35 Burst results for "Malaria"

Where Did This Animosity to Safe, Established Drugs Come From?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:53 min | 2 months ago

Where Did This Animosity to Safe, Established Drugs Come From?

"Where did this animosity to save established drugs vice the vaccines come from Paul? Yeah, it's a great question, Sebastian. And I think we ought to divide it into two categories. One category would be brand new Therapeutics and the second category would be, as you mentioned, hydroxychloroquine, which has been around to treat malaria, I think it is. For 5 or 6 decades. And when the FDA evaluates a therapeutic for emergency use, basically the rules are with all of the scientific evidence that's available, did the benefits outweigh the risks. And what we knew about hydroxychloroquine was there's virtually no risks. I mean, people take it for decades quite honestly. And we gave it, we gave hydroxychloroquine to our soldiers in Vietnam. So this is how long we've been doing it as Americans in Africa. At the beginning, we didn't know about it. And none of us lame and knew about COVID. So what did we do? We had to do some research, especially those that had a media platform. And then early on, I looked at the map of world infections, and I saw this fascinating thing. I saw that Africa is basically devoid of coronavirus. And I thought, why is that? And then I find out what hydroxychloroquine the antimalarial drug is sold without prescription over the counter in Africa, which means people have been taking for decades, which probably is the reason that hydroxychloroquine protected Africa from the worst consequences. So keep explaining where this resistance came from. Sebastian, I think it's about control at some level. And I don't understand the hydroxychloroquine argument because as we said, even if it weren't effective, which I don't think anyone has proven that's the case. It certainly wasn't harmful. So what do we have to lose if people are

Sebastian Africa Malaria FDA Paul Vietnam
Noah Was a Conspiracy Theorist Until It Rained. Dr. Vladimir Zelenko a Conspiracy Realist

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:57 min | 5 months ago

Noah Was a Conspiracy Theorist Until It Rained. Dr. Vladimir Zelenko a Conspiracy Realist

"And so doctor talk a little bit about how you've had this correct hypothesis from nearly the very beginning. And you've now seen the vaccine and some of its failures. You've seen all of this kind of unfold. How are you processing this? It must be incredibly frustrating for you, especially as you see what's happening in Israel here in the United States because as you say you've treated 7000 patients. It's incredibly liberating for me. I have to tell you that becoming aware of reality, even if it's unpleasant, but at least living in reality has therapeutic value. And not living in a lie. So I reverse engineered the worst crime in human history. And I've put the pieces together and I see the puzzle. I see the big picture. And I'm not a conspiracy theorist. I'm a conspiracy realist. There's a joke, right? No, in the Bible, was a conspiracy theorist until the grand, right? That it wasn't the theory. I'm going to use that. Wait, feel free. So it began when Cuomo murdered 20,000 nursing home residents in the state of New York. Blocked access, he issued an executive order where my patients can't get hydroxychloroquine. And it was my patients because I was the only one in the state doing it. Let me ask you a question. A drug that was used over a billion times over 65 years is FDA approved for lupus rheumatoid arthritis malaria malaria prophylaxis is given to nursing mothers is giving to pregnant women given to children. Some people live on it. Their whole lives. And all of a sudden, it's deemed dangerous, but it's all dangerous for COVID patients. It's not dangerous to pregnant women or taking it to a room to arthritis. And so he issues an order where patients can get it. Well, that really made sense to me. So I improvised I did research again. I innovated. I found the substitute for hydroxychloroquine. On the NIH server, it's funny. And if something called quercetin, and I didn't even know what it was, I just Googled it. And I see that it's over the counter. I said, oh my God, I just discovered the cure to tyranny. Because I could say listen, Charlie, screw the doctor and there are two reasons why people die from COVID. Is the moronic doctor that delays treatment? And the tyrannical government that people live under that blocks access to lifesaving medication. Besides that, there's really no reason to die from COVID. That's what the evidence shows. So all of a sudden, now I can just circle then all the regulation and just say go to the right and shop buy some corset and vitamin C, D and zinc, take it in the right way and you'll be okay. And that's incredibly liberating. I have to say, because people could reintegrate back into society and they could see the people they loved. They don't have to be isolated. Then I have to live in

Lupus Rheumatoid Arthritis Mal Covid Cuomo Israel United States FDA New York Arthritis NIH Charlie
"malaria" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

02:15 min | 6 months ago

"malaria" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Go with asking. Go with arsenic. And it's a good choice. The answer has indeed be arsenic trioxide. Napoleon is famously believed to have been poisoned by his wallpaper that had been painted with shields green, arsenic is found in surviving samples of his hair, but even if there wasn't enough in the paint to kill Napoleon, there was enough in his hair to cause illness. So at the end of round two, that's one point to seraphina and John, and two points to NASA and Hugh. So it's still all to play for. Round three in our being green quiz is it ain't easy being green. Came at the frog performed the hit song being green in 1970 for Sesame Street. As Kermit is a frog, this round is about frogs. That is not at all tenuous. That's when I really, really. This is just because I really like frogs, so I wanted to do a job. So with this being green round on frogs, question one to sarafina and John. 40% of amphibian species are under threat. And a lot of that is because of a deadly frog fungus. This initially spread really quickly as frogs were being shipped around the world. What were they being used for? Was it a as a mosquito control agent? Was it B testing the safety of drinking water or was it C pregnancy tests? Here I see you know it, but this is not for you to try and keep a poker face. We call a friend. Annoyingly, three stories down is the guy who works on frog fungus is and would have the answer. So if you gave me 30 minutes to run down to Matt's office, I would have the answer. Has he ever mentioned to you at lunchtime? Why frogs were such useful animals and it's not pregnancy tests? What were the other two? We've got as a mosquito control agent testing the safety of drinking water and pregnancy tests. I think it's BRC. Simply according to Hughes reaction, I think it's BRC. I got to go B we're going to go for B testing the safety of drinking water. You put them out of their misery, what is it? Pregnancy testing? It is indeed test. Female xenopus frogs were widely used as pregnancy tests in the 1950s.

Napoleon seraphina Kermit John Hugh NASA Matt Hughes
"malaria" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

01:42 min | 6 months ago

"malaria" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Was the first one? We have chromium copper and cadmium. Let's go chromium. It feels like that one that sort of crystal color used to do for precipitation. But go for it. The answer is indeed, chromium. Yeah. Emerald is a green barrel colored by about 2% chromium and sometimes vanadium. Aquamarine, which is obviously aquamarine colored blue, has iron impurities and the color of morganite, which is a rose pink color can be attributed to manganese irons. Good job. So question two, Vanessa and hue. 400s of years, copper ores such as malachite were used as green pigments. In 1775, Carl Wilhelm shield invented a new green pigment that took the world by storm. But what question of all component did he mix with copper to obtain this green color? Was it a, potassium cyanide? Was it B, arsenic trioxide, or was it C mercury fulminate? Arsenic thing rings of bell. But lots of painters in horrible things by licking their brushes and things and getting all sorts of things. So it could be any of those that would give you a nasty end. But the radium women who painted radioactive watch faces used to have terrible poisoning after licking their yeah. But lovely smiles. Until their jewels dropped off. Yeah. Well, I don't know. Some reason I'm associating arsenic with white for no reason whatsoever. And how to press it for an answer. I want to go with yours. Yeah, let's go with asking. Go with arsenic. And it's a good choice. The answer has indeed be arsenic trioxide. Napoleon is famously believed to have been.

Carl Wilhelm Vanessa Napoleon
"malaria" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

01:49 min | 6 months ago

"malaria" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Is the middle one. And this time. It is correct. A third of our water goes down the toilet. One of the more disgusting things I learned while writing the book was that only 30% of men wash their hands after going to the toilet in petrol stations. That crept up to 40% during the pandemic, but I think it's back down again. Okay, so I'm now back on side with Sally and the can we follow the condors because the men are not doing well here. You grubby creatures. What does anyone touch inside of petrol station and how can I avoid touching it at all? Oh my goodness. I suppose they're using less water into it. We're saving the planet. Through planting. Well, at the end of round one, that's so far no points to sarafina and John and one point to NASA and Hugh. But still catch up round two and being green, green is not only the color of envy. Question one to sarafina and John. Emerald, aquamarine and morganite are all types of beryl. Their individual characteristic colors are determined by metal impurities. What metal impurity gives emerald its green color? Is it a chromium? Is it B, copper, or is it C cadmium? I think it's not copper. Okay. It's absolutely no idea. I just feel like you would be able to see that. I don't know. What was the first one? We have chromium copper and cadmium. Let's go chromium. It feels like that one that sort of crystal color used to do for precipitation. But.

sarafina Sally John Hugh NASA beryl
"malaria" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

