36 Burst results for "Malaria"

Fresh update on "malaria" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:02 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "malaria" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"Got it. They are all looking forward. I want to get rid of these mass, you know, and to have a gathering of my friends. We gotta be like, Oh, let's head through the back door to go outside to sit six FT. Apart. Doctor Claire Bogart says the vaccine is safe and effective for Children protected 100% of the kids. I got the vaccine and the visor trial again. Contracting malaria virus That's about as good we could get really at Children's National Hospital Neil Organ, Steen W. T. O P knows it's to all five and gasoline is flowing through the colonial pipeline again. But many stations here in the D M V or sold out, and it could take a while for stations to fill their tanks. Phil Flynn is a market analyst with the Price Futures group, he tells w. T o p The way to keep this from happening again is to build more pipelines, but he acknowledges that won't be happening. Anytime soon. We've had an anti pipeline policy in this country. Nobody wants a pipeline until one goes down when they realize how vital they are to national security and how vital they are to our daily life, Lyn says. It could be a few weeks before the flow is fully restored and supplies or back up to the levels they were at before. A cyberattack last week shut down the pipeline. Christopher Cruz, w T o P news and the gas shortage is pretty serious around here in the district, 73% of stations have empty Tanks and gas, buddy says in Virginia, 51% or drive this afternoon, Maryland is faring the best but 36% of its stations air out of fuel. W T. O P has contacted several local stations that have run out of fuel. They tell us they expect to get new shipments within the next day or two. Stay with us here on double D T O p an update on this fine weather coming up to 06. Are you ready for spring? Well, now's the perfect time to head out to your local.

Phil Flynn Virginia Christopher Cruz Claire Bogart LYN 51% 36% 100% Children's National Hospital 73% Last Week Neil Organ Price Futures Five Next Day This Afternoon SIX Steen W. T. O P Contracting Malaria Virus M V
The Coronavirus Is Ravaging India

Short Wave

01:23 min | 6 d ago

The Coronavirus Is Ravaging India

"I've got lauren. Freyer international correspondent based in mumbai india. With me hey lauren. Hey mattie so weeks into this massive surge of new cases i mean how would you describe the situation there. I would describe it as a five alarm health emergency and the alarm just keeps on going like it's been weeks of this. Hospitals are overwhelmed. People are dying in parking. Lots of hospitals waiting to get in people are dying at home unable able to get an ambulance. I mean imagine calling nine one one and no one ever answers for weeks. India is seeing shortages of pretty much every tool country needs to fight a pandemic so hospital beds hospital workers because you know in some cases half of them are sick to medical oxygen antiviral drugs shortages of test kits. So you know. Four hundred thousand cases a day sounds like a staggering number scientists modeling. This say it might actually be more like five million cases a day here. Crematoriums are working nonstop like a public park. In delhi was turned into a mass cremation ground. And i spoke to a public health official recently. Who's supposed to be working on. Malaria prevention. his job now is to count bodies all day long and his biggest concern is finding enough firewood for all of these funeral. Pyres

Freyer Lauren Mattie India Mumbai Delhi Malaria
India's Covid-19 Crisis: What Happens Next and How Long Will It Last?

Short Wave

01:23 min | 6 d ago

India's Covid-19 Crisis: What Happens Next and How Long Will It Last?

"I've got lauren. Freyer international correspondent based in mumbai india. With me hey lauren. Hey mattie so weeks into this massive surge of new cases i mean how would you describe the situation there. I would describe it as a five alarm health emergency and the alarm just keeps on going like it's been weeks of this. Hospitals are overwhelmed. People are dying in parking. Lots of hospitals waiting to get in people are dying at home unable able to get an ambulance. I mean imagine calling nine one one and no one ever answers for weeks. India is seeing shortages of pretty much every tool country needs to fight a pandemic so hospital beds hospital workers because you know in some cases half of them are sick to medical oxygen antiviral drugs shortages of test kits. So you know. Four hundred thousand cases a day sounds like a staggering number scientists modeling. This say it might actually be more like five million cases a day here. Crematoriums are working nonstop like a public park. In delhi was turned into a mass cremation ground. And i spoke to a public health official recently. Who's supposed to be working on. Malaria prevention. his job now is to count bodies all day long and his biggest concern is finding enough firewood for all of these funeral. Pyres

Freyer Lauren Mattie India Mumbai Delhi Malaria
 Malaria Vaccine Trial Raises Hopes of Beating Disease

Ben Shapiro

00:25 sec | 2 weeks ago

Malaria Vaccine Trial Raises Hopes of Beating Disease

'The Stories Are Heartbreaking.' What 1 Reporter Witnessed In Mozambique's Violence

Weekend Edition Saturday

03:46 min | 2 months ago

'The Stories Are Heartbreaking.' What 1 Reporter Witnessed In Mozambique's Violence

"Graphic violence. Kaba Delgado's were the poorest regions in Mozambique and was largely ignored by the central government. Into large reserves of oil and gas were discovered offshore. His international oil companies have moved into the area. Fighters have stepped up their attacks. Terrorizing Villagers, burning homes, destroying farms. And publicly beheading. Women and Children. But the government of Mozambique and trying to put down the movement is also implicated in the violence. Aid groups estimate that half a million people have fled their homes and are in urgent need of aid. Journalists are not usually granted access to the area. But nay Hewat occur accompanied it. Aid group to cover Delgado last November. And was able to speak to survivors joins us now. Thank you for being with us. Thank you so much for having me. What did they tell you? I mean, the stories are heartbreaking. We spoke with a 10 year old girl named Maria and she remembers the day that the Attackers came into her village. They started burning houses down, they started looting. Maria was separated from her family during the violence, and she told me that the Attackers forced her and the other Villagers to sit and watch as they beheaded. People that they had grown up with people that they knew. After she fled. She fled into the forest and her foot got caught in an animal trapped like a hunting snare. Eventually she was rescued and she was carried to Pemba, which is a southern city in the Kaaba Delgado province. And Maria recovered from her wounds, and she also had malaria in the local hospital. And that was when she discovered that both her mother and her father had been beheaded in that attack. You know, That's just one of the many, many stories that I heard while I was there, all of them with the same level of brutal and senseless violence. Who are the Attackers, or is there one answer to that? There are many answers to that. But I will try to give Ah general overview of how this developed from what we know, Um, outsiders. The countries that have been named have in Kenya, Tanzania. On brothers so outside influences came into the country and started preaching against the version of Islam that was practiced in cover Delgado at the time. And they began preaching radicalizing in the mosques up there. And I spoke with some civil society leaders who told me that you know there were folks in these mosques who told the government something is going on here. Something is going wrong and that Thies concerns were just not addressed urgently. By the government. And so what ended up happening is that you have a local population, primarily young men, primarily unemployed who hear this radical version of Islam, and that's how people say that this started And then if, of course, if you fast track it a few years in 2019 Isis, the Islamic state claimed credit for its first attack, and that really changed the dynamics. This went from being a kind of local issue of violence by you know citizens who were unhappy or felt left out or left behind. Becoming really an international geopolitical problem. And you know that brings us up to where we are today. Just just this week, the United States government Has classified the Islamic state Isis

Kaba Delgado Mozambique Nay Hewat Maria Delgado Kaaba Delgado Central Government Pemba Malaria Tanzania Kenya Thies United States Government
World moves to embrace vaccine passports

