were yelling at CEOS about bias on platforms is obviously something cover a. At. You were paying a lot of attention that case you're paying a lot of attention to it. Do you think that was effective in creating because you know there's like a parallel conservative Universe Jim? Jordan was on Tucker. Carlson. Last night like was that effective or d think that the CEO's were able to sort of tamp down on interesting the Tucker Carlson pointed out that Google and other companies are all big donors to Jim Jordan another folks. So that is a weird side, but I think it was actually besides the moment where they mixed up twitter with facebook I. Think this was much more effective off. Off Topic yelling about technology than we usually see like are genuinely issues that like they are upset about that, they could point to largely around like cove nineteen misinformation and they could at least like pick those topics and stick to them rather than kind of asking vague questions about like, why is my phone listening to me? Well, they're definitely asked questions about why are my campaign emails getting filtered by G mail? Yes. I should. I should mention that they have really and they have all of these cases where they ask about extremely specific one off incidents that anyone who has used social media knows happens constantly. And, then turn them into a sinister pattern. But I think they managed to come off as sounding more like they understood what they were talking about the unusual. I think that was a real theme of the hearing, Casey. What did you think of this sort of bias side show that occurred? Well, I mean the the idea that conservative voices are being suppressed is foundational to the conservative movement and is behind the rise of conservative talk radio. It was behind the rise of Fox News. Now that social media exists, we have seen it in this new form, but it is sort of being presented as extra, sinister and worthy of. Some sort of legislative intervention what frustrates me about it is that much more than newspapers or or cable news like Mark Zuckerberg Dorsey. These people benefit hugely from having all possible voices on their platform. None of them is incentivized to drive conservatives off their platform. What they are incentivized to do is have rules that make the place safe and welcoming. So that people want to hang out there and so to the extent that there are issues on the platform, they've largely come because these platforms have rules. And you know you would think that a bunch of free marketeers would realize that the alternative to the system that they're so mad about would be creating a new system, but they don't seem at all interested in doing that. So I just sort of dismissed all of them as charlatans I actually thought it was interesting that the opposite track came up, which was the Stop Hey for profit campaign I kind of wasn't expecting that. The representative Raskin I believe asked facebook. Basically, why aren't you kicking more hate speech off. I forget who else asked like look is the point that you're so big. You don't care about advertiser boycotts I. Mean, you know it will here. Here is a fact that the number one complaint that facebook gets from its users, the thing that users. About. FACEBOOK is that it removes too much content and so if you're running the place, you do have to take these complaints seriously in a way. Right? It might not be you know that you shadow band conservative whatever that even means on social network in twenty twenty. But the fact that you're removing content is really upsetting people. So you can't dismiss that idea entirely, but I still don't feel like we're having that intellectually honest conversation about it. So this was definitely I feel like you can connect the you control distribution. We're GONNA show the abuses of power narrative. We got other. Democrats. With the you control distribution. You're banning conservatives right like I. Think what's Sensenbrenner Again, cups and conservatives are consumers to is that people don't realize that like fifty percent of the population in many ways. But facebook has like famous conservatives working its highest levels Kevin. We last week, we're talking about Kevin Roose keeps sharing the list. List of the most engaged content from crowd tangle. It's all conservative content, and that's so problematic for facebook that they're. They're pushing back with other metrics and graphs of their own, making the facts just aren't there, but it doesn't seem to be convincing. Brett Kevin is being asked to recuse himself from facebook case because he's like best friends with facebook I, AP I wrote a column almost two years ago. Now, arguing that conservatives were trying to redefine. Any conservative identified person having any unwanted outcome on a social network, right? So bias is your name was higher than mine in search results. Bias is used suggested that I follow a Democrat and not a Republican right, and if you take action on your policies that apply to everyone against me a conservative that is biased against conservatives, right. So and by the way I have to say this has been hugely successful because we've talked about it. How many minutes now and the longer that these discussions. Discussions. Go on. They just sort of refi people's minds. The idea that there really is a vast conspiracy to silence conservative speech because he's networks are so big millions of conservatives are having experiences like this every day, and now there is an ideology that is basically a religion for them to attach to, which is although Silicon Valley liberals are out to get. Reason I wanted to talk about the conservative side show, which in many ways was a circus is it feels like the notion that we should be punitive to the companies or mad at the company's. Bipartisan, right we were. We were not looking at a hearing where the Democrats were on the attack. Republicans are saying we love. Apple. We're looking at hearing where they were. Everyone was mad. There are a couple of exceptions to that. There were a couple of I think sensenbrenner and a few other folks were like look we want to be clear. Big is not bad. We just WANNA make sure we're not punishing you for your success, but you were like almost entirely, right? Yeah. I. Mean I. think that's it's important to. To capture that mood like Jeff Bezos Mark Zuckerberg, Tim, Cook soon. Darpa, try they usually get to finish whatever sentence they start saying. Right. They're not used to being interrupted. Their thoughts are usually like you know they get to live in complete sentences and people take them seriously here in five in intervals, they were interrupted almost every time they started speaking to be told that they were wrong that they were filibuster at one point Sicily said stop thinking is for the questions. We can just assume they're all good questions. They. Were getting yelled at and they're going yell that about a variety of things that were pretty specific. So you kind of in your kind of structure here. The first one was controlling distribution. What did you hear as a hearing went on the indicated to that? The committee had a case here? I think the apple's APP store is one thing you know charging thirty percent cuts on certain things is just controlling an APP store. It's the same thing with Amazon's marketplace. They can inherently in control what gets placed and what gets sold and you know if they want to play with search results on Amazon, they can do that, and then on facebook and Google, it's not just like products and software that's information. And it could be information when it's like Google. Google. Stealing yelps, texture views right in putting those in its little info boxes in search queries in facebook if facebook is just like an. Mation, distribution platform and. It can decide Algorithm Mickley. Knowingly. What people get to see this bution was very keen to the committee's hearing yesterday and they pointed out different aspects in which you know each company exhibited that kind of behavior. So the one that will you bring up apple? We wrote about this, say there's much emails. Apples document production is just one hundred and thirty pages of unrelated emails and whatever order see it's like scan through it. So there's a lot of little stories in there. There's one about right to repair and apple realizing it needed to repair. By watching PR people operate by reading their emails journalists. Very entertaining. They're like we had a break like here's our strategy. Here's we're GONNA. That's all in there. You can look at it, but there's a lot about the APP store itself and how they're going to use the mechanics of the APP store to control their platform, and it started at the beginning like the first emails in this production from twenty, ten there. From Phil, Schiller Steve Jobs saying, are we GONNA? Let Amazon Sell Books in the kindle store. Store, it felt like I saw an Amazon ad was hard to watch this hard to watch this ad where a person's reading a book on an iphone in the kindle APP in the pick up an android phone keep reading. He's like literally like it was hard to watch like Schiller's at home like pain what a customer is having an experience that good it really just. Heart and so he's like it was hard to watch. You fours Steve Jobs. They're like we gotta shut it down jobs is the bookstore will be the only bookstore on the APP. Store. That's the way it's going to be everyone's gotta used to it. We know that restricting payments will hurt other things, but that's what we're doing and they started there in two thousand ten and they pulled it out, and then that ladders up into everything that we've seen with, hey, ladders up into the analysis group showing up to. Apple, can pay them to say that there's independent study has revealed. Everybody has a thirty percent cut. It has landed up into Tim Cook, forwarding. He gets a letters from developers that are in this direction. It's like apples breaking my heart and he just like Ford's it. Tim, Cook forwards that email to filter credit eighty, just as thoughts like amazing like they are constantly thinking about the APP store as a mechanism of control for the platform in the leverage and other deals. So the other one was apple is this Amazon one which I have very mixed feelings on saying that this is bad or legal I'm curious for all of your thoughts famously. Did, not have the prime video APP on the Apple TV and all these other places apple, Amazon came to a deal. There's an entire presentation in this production like the slide deck of how the deal is going to work. Apple got to be the preferred seller of its own product. So third parties cancel. Apple. Products, Amazon pages, they got. They have a custom by flow. They've custom product pages, all the stuff in return. Amazon got a lower commission on the APP store and gets to Selatan products which no. No like you can rent a movie from the Amazon APP on the Apple TV, no one else gets to it in one world. This is just pure platform collision, right? Apple cut VIP deal for big companies because it wanted something and you could say this is legal in another world. It's like this is how deals work apple something valuable. Amazon s something valuable and they came to a conclusion wherever made more money and quite frankly the consumer experience platform has got better. How do you read that? Casey? That is good and fair analysis of it. I. Think I did read slightly more scandalous. Tones into it in part because apple would never acknowledge that some developers are more important to it than others even though if you assume that that's true, I think maybe one of the things that's frustrating about it is there is no transparency accountability around which developers get sweetheart deals is that once you hit a certain threshold of revenue will cut your price. Why couldn't they extend that deal to everyone right? Or is it just if we withhold something that seems particularly valuable, we can eventually drag you to the table. Table, which is sort of what seems like happened here. I think in all cases, what I'm always looking for is the accountability, right like and some sense of of equitable treatment of developers and I understand the guys are always going to get the best treatment, but it can that be publicly visible. Can it be acknowledged and there'd be routes for others to achieve that same level of success and treatment, and that I'll just seems missing here. Did you buy Tim Co? He said it twice. It was obviously A. Glimmer, of sympathy for all four CEOS. There is a lot of reporting that they had spent months preparing for this hearing like being grilled there, they'd hire outside law firms. They. Practiced they all clearly had soundbites memorized in none of them. Got To say him because it kept getting interrupted. Tim Cook had this one where he is like if we're the gatekeepers, the gates are open wider than ever. We've gone from five hundred. APPS to one point seven, he said like. A whole speech. and. The thing is there's fierce competition for developers. They don't like our store can do for android the windows. For xbox and PS. Four. Which I was like the idea that adobe is going to be like we don't want to be on the IPAD. Here's PS. Four Photoshop is insanity to me. I'm going to build a spreadsheet. APP. For the five. That's how frustrated with Tim Cook. To that ring. True to you I. Mean, there's no, it does not ring true. There is a, there is a duopoly. In the United States when it comes to smartphones, iphones have majority share in the United States and you can't