04:58 min | 6 months ago

"malaria" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Next clue, this is a sound you couldn't normally hear with your ears. Sarafina got any ideas there? I have two haunches. The first one is is it wind on another planet? Interesting. And your second hunch? Is it the resonant frequencies of planets? Interesting. Well, we shall see as we get some more clues. Oh, I'm teasing you now, aren't I? John, it's over to you next. We have had a question in from listen at rohin, who asks, there's now a malaria vaccine being rolled out. Do you think we could wipe out malaria like we did wipe out smallpox? Yes, optimistically, I think we can, and not just with the vaccines. I think there'll be a number of different ways. But if you go back 400 years, malaria was much more widespread. So Shakespeare had the ague, which he probably think was malaria. And it was associated with swampy grounds. And as the places like East Anglia were drained properly, the mosquitos that carried the malaria disappeared. So through a program of getting rid of that family of mosquitos that carries malaria and some vaccines and some drugs that stop transmission and better bed nets, you could get to a place where we are malaria free. And remarkably in the last year, China became malaria free. And there are relatively few countries that now have malaria. So yes, I think we can achieve that. And not necessarily through vaccines or not. That's amazing. Such good news. What about everyone's favorite infectious disease, the common cold? Are we ever going to wipe that out? No. So some things just because it isn't one thing. Common cold is a whole collection of viruses, bacteria, funguses, anything that can kind of get into your nose and inflame it and cause you to make snot and mucus is a common cold. There are as many things under the sun that can cause those as you can imagine. Where does coronavirus fit on that scale between smallpox and flu then in terms of viruses stable enough that we could wipe them out? So coronavirus is there's lots of different coronaviruses where the one that has just kind of caused the pandemic is SARS CoV-2. So it's the second very severe recorded coronavirus in the last 15 years. But there are other ones that are kind of common colker and viruses that if you went around and swap people you'd find in these kind of endemic coronaviruses. In theory, they are more stable than influenza. So flu when it makes copies of itself, we describe it as leaky. So basically, when it makes copies of its own genetic material, it's like when you make a photocopy of the photography of a photocopy, each time you add it, you put in more and more errors. And flu kind of changes quite quickly over time. While coronaviruses have something called a proofreading ability, which is like somebody checking the photocopies and putting the original one back on and making kind of clean copies each time. So in theory, coronaviruses don't change as quickly as flu viruses. We have seen them changing in the last 18 months, but that's probably because everyone has had it and so it's had much more opportunities to change. And the more roles of the dice, the more changes you'll get. Well, Nessa, I've got a question for you now. I have seen in the news about a condor that is a huge type of vulture that has had chicks without mating with a male. How can that happen genetically? Because as far as I know, birds are like us and that they need both a sperm and an egg cell to combine to create offspring. Right. So Hugh I take your flesh eating duck and I raise you a parthenogenetic function. So parthenogenesis is the phrase we use for creating live young without mating. We've had hints before that this can happen in birds. But we've never seen it in species like condors and vultures, which are these huge, huge scavengers. The really weird thing about these condors that did it these female condors is they actually had access to males to fertile males. Normally we only see this thing in birds of producing eggs and young with no males under extreme conditions where there's no males around. But this time there were males. It's just for some reason the females decided not to bother with them. So it wasn't that there weren't no that the condors didn't have a man. They just didn't want a man. They just didn't want a man. They just decided that this time the vulture sisters were doing it for themselves. And these two females, so it happens twice. They laid eggs and those hatched and it was little male condors that came out. And it seems like what happened was when the female first started producing an egg. When you do that, you basically half the amount of your DNA because essentially each offspring gets half from mom and half from dad. But it looks like what the female database she halved her DNA and then thought, I'm not bother with that. I'll just copy this so that I end up with the right amount of DNA..

malaria flu rohin smallpox East Anglia infectious disease Shakespeare SARS John China Nessa Hugh
"malaria" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

03:00 min | 7 months ago

"malaria" Discussed on Short Wave

"Winter cloth has had malaria lots of times as a little kid, a teenager as an adult. But there was one time that was particularly memorable. She was in primary school and had just moved from Nairobi. To somewhere a lot more rural. A village outside of kisumu. So that's in the western part of Kenya. Along the Lake Victoria shores. It's a region with one of the highest rates of malaria in all of Kenya. And it didn't take long for her to get it. I remember being really realistic and for me initially at that time I had no idea that it was malaria. My grandmother should find a way of trying to just relieve the symptoms. So she would boil like some leaves, and then I would drink it just to relieve the headache, like some of the symptoms like severe headache, chills, like if you have the chills and when you're vomiting and you're just so sick and you lose your sense of taste. Winter was lucky. She survived, but lots of kids don't. Globally, a child under the age of 5 dies from malaria just about every two minutes. But even for the kids who do survive, kids like winter. There can be long-term complications. Things like permanent damage to the immune system and kidneys. Cognitive impairment. And in some parts of sub Saharan Africa, many kids will be infected multiple times in the same year, which means they miss a lot of school, and often fall behind. Winter says that is awful as that is, for most kids in Kenya, malaria is just a normal part of growing up. Definitely there's no single child in Kenya was never gotten malaria or infected by malaria. So it's one of the challenges that we have to go through growing up and it really impacted me in a negative way. Winters in her 30s now, and she's a malaria researcher. Everything she experienced as a kid made her want to figure out what she calls the wrath of malaria. And the big breakthrough finally came last month. When the World Health Organization officially endorsed the first malaria vaccine. Do you remember what you saw or felt when you heard that WHO had endorsed this first ever malaria vaccine? I was so excited. I was so excited. And I got so many messages. Family in France. People sending your messages. I'm like, oh, when I heard this, I thought of you first. Oh, I know. I know. That's amazing. I was so elated because I think to finally at least have a licensed malaria vaccine that has gone through really extensive research, I think it's a massive step in the right direction. And.

malaria Kenya chills headache kisumu Lake Victoria Nairobi Saharan Africa Winters World Health Organization France
"malaria" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

05:48 min | 8 months ago

"malaria" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Mosquitoes that can carry. Malaria are the ones of the genus anopheles story of you all more name. Anomalies any malaria mosquito and those live all over the world. it's just that in most of the world. They don't give you malaria. If malaria were introduced there will be an awfully mosquitoes. You know in the us. In europe everywhere but after artika Could carry it. But we've successfully wiped out the malaria parasite me now. You wouldn't harnett believe back in the good old days. I will really stop so. This isn't really a question of getting rid of all the mosquitoes. It's about getting rid of these kinds of mosquitoes. That have malaria. So obviously if no mosquitos ever bit anybody again. I think we would all love that. But in terms of minimizing the impact on the ecology and not having a risk of serious environmental side effects. Most proposals to you know use teen drives or use sterile male mosquitoes to wipe out malarial. Mosquito have focused very narrowly on the specific kinds of mosquitoes that bite. Humans and can carry malaria So we might still have other mosquitoes around and you know the mosquitoes it only livestock. Probably we don't care as much about those being around and that way we don't have to worry about you. Know majorly disrupting ecosystems by taking out an entire kind of animal. Even if it's a kind of animal who we all hate. You're answering a question. I have for you here in advance of me asking it. Which is would it be bad to just get rid of all the mosquitoes. We don't know. I think it might be fine. But since we don't know and since it's a little bit hard to reverse probably it's smarter to do something more conservative. Like get rid of all the malaria carrying or human biting mosquitos. The florida keys. Mosquito district has started releasing about twelve thousand genetically modified non biting mosquitos part of a pilot. Project the epa approved last may which is narrower and almost definitely safe the plan test to see if a genetically modified mosquito is a better alternative to spraying insecticides to control the type of mosquito carrying deadly viruses in the keys including zeka dan. Gay and yellow fevers. I think we've talked about some of the strategies here on the show before at least one. Maybe where bill gates wants to edit the genes of these malarial mosquitos using crisper. Correct me from getting anything wrong but yeah nope that is a proposal. That's been put forward until we're working on genes that either reduce mosquito populations or eliminate the anopheles mosquitoes. What else is out there. all right. So one option yeah is putting a sort of genetic time bomb in some mosquitoes where maybe they can have children but those children will be sterile and you put those mosquitoes out there. And then you haven't next generation of mosquitoes that all have this gene for sterility or many of them. Carry it on and then if you design your gene drive correctly after a couple of generations you've wiped the species out. There's obviously a lot of challenges in implementing this but researchers have plans for it and you know given that four hundred thousand people a year are dying doing testing and figuring out how that works is definitely a priority and something. I think we should honestly be investing more in another option Which is a little bit less scary to audiences. It doesn't have the phrase gene drive in it. Is you flood area with tons of sterile male mosquitoes and then the female mosquitoes will mate with your sterile male mosquitoes instead of with the regular mail mosquitoes and then they just don't have offspring because you flooded the area with cheryl mills and since the sterile males will die off. This is a temporary intervention. So we can sort of do it wipe out the mosquitoes. Basically to a tiny fraction of their original population for one mosquito generation will come back over time but that lets us test like okay. We wiped these mosquitoes out. Did that have any negative ecological consequences. Did it have the desired effects on malaria. We can sort of do things like that and there have been some pilots of projects like this and see okay wiping out. Mosquitoes seems to be going pretty well. So all these strategies are like based around tricky sex. that's honestly many.

malaria harnett zeka dan europe bill gates epa florida us cheryl mills
"malaria" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

04:49 min | 8 months ago

"malaria" Discussed on Today, Explained

"How long have you been at it. There have been efforts to develop a malaria vaccine that go back century mosquito. Actually work on. It started in the nineteen eighties. That's when glaxosmithkline. Which is the pharma company that developed this. I put together the pieces that became rt ss. Okay so a really long time yeah. It's an obvious one to go for as soon as you have the concept that we can use vaccines to control infectious disease. Malaria is really bad. It's one of the worst ones out there. And gave vaccine is going to be a huge part of any strategy to control it. Currently we do Preventative prophylactic distribution of medications against malaria. We do bednets those help a lot but they can only get you so far whereas vaccine if you can make it universal enough if the vaccine is effective enough can really change the game. What did scientists figure out here with our t. s. comment s aka. Miscue eric's so in early stages of figuring out how to fight malaria. There were efforts to target it at different points in the parasites lifelike. Do you want to target it as soon as it gets injected into the body. Do you want to hit it in the liver. where it's multiplying. A lot of those turned out to be dead ends. Rt s and you know other efforts at a successful. Mary vaccine try and hit it earliest. Prevent it from getting to the liver and reproducing in the first place and then that can stop you from getting sick and they've also gotten a better understanding of how to prompt the body to do that. Like which specific things you need to teach the body to look out for so that it can mount a strong immune response when the parasite shows up to. How effective is this mosquito business. So unfortunately not as effective as we'd like it depends a little bit on how you measure it. But in general for someone who's gotten the whole course of shots you see like a thirty percent reduction in the risk of severe disease from a malaria. Now when four hundred thousand people are dying every year. Thirty percent reduction. That's still very real. But it's not the sort of dream vaccine that you know would just made. Malaria was a thing of the past. And now the vaccines are so top of mind for a lot of people i mean. How does this one get. Delivered as at one shot is a two four. How does it work. It's four shots Three of them a month apart in a booster year later That obviously a lot to administer but since malaria is so hard to teach the body to make an immune response against It's kind of what you gotta do. Does that mean that this vaccine is presenting an additional challenge of getting someone to come back twice and then even third time for a booster shot. So obviously that's a huge challenge in vaccine administration but what the world health organization recommended. Wednesday is that nations. Make this part of their normal childhood immunization programs so this is something that like the measles vaccine like the diptheria or whatever else. You're administering two young kids as part of routine medical care so a lot of the time that means you're you're traveling around in these communities frequently anyway in order to get those kids all their other shots which hopefully makes it a little easier to add. The malaria shot into the mix. You know without having too many problems with uptake. And they've had pretty solid uptake in the countries ghana and kenya and malawi where they did a pilot program so you know despite the four shots. They're really able to get people to get the care that their kids need. Okay and this four-shot vaccine for malaria mosquito. It's the first one the. Who has ever recommended will be the last. Hopefully not so thirty percent efficacy. It's much better than nothing. It's not really good enough to turn around like the whole fight against malaria and there are vaccines in the works. That look like they're a little bit better One the study came out. In april it was a phase two clinical trial So in a real population but pretty small scale. That found something. Like seventy seven percent reduction in severe malaria cases. That's a lot more huge. It's really exciting. And that one is now in phase three trials which are larger scale. And we'll be more definitive and if that holds up then we might only have mosquitoes you know for a few years before. We're able to replace it with something even better and i know of things that are earlier in the pipeline and you know obviously have a high chance of not panning out but have the potential to be even better so i do think eventually we have a shot at getting one of these vaccines that is as effective against malaria as vaccine against measles which is like ninety five percent effective or cova Which is yeah in. Like ninety percent effective against the original variant..

