4 Burst results for "Malaria Ding"

"malaria ding" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:47 min | 2 months ago

"malaria ding" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

"This week we've been talking with Bill Gates copy of the bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and is trying to eradicate polio and malaria globally gates created a billion dollar climate investment fund. He has funded multiple factories to find a vaccine for Covid nineteen and the foundation is matchmaking companies around the world to get that vaccine distributed. Gate. Doesn't the position to do all of this because he's one of the world's richest people because he co-founded Microsoft and to be honest that's a little weird. So in part three here I asked Bill Gates how his philanthropy ends up doing. So much of the work of government he said some of it is mission creep take malaria. When we started out, we mostly thought that we would just increase the arm de because. You know for malaria, the people who die which at that time was over a million children a year they don't have enough money to have a voice in the marketplace. So there was no. Science, or willingness to fund on their behalf in a capitalistic system. And there was a little bit of foreign aid but much. So we came in, is the the biggest player in Malaria Ding. At first, I thought our role would just be to create the drugs and the nats. And that we weren't mean to fund the actual delivery side. Because once we have the tools. The uptake would be there in fact, it turned out that. It was much harder to. Have things delivered than we expected. So we were CO founder the Global Fund. Goes after three diseases HIV to Berkeley similar, and we were a founder of this Kavi organization that buys vaccines for the poor countries at the very lowest prices, and so those two institutions which we did in our first two years of existence to learn about delivery so far actually they've probably been the most impactful thing we've done. The R. D. promises to give us some amazing things including the tools that will help ascent malaria and. Make incredible progress on issues but the delivery side I underestimated how hard it was and how we would have to partner up to figure out what kind of axiom would be acceptable. What kind of medical intervention you know even how do you tell people that they really need to sleep under that bed net and that feeds back to the design of the product?.

CO founder Bill Gates malaria Melinda Gates Foundation Malaria Ding Global Fund Microsoft polio nats partner Berkeley
"malaria ding" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:41 min | 2 months ago

"malaria ding" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

"This week we've been talking with Bill Gates copy of the bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and is trying to eradicate polio and malaria globally gates created a billion dollar climate investment fund. . He has funded multiple factories to find a vaccine for Covid nineteen and the foundation is matchmaking companies around the world to get that vaccine distributed. . Gate. . Doesn't the position to do all of this because he's one of the world's richest people because he co-founded Microsoft and to be honest that's a little weird. . So in part three here I asked Bill Gates how his philanthropy ends up doing. . So much of the work of government he said some of it is mission creep take malaria. . When we started out, , we mostly thought that we would just increase the arm de because. . You know for malaria, , the people who die which at that time was over a million children a year they don't have enough money to have a voice in the marketplace. . So there was no. . Science, , or willingness to fund on their behalf in a capitalistic system. . And there was a little bit of foreign aid but much. . So we came in, , is the the biggest player in Malaria Ding. . At first, , I thought our role would just be to create the drugs and the nats. . And that we weren't mean to fund the actual delivery side. . Because once we have the tools. . The uptake would be there in fact, it , turned out that. . It was much harder to. . Have things delivered than we expected. . So we were CO founder the Global Fund. . Goes after three diseases HIV to Berkeley similar, , and we were a founder of this Kavi organization that buys vaccines for the poor countries at the very lowest prices, , and so those two institutions which we did in our first two years of existence to learn about delivery so far actually they've probably been the most impactful thing we've done. . The R. D. promises to give us some amazing things including the tools that will help ascent malaria and. . Make incredible progress on issues but the delivery side I underestimated how hard it was and how we would have to partner up to figure out what kind of axiom would be acceptable. What . kind of medical intervention you know even how do you tell people that they really need to sleep under that bed net and that feeds back to the design of the product? ? Because you're a partner in the delivering, , you see what's not working and we thought we could get women to take a daily pill. . For, , HIV prevention. . And the uptake on that very very low, , and so now we're working on something that you'd only have to take either a shot or a pill every ninety days because it looks like that would get uptake, , but you're driven by the limitations of of uptake, , and so that's why we've got to be deeply involved not just in rnd, , but also the delivery side at what point do your priorities, , the priorities of the foundation end up becoming the priorities for the world, , and you've described a sort of a series of unintended consequences that pull you in deeper and deeper to. . Ultimately, , the work of governments in no case should countries depend on our philanthropy or any other philanthropy to solve a basic need? ? We can accelerate the RND and so yes, , by spending money on malaria supposed to. . Some. . Fancy. . Vacation or something. . Yes. . The world's resources are going more into malaria now than they did before and those million deaths are now down four, , hundred thousand and so yes our values to change what gets funded in this economy and malaria just. . was in my view grossly underfunded. . You said it was either like it could be either malaria or a luxury. Good. . . But there's like a lot in between there and do you ever think maybe I. . Should Turn My Lens on disinformation or wealth inequality or racism in the United States. . Well we spend. . We have two big things. . We do one of inequity in the US, , which is lot about education, , and then there's global health I do believe you really have to focus and become expert. . We're basically saving a life for less than a thousand dollars per life saved. . These miraculous interventions in other fields. . People have brackets interventions through the giving pledge. . Make sure lots of plant perceived these high impact things some problems. . Government's spending way more than plant. . Can haven't been able to solve. . So mostly flat becomes up with pilots pilots. . Of a mentoring program pilots of. . How schools could organize a bit differently. . So we do a Lotta that but once we've committed to Milorad occasion we're not going to abandon that. . Sadly, , there's very few fields where you can save millions of lives for small sums of money. . Bill Gates is Co Chair of the Gates Foundation. .