First Morning News

01:59 min | 2 months ago

World moves to embrace vaccine passports

"Of a vaccine passport. Before you can travel was gonna closer Look at that. Joining us now, NBC radio national correspondent Rory O'Neill. Good morning, Rory. Good morning, you know, and it's trickier than you might think trying to navigate these waters because who sets the standard and what about your privacy concerns as well? And even if we get these vaccines rolled out, it's not as if everyone has access to them just yet, So it's a case of have and have not. You know what vaccine passport would essentially show proof that you've gotten your vaccine. That what kind of form doesn't come in? Is it something on your phone? But if you don't what if you still use a flip phone or eyes, it's something that will go with you is you travel from country to country, and who else would require it? You know, we've seen in the Israel that more than half the country has already been vaccinated, and they're using vaccine passports, toe let you access the local gym or to get into movie theaters. They use it as an inducement to open up more things to you so that if you get your vaccine, it's more of a reward and you can show proof of it. So exactly how these vaccine passports will work what standards will be set still up for debate around the world. Well, The other thing, too, is so in other words, if you don't get a vaccine, you can't travel. I mean, in fact becomes the law, right? Right. So that's another issue with some people are allergic to the vaccine and can't get the vaccine. What are they supposed to do? But, you know, vaccine requirements are nothing new. If you want to go to some countries, you need a malaria vaccine. And you know, they will have that requirement when you enter the country, So we've done this before. The question is, this vaccine just isn't as available as of malaria vaccine. So how can do what kind of a restriction are you putting on now? Airlines and hotels are doing their own thing. Some of requiring vaccine proof in order, let you fly their airplanes or check into the hotels. We're all expecting the cruise industry will require proof of vaccination. But again, what does that look like? Is it on your phone? Is that a piece of paper? All these things we get to be settled in the may be done piecemeal, which is what is the worst thing possible because that would just create lots of confusion. Well, we're used to that.

Rory O'neill Rory NBC Malaria Israel Confusion
New Ebola Outbreak Declared in Guinea

UN News

00:50 sec | 3 months ago

New Ebola Outbreak Declared in Guinea

"The un world health organization. Who thursday that. There's a very high risk of the ebola virus spreading in guinea after. An outbreak was announced last sunday in an update. Whol said that its concern was based on the unknown size duration and origin of the outbreak. It has led to five deaths so far in the southern region of missouri corey which borders sierra leone liberia and cote d'ivoire the first confirmed victim was a nurse from rural health center. He was initially diagnosed with typhoid and malaria. While her known contacts include a traditional healer and their family are potentially a large number of others and limited capacity to respond cautioned the agency guinea was one of the three most affected countries in the two thousand fourteen to two thousand sixteen west africa ebola outbreak which was the largest since the virus was first discovered in nineteen seventy six

Whol Missouri Corey Ebola Rural Health Center Guinea UN Sierra Leone Cote Liberia Typhoid Malaria West Africa
South Africa halts AstraZeneca vaccine rollout

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:57 min | 3 months ago

South Africa halts AstraZeneca vaccine rollout

"South africa has halted its rollout of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine just a week after the country received. Its first million doses. It seems the vaccine offers limited protection against a new variant of the corona virus. That's now dominant in the country. Salim abdul karim co-chair of south africa's ministerial advisory committee on covid nineteen spoke to a world health organization briefing yesterday. We don't want to end up with a situation where we vaccinated million people too. Many people would have vaccine that may not be effective in preventing hospitalization and severe disease in total more than one point. Two billion corona virus doses have been allocated for the continent. But it's not clear when all those jobs will arrive. The longer any region remains unvaccinated. The greater the chance that more variants arise vaccines though can be tweaked in a formulation of the oxford vaccine targeted at the south african variant could be going into arms by autumn. What scientists cannot address is the long run damage to africa both in human and economic terms so far continent to have been spared from the worst case scenarios predicted early on in the pandemic but the longer term picture remains bleak many ways the impact of the pandemic and africa is worse than it appears on the surface around the official numbers. Kenley salmon is one of our africa correspondent based in dakar. It is the case that having a young population has to some extent protected the continent from the virus africans and died from it that americans europeans but the true scott of infection. Death is really hard to gauge. Studying sudan recently showed the perhaps only two percent of all the covid desk for a quoted in the official tally and the economic impact is worse than it looks last year. The region's economy shrank for the first time. In twenty five years tourism has been badly hit as have commodity exporters things like oil in nigeria and taken together. Gdp per capita fell below twenty ten levels last year so things are perhaps not quite as bad as some other parts the world but certainly still very tough and things may get tougher house. What are the particular challenges to africa. Africa faces quite a number of challenges in the next few years as it tries to recover from the pandemic but the biggest i of the really is vaccines. Some african governments have perhaps failed to grasp the urgency of the situation in tanzania for example the populace president john food even casually cast out with a vaccine work but i do forgive aside claiming the postman precautions such as steaming nation were better than vaccines and even added that if the white man was able to come up with next nations then. Vaccinations for aids. Malaria and cancer would have already been found. So it's not so much a question than of supply. I mean given that quite a few vaccines have been essentially booked at the stage. A number of vaccines have been booked but the big question is when will they arrive because right now there aren't anywhere near the number of axes required forever on in the world and rich countries are of course the front of the queue for those vaccines have been produced africa's going to need perhaps two point six billion doses to vaccinate everyone and those are not being made locally so they have to rely on supplies elsewhere for the moment so that means joining the queue. All this means that whereas rich countries aim to vaccinate most of their people by the middle of this year the african. cdc a public health. Bali in africa's aiming for sixty percent of africans to vaccinated by the end of next year. But even that may be too optimistic. For the poorest countries. The economist intelligence unit sister organization estimates that in most african countries most people will not be inoculated until mid twenty twenty three or even early twenty twenty four and there must be serious consequences of it being that long until the continent is on average vaccinated. Africa is likely. It doesn't get those vaccinations into suffer. Further waves of the infection while after the disease may have amped in the rich world. And that of course will cause more death and more suffering. Doesn't risk that. Having the virus transmitting between people frequently africa could allow new variance to evolve. We've already got the south. African variant and these new variants could endanger people even in rich countries if they prove to be resistant to vaccines and then finally of course not having vaccines could force. African policymakers to continue with these very difficult economic lockdowns curfews even after many other countries around the world set free of those kinds of restrictions and if the public health concern lasts that long then surely the economic concerns will last at least that long. That's right in many african countries facing pretty severe crises at the moment just getting finance to pay their bills. Africa has very limited fiscal space on average countries in sub saharan africa. Spending more than thirty cents on every dollar. They raise and text revenue paying their debts. And that's up from twenty cents on the dollar before the pandemic on the debt side to over half of low income sub saharan african countries are now classed as in distress or at high risk of distress. According to the imf and what about countries with bigger economies the two biggest economies in africa nigeria and south ever both in pretty deep trouble nigeria for example was described by the world. Bank is being an unprecedented crisis. Recently the bank is not normally quite so blunt in nigeria. There has been a legacy of management for a number of years and pandemics really accessible that quite badly. Now focused suggested by twenty twenty three. Gdp per capita may go back as low as it was in one thousand nine hundred eighty time when the oil price was some high on so africa too is in trouble that have been in recession twice in the last three years before the pandemic hit of course now is dribbling itself with a particularly heavy toll from the pandemic so both countries in fact are facing a difficult road out of the crisis. And what about outside help in terms of financing has been quite a bit of outside help although the crisis of course is very big but in twenty twenty the imf for example provided sixteen billion dollars in loans most of that came with relatively few strings attached and this help frigging countries to respond to the pandemic to avoid some of the liquidity crises that were looming the world bank also dispersed another ten billion but many countries got that funding to if the imf under emergency allocations that came quickly and relatively easily and those allocations for many countries will soon be exhausted. The rich world has been trying to help when it comes to debt. They've provided liquidity to countries through some bits of suspension initiative that basically allows poor countries to put off debt repayments until july. Twenty twenty one. This is of course helpful but the trouble is that those payments just suspended and they have to be paid back with interest in about five years time so as the chief economist for africa the world bank put it to us. It may just be kicking the can down the road to. How do you see this playing out. Then how high could the human cost of all this be while the stakes are pretty high. The pandemic has already done lower damage to people's health and africa. it's hitting their economic prospects and they wealth and it's also affecting education of course. Hundreds of millions of students in africa have been affected by school closures. This increases the risk of dropouts and reduces the prospects for africa's largest every generation so overall the costs here really quite significant. There are some reasons for optimism. We may see vaccine rollouts accelerate. There's also hopes that commodity price rises could give africa real boost as the global economy recovers been on balance. The evidence probably points to at pretty difficult road ahead with several more waves of the virus hitting already struggling health systems and perhaps a form of economic long covert in africa. So you know africans have come through this showing remarkable resilience but it may be toughest years are still to come in. Thank you very much for joining us. thank you