malaria Miscue eric glaxosmithkline infectious disease pharma malaria mosquito Mary malawi ghana kenya
"malaria" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

04:20 min | 8 months ago

"malaria" Discussed on Today, Explained

"You get your podcast..

"malaria" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

06:38 min | 8 months ago

"malaria" Discussed on The Big Story

"The casino malaria. That's how prevalent. Malaria has been for people to make it to a bollywood zone. But we finally have a breakthrough to prevent this infectious parasitic disease that has caused lax and lacks of deaths worldwide year. After you on six. October the world health organization. The world's first malaria vaccine moxie corrects. That has been developed by british pharmaceutical glaxosmithkline. In one thousand nine hundred seven for malaria prevention children living in regions with moderate to high transmission of this disease. Children under five. It has been found out at the most susceptible to malaria. In fact in one thousand nine hundred ninety accounted for sixty seven percent of all malaria deaths worldwide and the. who's recommendation for administering moxico. Extra children is based on the data of an pilot program. That has taken place in ghana. Kenya and molavi that has been able to provide more than two point. Three million users to over eight hundred thousand children's since one thousand nine hundred now. The efficacy of the vaccine has been proven to be around forty percents. Basically it can prevent four out of ten cases of malaria and show that. it's not foolproof. That experts have reason to believe that. It's a remarkable success. The violet dry found out that the vaccine is safe. It's cost effective. It improves health and can save lives with good and equitable coverage. That can be a shot through routine immunization and most importantly this vaccine was found to be able to prevent three out of ten cases of severe malaria. But how does moxie crick's book by did it take so long to develop this vaccine. And what will be the impact of this scientific development in developing countries in africa and ultra india van. Malaria infections are prevalent in this episode. Bill all questions on malaria and moxico trickster. Dr british data was researched extensively on malaria and is also the associate professor of epidemiology at the indian institute of public health improve initial. You're tuned into the big story. The podcast very dissect the headline making news for you and your host shorty. It'd be fair. Does zoom that most of us living in india probably very very familiar. Because that's how long disinfection has been a part of our lives. It's one mentioned in ancient text. It's been recorded in history for causing millions of debts all over the world but in a contemporary word. We don't hear much about malaria. From developed countries. The hot spots are largely found in the humid. Swampy amazonian. be since on. Parts of the tropical southeast asian region is web it of course it's the sub saharan region that has a disproportionately high number of me infections. And all the right now it's covered nineteen. There is the talk of town according to who data in twenty nineteen devil. An estimated number of two hundred and twenty nine million cases of malaria. Worldwide and the estimated number of malaria deaths that yesterday at over four hundred thousand a bulk of which were reported from african countries. Now it's curable when arrested and diagnosed early on they're also anti-malarial drugs that are used by travellers as preventive very frequently insecticides to used to suppress contagion to an extent but one of the primary reasons for white hasn't been eradicated yet is because there is no silver bullet against it as we know me infection spread through bites off infected female and office mosquitoes and often they have proven to be resistant to insecticides but perhaps one of the biggest challenges in fighting this ancient infection has been the pata sites ability to evolve in such a manner that a patient can only build up immunity overtime through repeated infections and even that might not be enough to ensure full immunity dot com bridge that that tells us more about how melita impacts the human body. Why's it so hard to build an immunity against it and via children's who susceptible to it means we choose is caused by a better site which is called because species of which the issues. When superior is most common in most parts of the word i'm working benefit undergoes complexly in the as a human being with the complex phenomena be penetrate enters into lexus of the sense of the individuals with presidents and don't be let since plugging cvs Fiore's other signed something. Illness and gordon. Cvs anemia and babies are this. Even and organs of the city from common acquired by or activities. I mean does not As he room despite some the body and then somebody as you'll need repeated in and and soldiers defeated so fittings to take used A semblance of and before that one can succumb to it. Before the grading community one gets a complete more exposed to mustard rights and get a -sorship to being exposed to be Consequences of the. Don't get a sense and siegler lilia so it's not Maybe i'm touching today and considering these factors that's exactly why. The approval of the world's first vaccine against malaria is sued deeply significant but making the announcement. Dr bedrose at phnom director. General of the world held organization had started. His career as malaria researcher. Said it was a gordon. Good historic moment dr. That also believes that. It's a big step towards bringing down. Malaria induced mortality. Because in subside. Enough two on two million people a quarter million children.

Malaria molavi moxie crick parasitic disease moxico Dr british indian institute of public hea glaxosmithkline world health organization india ghana Kenya africa Fiore siegler lilia anemia gordon Dr bedrose
This Is Why African Countries Have the Lowest COVID Rates in the World

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:31 min | 9 months ago

This Is Why African Countries Have the Lowest COVID Rates in the World

"If you look at what country has embraced the vaccine the most and the lockdowns the most and the masks the most israel would be the top of the list yet. Their rates for cases are worse than almost any other country on the entire planet per capita. Why do you remember for a short period of time when everyone was freaking out about india india with the massive kovic search. What happened well if you go. Look at the indian government's own website you do know that they say in their treatment portfolio. Just go take some ivermectin and hydroxy klaren india's. Kobe rates have plummeted. What's the lowest cove rates in the entire. World is in america. not even close. Is that mexico. No the lowest as of a couple of months ago and it's probably changed as uganda. Why is it that african countries that take antivirals with their breakfast food literally because malaria is so widespread. I don't mean that as a pejorative. it's just you take anti antivirals all the time you get bit by a wrong insect in africa just injured life. Do constantly drinking tonic water constantly. Taking anti-malarials why is that. Why is that. Why is there not been a massive coverted death surge beyond anything that we would have expected in the poorest countries with the worst healthcare systems like africa.

India Indian Government Israel Kobe Uganda Mexico Malaria America Africa
Why Is There a Disinformation Campaign Against Ivermectin?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:27 min | 9 months ago

Why Is There a Disinformation Campaign Against Ivermectin?

"Rogan said he defeated co vid in just a couple of days. Thanks to the use of ivermectin now. This started a sequence of disinformation. Let's actually go to eight. I 'cause established this whole idea of this information. A whole sequence of disinformation stories around ivermectin. Saying that it's a horse de warmer. Now that's actually an off label. Use ivermectin won a nobel prize for its use on humans. In fact a two thousand nine hundred. Cdc memo on ivermectin said that all refugees in it they should take two doses of ivermectin orally. In fact it says right here on the cdc's website which they don't want you to read top of malaria guidance. That ivermectin can be very helpful for you. That's the cdc's own website. A study in the american journal of therapeutics published june. Twenty two thousand twenty one said that the apparent safety and low cost suggests that ivermectin is likely to have a significant impact on the sars covy to pandemic globally and hydroxy. Clark is also anti-malaria drug and personally every person that i've given hydroxy chloride quinn to help them get connected with. They've turned the now that that's not. Okay that's not empirically scientific enough to convince me but fao cheat. Made sure he had to go out. Vouches dis- disinformation artist. You notice how vouching never actually has a real symposium or takes legitimate questions play tape when it comes to a public health issue like cova nineteen in which it is essential to get correct information out one of the enemies of public health his disinformation and unfortunately we do see that in some quarters. Disinformation you mean. Disinformation like this disinformation. Where all the sudden a story was going viral. We re tweeted an amplified by rachel maddow. Same that oklahoma's hospital. Emergency departments were backed up and they could not serve gunshot victims due to ivermectin overdoses. What as soon as i saw that story. I said this doesn't sound right or rachel. Maddow spread this on social media. And this guy right here. Here's the original news clip. It turned out to be absolutely

CDC American Journal Of Therapeuti Rogan Malaria FAO Quinn Clark Rachel Maddow Oklahoma Maddow Rachel
Hydroxychloroquine and the Political Polarization of Medicine