say, well, you know there's there's a rogue fork of android in Malaysia that you could go develop for if you really wanted to and have that come across as a credible argument to Americans. Right it is. Natural for any monopolist to spend most of its time, arguing that it is much smaller and much less consequential as as you think it is and they're essentially always asking you to ignore what is in front of your face, which is that they are the giant. They are in control. What they say goes, and it doesn't matter which small businesses get hurt along the. The. Way I would point out that the contact and we're gonNA talk about earnings eventually. But the context for that is apple had its biggest third quarter ever this month, their revenues went up eleven percent year over year, they're making obviously making billions of dollars in their services revenue, which is a lot of the narrative around the APP stores increasing that services line. Also went up. I think it was thirteen billion. So you're right. They're very big in their earnings the day after the hearing did nothing. To reduce that impression. I want to switch to Amazon a little bit McKenna. You really focused Amazon was basis first time up there. They came at him a lot about marketplace. How did you think that went I think it went pretty good. I. Think. John Paul specifically was just like killer her questions with breakout star. Yeah. She was just like killer and she's the representative for. SEATTLE. So this is where Amazon is right. So she just like killed it and. And I think there were a couple of instances in the documents and in questioning yesterday that really pulled important things out there was like testimony from one bookseller who was like, yeah. We just can't sell a category of books and we don't know why Amazon doesn't let us do that just like testimony like that or even when it comes to like acquisitions, the ring acquisition especially, I wrote about that today through the documents and how. They said, this is for market position. This is a for technology, your talent or anything. We just bought this and that's something that base said again, yesterday he was just very clear. It's like, yeah, we do buy things market position, which is like so insane just here like the richest person in the world. But like, yeah, we're buying market position. It's just what happens. That's another one I have mixed feelings right, and by the way, people should read McKenna story because those documents have just a very funny breakdown like the pros and cons of buying. Buying ring in many of the cons like what if this turns into nest, which if you're just the verge cast listeners like it's just like the Keyword Bingo, but it's fine to say, we're buying market position like this isn't the best product out there, but it's the category of video. doorbells is not huge, right? So to by the the market leader in video doorbells is maybe the most rational use of the money. What is the problem that you think the committee was trying to show an address sense of we're just going to market position. Pointing out, they can just do whatever they want and how casual it is, and there really isn't. It's really funny to read an email like that, and we could buy it or we could just copy it or are. We could just watch. You know that was one of the emails that base from someone. Those are just three options you know and it's like just pick and choose you know. Pointed out like a lot. Just that email itself really pointed out just how easy it is for them. They used a lot of that time history to talk about copycat behaviors and to talk about just like you know buying up competitors and it just seeing that all in one little e mail having to do with the ring was like really i. think it was really kind of I opening and especially like useful for the committee. So Amazon got hit a lot for the data collection side of it of copying competitors. bezos did not seem to have great answers there. Right. So that's the. The thing they got in trouble with this. There is that Wall Street. Journal article from like April where employees were literally like, yeah. We dip into data and we use that to guide our own private label products and everybody was like Whoa and Amazon basins. Yesterday said, well, we do have a policy that bans that but giant pointed out yesterday. It's like, okay. So what's your enforcement look like you can have the policy, but like if you don't enforce it, then it's like meaningless. And then yesterday I. Think Paul was like, can you give me a yes or no answer? Do you dip into data and he's like I can't I can't give you. Yes or no, and we're just like we're looking into it. The story had anonymous sources. So that isn't very helpful to us. You know what I mean. So that was one of the main things and that Wall Street Journal article and I think it's the same kind of examples in the committee's documents. They point out specific examples like car trunk, organizers of all things. It's like weird little products like Amazon's like this is a little hot. Maybe we should do that. So I, I think. I, think they made a good case yesterday. Yesterday on that. Yeah. I mean bezos brought up that Wall Street Journal, Article himself twice, and he was like, well, your policy against it. But I can't guarantee never happened. Then there is a strange just didn't come across clear I. Think I know what the committee was trying to get at their like US aggregate seller data when there's only three sellers and then only to sellers? Yes, I. Think what they're getting at is when you're down to the aggregate data of two companies, you heard effectively looking at individual data. What is the problem? They're like the I get what you're doing. You're just reducing the denominator to get to one, but like it, why is that particular problem? Right? Well, none of these. Dipping into individual seller data and looking at aggregate data. That's not a legal. There is no law. This is all voluntary of Amazon. So they have a voluntary policy where like we can't do individual seller data, but they say nothing against aggregate and aggregate what you're getting at eight. Here you is. Does the same thing if it's just like some goofy little product they. They bring up pop stock. It's all the time before pop tops in a moment. Right? There's only like one pop. So company like you know pop soggy, it was kind of an innovative product. It's like well, if there's only two of them and use the aggregate data, you you you have everything you need to know you know about that product line looking aggregate. If that's what you decide to qualify as do you as you're looking through the other Amazon documents and other stuff. So anything jump out at you is something the committee was trying to prove or get at. The questioning seemed very focused on. Like are you using the state at a copy products? Are you buying things? You shouldn't buy. There's one question which I did not understand why came up about DMC. Take downs on twitch and Jeff as just had this look of panic in his eyes. He's like I don't know man I bought Wedge because my kids want to. Do something like that was like the side show stuff, but the real focus here, it just seemed like it was definitely in the marketplace, right? Amazon, everyone came at Amazon for the marketplace. That's what everybody knows him as like they have all these little sides. They got rain. They got Alexa Alexa was one thing too. That was kind of interesting. It's like. Are you buying things like ring to put Alexa into and dislike expand your like Titan Ism as like an Internet Internet connected home. Thing and make that more closed off and walled gardening. That was one thing. But no, it was just focusing on how much power they have to kind of change. What happens in the marketplace to kind of decide what companies in what products are able to come up on the first page of results. You know that's also something that they dug into Google and in something that one of those like themes that kind of ties everything together. We should say they all spend a lot of time talking about counterfeit goods, and why is it Amazon removed? Fake stuff from the platform and how much is it profiting off of you know selling pick rolexes? Is it surprising? The whole foods didn't show up at all they're. Like that is a really massive thing. Amazon owns that. Is it moving into a huge new product category? I think whole foods is not an online marketplace, which was the title of the hearing, not that that restricted anybody from doing anything except that, one of the things Amazon says is we have lots of competition from offline marketplaces, right? Brought up kroger a lot I mean, this is the case he's point. They all made. It seem like they were beset at any moment. They could be crushed by the likes of stop and Shop Right? Like I think the point though was really on the. Digital. Experience Consumers have and like I, don't know Ho-. Foods fits. Into that narrative, especially, because it is itself not dominant like they bought it because you needed to grow in their. Good at that at my question for you on the Amazon stuff was when you think about, we talk about two thirty a lot right like you and I in particular spent a lot time to thirty, which regulates with the platform can do with content. There's not really an equivalent of two thirty for goods on store. Right like there's some case is out there saying like you're liable for what what happens on your online store page, but Amazon doesn't have that like second order of like Messi nece around it that twitter and facebook to with two thirty, I. Mean, it gets invoked a lot for marketplace's, but it's way messier. Well, I just wanted to like this question at counterfeits question about ranking the store like they are even more free than any twitter is to to sort tweets algorithm. Algorithm clear to modern like it just their store. Do you think that they're like that Algorithm transparency? Your wire things ranked. Did you catch a sense that that's where the regulation is GonNa go. So much of the conversation around Amazon really felt like it was individuals sellers being wronged for reasons of Amazon being unresponsive or stealing. It's data. So I don't know it didn't. It didn't seem like a really big focus of the hearing, but it is a huge deal. Yeah. The, digital marketplace frame of this, which is where we have talked to. Cellini. That's where he's going right like facebook and Google very digital. They have like they don't do physical goods. Really. Apple is the APP store. It's all digital goods. Amazon is the one where it's. Front to a lot of physical things, and that is the only place where I can see this regulation needing to make some sort of like major meaningful distinction in I. Didn't see it in the hearing, but I was curious of you caught a glimmer of it. I'm not positive that they have to make a huge distinction there like depending on what they come up with because. So much of this is about their companies and whatever product they produced. The issue is more or less whether or not they're being surveilled and unfairly by targeted and crushed by that data surveillance. All right. We have gone for forty minutes. We should take a quick break. I said I wasn't going to go by company and it happens. So we should come back and talk with facebook Ango. We'll be right back. This is advertiser content. When I say utopia what comes to mind. Birds Chirping lush natural beauty dialed up and vibrant technicolor. Is it within reach. Your world world. World. explained. You are an essential part of the perfect social body. Every Body Matt Place. Everybody happy now while the peacock original series, brave new world takes place in a scientific futuristic utopia. A concept is nothing new Sir Thomas more. I introduced the theory five hundred years ago. But we keep looking for that community identity stability of aldous Huxley's Utopia and not finding it Americans are the unhappiest they've been in decades, and we're increasingly lonely whereas in a utopia. Everyone belongs to everyone else. In nineteen forty-three, the psychologist Abraham. maslow's developed a theory of Utopia. One that allows total self determination in basic terms. maslow's theory says that in Utopia, we decide for ourselves, what we need and how we're GONNA get it in Huxley's Utopia citizens always get what they want and don't want what they can't get. Sounds. Pretty good. Right. Then why can't we make it happen? For a Utopian Society the work we might need to disband some of the things we hold dearest marriage government privacy individualism even family. See for yourself. If a Utopian world is as perfect as it seems watch brave new world now streaming only on peacock. These are really difficult crazy stressful times, and if you're trying to sort of cope, it could be helpful to find something that gets beyond like doom scrolling and like obsessive worried. But digs into what is really going on underneath the surface, and that's what the weeds is all about I. Matthew Yglesias. Weeds podcast here on the box meeting podcast network. This is podcast for people who really want to understand the policy debates and policy issues that shaping our world. We've seen now more than ever like how relevant policy is to our actual lives, but so much in the news isn't focused on really understanding and explaining detail way if that sounds good to you, join us for the weeds, every Tuesday and Friday to find out what's going on why matters and what we can do about it. You could download the weeds on apple spotify or wherever else