Africa Salim Abdul Karim Co Ministerial Advisory Committee Kenley Salmon Nigeria Oxford South Africa John Food Astrazeneca Dakar Saharan Africa IMF Sudan Tanzania Malaria CDC
Amy Schumer explains her part in Hilaria Baldwin controversy

Radio From Hell

01:32 min | 3 months ago

Amy Schumer explains her part in Hilaria Baldwin controversy

"Amy Schumer. Hmm. Just talking about her role in the insane drama. Surrounding Hill area, Baldwin and her exaggerated Spanish roots. Ms. Schumer got caught up in the controversy after sharing several snaps poking fun. At Hilaria Baldwin, the fitness guru, mother of five, of course, wife of Alec Baldwin for claims she was pope poking fun at herself, not at Hill area. For claiming to be from Spain when she was actually born in Boston. But Amy made it clear that she only had love for Hilaria Baldwin, she said. Well, she's amazing. I wish her and her family the best, and I hope she gets to visit Spain as much as she wants. Schumer had weighed in making light of the situation, saying, I feel like it was so insane and entertaining that I think hilarious probably the only person who's happy about the insurrection in the capital because it distracted people from Her Spanish roots, not trying through. It was the same time. But then she went on to say she's amazing. I wish her the best. We'll know what Amy posted. It was funny. It was a picture of Malaria with her new baby and Hillary is ah yoga guru She's got, you know, teeny, tiny fit body and Amy Schumer also just had a baby. And what Amy posted was just me and Gene, you know, enjoying our you know. Making some joke that it though this is a picture of me and my baby when it wasn't she was making fun of herself.

Hilaria Baldwin Amy Schumer Ms. Schumer Hill Area Spain Alec Baldwin Baldwin AMY Schumer Boston Malaria Hillary
Bill Gates, the Virus and the Quest to Vaccinate the World

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

10:14 min | 6 months ago

Bill Gates, the Virus and the Quest to Vaccinate the World

"Who gates welcome back to the daily social distancing. Show good to see you you lost. Join us on the show. I would say it was about seven months ago and seven months ago. Just like dr fauci. You said you will worried because you felt like the worst was yet to come a lot of people accused you of peddling fear and terror and now it appears that unfortunately you were correct. Here's my question to you. Why does it seem like we've become worse at handling the pandemic you know in europe in the us then we were seven months ago when seven months ago. It was so bad. Well there's a couple of things working against us. I is that with the winter when we're colder we. The virus multiplies more and more indoors. More so that is not a good thing and then there's a certain fatigue. Some of the things people have had to do in terms of staying away from friends. That's tougher i've to say this round. It looks like europe is getting better compliance with the restrictions than the. Us is so they're starting to see a downturn. When you talk about that compliance and when you talk about the downturn is part of the downturn like should we should we be looking at the virus cases or should we be looking at the deaths because i never know which one is more important than usual. Be like a million more people to me. Five million seven million and then you'll see some doctors saying yes but fewer people are dying from because we know how to treat it. How should we be looking at this virus and the fight that we have against. It's well the case is our leading indicator it is true that cases are translating into less doubts for two reasons. One is that the cases are more in the young people Who are less likely to be very sick. And the other is that the quality of treatment including some new drugs like decks method have been proven out so when you do get hospitalized you have a higher chance of survival but were predicted to go back to over two thousand deaths a day in the months ahead so for the next six to eight months news is mostly bad after that the volume of the vaccine will have kicked in and then we'll have a light at the end of the tunnel. Wow i mean the the question is then i think for a lot of people is like. How long tunnel. How bad does that tunnel get. And how do we stop it from being the worst possible tunnel one of the big things. A lot of people are worried about is going to be the transition between joe biden. donald trump. You know you've worked with governments all over the world working on their vaccine distribution working on healthcare around the planet. You know how important it is for one administration to talk to the next when it comes to Handing off on their plans. How much do you think this will actually affect america's response if if there isn't a transition well it's unfortunate that the current administration got tied into a positive narrative that you know we're turning the corner And that you now have this transition will make. The message is a little less clear. You know this is when you'd love to see the best. Cdc people on tv reminding us about social distancing and masks. You know particularly when there is that fatigue out there so leaders at all level. This is a chance to step up even on politicians. You know encouraging friends that hey we. We don't want this additional several hundred thousand deaths you know it'd be adjective. A person who dies know when the vaccine is absolutely on the way and so i think the good news should drive compliance not lacks laxity as somebody who's done work globally around healthcare for so long especially around infectious diseases. What have you found is the key to encouraging or convincing community members to buy into the measures that keep them safe where we had vaccine resistance with polio and they're getting the religious leaders to speak out have them a visibly vaccinating their own children for would like we'd never stopped polio in africa and yet now it's just been certified that we've gone three years without wild polio so activating the trust hierarchy and getting rid of the conspiracy political element to it and just reminding people you know in this case. It's about saving lives in that case it's about kids not being paralyzed people back to that. Very human impact. If we don't behave well. I think it will often come through. It's interesting that you bring up conspiracies because the conspiracy theories about you online have are insane on social media and social media has propagates them in a way where it's like bill gates is trying to create vaccines so that he can cook troll your minds and he wants to vaccinate. Everybody can implant change. People's dna is what they said. You're going to change our dna. So that i don't know we turn into something and then we work for you somewhere. I don't know the full story. I'm still learning it when you see these things first of all. Have you been able to track down where it comes from. And secondly have you. Even i know you think about these things you want to like the biggest thing because i hadn't even thought about like the motivation behind it because i'm always trying to figure out who benefits from a conspiracy theory and i'd love to know if you've put any thought to this at all because of how many people won't get a vaccine because they truly believe conspiracy theories yeah usually when you work on infectious disease like dr fauci and high do your your kind of obscure in a nobody talks about t be or or malaria so here we have this complete turnaround where vaccines and are they. Good for people are now front and center. And there's always been a small group of anti vaccination people and we see this with you know measles vaccine. They've now got a platform and they've sort of joined forces with some political and spiracy abuse and it's so easy to click on particularly when a simple explanation for this pandemic that there is somebody evil behind it. You know as somehow easier than you know the true biology which is actually kind of complicated so we have to make the truth more interesting. And you know we've got a label things with the truth and sadly the naievety about how to make social media work. Well is pretty strong. And that's coincided with the election and the epidemic. I wish i had the answer. But you know it's it's it's out there in big big numbers and hasn't it just keeps growing so when we look at the vaccine. Now i mean that's now the story you know. Now the world is waiting for the vaccine because the vaccine becomes the key that unlocks the doors. You say the lights at the end of the tunnel. The question then is how do people get the vaccine. How effective will the distribution method be and how difficult is will the vaccine short supply. The good news is that there's four other vaccines that are likely to get approved fairly quickly as well. The fact that pfizer worked so well makes us optimistic. That astrazeneca johnson and johnson vacs which those are much cheaper easier to scale and don't require that cold chain so we'll have a lot of scenes and we need to prioritize people. At risk elder people people working nursing homes and each country Will have to decide okay. Who goes first. That's still a little bit confused in the us but hopefully we'll get that straightened out very very soon because the vaccine is likely to be shipped a lot in the month of december as you said anti vaccine community has only grown over time. I think the us is now the biggest hub of anti vexes in the world it started as a fringe thing with measles now with corona it is fully fledged and because of politics it's been amplified so now you'll have some people who on the liberal side saying i don't trust that vaccine it was made under trump and then you'll have other people saying like i don't trust that vaccine that came from joe biden and the and the democrats trying to brainwash. It's a lot of people may not want to take the vaccine which may now go against everything we've worked toward. So how do you begin convincing people that the vaccine is safe like in the midst of this political crisis. Well it's clear that the fda through the professional staff. They're all the things that are supposed to do likewise pfizer. There's even an external committee that will weigh in just to make absolutely sure that the the political desire to get this quickly did not in fact the efficacy and safety review and i feel very confident because the people involved are are really doing their job. Well we don't need everyone to take the vaccine. Society will have to decide if there's some jobs like going to a nursing home in taking care of somebody's grandparents whether that person you know how strongly you encourage them to have a vaccine so they're not spreading seeing but with this level of efficacy if we can get to seventy five percent dosed then you'll block the spread of the disease with measles you'd have to get to like ninety five percent because it's even more infectious but the good news here is that we just need that maturity and i think as people see people taking the vaccine and they see that The side effects of any are very very rare. That confidence will build and that will be good for society because when you take the vaccine you're helping to protect other people.