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:43 min | 9 months ago

Hydroxychloroquine and the Political Polarization of Medicine

"I remember as well at the very beginning of the pandemic in new york city these some of the finest doctors in the world and i can tell you for a fact i know there were. There were acquaintances of mine. Who were schick as can be in the hospital early on and this was you know march april of last year and they were prescribed hydroxy caloric when they call it the anti malaria drugs. That was what i saw. I saw the text messages. That were being exchanged between friends. And i saw the text messages and one of them was real sick and said but wait till the and his coworker was sick as well both in the hospital. They said he said. I got this anti-malaria drug. It is a godsend. You can't believe how great it is. Then he he told his friend who was also sick. Way to ask for this anti-malaria drug both of them recovered completely and yet later they publicly stated one of them at least publicly stated in an interview. Well i don't know that it was the hydroxy chloroquine it very well could have been something tried to minimize. Downplay the effectiveness of it. After it became politicized the doctors in new york. City didn't care about politics. They didn't care about making. But i know for a fact again. This is purely anecdotal. Just like your story is larry. No one knows for certain that it was hydrochloric. When saved your wife's life but it could have been the physicians at that hospital. Decided to try it and she survived and recovered in his doing great which is incredible same with these people in new york city

Malaria Schick New York City New York Larry
How Open Access Science Leads to More Citations

The Science Show

02:02 min | 11 months ago

How Open Access Science Leads to More Citations

"Meat cure macneice who's from melbourne originally but usually resides in cambridge working for the famous press the publishers care wise open publishing so important now cambridge university press exists as an organization to try to advance knowledge research and learning and part of that mission is what we do in publishing research we publish about four hundred journals plus fifty books and as well as just publishing research we care about making sure that best practices are followed in research and the research we publish is robust and reliable and so we work with communities of authors and researchers and without journal editors to try and ensure that we can support upcoming best practices and research and what is open publishing much it made of well so are there a few aspects often people will talk about open access publishing and this means access to the published papers once they put out there on the internet or in print form and a lot of these in the past have been subscription access only and there's solid movement around the world which we fully support for more open access to the results of research so these papers can be read by anyone and learned from anyone around the world but also looking at open research across the whole research life cycle there are practices being developed around sharing information long before we get to the publication stage and also sharing the data and other materials that underpin what's published in that final stage all to support greater transparency. Indeed you probably know that this motion at the university of sydney and chemist in fact still is doing work on. Malaria is one of the pioneers in this country of that sort of approach and she actually won the eureka prize for the promotion of science last year. So you probably know about her. Yes i think that work is fantastic. I think i must have just missed her. When i was in england. I think she started at cambridge just after i left in her phd. That i think the whether they're doing is great. Supporting fully author notebooks in library such and the like

Macneice Cambridge University Press Cambridge Melbourne University Of Sydney Malaria England
Brazil Still Debating Dubious Virus Drug Amid 500,000 Deaths

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

Brazil Still Debating Dubious Virus Drug Amid 500,000 Deaths

"As Brazil hurtles toward an official coded nineteen death toll of a five hundred thousand the second highest in the world silence is on trial inside the country and the truth is up for grabs with the most unlikely to be reached this weekend Brazil's Senate is publicly probing how the toll got so high focusing on life president Chaya Bolsonaro this fall rights government ignored opportunities to buy vaccines for months while it relentlessly pushed hydroxy chloride Quinn the malaria drug shown to be ineffective in treating okay with nineteen the skepticism has extended to the death toll itself with Bolsonaro all getting the official tally for his own health ministry is greatly exaggerated some experts say the real figure is significantly higher perhaps hundreds of thousands hi I'm Charles that's my

Brazil Chaya Bolsonaro Senate Quinn Malaria Charles
Episode 215-2: Leave the Gun, Take the McFlurry - burst 08

The Security Ledger Podcast

05:45 min | 1 year ago

Episode 215-2: Leave the Gun, Take the McFlurry - burst 08

"Mcdonalds email to its franchisees. Was basically as you said it said. You're you're voiding. The warranty on the taylor hardware which are basically required to us and you may be exposing your employees to bodily harm. Of course franchisees were would be. I guess free to ignore those warnings. Except for the fact that i think the the implicit message that e mail was that this that we don't want you using these things so you shouldn't use them right. Yeah you know it mentioned so it said that but it also mentions that it also mentioned confidential information in that You know kitsch access all of the systems confidential information and this is why again. I'm going back to your rights repair issues. These are the exact same arguments that you hear time and again from whatever that whether it's medical device whether it's an automobile whether it is a Home appliance the three legs of the stool. Our intellectual property warranty void warranty and physical harm and physical safety. Those are the three just kind of reliable like malaria. Curly of the of the anti repair argument is particularly interesting on this case about the mcdonald's machine because confidential information is is another again. I'm not I'm one of the last people to stand behind Or defense you know companies like apple and samsung but at least they make some effort right like some. Some efforts actually define what confidential information is. I mean if you look at this situation. The mcdonald's ice cream machine. They mentioned confidential information. But are there implies. It's their confidential information when really it's actually the owner of the machines confidential information but they never make that clear and so it's a it's a very interesting Head scratcher in which you like. What is going on with this machine and and the ecosystem lewis makes it while we're at it. Let's dispense with the warranty argument. Magnuson moss the federal warranty acmes. It really clear that you know you you do not void the warranty by having e either servicing it yourself or having an independent service person work on it or anything like that. So the whole you know by attaching to catch device you're voiding. The warranty is clearly not supported by federal law. But you're right. What this reminds me of. Actually a lot is the situation on farms right now with john. Deere and data that dedere equipment is collecting from farms soil moisture data weather data and sell on That deer considers it's proprietary information and in fact resells at a at a hefty profit and yet many people are like well. That's the farmers data. They should have a say into whether that gets collected and resold an and it would seem to be the same really the same question. Whose data is it. It's my franchise. My customers isn't it. My data But but apparently not well especially because it's not defined to and you know mcdonalds. John deere probably unfairly. Certainly in an unbalanced way makes the claim that it's their data. But taylor at mcdonald's in some taylor. Mcdonald's make no effort to actually define that or to try and make that argument. they just. It's very interesting. That taylor is a logo. This like nineteen seventy s or nineteen eighty s era kind of crowd. And it's like. They're they literally think they're king and they can just to create a stuff that oh by the way this void your warranty and guess. What is our confidential data. Like you know what you're not saying. This is america. You can't just decrease often have it happen. What do you think what was the response of the franchisees to that message. I guess from your standpoint as a business owner obviously it was a big blow to your business but did you hear back from them on on the specifics of that hoban who would. What do they mean at saturday dr that it was my data or any kind of questioning of that or is it more like. I don't want to kill the goose that lays the golden egg. And i'm just gonna do what they tell me to do and not ask was both. I think it was both. I mean. there's this is. It's both the same time it's like. Hey part of the system It's the system is doing a lot of things that i don't agree with but at the same time. I'm going to completely Sympathetic to catch. Because again it goes back to the rebellion of franchisees in the first place. Why would they have to you know when you when you kind of have to when you look at the existence and growth of kit which is basically a vaccine you know to to a virus that was created you have to. You can't acknowledge the growth of the vaccine without acknowledging the virus and so this this was obviously a slap in the face to the mcdonalds industrial complex that produces this machine but on one hand it was clearly a necessary vaccine technology that That the franchisees still stand behind they still use on so like use analogies and metaphors and it's kind of like being i never. I never supported the war in afghanistan right. But it's like. I'm still still in america so pay taxes so it's like on one hand you don't support this war effort and you don't support you're going there but it's like you're still part of this system and i as a citizen and very powerless to impact. What goes what goes on in washington support afghanistan. I'm not to pay my taxes. Because i don't want the money you know like i mean you can. You can certainly right. That's right the. Irs franchisees are are very much in the same situation. They're like listen we. This is their afghanistan where they don't

News Trends Executives Experts Interviews Cyber Security Samsung Apple Mcdonalds Mcdonald Nineteen Seventy S Nineteen Eighty S Era Three John John Deere ONE Three Legs Magnuson Moss Taylor Lewis Malaria Deere Hoban America Afghanistan Washington IRS
A Closer Look at How Semiconductors Are Made

Daily Tech Headlines

03:00 min | 1 year ago

A Closer Look at How Semiconductors Are Made

"Friday we talked about bismuth being used to make semiconductors below one nanometer using a helium ion beam lithography system. This comes from a study published in nature by taiwan semiconductor manufacturing company. Mit and national taiwan. University semiconductors can be super complicated. So let's take a closer look. A semiconductor is a material that has an electrical conductivity value between that of a conductor and insulator it's registered city falls as the temperature rises behaving in the opposite way of metal. Semiconductors like silicon are the basis of most modern electron electroncs. The electrical properties of a semiconductor material can be modified by doping it that is applying electrical fields or light which can be used for amplification switching and energy conversion currently semiconductor design uses five nanometer and three nanometer node. With the number of transistors piled on chip nearing physical limitations. Moore's law observes that the number of transistors in dense integrated circuit doubles every two years. However there is still an eventual maximum capacity using atomic lee. Thin materials. Instead of silicon. Could help delay reaching maximum. But the problem of the energy barrier formed between the metal electrode and the semiconductor interface of these thin materials continues to constrain semiconductor design improvement in the nature study. The scientists found that by downscaling the semiconductor below one nanometer roughly the thickness of three atom layers they could create a two dimensional material pushing semiconductors to the quantum limit and potentially surpassing the prediction of moore's law by resolving one of the biggest problems and miniaturising semiconductor devices. The two-dimensional semiconductor also makes the energy barrier negligible by using bismuth which is a semi metal. Meaning that it has lower electric and thermal conductivity than a metal to make these. Semiconductors the optimized the chemical vapor deposition of bismuth and then shrank channel material to the nanno scale using helium. I am being with agassi. This study recorded the lowest energy barrier resistance ever at one hundred and twenty three arms as well as the highest current density to date of one thousand one hundred and thirty five micrograms per meter. This technology proves the potential of malaria transistors as being on par with the most recent three d. semiconductors it will allow for future device downscaling possibly bringing about a new generation of semiconductors experimental. Physics research will benefit from this technology immediately but commercialisation. We'll have to wait for more engineering work though it will be years before this technology could become mainstream future. Applications include cutting the carbon footprint of data centers quadrupling cell phone battery life speeding-up laptops and contributing to higher performance. Ai

Taiwan MIT Moore Agassi Malaria
"malaria" Discussed on Many Roads Travelled :  (Solo Female) Travel Podcast