CO founder Bill Gates malaria Melinda Gates Foundation Malaria Ding Global Fund Microsoft polio nats partner Berkeley
How the Gates Foundations values shape the world

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:41 min | 2 months ago

How the Gates Foundations values shape the world

"This week we've been talking with Bill Gates copy of the bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and is trying to eradicate polio and malaria globally gates created a billion dollar climate investment fund. He has funded multiple factories to find a vaccine for Covid nineteen and the foundation is matchmaking companies around the world to get that vaccine distributed. Gate. Doesn't the position to do all of this because he's one of the world's richest people because he co-founded Microsoft and to be honest that's a little weird. So in part three here I asked Bill Gates how his philanthropy ends up doing. So much of the work of government he said some of it is mission creep take malaria. When we started out, we mostly thought that we would just increase the arm de because. You know for malaria, the people who die which at that time was over a million children a year they don't have enough money to have a voice in the marketplace. So there was no. Science, or willingness to fund on their behalf in a capitalistic system. And there was a little bit of foreign aid but much. So we came in, is the the biggest player in Malaria Ding. At first, I thought our role would just be to create the drugs and the nats. And that we weren't mean to fund the actual delivery side. Because once we have the tools. The uptake would be there in fact, it turned out that. It was much harder to. Have things delivered than we expected. So we were CO founder the Global Fund. Goes after three diseases HIV to Berkeley similar, and we were a founder of this Kavi organization that buys vaccines for the poor countries at the very lowest prices, and so those two institutions which we did in our first two years of existence to learn about delivery so far actually they've probably been the most impactful thing we've done. The R. D. promises to give us some amazing things including the tools that will help ascent malaria and. Make incredible progress on issues but the delivery side I underestimated how hard it was and how we would have to partner up to figure out what kind of axiom would be acceptable. What kind of medical intervention you know even how do you tell people that they really need to sleep under that bed net and that feeds back to the design of the product? Because you're a partner in the delivering, you see what's not working and we thought we could get women to take a daily pill. For, HIV prevention. And the uptake on that very very low, and so now we're working on something that you'd only have to take either a shot or a pill every ninety days because it looks like that would get uptake, but you're driven by the limitations of of uptake, and so that's why we've got to be deeply involved not just in rnd, but also the delivery side at what point do your priorities, the priorities of the foundation end up becoming the priorities for the world, and you've described a sort of a series of unintended consequences that pull you in deeper and deeper to. Ultimately, the work of governments in no case should countries depend on our philanthropy or any other philanthropy to solve a basic need? We can accelerate the RND and so yes, by spending money on malaria supposed to. Some. Fancy. Vacation or something. Yes. The world's resources are going more into malaria now than they did before and those million deaths are now down four, hundred thousand and so yes our values to change what gets funded in this economy and malaria just. was in my view grossly underfunded. You said it was either like it could be either malaria or a luxury. Good. But there's like a lot in between there and do you ever think maybe I. Should Turn My Lens on disinformation or wealth inequality or racism in the United States. Well we spend. We have two big things. We do one of inequity in the US, which is lot about education, and then there's global health I do believe you really have to focus and become expert. We're basically saving a life for less than a thousand dollars per life saved. These miraculous interventions in other fields. People have brackets interventions through the giving pledge. Make sure lots of plant perceived these high impact things some problems. Government's spending way more than plant. Can haven't been able to solve. So mostly flat becomes up with pilots pilots. Of a mentoring program pilots of. How schools could organize a bit differently. So we do a Lotta that but once we've committed to Milorad occasion we're not going to abandon that. Sadly, there's very few fields where you can save millions of lives for small sums of money. Bill Gates is Co Chair of the Gates Foundation.