Dr Fauci Polio United States Europe Joe Biden Donald Trump Gates Fatigue Measles CDC Astrazeneca Johnson Bill Gates Infectious Disease Africa Malaria Pfizer Johnson FDA
How COVID-19 human challenge trials work -- and why Sophie Rose volunteered

TED Talks Daily

04:01 min | 6 months ago

How COVID-19 human challenge trials work -- and why Sophie Rose volunteered

"In april. Two thousand and twenty. I made what many perceive is a risky decision volunteered to be deliberately infected with covid nineteen. This infection would be part of what is cold. A human challenge show where young healthy people given a vaccine and then deliberately exposed to the virus that causes covid. Nineteen these trials help. Researchers figure out more quickly if a vaccine is working. I think this research is crucial. Because today i'm going to speak to you for six minutes in that time. Roughly twelve hundred and fifty people will be confirmed infected with covid nineteen twenty. One people will die and then this pot repeat hour after hour and day by day until we're able to vaccinate most of the eight billion people affected but squabble crisis. Scientists have been working around the clock to make those vaccine's reality. But what should we do when the human cost of waiting for vaccines is rising by the day. This is a human challenge shells. Come in the different from the traditional phase. Three bucks trials taking place now where people are given a vaccine or placebo. An oss to go about their everyday lives. Researchers have to wait to see how many people in each group become infected until enough of them get sick. We don't have enough data to know whether a vaccine is working. Finding effective vaccine with this method can take months sometimes years and it requires thousands of volunteers. A challenge tall works foster because research control exposure instead of waiting for people to get sick so instead of a year we could know in as little as a month whether a vaccine seems effective instead of thousands of volunteers a challenge shawl relies on just fifty to one hundred because we know if a sudden when people are exposed and develop disease. These trials also allow us together data about the early stages of infection and our response. This data is impossible together in any other way especially for people who become infected but never showed symptoms. This knowledge is important for designing policies. That limit covid nineteen transmission. The time saved translates into precious month's headstart on manufacturing getting a small working covid. Nineteen vaccines scenes foster. These trials are useful even their recent phase through results on encouraging. The arrival of the fuss vaccine is going to be a monumental breakthrough. it just isn't quite the fairy tale ending role harping full. We're going to need multiple vaccines because we just don't have the infrastructure needed to immunize eight billion people on the planet with just one kind. Each type of back seen requires its own special process and equipment to make store and deliver it if we had multiple working covid nineteen vaccines. We could make use of all of our equipment at the same time. Some of the leading candidates need to be kept extremely colds before they live limit to people. This can be really hard especially in countries where there isn't reliable electricity or a secure method to store them. Scientists have been using human challenge. Charles for hundreds of years. They've sped up the development vaccines against typhoid and cholera. And i've helped us better understand how immunity develops to things like the flu. Malaria and dengue gay with use them for other types of coronavirus. Before there's been a lot of debate about whether challenge charles a too risky. I happen to think that those risks of taking a challenge trial would recruit young and healthy participants think between the ages of twenty and twenty nine fewer than one percent of people in that age group need to be taken to hospital after becoming infected with covid nineteen likely even lower in a challenge trial because researchers check to make sure that participants have no pre existing conditions. The risk of a young healthy person dying of covid nineteen is around five thousandth of a percent

Colds Typhoid Cholera Dengue Malaria Charles FLU
Biden turns to coronavirus response, names advisory board

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 6 months ago

Biden turns to coronavirus response, names advisory board

"As his White House transition begins president elect Joe Biden is making a quick pivot from the campaign to the virus pandemic public health officials warn the nation's entering the worst cove it nineteen straight yet Biden says the pandemic is one of his administration's most important flights and you'll be informed by science and experts he's named a task force to come up with a blue print for fighting the pandemic including doctors and scientists who served in previous administrations among the more notable members record right he says he was ousted from heading a government agency for resisting pressure to allow widespread use of a malaria drug which president trump pushed as a virus treatment Sager made Donnie Washington

Joe Biden White House Biden Malaria Sager Donnie Washington
UN: Child Malnutrition Soars in War-torn Yemen