you get your podcasts. Tracy. When it comes to facebook I turn to you. FACEBOOK is patience consumer of startups as what we've learned. Yeah. But you said something to me yesterday was interesting, which is everyone else's problems are forward looking and it feels like facebook's problems are actually in the past break for people explain what you mean. Yeah. So when Congress is looking at any trust with respect to these four companies for three of them, it's It's sort of about the marketplaces that their operating right now with facebook, the question is much more about should we have allowed it to buy serum? Should we have allowed it to buy WHATSAPP and most of the antitrust conversation that was around facebook yesterday was all about that. What did Mark Zuckerberg know about Instagram, and when did he know it? We wrote a story based on some documents that the house released yesterday. In which facebook has clearly identified instagram as a competitor. In at least some ways and wants to go after it and knock it off the table, and so that's kind of where the focuses their facebook and Burke did get a lot of other questions yesterday, but it tended to be much more about content moderation and things that don't have a lot to do with antitrust. So there was weird section where they asked the face. Face Research APP in the novel, Vpn? Any kind of got lost well, explain what happened and I'm curious reactions. Yeah. So facebook has a bunch of nifty tech tools to figure out what's trending which APPs or the kids using, and so that can essentially have an early warning system if it needs to consider acquiring something or more likely in these days, go out clone it. and. So Zuckerberg was asked about the way that the company uses these systems and if they are anti competitive I, think you know traditional antitrust law probably would not say copying an APP feature is anti competitive, but could lobby written in the future about it shirt I. Think the one that caught me was I mean, this is what I'm. McKenna's points from earlier is like one of the themes here is, are you so dominant that you can collect data that's unfair and then use that to crush or killer competitors, and definitely bought the Inaba VPN to do it. That's true. Now, when I've asked executives at facebook about this, what they'll say is they don't get surprised anymore. When you have three point, one billion people using your apps around the world. You know what links they're sharing, you know what they're talking about. And so you're not going to need some kind of specialized tool to know that WHATSAPP is really taking off. Right. So they would argue that, yes, these tools were useful to them, but you know at their scale, they know what's popular now, which doesn't really seem like addresses, the problem is reached. The fact that we're so big that we're all knowing is maybe not the defense that they sometimes presented as so here's what I didn't get. I thought, Zuckerberg I want to the instagram. What's about who's issues, but on the facebook research front, the data front, they him about this APP facebook research, which you were giving to teens. They were deploying with an enterprise certificate that story broke apple revoke the certificate, and all of facebook's internal APPs went dark, and this is a scandal story after story about it, they went on for two days. So I can I, don't recall that APP? Just how he you know, he remembers the day that all facebook's internal APPS went down and people couldn't go to the cafeteria. I would agree I found that answer. Extremely, ed? Persuasive. that. Do you think that was like actually strategic for him to be like, I, don't know and then come back later and correct the record I do remember when that happened I. Mean. I really don't know I mean also you know during a six hour hearing, it's also possible that you just you get flustered or you miss here something or or something because. Yeah. As as you say, I'm sure he remembers the day that apple turned off their internal APPS I mean. Honestly. Seems like an opportunity to talk about apple's market power, and the fact that you know a day of work canceled at facebook because apple got mad. But I think most of the CEO's didn't go into yesterday a wanted to pick fights with each other. It was kind of sad that they didn't. I was Kinda hoping that Tim Cook take a shot at soccer burger. Point that the other two APP platforms I was expecting it. It was there. It was. There was all there. So cellini ended and he ended the whole meeting with closing statement. He said, some of these companies didn't get broken out. They all need to get regulated in the off too much power that some of them I. don't these breaking up apple. What sort of break. Right like. The division get sent into the corner thing about what it's done. Right. Does should spin out the finder team I've always wanted to. A clean is always that they want to. They want the APP store to be separate from the IPHONE. Basically, that's the thing I always hear. Can't break I. Think you can write some strong regulations but not playing you're on store, right. But like Elizabeth Warren's point was it's cleaner if it's two companies, but it's still a gigantic remedy that I don't think there's a lot of like like consumer or public opinion is going to walk into an Apple Cup I think you'll radio at marketplace. It seems very clear that we says some of them she broken up he is talking about facebook. I have a twenty percent conference level. He might be talking with Google and Youtube as well. But if he's going to say some of the need to get broken up like it's facebook, did you hear anything yesterday that supported that conclusion or Saudi stocks I? MEAN HE I don't remember which Republican it was, but he was like the Obama FTC looked at this and they said it was minding love. Obama. Right. Like. Why would we go back in time to relook at I? Mean, there is a belief and I mean. Somebody who thinks there could be a lot of benefit in instagram and WHATSAPP being different companies from facebook. And the reason you ask. So many questions about that acquisition as you're making the case that it never should have been approved in the first place, and so now you need to remedy it. So that was actually like the entire thrust of the argument against facebook yesterday. I think, you could probably make just as good a case that Amazon after spin out aws, but lawmakers chose not to make that case. Yeah. I think that also gets into. Politics of the acquisition of the time. To his credit is like nobody knew instagram would actually be a success like we made it a success. It didn't happen by itself. I, don't know if the lawmakers. By award, these guys said, but I don't know that he actually made that case very persuasively. and. Who knows I mean? That's like anything could have happened. Right? Cram could've stayed independent and rapidly grown and overtaken facebook like that's something that could have happened. It could have kind settled into a middle zone like snapchat or twitter seems more likely to me although I think probably would have been bigger than those two but. You're never going to know I mean it is true that facebook gave Mike and Kevin it instagram enormous resources. A lot of the reasons why Mike and Kevin sold was because running tiny startup that's blowing up is absolutely exhausting Mike. Krieger. was dragging his laptop all around San. Francisco. Because the servers were melting at all times of the day whenever Justin Bieber. Posted like the site stopped working and they really we need help. Finding a person who can quickly fix this? So we don't have to like that is the reason that they were entertaining these offers and wanted to sell it. So that is also thing that happened. Do you think that that same kind of argument or approach can apply to what's up? What's up basically did not come up yesterday and all the focus on Instagram, but that's the other one, right? Yeah, and we know weirdly a lot less about that acquisition I. Think it's because people in America just have so much less love for what's APP generally. That, it's never seemed as important. What happened to WHATSAPP as what happens to instagram even though WHATSAPP, is used, you know way more, it probably has way more engagement even than instagram does so I don't know why that didn't come up as often. We know there was a competitive bidding war for that as well. Goule. Wanted it as well. You know Mark Zuckerberg made them an offer, they can't refuse. Do you think everyday Google's we should've spent more money on what's whatsapp like this could have been solved. Should have, but Google has been placed under an ancient curse that prevents them from ever making the right decision about any social product. So it was doomed never to happen. It's fun looking through the documents and watching them casually say they should buy facebook dot com. Yeah, that. Point. That is how they talk like the window into these executives just casually being like we should just this thing or maybe not, or we should just copied ourselves and kill it before it gets any traction like it's repeated over and over again last facebook question. This one is like harder to parse because I. There's a chance, it's October is just joking around but. But. He's in many of these emails. He's like the thing about startups, as you can always buy them, which I think the committee thinks is a smoking gun, right? Like facebook's entire plan is to buy the competition to get the data from wherever they get it to say, oh, man, this apps popping, we just buy it and kill it before it competes with us. I. Think he actually said at one point. That's a joke. Yes, he did and I believe that you know it was two thousand, twelve, right? He was probably still in his mid twenties. At that point, the company was a lot smaller like people were joking around like there's more loose talk when companies are younger and I do think. It was it was part of that. I think the more interesting question becomes. Let's say facebook is telling the truth about everything. Let's say they thought it was going to be a successful acquisition, but they never knew it was gonna big as it became today and they invested in it and it got super big. Okay. Well, now, it's as big as it is. Should they be allowed to keep? Keep it or should they be forced to spend it out and if you're GONNA force them to spin it out. What's the argument that you'RE GONNA. Make about why one question that I have a lot is clearly the referral they're gonNa make, and it seems like if you don't have some other reason, we've heard hints that there's some other reason, the FTC scrutinize this that will eventually be revealed. But what you're saying is the antitrust standard at the time, the Consumer Hartman stand, which is still our standard. Says, you have to prove prices will go up both products for free. You're screwed. Right? There's nothing to review because you're not gonNA prove prove that free products are gonNA get more expensive. I think it's pretty unfair if you change the standard and you go back in time and say you missed that standard. So I think there has to be something else there. Well, what was the standard by which at and T. was broken up? Right? Like presumably at and T. didn't used to be that big, and then it just got really big and then they broke it up at least. That's the thumbnail understanding I have of that break-up. Well, yeah. But then reformed itself. Right. But because of lax antitrust regulation, right? Like it wasn't a naturally occurring phenomenon that all those APPS got back to the other or was that just sort of like inattention to capitalism It's like in the seventies and eighties. This is Tim moves book the cursive bigness in the seventies and eighties Robert Bork I can't talk about Robert on this podcast. Are we doing this right now. Robert was very influential judge Appellate Judge Federal Appellate? Judge. And basically moved the antitrust law to the consumer harm standard as part of a movement called and economics. A whole thing Robert. Bork. Mostly famous because he was not appointed. He was nominated Supreme Court by Reagan but they leaked video tape rental history, and then he didn't get nominated and that is where the expression getting bork's comes from. This is all true Netflix's still has to abide by videotape data privacy act is a whole. This is all true when facebook and Netflix had some partners, Nansen? Partnership. To. Automatically share your net flicks, watch history to facebook. They're like pending the change of this law which we are working on Robert Bork. He haunts us all. I'm sorry, I can't believe this much. Yeah I. think that's just like the law changed in the in the seventies and eighties, the standard change. The conversation right now is a very much about changing it back months and months ago, pre pandemic, we had an economist from I. Think it was Nyu Thomas Philippon came on the show, and he was like look you have this natural ab test going on in the world where the European Union when it formed was like, how do we get an economy like America's? So, we'll just take their competition policies pretty good, and at the same time we changed consumer harm standard. So everything you're seeing the EU is basically our old competition antitrust standard in. You can see how active they are in everything. Here's a new consumer welfare standard. Whether you believe, this is actually a functional Ab test given. The state of both governments is up for debate, but that was his point I thought. It was spare can say.