Many Roads Travelled : (Solo Female) Travel Podcast

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"malaria" Discussed on Many Roads Travelled : (Solo Female) Travel Podcast

"For about an hour. It's ridiculous cell. Phones would have been handy back then. That's for sure so that's kind of what we did all day. Dispaced back and forth between the farms to drop off. Seedlings want the other funding to to bruce's farm. Or i just kind of Lie down. Because i could barely walk foot was killing me and then we decided that we're going to go to the club for dinner that night. So merrill had led me address to where. I hated that law. Hey that lov no shorts larry so after dinner kabir's there was good. 'cause bruce paid for all the Vervins dinners thousand is and then got back. Tens of i just crashed there the next morning i got i thought it'd been run over by truck cappelli walker mike flood but i could barely walk period. I had to severe head is like a head was in vice. Started hallucinating again. I had the sheds which were green muncy. I could literally by the end of the day. I was crawling to the bathroom. Like luckily i had one of the main bedrooms. So i have is an thankfully. And then i started puking a had nothing in my stomach so it was like just bile and i you know shitting bile. Oh my gosh. It was brutal so our new is getting really dehydrated as well and just so so sick. And that's an bruce. David came over and they were like. I think he got malaria. And i was like yeah i think so too. So that's awesome. Well i was so sick for two days. I couldn't even move me. And then i just kept getting worse and worse and worse and then a guy said right. We're just gonna put a mattress in the back of the pickup. And we're just gonna lay on. Just go back to blantyre and take a to the doctor's like asap. Bruce had to carry me out of his room. The girls packed up committed and have a lot packed up my stuff. Put me in the Cuts of blantyre course. the doctor. The doctor was closed until four. Pm so we had to wait at two goals. Finally four o'clock go there. I got tested hideaway by our for results found out. Yes i had. Malaria as well as dysentery so probably got dysentery from taking out the stream. My guess so not just play but dysentery on top. No one are so sick and still climbing mountains and style plus my illness as well kicked in. So there's three. Massive things are happy received nine. So i got medication for the malaria and as well as antibiotics for my foot and it was bacteria dysentry so the as while just went back to david just gave me my own room in the ex-luxembourg been camping before so i had my own name because it needed to be close to a bathroom castillo diarrhea and was still peaking. Luckily the boys. Because mike was still there for days precise back to the farm david as well stay for a couple days so they were checking on me all the time plus all the other travelers that was still their new malaria. I was looked after very very well. Which is very lovely. And i now call me malania because every single person i pretty much got malaria in malawi. And most those people were on malaria prophylactics. I was on them..

David malawi two days four o'clock Bruce two goals mike bruce one next morning three nine about an hour malaria Tens Malaria luxembourg Vervins kabir every single person
UN Launches Response Plan for Rohingya in Bangladesh

UN News

01:13 min | 1 year ago

UN Launches Response Plan for Rohingya in Bangladesh

"Bringing Refugees who fled persecution in myanmar. For years ago are more vulnerable than at any point since two thousand seventeen the. Un has warned in an appeal for international support to help them launching the cool for nine hundred and forty million dollars for nearly nine hundred thousand refugees in bangladesh's cox's bazar camp complex un refugee agency chief. Filippo grandi also urged india and thailand to keep their borders open to those fleeing from violence linked to the myanmar coup tuesday's appeal covers requests for more than one hundred thirty four partners who include un agencies international ngos and a majority of bangladeshi ngos if funded it will also benefit almost half a million bangladeshi nationals living in communities that are hosting the refugees the world food program which is also present in cox's bazar warned that the covid nineteen crisis has reduced opportunities for refugees. The camp complex also disaster-prone and faces a monsoon to cyclone seasons every year which is why the un agency continues to support disaster risk reduction activities. These include rebuilding cyclone shelters improving drainage systems stabilizing slopes and helping communities diversify their livelihood activities. So that they do not need to rely on agriculture for income

UN Myanmar Filippo Grandi COX Bangladesh Thailand India
The Coronavirus Is Ravaging India

Short Wave

01:23 min | 1 year ago

The Coronavirus Is Ravaging India

"I've got lauren. Freyer international correspondent based in mumbai india. With me hey lauren. Hey mattie so weeks into this massive surge of new cases i mean how would you describe the situation there. I would describe it as a five alarm health emergency and the alarm just keeps on going like it's been weeks of this. Hospitals are overwhelmed. People are dying in parking. Lots of hospitals waiting to get in people are dying at home unable able to get an ambulance. I mean imagine calling nine one one and no one ever answers for weeks. India is seeing shortages of pretty much every tool country needs to fight a pandemic so hospital beds hospital workers because you know in some cases half of them are sick to medical oxygen antiviral drugs shortages of test kits. So you know. Four hundred thousand cases a day sounds like a staggering number scientists modeling. This say it might actually be more like five million cases a day here. Crematoriums are working nonstop like a public park. In delhi was turned into a mass cremation ground. And i spoke to a public health official recently. Who's supposed to be working on. Malaria prevention. his job now is to count bodies all day long and his biggest concern is finding enough firewood for all of these funeral. Pyres

Freyer Lauren Mattie India Mumbai Delhi Malaria
India's Covid-19 Crisis: What Happens Next and How Long Will It Last?

Short Wave

01:23 min | 1 year ago

India's Covid-19 Crisis: What Happens Next and How Long Will It Last?

"I've got lauren. Freyer international correspondent based in mumbai india. With me hey lauren. Hey mattie so weeks into this massive surge of new cases i mean how would you describe the situation there. I would describe it as a five alarm health emergency and the alarm just keeps on going like it's been weeks of this. Hospitals are overwhelmed. People are dying in parking. Lots of hospitals waiting to get in people are dying at home unable able to get an ambulance. I mean imagine calling nine one one and no one ever answers for weeks. India is seeing shortages of pretty much every tool country needs to fight a pandemic so hospital beds hospital workers because you know in some cases half of them are sick to medical oxygen antiviral drugs shortages of test kits. So you know. Four hundred thousand cases a day sounds like a staggering number scientists modeling. This say it might actually be more like five million cases a day here. Crematoriums are working nonstop like a public park. In delhi was turned into a mass cremation ground. And i spoke to a public health official recently. Who's supposed to be working on. Malaria prevention. his job now is to count bodies all day long and his biggest concern is finding enough firewood for all of these funeral. Pyres

Freyer Lauren Mattie India Mumbai Delhi Malaria
 Malaria Vaccine Trial Raises Hopes of Beating Disease

Ben Shapiro

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Malaria Vaccine Trial Raises Hopes of Beating Disease

'The Stories Are Heartbreaking.' What 1 Reporter Witnessed In Mozambique's Violence

Weekend Edition Saturday

03:46 min | 1 year ago

'The Stories Are Heartbreaking.' What 1 Reporter Witnessed In Mozambique's Violence

"Graphic violence. Kaba Delgado's were the poorest regions in Mozambique and was largely ignored by the central government. Into large reserves of oil and gas were discovered offshore. His international oil companies have moved into the area. Fighters have stepped up their attacks. Terrorizing Villagers, burning homes, destroying farms. And publicly beheading. Women and Children. But the government of Mozambique and trying to put down the movement is also implicated in the violence. Aid groups estimate that half a million people have fled their homes and are in urgent need of aid. Journalists are not usually granted access to the area. But nay Hewat occur accompanied it. Aid group to cover Delgado last November. And was able to speak to survivors joins us now. Thank you for being with us. Thank you so much for having me. What did they tell you? I mean, the stories are heartbreaking. We spoke with a 10 year old girl named Maria and she remembers the day that the Attackers came into her village. They started burning houses down, they started looting. Maria was separated from her family during the violence, and she told me that the Attackers forced her and the other Villagers to sit and watch as they beheaded. People that they had grown up with people that they knew. After she fled. She fled into the forest and her foot got caught in an animal trapped like a hunting snare. Eventually she was rescued and she was carried to Pemba, which is a southern city in the Kaaba Delgado province. And Maria recovered from her wounds, and she also had malaria in the local hospital. And that was when she discovered that both her mother and her father had been beheaded in that attack. You know, That's just one of the many, many stories that I heard while I was there, all of them with the same level of brutal and senseless violence. Who are the Attackers, or is there one answer to that? There are many answers to that. But I will try to give Ah general overview of how this developed from what we know, Um, outsiders. The countries that have been named have in Kenya, Tanzania. On brothers so outside influences came into the country and started preaching against the version of Islam that was practiced in cover Delgado at the time. And they began preaching radicalizing in the mosques up there. And I spoke with some civil society leaders who told me that you know there were folks in these mosques who told the government something is going on here. Something is going wrong and that Thies concerns were just not addressed urgently. By the government. And so what ended up happening is that you have a local population, primarily young men, primarily unemployed who hear this radical version of Islam, and that's how people say that this started And then if, of course, if you fast track it a few years in 2019 Isis, the Islamic state claimed credit for its first attack, and that really changed the dynamics. This went from being a kind of local issue of violence by you know citizens who were unhappy or felt left out or left behind. Becoming really an international geopolitical problem. And you know that brings us up to where we are today. Just just this week, the United States government Has classified the Islamic state Isis

Kaba Delgado Mozambique Nay Hewat Maria Delgado Kaaba Delgado Central Government Pemba Malaria Tanzania Kenya Thies United States Government
World moves to embrace vaccine passports

First Morning News

01:59 min | 1 year ago

World moves to embrace vaccine passports

"Of a vaccine passport. Before you can travel was gonna closer Look at that. Joining us now, NBC radio national correspondent Rory O'Neill. Good morning, Rory. Good morning, you know, and it's trickier than you might think trying to navigate these waters because who sets the standard and what about your privacy concerns as well? And even if we get these vaccines rolled out, it's not as if everyone has access to them just yet, So it's a case of have and have not. You know what vaccine passport would essentially show proof that you've gotten your vaccine. That what kind of form doesn't come in? Is it something on your phone? But if you don't what if you still use a flip phone or eyes, it's something that will go with you is you travel from country to country, and who else would require it? You know, we've seen in the Israel that more than half the country has already been vaccinated, and they're using vaccine passports, toe let you access the local gym or to get into movie theaters. They use it as an inducement to open up more things to you so that if you get your vaccine, it's more of a reward and you can show proof of it. So exactly how these vaccine passports will work what standards will be set still up for debate around the world. Well, The other thing, too, is so in other words, if you don't get a vaccine, you can't travel. I mean, in fact becomes the law, right? Right. So that's another issue with some people are allergic to the vaccine and can't get the vaccine. What are they supposed to do? But, you know, vaccine requirements are nothing new. If you want to go to some countries, you need a malaria vaccine. And you know, they will have that requirement when you enter the country, So we've done this before. The question is, this vaccine just isn't as available as of malaria vaccine. So how can do what kind of a restriction are you putting on now? Airlines and hotels are doing their own thing. Some of requiring vaccine proof in order, let you fly their airplanes or check into the hotels. We're all expecting the cruise industry will require proof of vaccination. But again, what does that look like? Is it on your phone? Is that a piece of paper? All these things we get to be settled in the may be done piecemeal, which is what is the worst thing possible because that would just create lots of confusion. Well, we're used to that.