UN News

03:34 min | 7 months ago

UN: Child Malnutrition Soars in War-torn Yemen

"The children of Yemen are suffering acute malnutrition president at rights as the world's worst humanitarian crisis grinds on UN agencies have warned in an alert based on new food security analysis in some areas more than one in four children is acutely malnourished. said the UN Children's fund UNICEF along with the World Food Programme, WFP and the Office for the Coordination of humanitarian, affairs or. They cited data from one hundred and thirty three districts in southern parts of Yemen which are home to one point four, million children under five. It revealed a ten percent increase in acute trish in so far this year even worse is the more than fifteen percent rise in children suffering from severe acute malnutrition meaning that at least ninety, eight, thousand under-fives are at high risk of dying without urgent medical treatment from Geneva. Here's UNICEF spokesperson Eczema. Kado. The most significant increase is among young children who suffer from inferior acute malnutrition. This is a condition that leaves children around ten times more likely to die. Z's as such as cholera, diarrhoea, malaria, or acute respiratory infections, all of which are common in Yemen. According to Wip by the of twenty, twenty, four in ten people in surveyed areas of Yemen about three point, two million people are likely to be severely food insecure data for the remaining districts. Northern Yemen has yet to be published, but the situation is expected to be equally concerning based on historical trends. Fighting between government on non-state actors has continued in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province where civilians have been killed thousands displaced the UN hazard an update from Austria, the UN Humanitarian Aid Office reported that more than two weeks since clashes began near Lashkar Gah city. The security situation remains volatile while talks between the Afghan government and Taliban representatives continue in Qatar fighting has also been reported along the road connecting Chicago with Kandahar city in the East with improvised explosive devices planted on main highways continuing to threaten those looking for shelter. Amid attacks affecting fifteen medical facilities, the World Health Organization W. H.. O.. Also reported that the closure of clinics has affected thousands of people although handful of partially reopened. Science needs to be more accessible, transparent, and in tune with people's needs if global threats like the covid nineteen pandemic ought to be overcome effectively, you agency heads said on Tuesday in a joint appeal for free access to scientific reviews, data tools, and software audrey. Azoulay. From yes. Go Ted Ross at an Gabri ACIS from the World Health Organization has. Michelle Bachelet High Commissioner for Human Rights called on the international community to take all necessary measures to make this happen with the additional support of Fabiola Gianotti who had Sunday European Laboratory for particle physics. The appeal also intends to promote trust in research and technology at a time when rumors and. False information I increasingly common in a statement UNESCO the UN agency for Education Science and Culture said that the recent response of the scientific community to the cave nineteen pandemic has demonstrated how well open science can accelerate the achievement of scientific solutions to global challenges. But the agency insisted that sustainable solutions to global threats require an efficient transparent and vibrant scientific effort from everyone in society not just scientists in line with the wishes of UN member states UNESCO is developing guidelines explaining how countries can implement open science policies to bring citizens closer to science and how they can commit to helping to share scientific knowledge around the World

Un Children Yemen UN Un Humanitarian Aid Office World Health Organization Unicef Coordination Of Humanitarian Education Science And Culture Unesco WFP Geneva Michelle Bachelet Fabiola Gianotti Ted Ross President Trump WIP Cholera
If approved, UK to start controversial Covid vaccine challenge trial infecting patients

Up First

01:03 min | 7 months ago

If approved, UK to start controversial Covid vaccine challenge trial infecting patients

"Researchers are preparing for a step toward finding a corona virus vaccine a particularly terrifying step it's called a challenge trial and it means you give the vaccine to people, and then you expose them to the virus to see if the vaccine works. Channel trials are used to test vaccines for diseases like typhoid, cholera and malaria. The difference here is that if new vaccines for those. Illnesses do not work there at least ways to treat the people who've been infected for covid nineteen. Of course, there is no cure and treatments are still limited. So a challenged trial raises some real ethical concerns. Arthur Caplan is a bioethics professor at New York. University School of Medicine. We don't fully understand the Cobra virus we're going to give it to people intentionally make them sick. What if there's a death? What if there's long-term disability? What if things go really soured for the subjects? As, just GonNa look like an ethics catastrophe researchers in the United Kingdom? Still think challenge trial is worth it and they plan to try one

Arthur Caplan Typhoid University School Of Medicine United Kingdom New York Professor
University of Florida cancels football team activities amid 19 new coronavirus cases

The Paul Finebaum Show

04:43 min | 7 months ago

University of Florida cancels football team activities amid 19 new coronavirus cases

"Ross Bjork. Two Am athletic director putting out a statement now saying we've been in touch with officials. At Florida and also reviewed. The available data from the contact tracing system deployed by the SEC. At this point there is been no impact within our program, but we will continue our regular testing regiment this week. And stay diligent. With all of our safety protocols. So that is a fairly similar statement to what Ray Tanner put out yesterday in terms of possible inflection or. Infection I should say on the previous Game Notre Dame had that issue a couple of weeks ago and That's that's the only time we've seen now we're we're a team played last week ended up causing as well. Back to the phones at eight, five, five, two, four, two, seven. Two eight five and Paul was up next in Arkansas Paul. Thanks good afternoon. Hey Paul With my situation what I'm with what I have done a lot of research on this. covid nineteen and when the government I was. Testing all these vaccines they've found that the vaccine. That was used for malaria had a a a very good impact on covid nineteen. The ingredient was drowsy. Clark. And based on some of the studies. it was saving like fifty percent of people's lives it was taken. As Preventative You know as a preventive. Medication instead of waiting until you got the virus to take it. I have a very. Close or good medical A. Person that I've talked to about this and they said most doctors that have. are are very positive about this ingredient And they have patients that they've recommended. You know taking it There are some patients have some kind of Rimma Tori disease it take it all the time that they don't get a covid nineteen I don't understand why the government is trying to hide this. I mean if it allows I don't know but but but I do know that I think four drug companies at least in this country or many more around the world are pretty deep into. The the vaccine. So I I would. Dare. Say What you said I've heard before but it may very well be a moot point right now. Well. All I'm saying is if it's you know it's going to say it's SORTA and they start they get with a doctor that you know has you know patients where he's distributed this out I mean if it would help that program, you know to the point where you know by the time. I think issue there I'm certainly not talking about my expertise, which is pretty miniscule almost everything but. The there's no way. A doctor is going to administer this to a football team. Well maybe not but all I'm saying is that. You know this particular ingredient. For the malaria virus did test of you know pretty good against Kobe nineteen and my point is You know I'm just frustrated we're in this situation with. and I it may be. Hey. Here's what I think is the good news that we are pretty close At least we're told we're pretty close to a A vaccine. So I I I. Don't I don't think anything's going to change that Let's hope it's. Like today, Jonathan is in Kansas you're on the Air Hello Jonathan good afternoon. I'm actually Tampa, Florida. Good have you on. Sir. I'm I'm in Tampa Florida, I I I graduated from the University of Florida in two thousand, sixteen I just want to quickly touch up on touch touch up on a few things. Dan Molin I know he has got a lot of backlash for saying you went to the stadium, but I also remember coach Free Coast Frost got a lot of backlash when he said he went to play and now he's playing. I believe that he will not be

Florida Malaria Jonathan Tampa Ross Bjork SEC Ray Tanner Dan Molin Rimma Tori Director Paul University Of Florida Clark Arkansas Football Kobe Kansas
Sandra Bullock to Star in Romance-Action Film ‘Lost City of D’ for Paramount

Colleen and Bradley

00:42 sec | 7 months ago

Sandra Bullock to Star in Romance-Action Film ‘Lost City of D’ for Paramount

"Sandra Bullock is producing and starring in a new romantic action film. It's called The Lost City of D O. Endit film is centred on a romance author who discovered well, you'll be able to when When the movie comes out, it's about a romance author discovers at a fictional city she's written about Israel, prompting her to embark on a risky journey to find the city student for D Looking for D. Apparently, Paramount is eyeing Ryan Reynolds. As a possible co star in the loan. I would watch those two together in a movie. I mean, the last time they were together, it was malaria will like their chemistry was in the proposal all the way back in 2009. Yes,

Sandra Bullock Ryan Reynolds Malaria Paramount Israel
Trump joins growing list of virus-infected world leaders