Facebook Apple Amazon Mark Zuckerberg Google Tim Cook Instagram Jeff. Bezos Tim Co Twitter CEO Casey Brett Kevin Cellini Jeff Bezos Jim Jordan Sicily Mckenna
Malaysia court sentences ex-Prime Minister Najib Razak to serve up to 12 years in jail for crimes linked to 1MDB scandal

Morning Edition

02:12 min | 2 months ago

Malaysia court sentences ex-Prime Minister Najib Razak to serve up to 12 years in jail for crimes linked to 1MDB scandal

"Court has found former Prime Minister Najib Razak guilty. He's been sentenced to 12 years in prison. This was in his first corruption trial connected To the plundering of the so called one Mdb State Investment fund. This is part of one of the largest most far reaching financial scandals in history involved at least 10 countries, including the United States, Michael Sullivan reports. Things could have gone a lot better for Najeeb today, the judge finding him guilty on all seven counts of abuse of power, criminal breach of trust and three counts of money laundering in a trial widely seen as a test of Malaysia's commitment to the rule of law. I think it's a good day for Malaysia. Bridget Welsh is a research associate with the University of Nottingham. And an expert on Malaysian politics. Speaking from the capital, Kuala Lumpur, This decision actually re affirms that the rule of law is working. The judge was very careful and laying out his decision, and I think that there was set the sense that the decision move forward in a very uncertain political environment and the judiciary. At least this has ruled the day and with that there has been a sense of justice. Now Jeeves Fall from Grace has been swift just two years ago. Then Prime Minister. Najib's party was dealt a shocking defeat in the general election, in part because of the public's discussed with one MDB scandal, which saw billions siphoned off from the government investment fund into individual bank accounts, including prosecutors say Najib's The Jeep has maintained his innocence and said on Facebook last night that he was misled by others and that the charges against him are political in nature. It's going to be a long process of appeals and their two more paces, and it may be a number of years, but you know he will basically not be allowed to contest the election. During this process, and that's important, Brigitte Wolf says, and helps Malaysia's current prime minister Modena seen who heads a shaky coalition that includes Najib's party. She says Mujahideen will gain the most from today's rulings because he will be seen as putting the country before politics malicious restoring its reputation internationally, and it used to be in the top 10 countries for corruption. Now this makes it stand tall, and I think that is that really serves Malaysia well for NPR