Malaria Bill Gates Co Founder Melinda Gates Foundation Malaria Ding Gates Foundation Microsoft Global Fund Polio United States Partner Nats Milorad HIV Berkeley Co Chair
"malaria ding" Discussed on Dope Labs

Dope Labs

09:09 min | 1 year ago

"malaria ding" Discussed on Dope Labs

"So before we get into mosquitoes and mosquito born illnesses. Let's introduce what we're talking about in our next lab lab fourteen is all about the art of the CON. We're going to dive into the neurobiology behind nine being conned. Have you been scammed. Are you out here scamming. Do you have a con story that we need to hear call us. We want to hear it. I know y'all are going to be saying all the crazy things the following them on instagram. I know some of them are here Connie. Absolutely you can reach us at two zero two five six seven seven zero two eight. Let's get into it so there's a reason that we call the mosquito. The Apex Predator because nearly seven hundred million people get mosquito borne illnesses each year and out out of those seven hundred million over one million results in debt. That's a lot of people some of the most common mosquito borne illnesses in the US malaria ding gay in West now so we know that mosquitoes does can transmit disease organisms that transmit disease or call victors so we call the vector an insect or a tick that can actively transmit a pathogen so I I do identify as a vector biologist so you mentioned malaria is one of the diseases transmitted by mosquitoes but there are other diseases to yeah so let's start with Arbil viruses so an hour viruses. Any virus is transmitted by an arthropod vector. Somebody decided to call them. Arba viruses as a kind of conjunction end of arthropods born viruses that we condensed the word to Arbow viruses not thinking about the people who work on trees at all the most prominent examples of Ann Arbor virus are then gay chicken Gunja West Nile and Zeka. We have these. Arthur pod borne virus is transmitted by really specific types of mosquitoes and when they get into a person's body tend to make us really really sick so what are some of the symptoms you could get something called dengue fever ver- where you have a really debilitating fever sometimes like deep pain in your eyes terrible headache sometimes a rash across the body. He is in a different group but can equally make you really really sick. There's often a rash associated with getting chicken Ganja and terrible arthritis service so Japan pain in the joints that often lasts and lingers for months so mosquitoes can transmit arbor viruses but there are also other other mosquito borne illnesses that aren't linked to viruses like malaria so there's an important distinction to be made there right. Malaria is not the same as Dan gay or chicken Gunja or Zeka. Malaria is caused by another organism yeah pathogen plasmodium falciparum that sounds like some out of Harry Potter when we had malaria and we could still have malaria we have mosquitoes across the United States that are what we would call competent vectors so if somebody were infected with malaria parasites there are anopheles mosquitoes around in Wisconsin and in DC see ya that that could get infected with those parasites and transmit them to other people but is not as much of a threat if we don't have people that already have malaria or already have dim gay and sounds just like the vaccines yes. This is very similar to hurt immunity which in this scenario would play out as follows if you lower the pool of people who already have malaria or ding gay or some other parasite eight transmitted by mosquitoes then when these mosquitoes that are available in those regions go to feed they don't pick up the parasite and I I think Dr Bartolomeo also said that some mosquitoes don't have all the things in them necessary to be able to transmit the disease right even when they have a parasite or virus. They aren't able to pass it on. It's a really important point to make that there are thirty six hundred different kinds of mosquito but in any one of the groups of mosquitoes they're in maybe ten percent of them are actually going to be able to transmit a passage in so we just outlined a scenario for illustrative creative purposes but it's way more complex than just one mosquito biting you go into the next person biting them and just spreading. West Nile virus everywhere they go right. It's the process that takes a lot of time at sort of intimate interactions between the virus and all of the spaces it encounters inside the mosquito and what what we found is there a lot of mosquitoes that put up