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 7 months ago

Trump joins growing list of virus-infected world leaders

"President Donald Trump has tested positive for the coronavirus joining a small group of world leaders who've also been infected the president is not alone among world leaders to get could be nineteen Britain's Boris Johnson got sick in April and in hospital spent a short period in intensive care than Brazil's president diables tomorrow announced his illness in July and used it to public extol hydroxy chloride Quinn the unproven malaria drug that he promoted as a treatment for Kevin nineteen I was taking himself another Belarus's Alexander Lukashenko who dismissed concerns about the virus as a psychosis and recommended drinking vodka to stay healthy said in July he contracted it himself but was a symptomatic I'm Charles and the late that's my

President Donald Trump President Trump Britain Boris Johnson Brazil Kevin Belarus Alexander Lukashenko Charles
Trump joins growing list of virus-infected world leaders

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 7 months ago

Trump joins growing list of virus-infected world leaders

"President Donald Trump has tested positive for the coronavirus joining a small group of world leaders who've also been infected the president is not alone among world leaders to get could be nineteen Britain's Boris Johnson got sick in April and in hospital spent a short period in intensive care than Brazil's president diables tomorrow announced his illness in July and used it to public extol hydroxy chloride Quinn the unproven malaria drug that he promoted as a treatment for Kevin nineteen I was taking himself another Belarus's Alexander Lukashenko who dismissed concerns about the virus as a psychosis and recommended drinking vodka to stay healthy said in July he contracted it himself but was a symptomatic I'm Charles and the late that's my

President Donald Trump President Trump Britain Boris Johnson Brazil Kevin Belarus Alexander Lukashenko Charles
"malaria" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

The Guardian's Science Weekly

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"malaria" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

"I might just add. We are already well into the next sort of phase experiments which is trying to spread this micro within large screen house population of mosquitoes. That are supposed to kind of represent what we have in the wild and that will give us the parameters to to try something larger in the field and Hopefully the results are good than they could be rolled out shortly after that. Jeremy I mean most of us onto fund of mosquitoes and tickly malaria carrying one's a bit as you've been working with these insects wonder. Do they have any good points at all to good question an awfully. Mosquitoes are very interesting because these are the ones who oversee which transmit malaria but other than transmitting malaria. They are I. Would I would say the most considerate of of the mosquitoes they. They don't make a lot of noise. you don't actually notice them that that often I in even in places where. Malaria is being spread. You know very very extensively in a usually sixty seventy percent of the mosquitoes you encounter are are are different types of mosquitoes. Those the ones which allowed they hurts when they bite you. The northeast ones are at least very considerate. They don't cause much disturbance of course in you transmit the disease. They're also incredibly difficult to rear in in the lab and many of the species which are major malaria. Vectors are still very very difficult to culture laboratory laboratory conditions which action make studying them very difficult to end that I find quite amazing that something which is so difficult to kill in the wild Yet when you bring it into the lab and you know you just just treated a little bit badly just kills over and is Lord of mysteries.

Malaria Jeremy
Trump Urges People To Take Hydroxychloroquine: 'What do you have to lose? ... Take it.'

On The Media

01:18 min | 1 year ago

Trump Urges People To Take Hydroxychloroquine: 'What do you have to lose? ... Take it.'

"And I say it. What do you say to get? What do you have to lose on Saturday? President trump again touted the use of hydroxy chloroquine an anti-malaria drug as a potential treatment for covert nineteen the USC announced has stockpiled. Twenty nine million doses. Though the basis for using the drug to treat the disease is entirely anecdotal. Some doctors are already using it in hospitals around the country. Some report that it might be useful in the early stages of covert nineteen. But we really don't know. And what do we have to lose? There are side effects. Experts warn and it is potentially fatal for patients with heart problems or who are on certain antidepressants. And then there's the side effect of a shortage for people who are actually prescribed drugs clerk in four illnesses like lupus and rheumatoid arthritis yet. We have to be careful Laura that we don't assume something works based on an anecdotal report. That's not controlled and I refers specifically to hydroxy chloroquine. Dr Anthony FAUCI Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has been urging caution in White House briefings

President Trump Malaria USC Lupus Rheumatoid Arthritis Dr Anthony Fauci Laura National Institute Of Allergy White House
"malaria" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

Ben Greenfield Fitness

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"malaria" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

"And you're never able to get rid of the heirs in update. So I really did fact checked pretty much everything in the book, and you can tell by the referencing in the book, there's just under a thousand references. So I checked into the Sardinian issue because I wanted to make sure this wasn't just some kind of lower from. Natural medicine. It turns out that this does checkout, and I believe it was in the nineteen fifties. That Sardinia went through this anti malarial campaign because there's a fairly high incidence of malaria in Sardenia, and what ended up happening years after that was the incidence of multiple sclerosis in Sardinia started to go up to one of the highest in the world. And what the researchers who have been tracking? This are now positing is it was a or the the malaria was. A or I should say the star Deion immune system. Learn to evolve under the pressure of malaria and kind of required that little bit of tension in the immune system from the malaria for the Sardinians immune systems to be healthy. Once that was taken away, the Sardinian immune system that was always kind of used to having this little bit of tension with malaria once that was gone. It's almost to say these are immune system did not to do with it self. And it was so used to being a little bit turned on to guard against the malaria than when the malaria was gone. It was kind of like having a board army. Right. And then the soldiers get drunk going down start picking fights and you see this by standard autoimmune effect. And so sometimes things that we don't think are good may actually be good, especially if the immune system has evolved to pee in harmony with those in the same thing applies to. The.

malaria Sardinia Deion Sardenia
"malaria" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"malaria" Discussed on The Science Hour

"Countries cases are on the rise and the number of deaths has stopped falling for the first time in ten years and has more trouble on the horizon with the malaria parasite developing resistance to the world's leading drug treatment a combination of two drugs one of which is fast acting artemis in in but some years ago in southeast asia the malaria parasite mutated and resistance to these drugs has gradually spread now i say gradually bought new research where they did genetic analysis of the parasites in blood samples collected from patients with malaria across seven years showed that resistance began to develop earlier than anyone thought it turns out that for years multidrugresistant malaria has been spreading onto the radar dominic 'cause yakov ski from the science center an oxford university in the uk did the work and i asked him when doctors started to get concerned revolt services to also leases salter to emerge about ten years ago in western cambodia became play the pa hera sars when not was fully quite so quickly to the drunk but at that time that at least the drug was still working still clearing parasites from the body what happened about five years ago is is reports came through that a particular and important type of automation and combination therapy cold dha the pera quinn that was completely failing to treat patients they it was just wasn't clearing the parasites on the worrying thing is that is now spreading from west in cambodia to other parts of the country and to surrounding countries to allow to vietnam and into thailand so that's the concern in your new research has shown that the root of this multidrug resistance problem actually goes back to the year cambodia started to use this particular combination treatment widely in two thousand eight that's rice what was was that that the the origins of resistance were actually already in the parasite population in the very year third that particular treatment became the official firstline treatment.