Rory O'neill Rory NBC Malaria Israel Confusion
New Ebola Outbreak Declared in Guinea

UN News

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

New Ebola Outbreak Declared in Guinea

"The un world health organization. Who thursday that. There's a very high risk of the ebola virus spreading in guinea after. An outbreak was announced last sunday in an update. Whol said that its concern was based on the unknown size duration and origin of the outbreak. It has led to five deaths so far in the southern region of missouri corey which borders sierra leone liberia and cote d'ivoire the first confirmed victim was a nurse from rural health center. He was initially diagnosed with typhoid and malaria. While her known contacts include a traditional healer and their family are potentially a large number of others and limited capacity to respond cautioned the agency guinea was one of the three most affected countries in the two thousand fourteen to two thousand sixteen west africa ebola outbreak which was the largest since the virus was first discovered in nineteen seventy six

Whol Missouri Corey Ebola Rural Health Center Guinea UN Sierra Leone Cote Liberia Typhoid Malaria West Africa
South Africa halts AstraZeneca vaccine rollout

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:57 min | 1 year ago

South Africa halts AstraZeneca vaccine rollout

"South africa has halted its rollout of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine just a week after the country received. Its first million doses. It seems the vaccine offers limited protection against a new variant of the corona virus. That's now dominant in the country. Salim abdul karim co-chair of south africa's ministerial advisory committee on covid nineteen spoke to a world health organization briefing yesterday. We don't want to end up with a situation where we vaccinated million people too. Many people would have vaccine that may not be effective in preventing hospitalization and severe disease in total more than one point. Two billion corona virus doses have been allocated for the continent. But it's not clear when all those jobs will arrive. The longer any region remains unvaccinated. The greater the chance that more variants arise vaccines though can be tweaked in a formulation of the oxford vaccine targeted at the south african variant could be going into arms by autumn. What scientists cannot address is the long run damage to africa both in human and economic terms so far continent to have been spared from the worst case scenarios predicted early on in the pandemic but the longer term picture remains bleak many ways the impact of the pandemic and africa is worse than it appears on the surface around the official numbers. Kenley salmon is one of our africa correspondent based in dakar. It is the case that having a young population has to some extent protected the continent from the virus africans and died from it that americans europeans but the true scott of infection. Death is really hard to gauge. Studying sudan recently showed the perhaps only two percent of all the covid desk for a quoted in the official tally and the economic impact is worse than it looks last year. The region's economy shrank for the first time. In twenty five years tourism has been badly hit as have commodity exporters things like oil in nigeria and taken together. Gdp per capita fell below twenty ten levels last year so things are perhaps not quite as bad as some other parts the world but certainly still very tough and things may get tougher house. What are the particular challenges to africa. Africa faces quite a number of challenges in the next few years as it tries to recover from the pandemic but the biggest i of the really is vaccines. Some african governments have perhaps failed to grasp the urgency of the situation in tanzania for example the populace president john food even casually cast out with a vaccine work but i do forgive aside claiming the postman precautions such as steaming nation were better than vaccines and even added that if the white man was able to come up with next nations then. Vaccinations for aids. Malaria and cancer would have already been found. So it's not so much a question than of supply. I mean given that quite a few vaccines have been essentially booked at the stage. A number of vaccines have been booked but the big question is when will they arrive because right now there aren't anywhere near the number of axes required forever on in the world and rich countries are of course the front of the queue for those vaccines have been produced africa's going to need perhaps two point six billion doses to vaccinate everyone and those are not being made locally so they have to rely on supplies elsewhere for the moment so that means joining the queue. All this means that whereas rich countries aim to vaccinate most of their people by the middle of this year the african. cdc a public health. Bali in africa's aiming for sixty percent of africans to vaccinated by the end of next year. But even that may be too optimistic. For the poorest countries. The economist intelligence unit sister organization estimates that in most african countries most people will not be inoculated until mid twenty twenty three or even early twenty twenty four and there must be serious consequences of it being that long until the continent is on average vaccinated. Africa is likely. It doesn't get those vaccinations into suffer. Further waves of the infection while after the disease may have amped in the rich world. And that of course will cause more death and more suffering. Doesn't risk that. Having the virus transmitting between people frequently africa could allow new variance to evolve. We've already got the south. African variant and these new variants could endanger people even in rich countries if they prove to be resistant to vaccines and then finally of course not having vaccines could force. African policymakers to continue with these very difficult economic lockdowns curfews even after many other countries around the world set free of those kinds of restrictions and if the public health concern lasts that long then surely the economic concerns will last at least that long. That's right in many african countries facing pretty severe crises at the moment just getting finance to pay their bills. Africa has very limited fiscal space on average countries in sub saharan africa. Spending more than thirty cents on every dollar. They raise and text revenue paying their debts. And that's up from twenty cents on the dollar before the pandemic on the debt side to over half of low income sub saharan african countries are now classed as in distress or at high risk of distress. According to the imf and what about countries with bigger economies the two biggest economies in africa nigeria and south ever both in pretty deep trouble nigeria for example was described by the world. Bank is being an unprecedented crisis. Recently the bank is not normally quite so blunt in nigeria. There has been a legacy of management for a number of years and pandemics really accessible that quite badly. Now focused suggested by twenty twenty three. Gdp per capita may go back as low as it was in one thousand nine hundred eighty time when the oil price was some high on so africa too is in trouble that have been in recession twice in the last three years before the pandemic hit of course now is dribbling itself with a particularly heavy toll from the pandemic so both countries in fact are facing a difficult road out of the crisis. And what about outside help in terms of financing has been quite a bit of outside help although the crisis of course is very big but in twenty twenty the imf for example provided sixteen billion dollars in loans most of that came with relatively few strings attached and this help frigging countries to respond to the pandemic to avoid some of the liquidity crises that were looming the world bank also dispersed another ten billion but many countries got that funding to if the imf under emergency allocations that came quickly and relatively easily and those allocations for many countries will soon be exhausted. The rich world has been trying to help when it comes to debt. They've provided liquidity to countries through some bits of suspension initiative that basically allows poor countries to put off debt repayments until july. Twenty twenty one. This is of course helpful but the trouble is that those payments just suspended and they have to be paid back with interest in about five years time so as the chief economist for africa the world bank put it to us. It may just be kicking the can down the road to. How do you see this playing out. Then how high could the human cost of all this be while the stakes are pretty high. The pandemic has already done lower damage to people's health and africa. it's hitting their economic prospects and they wealth and it's also affecting education of course. Hundreds of millions of students in africa have been affected by school closures. This increases the risk of dropouts and reduces the prospects for africa's largest every generation so overall the costs here really quite significant. There are some reasons for optimism. We may see vaccine rollouts accelerate. There's also hopes that commodity price rises could give africa real boost as the global economy recovers been on balance. The evidence probably points to at pretty difficult road ahead with several more waves of the virus hitting already struggling health systems and perhaps a form of economic long covert in africa. So you know africans have come through this showing remarkable resilience but it may be toughest years are still to come in. Thank you very much for joining us. thank you

Africa Salim Abdul Karim Co Ministerial Advisory Committee Kenley Salmon Nigeria Oxford South Africa John Food Astrazeneca Dakar Saharan Africa IMF Sudan Tanzania Malaria CDC
Amy Schumer explains her part in Hilaria Baldwin controversy

Radio From Hell

01:32 min | 1 year ago

Amy Schumer explains her part in Hilaria Baldwin controversy

"Amy Schumer. Hmm. Just talking about her role in the insane drama. Surrounding Hill area, Baldwin and her exaggerated Spanish roots. Ms. Schumer got caught up in the controversy after sharing several snaps poking fun. At Hilaria Baldwin, the fitness guru, mother of five, of course, wife of Alec Baldwin for claims she was pope poking fun at herself, not at Hill area. For claiming to be from Spain when she was actually born in Boston. But Amy made it clear that she only had love for Hilaria Baldwin, she said. Well, she's amazing. I wish her and her family the best, and I hope she gets to visit Spain as much as she wants. Schumer had weighed in making light of the situation, saying, I feel like it was so insane and entertaining that I think hilarious probably the only person who's happy about the insurrection in the capital because it distracted people from Her Spanish roots, not trying through. It was the same time. But then she went on to say she's amazing. I wish her the best. We'll know what Amy posted. It was funny. It was a picture of Malaria with her new baby and Hillary is ah yoga guru She's got, you know, teeny, tiny fit body and Amy Schumer also just had a baby. And what Amy posted was just me and Gene, you know, enjoying our you know. Making some joke that it though this is a picture of me and my baby when it wasn't she was making fun of herself.