walls or berry hearst to pathogens so that they may get in with a blood but they never get any further and there are just certain types of mosquitoes that are more likely to transmit the disease like certain species of mosquito transmits more parasites than others others and so we have mosquitoes like eighties Egypt I for example and eighties album pickus. They really are what we call answer fulfilling so they've really liked to feed on people and then they're also it turns out physiologically really compatible with pathogens and so can transmit transmit a lot of different kinds of viruses so when we take all of this together there's a really important take away that we're talking about all of the variables that have have to be just right in order for you to have the spread or transmission of mosquito borne illness so you need first competent vector which is a mosquito of a certain species he's it then has to take up the the parasite or virus and then even once it takes up the parasite or virus the life cycle of the parasite or virus. It's right to replicate and be a high enough load and then there's the transmission of biting someone and it actually transmitting enough parasite or virus the cause that person to be sick right so if you're thinking of this like Ven Diagram. There's a lot of bubbles that gotta overlap in order for this thing to hit but we're could you go if you didn't didn't. WanNa be bitten at all what Dr by that I would have to go to the artistic will mate. I think the only parts so the world where there aren't mosquitoes or the extreme polls so we're all kind of faced with issues of mosquitos mosquito borne disease wherever we are on on the planet but there is a difference in the types of mosquitoes that are around depending on where you are like even within the US some mosquitoes are really tropical or subtropical tropical species that cannot stand like Wisconsin winter for example and then there are mosquitos that can persist even through the polar vortex for tax that we experienced this last winter in Wisconsin in the southern states. It's Zeka and chicken Gunja that are more prevalent in places like Florida for example There's a there's a real threat because of the mosquitoes that are there that people can be infected by things like Dang Gay and Zeka and in West Nile is mostly in high plain states so in the Midwest in places where this one type of mosquito thrives. S- mosquito called Culex Tar Saleh's which is a mosquito excuse that lives in really well and irrigation ditches so you can imagine than that anyplace. That's kind of air it and needs a lot of water for crops is is going to be a place for that mosquito will thrive and it's a particularly good vector or transmitter of West Nile virus. I think we've hit a lot of really good points here. We've learned so much about just mosquitoes in general I did not know that about the female mosquito me either and we learned about like how mosquito species determines a lot of different things disease transmission. What kind of bludger even going to feed on right but now I think what's important. I find out is how do we get these mosquitoes to not bite us yet. How do we keep these transmission rates down. Doc Bartholomew says that the focus right now is on what they call call vector control one approach use chemicals to kill the insect and their larva just yesterday. I was out in the field and Milwaukee with a team of people that that work in in our in our center here at U. W. and we were trying to control the mosquitoes that transmit West Nile virus so we were throwing larvicides so things that kill the mosquito Gita larvae down into the into the storm drains yeah we had to delay our interview a day because she was out there beating the feet beating the streets slither. Roosevelt feet foot pavement. It doesn't matter she was out she was working. She was on the ground doing some vector control and another approach which feels a little counter intuitive to actually protect the mosquito in this case. You're protecting the mosquito from Arbor viruses. There's some really exciting technology where we it can release mosquitoes that are infected with a bacterium called will lock you up and when those mosquitoes have that bacteria in their bodies. They're more resistant to virus infection. The type of actor control is using crisper which we've mentioned in another episode in the.

malaria United States West Nile Wisconsin Gunja West Nile Zeka Ann Arbor Connie Arthur pod Dan gay Ven Diagram Japan Dr Bartolomeo Midwest Egypt Milwaukee Doc Bartholomew Roosevelt Harry Potter