malaria oxford university uk cambodia dominic vietnam thailand official ten years seven years five years
"malaria" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"malaria" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"Mm mostly focuses on quinine and the discovery of the sinn kona tree i've got several papers on a site today and always cite the who but at least three other papers today so one was by bought at all in nature published in 2015 and that was the paper on the effect of malaria control on p faucet broom in africa between two thousand in 2015 and then the other two were the two papers about genetically modified anopheles and genetically modified bacteria those were both published in the september 2017 issue of science so you can find those the first one is by wang in the second one is by pike taught off the presses hot off the press september 2017 there was a bunch of other so if you're interested in any specific aspects of malaria shoot us a message or something and it also just as a reminder we do have a good reads list yeah which has all of these books and we're working on getting a global docks up for the different articles that aaron mentioned so you can take a look at those yet if you're interested in reading further yeah i think that that about wraps up our episode today does thanks again to do much for providing his first hand account of malaria super interesting and also thank you again to blood mobile for providing the music in this episode and for all of you bird people out there one of the songs features a bird native to the andes joseph see if you can pick it out rate review and subscribe please please follow us on social media and thanks for listening thanks so much now wash your hands dealt the animals.

quinine sinn kona tree pike social media malaria africa genetically modified wang aaron
"malaria" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"malaria" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"All of these spraying an drug campaigns so tell me what you got four today yeah that's that's where i should step in then got it all ah since her civil as of 2016 nearly half of the world's population lives at risk of malaria half half so it's like three and a half billion people or so britain that on the table right away it's literally over three billion people live in areas that have malaria transmission in ninety one different countries that allow thought of countries it's a lot of people at risk of malaria a lotta people probably getting malaria and the money that you're talking about that dried up back in the sixty 70s 80s didn't really start flowing back towards malaria research and prevention until two thousand while ago yeah i know i thought that had to be wrong but the other thing that's really important to keep in mind when we're talking about malaria is that when you look these numbers of cases in numbers of deaths they're basically guesses they're educated guesses they're guesses that are based on some surveillance and a lot of statistical and mathematical modelling but they're still just guesses and depending on who you talk to or whose paper you read there either really great guesses or there may be not that great of guesses and this is especially important because the guesswork in this case extends not just two guessing how many cases and deaths are are but how effective the interventions have been in reducing those cases and deaths it would have to be like a massive reduction to detect any sort of kind of yet and just to really understand like how big of an impact is this intervention having verses that intervention rates any sort of evaluation is it is really difficult yeah so in two thousand six who estimated that there were two hundred and sixteen million cases of malaria worldwide.

malaria britain
"malaria" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"malaria" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"Work in panama yes the entirety we spent months many months especially in your case as guys i spent years literally your literally panama had been the bane of europe's existence for awhile since it inconveniently blocked easy transport from the atlantic to the pacific oceans how root of it cannot believe it at its narrowest panama is about fifty miles or eighty kilometers across it's actually a little bit less than that so small it's very small and the spanish had previously built a trail actually the spanish had their slaves build a trail known as the community decreases to link these two oceans but the forests were full of malaria and yellow fever and in the rainy season huge parts of this trail would be washed away and i should know because i used to walk along what remains of this trail every week jan wife who worked in you find a lot of really cool old bottles injued yeah announced yet circle it was by favorite thing love anyway fresh off the success of the suez canal the french engineer ferdinand de lesseps tons rate was hired to cut into panama construction began but progress wasn't really made workers were dying by the thousands from malaria and yellow fever in eight years over twenty two thousand workers died in the construction what how eight years is twenty two thousand lives whilst that's half the students at this university was a complete disaster at his awful yeah so the french after this there were like okay this isn't working yeah so the poll project was abandoned for a number of years oh my god a few years after the canal was cancelled a couple of researchers finally showed conclusively that malaria was transmitted to the bite of a mosquito and this finding though would come to late for the thousands of workers who died during the first canal efforts yeah but not for the second successful attempt to build a canal when the u s took over cannot construction they.

panama europe malaria suez canal panama construction fever engineer eight years eighty kilometers
"malaria" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"malaria" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"Although malaria was new to the western hemisphere there was a secret their hidden in the forested hills of the andes the sing kona tree the bark of this tree contains a chemical called quinine which when ingested reduces the symptoms of malaria and basically cures you the catch where people of peru bolivia venezuela and ecuador had been using bark from the same country for ages prior to the european invasion but when malaria started popping up they saw that it was also an effective treatment for that illness some jesuits from spain notices catch one practice of treating malaria with the spark and coopted it bringing the powdered bark back to spain announcing it as a miracle cure which it really was yeah and calling it jesuit spark claiming that they had discovered it and it's practice t typical flick come ahead guys really europe was still very much malaria i think that's a word at this i'm which is like the mid sixteen hundreds and when the news spread about this miraculous fever tree the race was on to find these trees get their bark and most importantly control their production yeah there were many missions failed and successful to harvest saplings collect seeds and bring them back to europe to be planted it became a huge commercial venture with a lot of political turmoil the sing cone true was almost harvested to extinction wow mmhmm exporting these trees out of peru and selling the seeds was quickly outlawed but that didn't stop it from happening and the dutch maintain some pretty huge sincan plantations in indonesia while the british had some in india wow of course only wealthy people could afford to purchase the treatment which kind of set the precedent for malaria being a disease of poverty yeah the other thing that sinn coned bark did was to enable the colonization of parts of the world that had previously resisted because of the amount of malaria there now europeans could travel to and invade these places.

malaria peru indonesia chemical called quinine bolivia venezuela ecuador spain europe
"malaria" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"malaria" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"Well i could also tell you about my famous meal combo of bedbugs eggs and wine okay what not bad bug eggs but bedbugs and a chicken and egg wine yeah why i don't have those answer how do you prepare the eggs again i assume over easy now we are this sounds a i want to leave realm well whichever one of those you choose any succo sorry but i'm going to prescribe your whatever i think is best and i'm also going to prescribe you a piece of papyrus that you're gonna wear around your neck with the powerful word abracadabra on it not the yes no abracadabra that is where adverse abracadabra comes from stop it relates to here it was to prevent malaria in ancient romans dopp it right now he's it took everything i had to hold this facto in from you so i wanted maximum impact abracadabra means go away malaria mmhmm oh my god i don't know if it necessarily means we're going to say i looked at the eta mal aji and it seems like nonsense go away go malaria oh my god that is the best news i've ever heard yet okay so we got abracadabra we got some mouse livers we've got some bed bugs were done with ancient rome there's nothing more i can say i do leave this place i'm gonna talk a little bit about more modern rome i guess like not modern day but it's important because rome in like the 1500s i think is probably where malaria actually got its name oh so malaria mao meaning bad and rer area whatever meaning air you add air ban air so remember the theory of my asthma tourism idea the idea that diseases caused by foulsmelling air and certain weather patterns gap that is what was at play here when.

rome malaria
"malaria" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"malaria" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"Her cell super him who fell sip room probably made its appearance when people began to farm in or near rain forest in central africa so they're a new malaria parasite emerged taking advantage of settled groups so more stable where it could actually persists in a community whereas vivax was able to survive prior to us like large settled groups because of the dormancy uh that makes sense supercool yeah and then there was also a more efficient mosquito for fell super him disease transmission fell separation when it first popped up would have been really devastating so devastating in fact that when yet another mutation this one protecting against fell super malaria appeared it rapidly spread to the african continent this one you may have heard of sicklecell not going to delve too deeply into the biology or the genetics of this one but basically people with one copy of the sickle cell lille have blood cells actually people with one or two copies of the sickle cell little aleo have blood cells that have a shape that prevents the fell supreme parasite from entering them they're sickle shaped yes yeah there are other mutations with a pretty high prevalence that are linked to malaria such as g six pd deficiency fallacy mia and about one in fourteen people on earth has one of these mutations wow yeah any way with these two very protective mutations malaria should have been history rate rate than not so much to sneaky by the time that pretty much everyone in africa was protected against vivax malaria it had escaped to europe and asia and fall super him would continue and continues to wreak havoc on the african continent malaria doesn't leave any traces on skeletons but we can track its history through human genetics like i just talked about through examining mummies and through incheon writings would happen we see in mummies of his just going.