Prime Minister Najib Razak Malaysia Prime Minister Brigitte Wolf Kuala Lumpur Michael Sullivan Najeeb United States Bridget Welsh University Of Nottingham Mujahideen Facebook Research Associate NPR
Najib Razak, Malaysia’s Former Prime Minister, Found Guilty in Graft Trial

BBC World Service

01:06 min | 2 months ago

Najib Razak, Malaysia’s Former Prime Minister, Found Guilty in Graft Trial

"Has been found guilty ofthe corruption in the first of three trial was linked to a multi $1,000,000,000 scandal at the state Investment Fund. One Mdb He was convicted on all charges, including abuse of power, money laundering and breach of trust. Southeast Asia correspondent is Jonathan, Jonathan, head head of of the the seven seven counts counts against against him. him. The The judge judge made made it it absolutely absolutely clear. clear. He He found found Mr Mr Najib's Najib's defense defense unconvincing unconvincing his his claim claim that that the the money that went into his account he thought it too come from a Saudi royal, the judge said. Well, why did you never even checked with the Saudi royal family? Three claim that he didn't have real authority over a pension fund that siphoned large amounts of money into this investment fund. All of these, the judge found on convincing all seven counts found guilty. A clear sign that Mr Najib's sway is no longer what it wass. Mr Najib's says he will appeal and his lawyers are seeking a delay to sentencing. Prosecutors allege around a $1,000,000,000 from the Malaysian State Fund made its way into his accounts. He'd insisted he was changed after 15 years of

Mr Mr Najib State Investment Fund Malaysian State Fund Jonathan
Goldman Sachs $3.9B settlement with Malaysia over 1MDB

WSJ What's News

00:49 sec | 2 months ago

Goldman Sachs $3.9B settlement with Malaysia over 1MDB

"Sachs has reached nearly four billion dollar settlement with the government of Malaysia for its role in the alleged theft of billions of dollars from a government investment fund known as one MD. Our reporter lives. Hoffman has more on one of the worst scandals in the bank's history. The allegations against Goldman are basically that the bank turned a blind eye to red flags with one MVP. And that it failed oversee two of its senior bankers who have been accused and in. In one case pled guilty of being part of the scheme. It's important to note that the settlement today does not resolve an investigation into Goldman by the US Department of Justice, which still wants its pound of flesh. We reported late last year that the DOJ was seeking a guilty plea from the bank or or a subsidiary and wanted to install someone to overhaul its compliance

Goldman DOJ Sachs Reporter Theft Malaysia Hoffman MVP
Goldman Sachs agree to $3.9B settlement with Malaysia over 1MDB scandal

WBBM Morning News

00:25 sec | 2 months ago

Goldman Sachs agree to $3.9B settlement with Malaysia over 1MDB scandal

"Bailey said. Goldman Sachs has agreed to a $3.9 billion settlement with the government over the multibillion dollar one MDB scandal. How much anticipated deep dive into and I addressed allegations against four of America's largest tech companies and recommendations on how to tame their market power could be released by late summer or early fall from the House of Representatives Judiciary Committee's anti trust

House Of Representatives Judic Goldman Sachs MDB Bailey America
Goldman Sachs $3.9B settlement with Malaysia over 1MDB

Wall Street Breakfast

00:29 sec | 2 months ago

Goldman Sachs $3.9B settlement with Malaysia over 1MDB

"Agreed to a three point nine billion dollar settlement with the Malaysian government over the multibillion dollar one MD. scandal backdrop Malaysian prosecutors filed charges in December two, thousand, eighteen against three Goldman units for misleading investors over bond sales, totaling six point five billion that the bank helped raise for the sovereign wealth fund. However Goldman has pleaded not guilty to the charges. Saying that certain members of government and one MD be lied to about how proceeds from the bond sales would be used.

Malaysian Government Goldman MD MD.
"malaysia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:35 min | 7 months ago

"malaysia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Malaysia has a new prime minister less than a week after the unexpected resignation of Mahajan Muhammad to plunge politics into turmoil he Dan Yasin was sworn in by Malaysia's constitutional monarch the DiMaggio who's ninety four described the appointments of Mr Mueller Dan as illegal and a betrayal Joe Biden has revived his campaign for the US presidency with a resounding victory in the democratic primary in South Carolina the former vice president for more than forty eight percent of the votes well ahead of his opponents his popularity with African Americans gave him the win he badly needed off the poor performances in the first three state ballots thousands of migrants are again making their way from Turkey to Greece hoping to into Europe there are times follows the Turkish president's announcement that he would allow the movement as his country cannot cope with new waves of Syrian refugees and to put pressure on the E. U. to do more to help on Friday more than two hundred mated to the Greek island of Lesbos Australia has recorded its first death from the Kobe nineteen virus the seventy eight year old man have been quarantined since being evacuated from Japan he was one of the passengers on the diamond princess cruise ship held in Yokohama Thailand and the United States have also registered their first fidelity's and several hundred elite athletes have completed the Tokyo marathon the event was closed to general competitors because of the outbreak of covered nineteen BBC news.

BBC Tokyo Yokohama Thailand Japan Australia E. U. president Europe Greece Turkey Malaysia vice president South Carolina US Joe Biden Mr Mueller Dan DiMaggio Dan Yasin Mahajan Muhammad
"malaysia" Discussed on Unexplained Mysteries

Unexplained Mysteries

03:29 min | 7 months ago

"malaysia" Discussed on Unexplained Mysteries

"The Chinese aircraft. Pictures of the crash. Show a good six feet of wing missing. Although this sounds like a terrible accident the Boeing company labeled the damage is minor in their service report on September. Twenty second two thousand twelve by October third two months after the crash. The plane's wing had been repaired and it was sent back to work accidents. Like this are rare for airlines. But all the safety reports that followed this accident showed the aircraft in perfect shape on February. Twenty third twenty fourteen one month before its historic flight. The plane used for M h three seventy was found to be in compliance with all applicable airworthiness directives. Officially all damages were repaired but the aircraft was just one piece of the puzzle. The crew also had a history as we mentioned in the teaser. The pilot was fifty six year old. Captains a hurry Ahmad Shah. He was a Malaysian citizen and had always dreamed of becoming a pilot. He joined Malaysia Airlines in nineteen eighty one as a cadet pilot and earned his commercial license in nineteen eighty three. He saw his fellow employees as family in valued their work both in the skies and on the ground in nineteen ninety one. He was promoted to captain and through his many trips. In and around Malaysia he racked up an impressive eighteen thousand three hundred sixty five hours of flying experience. He seemed to love his work and in an interview. His sister stated my brother loved life. Shaw was known for Cooking Food for community events in his neighborhood and made sure his wife and children were there when he could not attend but in the months approaching the flight something in shot changed. He became cold toward his family. And more reclusive he would spend hours at a time in his homemade flight simulator in his basement. A simulator. That was designed to function. Like the cockpit of a Boeing seven seven seven. During this time. Shah's daughter reported he was quote like a different person. We don't know why the sudden shift happened but we do know the result the day before m h three seventy took to the skies. Shaw's wife and three kids moved out of his house. What seemed to be a happy marriage ended in separation? But what's more chilling is the flight simulator hours. Before M H three seventy took to the sky. Some of the flight data was deleted from his simulator. Experts would later report that none of this flight data had malicious intentions but it raises concerns the co-pilot for wreak Abdul Hamad had just as complex backstory. Although much younger twenty seven years old homage shared Shaw's passion for flying. He joined Malaysia Airlines in two thousand seven and worked hard in his position. He was promoted to first officer five years later in two thousand twelve and flight. Three seventy was his final training flight before he would be a captain. Hamad was certainly the more puckish of the two having snuck a couple of girls into the cockpit on previous flights to show off but he had straightened out in the last few months and had plans to marry a fellow Malaysia Airlines pilot. Captain Dera Romley just like Shaw. Hamad was kind hearted and dedicated to his community..