Hilaria Baldwin Amy Schumer Ms. Schumer Hill Area Spain Alec Baldwin Baldwin AMY Schumer Boston Malaria Hillary
"malaria" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

Healthcare Triage Podcast

05:50 min | 2 years ago

"malaria" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

"Today we. We have with US Dr Chandi John He is the Ryan White Professor of Pediatrics and the Director of the Division of Infectious Diseases in global health at Indiana University School of Medicine I should note that this episode was recorded before the pandemic started since then. Dr John's Infectious Disease Expertise helped lay the foundation for to covert related studies tactic, which is looking at how many. People in Indiana Wade. Actually be infected and discover which is looking at how immunity responses occur. After people are infected, we should also note that his research about sickle cell anemia, African children was recently published in the New England, Journal of Medicine and people might want to check that out as well Chandy. Welcome, thank you so you're the Ryan Way Professor Pediatrics. Who Is Ryan White? And what does he have to do? With Indiana Ryan White is in Indiana. Indiana heroes everyone in Indiana and the United States should know about him. Ryan White was really the first child in the United States, who was publicly known to have issued in make a secret <hes> and <hes> the reason he got into the news was because <hes> we lived. They didn't want him attending school with all the kids and he insisted on going to school. This is a very brave individual and kind of push this where a lot of. Of other people just kind of shrunk into themselves and bring it up because it's one of those things where it's like I remember I did live in Indiana at the time, but I remember it being in the news for people old enough. It was a huge huge deal I mean because up until that point. It felt like it was a pretty stigmatized disease were many people were blamed, but he seemed to be the face. If I'm remembering correctly. Correctly like the first quit I'm putting in quotes. Nobody else can see my equity. You're like innocent. Where we sort of public in this child at a big deal that everybody was so public about it. Yeah, it was a huge deal is very brave of him because he got a lot of <hes> discrimination and hate mail, and the rest of it, or you know hateful comments right to his face where he lived <hes>, but he refused to sort. Back away from that and also I. Think very importantly. He also refused to be the quote unquote innocent face of it. He said that everybody who has HIV is say they should be respected. However, it was easier for the public to handle that than maybe to handle gay men who they thought of as other or or something he really did <hes> in the United States help to give face HIV that many people could relate to more <hes>. And I'm the Ryan White Professor, of Pediatrics, and I always mentioned this because our whole division was <hes> supported. By an endowment for the Indiana University, Dance Marathon, and that <hes> endowment and the Indiana University dance, marathon itself were started by Ryan White's best friend from High Yeah To Stewart I believe her name was, and so she started at more than twenty five years ago and to start, it was started in honor of him, so he was supposed to start at you that fall and died before he could start the started, and she organized a dance marathons, and they've evolved this massive huge. Yeah, and if your local Indiana's a big deal with your kids and these guys are amazing, high school kids in college, kids and <hes> they raise funds for <hes>. Hospital for children, but for the first many years they raised it just for our division, and so that was amazing. It's funny because I knew I knew there is money for Riley but I didn't know it was for that purpose and I. It's funny. One of those I knew Ryan White was, but when I moved here I was like. Why do they have the professorship year? Like didn't know He. INDIANA. No, it's it's amazing, and so now the funds from the Indiana. Brisy dance marathon go to the whole department of beating. US For the first twenty years it was to raise his endowment, and so when people ask me who this rich donor was, who gave the endowment that allowed us to create this amazing or build this amazing division <hes>. It was <hes>. It's the college kids, and and I should also very important dimension. The connection there is that writes. Doctor was Marty climate. Who is the? The founder of our division, so that was when they wanted a way to honor Ryan White and <hes> and support the things that were important to him. The sought out Dr Climate. He said <hes> supporting research in this areas is critical, and that's what they did. Well, that's great and not just completely veer directions, but you know the time what we wanted to talk about. About. Today is global health. So I like to always start by talking to you like. How did you decide? This is the area that what you wanted to be in in studying not just infectious diseases, but how they the impact, the world, not just even the United States. How'd you get here? Yeah, so there are many answers that question, but the beginning always starts with. With my parents so <hes>. My parents are from India. They came here to do their residency I. always mention because this is a fact that. When they came here, they were paid to come here, so there was a doctor shortage. So when people are talking about all these terrible foreign medical grads and stuff boy. The US has relied on those foreign medical grads and. Show all the time. Yeah, it's it's a big deal and they've added a lot to the country. <hes> research wise clinical is an in every aspect of so. They came here for their residencies, and then they went back to India to work at a mission hospital <hes>, and so we sort of went back and forth from the United States indie when I was a kid, but when they were there this mission hospital, its mission was to serve the poor, and so they would take us on rounds or to the hospital on a fairly regular basis because they really wanted us to be sure to see why. Why they were doing what they're doing. Their lives were very busy. They both doctors and so <hes>. They were at the hospital a lot and you know kids could sort of feel like hey, why aren't you you know here with me? But we never felt that way because we saw what they were doing, and it was important, so that sense of those who have have a responsibility to serve those who have less because none of us earned what we have. It's all just you kind of like what we started with.

Ryan White Indiana United States Ryan Way Professor Pediatrics India Indiana University Ryan White Professor Nigeria Michigan Medical School Riley Marty Medical School University of M Bangladesh founder Stewart Madison Africa
"malaria" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"malaria" Discussed on WTOP

"The malaria medicine he's long touted as a treatment for coronavirus hydroxy chloride when I've taken it for about a week and a half now and I'm still here he said he's taking it as a preventive measure against the virus that's claimed the lives of more than ninety thousand Americans health experts in the FDA question the effectiveness of the drug and warned of potentially harmful side effects an announcement from the Massachusetts biotech firm send stocks soaring today CBS news business analyst Jill Slazenger stock investors cheered hopes for a corona virus vaccine driving index is higher by three to four percent to Madera therapeutics says its first eight participants developed antibodies after given just one dose of the potential vaccine company president Dr Steven Hoge our goal is to have a vaccine available for broad distribution by year end or early next year CBS news update I'm Pam Coulter six thirty two with Memorial Day weekend inside another fire regions normally packed beaches is about to allow more fun on the sands Virginia's governor made that announcement this afternoon our story from WTOP's Machel basher junior beach will ease more corona virus related restrictions in a few days as of Friday may the twenty second which is this Friday I will allow the city of Virginia beach to open its beaches to recreational activity sunbathing will be allowed along with swimming surfing and fishing but governor Ralph Northam says tense groups of beach umbrellas and group sports won't be Northam also announced that a group of state and local education leaders including representatives from K. through twelve schools and colleges and universities are meeting to figure out what classes might be like this fall this group is meeting regularly together with our public health team they'll be laying out specific next steps over the coming weeks Michelle Basch WTOP news in the small businesses in the Washington area are still struggling to hold on during the pandemic and they could get some help to keep workers on the payroll under a new proposal in Congress WTOP Capitol Hill correspondent Michelle Miller today on the hill the work share proposal from Maryland senator Chris van Hollen is supported by Amanda Ballantyne with the main street alliance which represents thousands of small businesses that create a pathway for many employers have the certainty they need to begin rehiring Ballantyne says one problem for small businesses is getting funds so they can adapt Americans have it how to keep the doors open anything with a lot of the restaurant industry where people are shifting to delivery are trying to shift to grocery the legislation would allow businesses to get federal assistance to share payroll costs and keep paying workers by trimming hours until operations fully re opened on Capitol Hill Mitchell Miller WTOP news I had a major discovery in the vet in the investigation into last year's Naval Air Station shooting in Pensacola Florida six thirty four if you don't know PPC if you don't know SCO if you don't know O. T. T. if you don't know targeted display social media man website development mail marketing you don't have to all you need to know is twenty sixty digital we can help you with the digital marketing your business needs but maybe doesn't understand or have time to execute twenty sixty digital is a Google premier partner may not mean a lot.

malaria
"malaria" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

05:00 min | 2 years ago

"malaria" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"The parasite that causes malaria and of course we spray mosquitoes the kill this from him the carrier of the parasite from one person the next and so it is kind of a process you got to go through here the same thing is true this corona thing so we came up with what we call first offense it goes back thousands of years of herbal stuff in all these communities and survives this New World is this in response to the corona virus or you've had it in response to things that were happening thousands of years ago and we got the original formula okay is made from cinnamon bark cloves eucalyptus the only hills oregano and it is got palmar Rosa temperament raven Serra he tree time and all those are in one chronicles first offense and I I you know kind of use that as an after shave in the morning after I shave and so it's in my face and and I am an inhaling it all day and then of course we have the hand sanitizer and then we have all these other things is for the new system all right we have the I. twenty six which is immune egg powder we inject the dead corona virus into the chickens okay and they build up antibodies against it and the lady that is the the antibodies in the aches and sleek power the eggs and then give it to people and so they're getting an antibody against all kinds of viruses including coronavirus and so forth coronaviruses document around for how long thousands of years yeah I had a friend of mine called me and this is good visit the somewhat humorous but not really and she had a can of Lysol five years old five year old canali saw on the back she said oh my god it says will also help fight corona viruses and she thought that there was something sinister going on here that how would they know about this virus five years ago and then I see they've been around the whole these are your soldiers away identified to species across viruses only call Mersey other was sars that's right which thank god didn't develop as bad as a lot of people thought it would yeah and because they're just a different strangers like you know what's more vicious a rattlesnake or herbal snake they're supposed excel right close to these viruses to the flow they're kind of distant cousins they're distant cousins just like how close is the streptococcus to the staphylococcal because the average person could not distinguish the difference that's correct between this will be the same the exactly so is it conceivable that this covert nineteen virus has been around much longer than what we thought oh absolutely it hasn't been around for thousands of years it was it as your friend said it was all class is part of the the the the flu which here is coronaviruses in there there's H. one N. one the swine flu the bird flu all this kind of stuff isn't and we just considered one disease until about fifteen years ago and they had the ability to separate amount identify all the individual members okay prior to that they just lump them all into one plan so it's conceivable people have the corona virus she died few years ago died and they tossed them into the seasonal flu numbers correct Jeez guardian eight plus plus exactly and so our job as an individual and and you know I grew up on a farm we had no electricity just nine years old grandma is a doctor okay and so we had every kind of urban environment knowing think of and that's when I I realize when I was nine years old the doctors are missing it I realize is when I was nine my mom and dad took me to twenty different doctors because I had a problem the doctors couldn't solve and so I just started eating animal food in three days time I was cured they had all the vitamins and minerals and animal food okay and so when I was nine years old I realized that I had to go do for people what veterinarians were doing for animals that's how the whole thing started and grandma she was big on the herbs and she was putting wood ashes in the garden which is kind of fertilizers minerals going to the garden in the wood ash and so forth and so you can't depend on what may or may not be in the food if you analyze carrots from every state no states all be different in the mineral content because nutritional minerals and other Kerney uniformed blank on the because the so just thinking that he will get everything you need is absolutely false you have to supplement as we do in animals who don't have health insurance for them we supplement them with everything we've eliminated nine hundred ever diseases and then by just supplementing with all nine essential nutrients so that's where the the youngevity program comes in with a ninety cents an entrance and this is working like a charm and so again good to have people take the ninety we have we call secret sauce is they have they come to us with ideas.