Shaw Malaysia Airlines Ahmad Shah Abdul Hamad Malaysia Captain Dera Romley Boeing officer
"malaysia" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

The World Nomads Podcast

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"malaysia" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

"So it has really dive in and it's quite old close together. So one of my fair countries is Indonesia, but to get to all the different places in Indonesia, even have to take big, you know, big trips. Take a quick though long message, but in Malaysia you can solve get on upper hours and being this new location. I think is really cool. Have you ever done eighth coast of Malaysia as well? I haven't been much of these coast known. Fortunately, I do actually want to go back. Several current eight in Thailand. Run rash. Go back to lane. Inexperienced experienced did the Indian islands by haven't ventured down the holiest what I did that along time ago and. It's really different to the west coast. I mean, it's much less developed for tourism at it's really has a genuine authentic fail about it. This was twenty something years ago. Why did this but we were trying to catch a bus and at a whole Berea? We miss the bus. And so we thought we'd try and catch up with the bus and we hired a taxi there were four of his and we hired taxis attack is to the next town. And then we're gonna actually this is Bailer between the four of us. We manage to cover three hundred kilometers with three taxis. Where the we want to take this to one town drops off with another taxi. He'd take us to the other one. So it was quite an amazing experienced during that as well on the was, you know, a turtle colony there a total rescue operation was going there. I was really a very light back different feel from the west coast. Nothing wrong with the way, Scott decides really Fanta. Tassie, but it was too. It's really different field on the eighth this the law of there's a lot of places in Malaysia that if you just venture off the beaten path if you go off the normal path, you can quickly get into areas that have zero so of touristic feel in very local, which I which I think is awesome. Yep. And totally appeals Tom to the adventures independent traveler now tomorrow Tyson is a freelance journalist and photographer she's what around the world for newspapers magazines, and she's also written guidebooks. She tricked the head hunters trial in Malaysian Borneo, and was Cain tonight. We'll I was because she actually knows what she got her since of adventure from. I'm used to read my dad's National Geographic magazines art Tessie on on Orlando. So put the scene Coney Island. Charles. It wasn't really need coined the expression. It was a Russia mum style who leaves to in the great columns from all star on. Hey, coin that expression Ireland, France. So I am an island fall for his nine yards. Seemed to have this natural nighties and throats are jittery wild island, sir. O'neill had played tonight. The years when I finally got there. I not I love so the forest the amazing for Sona say is the idea as God will cute the brat travel guides in England and gay to be up on that. So I began to ride with travelled to Borneo which took off in about two thousand and. Seven. All right was assessed the decision and will go into force addition with getting off next year. So that's how I ventured into head hunting territory and keep going back to her in a big way et will know, Matt where all about off the beaten track. Can you've written an article tricking Borneo's head hunters trial force is it also bayton track. Tomorrow off the vision shack face days, given compared to the treadmill. Ryan VAT's are not as a name Redmond O'Hanlon famous English Rajoub who wrote into the heart of Gorgias in Asia's eight never going to be unfortunately savvy, one can get very start..

Malaysia Tyson Malaysian Borneo Coney Island Indonesia Thailand Redmond O'Hanlon tricking Berea Tassie Russia Charles Bailer Sona Matt Ryan VAT Scott O'neill Tessie Gorgias
"malaysia" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

The World Nomads Podcast

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"malaysia" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

"Hey. Hey. News for this week Kim that was sensational. I love that one tell he runs a travel blog adventure in you and shares with us what he loves about Malaysia. It has a mix of different different things to hear him nine. There's obviously the street which is really unique. And then you can try all the different foods and get a really so Streep field there. And then what we did is we crossed the entry from Nang all the way cross the site and went through United. So this is quickly jumped off the mainland. But then when we came back on the mainland we went to the Cameron highlands did a bunch of tracking around that. And backtracking experience was amazing this really good hikes around that area. And then again from that we went down and it went down KO. And then knows you got cities. And then we mentioned to some sort of small villages around that. So I think the mainland just it just has just has been everything again. I mean, like a lot of countries in Asia you've got the mountains where you can do some great hiking some great trails. But then you have you know, crazy city life as well said like anchor K, Al so just go a bit of everything for me. I really. He likes Penon has the street dot has the like. Like the street dots in Georgetown for those. Don't knowing you can walk around there and take photos with their and you the way all the games doctors. You can pose inside the those. That's pretty cool. That's like a common thing a lot people do and and yet it has the hills. You can go to nine hill. It has the speed dial. It has nice beaches or who's beaches invo too. So it has an and then if you do like in you can just take eight bus from an into the Cameron highlands. I'm not sure on the duration the best comment. Tom Harris is a good couple of hours. And then yeah, there's a few trails you can spend booth. Two free days that so hiking on the trail. I died aside CIT straight odd and Malaysia to get the two just don't seem to go together. I know I had no idea about it. When I suppose when because I'm so traveler, I go and then for the locals, and I just find experiences on the move. Ironically, we run a travel blog. My -partment does all she's the main content rights and research ideal in business side of it. I'm not I don't do a lot of research or I like to bencher in places connect people. And then asks when I got nine I knew it had a little bit of last seen. But when our local friend walks around, I was young extended. It's really cool. You can take lots of lots of photos where like I said, and then there's even automa- hand to come in. But there is a freidy feed the Newseum as well where you can go in and take those these cool. It's like prints on the wall. I remember taking a Spiderman Pocos there's this huge. All it's been like painted. And and if you lie on the wall and to poke and looks like climbing society side house was fighting fighting a man says like this funny stuff in but again culture of aids. It's just really cool. It's reading unique to think it's Penang that's kind of the hipster destination for Malaysia. And I think that's very large sort of artistic community there. I think that's why that's air. It's on it's on. It's a good mix as well. Georgetown is all sort of colonial look, and then, you know, you've got this new vibrant culture that. Yeah. So I think people are really drawn to it. Because if you like islands, you wanna be all day, and that's great because you can go to Brenton islands you can head that. And that's just stunning. Like some of the most clear water. I think to this day I've ever seen on beaches on everything you can go diving snorkeling, I did the best no plan in my life in in those islands where you can. Even if you are a great swimmer. You can just go snorkeling and see these giant giant turtles and Walton league swimmer them incredible. And you can just have this like really nice beach holiday Diovan, all this type of things then equipped boat onto the mainland, and then you could be hiking up in the Cameron highlands..

Cameron highlands Malaysia Brenton islands Georgetown Al Streep Kim Asia Tom Harris United Walton league Penang Penon eight bus
"malaysia" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

The World Nomads Podcast

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"malaysia" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

"Tropical day, Malaysia and Everyday's is Alexa day. So you can choose a lot. So the Chendo that it'd be my recommendation how these culinary war extended like to what lengths do you? Go to prove that something belongs to Malaysia. I'm not sure what legs you can go to prove that you own addition, you if a nation can or dish, I do know that, you know, it's resulted in demonstrations outside of embassies. There were reports of cici's being thrown at at a Malaysian embassy in Indonesia while it gets guess. They get serious guys. Seriously. What do we want Nazila MAC? When do we want to? Say what made you become an Australian then with this fabulous heritage. It's I think like all would stories it starts with a woman. I'm a met I met my shayla and. Decided to become a stranger. But yeah, really, I guess if you wanted to be corny philosophy. We we're good melting pot here as well multicultural society still maintain some of that, you know, Malaysian heritage in in your everyday life life. Now, looking Stephanie something I am mindful of especially with you know, I have a a five year old daughter. And I think it's important to share with us some some aspects of my cultural heritage, so I tried to speak the malay- SuperFood. I explain things to through food dishes recipes my mother made recipes at my bad makes were about to start her to start teaching took me with her sameness, which is you know, what typically in Borneo really touch on the hit hunting things. Yeah. I think a trip back to Warner is ju- sometime soon. I feel a family, man. Listen news in the low houses still farm the land and have it. No other way enough. Where they are. They not. Yes. Slice of the world. So yeah, it's definitely part of my cultural heritage said I'd like to share with Ashley this year. Beautiful defending one has spent any time in kale. They might may have come across you on stage. Back in the day. A beautiful singing voice thanksgiving. I would dearly love to put a link to no woman. No cry. We can't do that. You know, we can't. But he does have a gorgeous blues voice. And maybe he said one day he weren't might return to it once he's daughters older while that would have to be doing a live podcast. I think I think I always get him That one. one. Yeah. Now, what's troubled travel? News Kim, we've chatted in previous episodes about the impact of over tourism what that can do to destination. Not just the crowding into many people on it, you know, being a bit obvious, but the environmental damage some big conflicted by these reports that Bali that's an Indonesian, of course, New Zealand and Japan or rule imposing tourist taxes on visitors every those crucial when you're traveling all taught budget have utility, you spend all taxes don't you not spending traveling. But if you're gonna have to hand have a tenuous dollars to enter Bali thirty five Newseum, which is about twenty four years dollars to get into New Zealand and two thousand yen or about nine US dollars on departing Japan. What do you think good idea or bad doesn't like seriously non US stolas on top of what you've paid for the trip? I don't have a problem with. Yeah. I'd like to see it being going into specific projects. I'd like it to be parent. Yeah. Just going into general revenue. Have you visited the? Trevy fountain in Rome and to throw the three goings in the found. Not. It's a very popular thing to do amongst visits and a roundabout two million dollars with coins get tossed into the fountain every year two million. How many how much get stolen well Wanda unilat- in the if you jump in. You'll get pulled up other carabinieri straight away. If you jump into the fountain. All this money..

US Warner Malaysia Alexa cici Indonesia New Zealand shayla Rome Wanda unilat malay Borneo Stephanie Japan Ashley Bali Kim two million dollars twenty four years five year
"malaysia" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

The World Nomads Podcast

05:31 min | 1 year ago

"malaysia" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

"I should say Borneo in the house. Yes. We had conversations about your family background, and you come from a pretty fascinating part of Malaysia. Yeah. Look, my dad's people more people more people. Come from Borneo, and where we're from the tribe from from the jungles of Borneo and have you been back us bay back? Visit with family came from originally. Yes. So I I grew up there. From the ages one to maybe four or five. My dad verge sheltered to mind grow up in a traditional longhouse is essentially a very long house which has anyway from thirty up to two hundred and fifty families. Each have room, MS sort of long common corridor that connects a house, it's a pretty amazing structure. How did fifty families? Did you grow up in this from one to four and that's in that set up? No, my my bag Rupp in one of those houses by the time. I I was a young boy those sorts of houses were not people are moving away from villages, usually div feel comfortable saying as much as you like, but looks that you've your ancestors, there's a pretty interesting history. There isn't they here. So the looks at you binds were. Probably the most feared warrior tribe on the island of Borneo. Known head hunting and a little bit of cannibalism on the side. Just remember paper when he contacting world Mets content team. Nice. We'd isaac. Ironically, you on the most placid person that I've met owns. I'm that comes. Maybe would have been pushing the right buttons. There's this. There's probably a cage story that eat maybe taps into the the the warrior Jane in Maine that I could tell you Kim. But I yeah, I am a pretty night back guy. Let's move on. Because we wanted to give out warring of a different type right now, we're talking about food walls. It's a lot of contention in the region about who owns particular dishes. Yes. A food is a source of national pride and delight. But you know, as as you know, food is is it's never just about food. It's about that's about cultural identity about I think, particularly for Malaysians are when you're talking to someone from the western world, it's hard for them to place, Malaysia until you give them a kindness, and you describe it in relation to something else is do you know what I mean, you can go on just the peninsula north of Singapore. Or it's, you know, just south of Thailand. And I think we have a kind of. National identity crisis that manifests itself when it comes to comes agents are on food. So we very protective over what we think our dishes that that we cannot with when in essence as as Malaysian did not it doesn't really matter. Does it? Yes. It does little trikes. Just give me my lock saw him. You called him. Malaysian nuts out. Alexa, happy. I'm happy. Also, go on so so we've got lack so what what else have we got this? We've had I guess he's Roy's over very times Chevy crab dish. And have you guys have had shimmy crowds. I have I have his senior. And it's to my mind. I think it Singaporean more than legend. But a while back. I think Malaysia claim claimed it as Malaysia which upset the Singaporeans, I know between Indonesia Singapore, there was assimilation around origins, nasty goring, which is fried rice. If he spoke to food historian and tried to trace the origins of fried rice, you know, it will probably go back to China, and then more recently Singapore. I think tried to get you miss Govan listening for streets claiming that unites let's uniquely Singapore in of course, Malaysia upset you get. Streaked Thailand get St. Bernard, Indonesia. The most recent case is a sued war of away Chendo, which isn't shaved high desert comes down. Yes. It sounds like you know, what I'm talking on love Chinda. All right. Look for the uninitiated 'cause I'm just realized we've we've been speaking well United. It's Grabwood agenda is never been. We'd better talk about what laxer is just for people who don't night so Chendo is a bowl of shade ice it's topped with like you say fill bit of condensed milk some syrup. We can have red beans peanuts. Bit of corn. And this kind of stodgy grain things that look like little noodles or Bergens depending on. How old you are what five year old, man? Look, it ain't go that's about who produce..

Malaysia Singapore Borneo Kim Mets Chendo Thailand Alexa Rupp Indonesia Singapore Bergens Indonesia Jane Chevy Maine Govan Chinda China
"malaysia" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

The World Nomads Podcast

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"malaysia" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

"Dive spots plus much of Malaysia is undeveloped allying wildlife to roam freely. There are plenty of beaches. I can attest to that. I've been on some crackers up there and challenging hikes all of which might get a perfect to sedation for the adventurous traveler who was a willed med Kim. Yes, we've as you said you've only been to the of land Cowie as part of a visit to Thailand. But again, feel what happens when we do these podcasts back goes right on the list in this episode. We'll chat with tomorrow who trick body on his head hunters trial to the pinnacles which she describes as a forest of limestone shots that are around one hundred and forty seven foot tall or a forty five. Meters. Fellow will know Matt Isaac entry joins us. We're gonna hear about he's end sister link to those Borneo head hunters. That was I poisoned. Don't worry. We do it and the food was between Malaysia Singapore and Indonesia plus home from adventure new Texas away from Borneo and onto mainland Malaysia. I though Sam he went on a guarded Tyler my trick. Which is really like sounds like oh, God it, nah. Off the beaten track off the beaten track to the top of mount la- tongue Luton perhaps the highest peak of the mill basin in Malaysia Borneo. That was in Borneo on I sixteen day trip around the Malaysian Borneo. I found myself in the rain forest. Obey the now, maybe ten days in total. I went to Dunham valley thirst, which is closed Amalia basin, but more accessible than valley's motive a research center, where they it's more like comes of Asian research. An I followed scientists around. So have referring say got to do lots of fun hikes? Canopy walks away move. My time the jungle they then told me him going on a trip to me obeys in at the time. I had no idea 'cause wasn't really given much of a scheduling being Malaysia teams always changed at the last minute. If is stolen the not before in the roads, get flooded. Then access is a bit more limited and maybe a tree full data. They have to physically go chain stores, and it the move at the road, and when traveling two hours along these logging roads, but less than you want to be stranded somewhere. So I think my sold the kept it a bit of a secret. Just in case the plans fell through the first day, we drove along in full by fall along. These these logging roads, I was stuck in the back in open apple really, get your chance to see. But young. Oh and actually get to feeling and you can you can smell it. You can hear it. You can almost tasted because you've not close tradition. Driving along inadequately wrote for us there. There's some great pictures and the and the Rhine for forest looks very dense. Can you describe for somebody that has an experienced that won't want it smelt like what it felt like I would imagine quite humid the best way or condition try? It's like started in the steam. The heavy with the humidity. You have a sweet smell all the time from all the pumps and the flowers. With a constant noise. It's never soil. The best way. I can describe the term. It's it's it's a high pick sounded monogamous is constantly in the background which things from this, the colonists. You have the birds up in the trees, they're making different sounds as well some of whistling some of sorta Hunkin some my hooting noises whenever you walk in every step. It's like even more on the moon every steps a hard one because you constantly fighting the heat the humidity. Everything's thick everything dense. It's just so difficult to to to move. Walk in one kilometer in the jungle with probably like walk in ten kilometers. He's on the road somewhere with all that you've described you couldn't be further away from the UK. I mean, you don't have rainforests. You don't have that kind of level of humidity. Was that the first time you've found yourself in a jungle feeling feeling that bang expires to that. It was it was the first time I'd ever been able to view one owing to Borneo and then suddenly fame myself in in in some ways, thirty five degrees in the day one hundred percent humidity's. So it it was it was strange to start off..