malaria
"malaria" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

06:50 min | 2 years ago

"malaria" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Zero seven ten is the number listen to get these drugs that are very effective it doesn't cure the corona virus but it brings down the symptoms dramatically you got to the Z. pack you got that malaria drug the malaria drug is particularly effective according to doctors I've talked to dozens of men there's hundreds of them have reported great success using them on all patients the bid they'll discover other things that help they're also looking for a vaccine couple companies think they've got some of those one of the scientists believe may be the vaccine and they think they can roll it out fast fast means a couple of months not a year so they're working on that let's take a caller to let's go to events in Florida offense where are you in Florida yeah good morning you know the state of New York in the city of New York take a lot of money from people and every day Cuomo in the blog here on TV demanding money respirators and you look at trump is giving tax breaks to people except the tax date till the summer why doesn't qualm all get together with the plot and says you know what if you want a business and you have a tenant that's employing his people or you got it an apartment complex how about if we give them a property tax break but if we give them an income tax breaks they have produced nothing you got price is well it's a good point thanks for thanks for calling Vince you're absolutely right a boat get a member trump basically a business man more than a politician Cuomo a hundred percent the blahs your hundred percent of politicians politicians don't like to give up money they want to get as much money out of you as you can remember these two before all of this we just we'll stand up nights trying to figure out other ways to pick your pocket from raising tolls to putting taxes on every little thing now this is going to end up costing the state the city of fortunes will need even more money after this it's already twenty Bucks to go across the bridge I don't know what it will be a year from now so that's another thing to worry about and I'm not that the money is wisely spent you know they overpay by ninety percent for the infrastructure is this two thousand and fifteen commission the state set up to look at health care and if you read the report this two thousand fifteen five years ago says we're not prepared for a major flu or pandemic and we need sixteen thousand more ventilators we recommend you buy them the governor the legislature everybody said no we're not going to buy them so we would have them all right now let's go to Jerry in Philadelphia Jerry how you doing Jerry you there nope let's try your let's go to Judith in the Connecticut all right we got Jerry Jerry are you there look down here well isn't there let's try Judith in Connecticut you if you're in Clinton Connecticut where's where's Clinton yeah they are Hey I'm I'm right here and how you doing to how you're holding up I'm holding up fine my husband and I have been to the wet market he was talking about the wet markets that's me I was at the wet market yeah that's the plan went into yeah we went we went to live in and I returned in nineteen eighty three I'm going to let mark and we were walking through the wet market and it was so disgusting that I wouldn't look at anything like I looked up and I saw a meat hanging on a clothesline and I said to my husband look there are no flights on the meat it's so disgusting even the flying school I want well there were flies but they died at the school but that yeah correct all right you too thanks for calling they are disgusting these wet markets unbelievable they're horrifying it's not exactly stew Leonard's in there they still letters they have a couple employees in different stores test positive they've remove them from the stores quarantining employees that were near them let's go to Bob in the Randolph a Bob hi how are you good what's gonna say Bob comment about the new governor Cuomo back in two thousand fifteen he commissioned the study worst case scenario about respirators in case of a calamity such as we are in now based on Mars servers you need okay commission as Ford says well I'm telling you so you can get I'm glad you told me bill the commission you would need about fifteen thousand respirators my god you're too at a cost of a million dollars Cuomo do you close out any cogent and spend three quarters of a billion Bucks on solar panels wow all right Bob thanks for the breaking news there for and give me a break he's been cooped up for weeks what does he know he's there's this picture I put on Instagram is president trump going home last night it's very dramatic you know he goes home the oval offices in the west wing you walk out the door and the walk down that prominent to go back to the White House this is a very lonely walkways after an eighteen hour day check out my Instagram mark Simone NY's bark Simone NYC on Instagram it's him walking home late at night all alone it's a very lonely job at the at the end of the day Hey we return at the admiral who's in charge now of logistics supply all of that we'll talk to two great military guys in a moment about what that's likely it will in a moment we'll talk the general Stanley McChrystal and a navy seal Chris Fussell about managing a crisis like this what you have also about what you need to do mentally to get through this we'll get to that in a moment on seven ten W. O. R. let's get the latest news here's Joe Bartlett all right mark good morning the number of coronavirus cases now tops one hundred thousand in New York state more than fifty seven thousand in New York City and two thousand nine hundred thirty five people have died statewide new numbers out from the governor this morning corona virus outbreak continues to take a toll on the economy labor department says seven hundred one thousand jobs lost last month pushing the unemployment rate up to four point four percent next month going to be much much worse Airbus has has five thousand new Yorkers could be in need of a ventilator by early next week governor Cuomo says the state could run out of ventilators in six days Yorkers being encouraged to wear face coverings it won't be enforced but the mayor says it could help stop the spread of corona virus and the Javits center now treating only corona virus patients after initially caring for those with other ailments the next updated noon breaking news at once instructor day would lead Berman and Michael Riedel in the morning ten on Monday I'm Joe Bartlett on.

malaria
"malaria" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"malaria" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Malaria this is often a sign in which is a drug that I've heard of past the past the chemical that comes from yes that's the active chemical found in this particular plant it was used for treating fevers they didn't use the word malaria they use the term fevers generally and this was well documented in the Hubble's of the day but it fell into disuse erring to the ready availability of Norton synthetic anti malarial us the discovery or rediscovery of autumn assigned and led to the Nobel Prize for medicine being awarded to two yo yo in twenty fifteen that must be countless traditional medicines around the world the remains untested with the knowledge of the use is still to be recorded now so far in the show we've been focusing on the listener Andrea is also been wondering about animals not as sources of medicine but as uses I was wondering if early humans of service for full of animals behaviors during if that's the case then we might be thinking about this question wrong if I'm the bulls use medicines then did the discovery of medicine even begin with humans in the first place I would argue absolutely not there are many many animals out there to use all sorts of medicine all sorts of medications treat their own pathogens and infections and this is been going on for probably hundreds of millions of years this is yet to road he spoke to us down the line from the U. S. I'm a professor of biology at Emory University here.

Malaria Nobel Prize Andrea professor Emory University Norton
"malaria" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"malaria" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Child dies of malaria and children account for the majority of the four hundred thousand deaths each year from the disease controlling malaria is currently based on preventing bites from the ski toes which transmit the disease bed nets treated with insecticide along with drugs to treat those infected Iraqi catching it globally would be a monumental achievement that does the world's first malaria vaccine offer the best hope of achieving that goal it's being rolled out today in Kenya the third African country to take part in trials global health correspondent to the prison Deborah's pain to the country's national vaccine deco in catching gala just outside the capital Nairobi. some students in the middle of Kenya's national vaccine death pay here in kitten gala this warehouse contains millions of vaccines for everything from polio rotavirus measles and tetanus lifesaving boxing. yeah I'm surrounded by around twelve fifteen huge fridges and freezes and if I go to this one here. where the malaria vaccine is cut out a hundred thousand of balls of the vaccine left here at the moment most of the balls have already been delivered to you every is in western Kenya wet the pilots is taking place and if I just came into the sports here in these two tiny little bottles. on one side it's the malaria vaccine and a white powder form on the other side tied to it is the liquid they used to dilute the vaccine this vaccine has been in development for more than thirty years now and it works by training the immune system to attack the malaria parasite which is spread.

malaria Kenya Deborah Nairobi. ski thirty years
"malaria" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

Very Bad Wizards

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"malaria" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

"A life. Like if that were the case that would mean every single person would get malaria if they didn't have one of these nets. And that's just not true. So they've actually created models to try to figure out how much money is given before life is saved and their models says it's about donating to the to the malaria found against malaria foundation about forty five hundred dollars before life is saved. So while what I was saying was was in the spirit of trying to tell you like that you buy might save a life. It is not an accurate way of saying what positive what it would. Yeah. That's right. If a life saved, it might be your they might be the malaria that you bought, but but but yeah. So forty five hundred dollars. This is something the other reason that I was. Slightly concerned. Now, my responsibility is also I have responsibility in this because I ended it noticed it. It was sort of too late to have to rerecord. And I just thought at the time like you did. Okay. They'll know what he meant. I was a little worried because I teach this. It's it's it's very kind of sh- concise ex expression of his view that he did. I think for the New York Times magazine or where in that article. He says something like two hundred dollars can save a life, and that's the vigor that he used and then when I interviewed him for the very bad wizard book, I brought that figure up and he said well, actually now we're thinking it's more along the lines of fourteen to sixteen hundred dollars not to under dollars. And so it does seem like this is a thing that that they're focused, right? Right. And rightly so because you don't if the whole point of these kinds of affective charities is that people don't think they're being duped. And and and give well is is at the forefront of being transparent about that. Which is why like you said, they're one of our favorite sponsors. All right. So we'll be right back to talk about vertigo..

malaria rerecord the New York Times magazine forty five hundred dollars sixteen hundred dollars two hundred dollars