Borneo Malaysia Malaysia Borneo Cowie Malaysia Singapore Thailand Amalia basin Matt Isaac Dunham valley Sam Texas Indonesia mount la Luton apple UK Tyler one hundred percent thirty five degrees forty seven foot
"malaysia" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"malaysia" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"Millions of tried to stitch together the pieces of this horrific story, but no one has been able to solve this mystery officially on March eighth, two thousand fourteen a commercial Boeing, seven, seven, seven was traveling from Kuala Lumpur international airport in Malaysia to Beijing, Capital International airport. In China, it was scheduled to be a direct flight lasting five hours and thirty four minutes, but that's not what happened less than one hour into its flight. M h three seventy disappeared from the skies, taking the lives of two hundred and twenty seven passengers and twelve crew members. It's hard to imagine in our age of GPS tracking satellites and global connection. That a plane could just vanish. But this is what was reported by the Malaysian government in twenty fourteen what followed was the most expensive search operation in airline history involving twenty six countries and hundreds of ships the investigation cost, the Malaysian government over one hundred fifty five million dollars during this episode. All three of us will investigate the minute by minute time line that forms the disappearance of and search for m h three seventy. We will present the official truth as we know it today highlighting the mysteries and auditees of the situation. Next week we will challenge that truth examining the conspiracy theories and mysteries the cloud, the details of March eighth twenty fourteen the greatest mystery in aviation history begins with the aircraft itself produced by the Boeing company. M h three seventy was the four hundred and fourth Boeing, seven, seven. Seven constructed at two hundred and forty two point four feet in length and weighing over seven hundred seventy thousand pounds. This plane was massive. In fact, this model is the largest twin jet plane flying today sporting to massive Rolls Royce. Trent eight ninety two engines each with a force of four hundred fifteen Killa Newton's Boeing, seven, seven seven's have approximately one..

Boeing Malaysian government Capital International airport Kuala Lumpur China Beijing Killa Newton Malaysia Trent official one hundred fifty five million seven hundred seventy thousand thirty four minutes five hours four feet one hour
"malaysia" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"malaysia" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Malaysia live forever no needs your georgia bulldogs eased chambord doug burgum bear here every eugene football game and the best buldana on b o ge the dogs the new suddenness 1205 live team coverage of traffic and weather joel nelson is in the wsb 24hour traffic center all lanes reopen 20 eastbound past flat shoals marillier crash there but you may know some minor delays leftover two right lanes are blocked by road work on the west side 285 northbound at pieces ferry back past south cub drive the exit to silvan road from both teams collapsed today use the cleveland avenue exit instead a right lane block and douglas county i 20 westbound from exit thirty seven fairburn road exit thirty four bill aarp on 400 a left lane blocked in both directions between exit fourteen and fifteen by some roadwork there jill nelson gbi us jeff selection is just john accurate and dependable weather forecast overcast in the rue the day teenagers will slowly climb through the 40s and will top out near fifty one degrees we'll have some isolated showers and more wide swathes drizzle through the day we'll continue with the drizzle and low clouds overnight tonight and into monday morning 44 abduct but then clearing becoming more and a high of six jordan on tuesday sunny low forty four high sixty three eva's forty six degrees on peachtree street with news on the hour mary ellen hopkins twenty four hour news weather and traffic station news 955 and am 750 wsb depend on it juice 955 at am 750 us gdp is is atlanta food theaters aim absorbs us zabaleta living and.

Malaysia jordan eva mary ellen hopkins georgia joel nelson douglas county john atlanta fifty one degrees forty six degrees twenty four hour 24hour
"malaysia" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

Power 105.1 FM

03:47 min | 3 years ago

"malaysia" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

"Sure go site in waco maimai fake girl beya thing can promised that promise alliances his tourism fairest ever does when it votes remember that sound a whose is enjoying visit name is a serious drain then daniel just is that it how is it lucky less my lucky full you less well this two that's not fully that was brutal mars morning everybody is dj envy ainsley ye shall amine guy we are the breakfast club ot genesis into bilden shelman loan of one of them twin brother mark that's malingco masih go through the miracle the sovereign what he ran with it in the law what happens in malaysia on what's exactly muslim emergency says one israeli and drink some thirty eight right nevertheless already i like this play of well living alive we're got to live by guiseley do young boy girl with none anomalies we just arm we cooling coil coup for is never were of out of for those of us odeon learned who would wanted that i'll noteworthy leads minds will leak okay this week is awkward law oh boy oh my brother yet for the station that's like lifing status that is true just because he would just bring anyway in hot suffer was he ran with it what happens in malaysia on wednesday the shot emergency says wonderfully some thirty eight right well if there were lender at all i like this play of well living ally were we're going to live by guiseley do young boy girl with not anomalous this we just we coolum norman kumcu for is never were of out of for those of us odiele who booed wanted that i'll noteworthy leads minds leaker okay this week is offering law another big oil voa oh my brother yet the distaste that's like wifey status that is.

malaysia daniel
"malaysia" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

The World of Phil Hendrie

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"malaysia" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

"Berry in the nays malaysia airlines malaysia are emily airline eighty three kalaheo goal on borrowing on a her yarn the search to go on for another year is that right in that region i'm reading it the best way i can given the fact that i don't have the proper glycemic one of these days subtle give you right over the store and you'll get blesses over to the door we them picking them up over 50 you could do worse than some readers eight doctor henry i got it under control let him read that okay fine go ahead at the end of our gird iin be ocoee an port they missing molly what does that mean in the andy on an ocoee and that's the indian ocean for god's sake all all in program molly tree that mark malaysia airlines i didn't pay airline hike in malaysia malaysia okay now airlines thank you apply plan a go on poor i'd not her her jahor on march likly click quickly crack most likely over i hadn't gotten nedcorp poor giving us moral caselaw launcer the search hold on a second case pediatric filter i wanted to be under i want to be undertaken in what i would i be fame on don't be racist for god's sake i not being like i said i want to ask you said you want to understand and i want to understand all right i'll take be searching for the plane for another year your comment i get get burned daylight near the day eight when you want to earn pocket okay we're brindisi life all what are you what are you get to see but this about what about the story reading i wear think guilty along an oscar lawyer australia's.

Berry australia malaysia molly brindisi
"malaysia" Discussed on Serious Inquiries Only

Serious Inquiries Only

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"malaysia" Discussed on Serious Inquiries Only

"Maybe family members or people that they know that are that worked for the religious police or are entrenched in the government so it wouldn't surprise me if they've been investigated like what the group has been trying to do is he a very low profile for now because recently what happened was the same group that wrote about us our age in the end the meeting they are trying to go into people's facebook age fine as many personal details that they can find just post it so i have an article were by name is mention but i could tell them all the information that they got was directly from my facebook page so how they went in and they wrote where i worked in malaysia the road by ethnicity by background and they took my post and they and the translated by coast and what i what i said that that i'm so i'm trying to suppress government control of people's religion in malaysia and tried to spin it in a way to make it look like weird these are kind of rebellious political activists right so they view you because you're a visitor there right yeah so they view eu as even though you're not under the legal requirements of you know milady people or anybody who is like a registered muslim there would even though you're not under those requirements is it a sort of xenophobic thing of look at these outsiders you know stirring up religious rebellion kinda thing they care is less about xenophobia and war about fear of their religion being challenged okay.

malaysia facebook
"malaysia" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

03:17 min | 3 years ago

"malaysia" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"It is yes any now resume linnea as a matter of eight on a moment my name is land on one on my mind is on the right now so our says and you yes and takes to me found fast gasoline on that is tariffs the mainland malaysia malaysia to my mi hashemi delay tayan when i leave us dow's china's rare loss on air bala just airtel jan does car sales she said zhu surgery on our says congratulations so so i'm a firm nongerman underground nor syndrome but i am sorry amega when you're in malaysia we know there we're not so much an army john everything consumer governmental i quit is says some car sales she said zone andrea.

linnea china car sales malaysia andrea dow airtel