vivax malaria asia africa europe incheon
"malaria" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"malaria" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"It's insane that is really a cool statistic now that's the kind of thing you wanna whip out at a party death like hi nice did you know only about statistics this way have so many friends okay so i don't really have an estimate for one malaria first popped up in humans the reality is that malaria has been with us throughout our evolutionary history and actually plays a pretty big role in it as we all know the cradle of human evolution is in africa so it's also likely that that is also where malaria evolved as you mentioned did malaria is caused by several different species of organisms i'm going to focus on just two of them because they probably made the biggest impact on human history cool all right so we've got plasma volume five acts and plasma volume fell super him which i'm just going to call vivax and false a broom from here on of good vivax is the less severe and more ancient one fell swoop rum is more deadly in more recent interesting i didn't know that that faucet premise more recent mmhmm five ex probably showed up in hunter gatherer groups many thousands of years ago and caused sporadic but deadly outbreaks and we know this because of something called the duffy antigen which prevents vivax from entering the blood like the red blood cell what so if you are a person with the duffy blood type than you are protected from by vacs malaria that is really cool and because vivax was probably so severe in those early years and this mutation was so beneficial the duffy antigen spread like wildfire throughout much of africa and by around five thousand years ago nearly every person born on the african continent had the duffy blood type and says that way you basically don't see vivax in africa exactly that is sadly awesome yeah cool and today the proportion of black individuals from africa with this blood type is between ninety and one hundred percent wow so it's persists said oh absolutely man that is very advantageous and despite the duffy mutation africa would not remain malaria free for long another malaria parasite was about to take vivax as place and.

malaria africa five thousand years one hundred percent
"malaria" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"malaria" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"In the next ten minutes now whoa first we're going to go back to the dinosaurs okay and malaria zika illusionary origins then i'm gonna talk malaria before treatments were discovered then panama canal time yes just a little bit and the failed eradication campaigns of the 20th century i'm thrilled let's do this give it to me malaria is an ancient ancient disease definitely prehistoric some researchers think that the parasite evolved from a free living plant species a plant species like algae her sobbing yet so it has a bunch of genetic fragments that are similar to those used to make chlorophyll what thea does so cool i never knew that it's very it's very strange i just assume that everything is like an animal kazym oh wow what is matt call it i have plant blindness yes yes you idea we we both do he had a lot of disease ecologists have plant a definitely a okay anyway so in prehistoric times i'm talking like time of the dinosaurs prehistoric the ancestor of malaria made the jump from plant species to parasite scientists have found the dna of a malaria species in a biting message which is an insect preserved an amber from one hundred million years ago steve stuff yes that's three like jurassic parkstyle oh that's really jurassic oh yeah that's so cool so long long long before malaria became a parasite of humans it was probably a parasite of dinosaurs which makes sense considering that there are malaria parasites in so many different groups of animals today including birds and reptiles okay but we know that modern malaria is transmitted by mosquitos not biting midges so when did that happen probably around thirty million years ago eventually it became a parasite of humans may be eight million years ago while or baid ancestors vehement rate uh bb 15000 years ago i mean there's a lot of debate everyone's like maybe center law maybe in the you and i study well sir minus eight million years uh in any case once it was in humans it never really left ever since malaria emerged as a human parasite it has infected and killed billions that's where the b that's with a b of people throughout history oh man.

malaria panama canal steve eight million years one hundred million years thirty million years 15000 years ten minutes
"malaria" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"malaria" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"To the parasite reporter reproducing exactly and that is also when you're going to be most infective four mosquitoes because that's when these stages that are infective to the mosquito are freefloating in your blood stream as well okay that make sense yeah so that's most of what you need to know i think about malaria biology one thing that makes it difficult to control also is that diagnosis is really difficult so typically it's done by microscopy so you need a person who's very highly trained to actually take a smear of your blood on a microscope slide and look through it and it's effective but you have to have people that are very well trained and even very well trained people because you have these cycles if you just take blood at the wrong time you might not see them or you might see things that look like malaria but aren't actually malaria so basically microscopy is imperfect there are other molecular methods that you can use for detection of malaria but they're also not perfect and in many cases their expensive and sometimes costprohibitive but yeah i think that's it for malaria biology okay so do out here about the history of malarial i've really excited about it it's spans aeons beyond so millions and millions of years light that's got to be the first time we've talked about millions of years on this app it shows probably is malaria zika story is yeah it's enormous and we're going to get through it all.

reporter malaria
"malaria" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"malaria" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"Exactly so in some cases because you can have this really long incubation period diagnosis and treatment can be somewhat harder especially for example if you're traveling are you become infected while you're travelling and you come back to a country where malaria may be isn't very common it can be really difficult to diagnose because it might be several weeks or months until you actually have any symptoms that make sense yeah so malaria is inside you you've been bitten by a mosquito that has injected a bunch of parasites what's my body going to do while first there's something that's called classic malaria which has a cold stage with shivering feeling very cold a hot stage where you have fever headaches vomiting young children can have seizures and then a sweating stage where you just so wet a lot but i don't know why they call it classic malaria because apparently this is a very rare presentation like a doesn't usually happen this way really yeah i dunno if maybe this is so maybe people have written about malaria in this way a lot and that's why it's called classic but realistically what happens is all at once you have fever chills sweats headaches nausea vomiting body aches you feel like absolute schick human garbage hugh from garbage and this happens in cycles a classic attack last for between six and ten hours and happens every two to three days depending on the parasite species so plasma volume fell sip room replicates every two days as as five acts in a valley whereas malaria replicates every three days so that means that in your cells they're basically taking two days to have a full cycle of replication and then there bursting out of your cells okay and so that is how you end up with these fever and headaches is all of these parasites all at once our bursting out of your cells and ensure bloodstream to each time you have this intense spike in all these symptoms it's in response.

malaria hugh headaches incubation period three days two days ten hours
"malaria" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"malaria" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"A person it happens just from the bite of this infected mosquito specifically it's and anomalies mosquito there are several hundred species but only about thirty or forty that are important in terms of human malaria transmission end there's some evidence that once a mosquito is infected with malaria lake once these parasites or in the salivary glands and ready to infect a human mosquitoes are more attracted to host more persistent in their attempts to feed and they feed on more hosts per feeding attempt which is crazy because it's basically the malaria parasite going hey i'm here i'm ready to go but a camille better take a meal but it can be a supercool its host manipulation by a parasite yeah it's crazy that's one of my favorite themes i guess you're like favorite things in a relic dessagne be fungus we will do an episode on court on cortisol definitely go question we have to okay sorry to interrupt no you're fine one thing i i think that's really interesting about this and i'll talk more about it later on is just that in terms of thinking about prevention a malaria on the one hand it makes it a lot harder to deal with prevention when you have an entire other species that you're trying to deal with but it also means that there is a lot of stages of the malaria parasite that you could potentially target that are outside of the human which i think is really interesting so i'll talk more about that when we talk about this status of malaria in the world today what else about malaria so the incubation period which again is the time from when you're infected too when you show symptoms in this case from when you're bit by a mosquito and until you have your first round of symptoms is between seven and thirty days and this large range depends on the species of parasite that you're infected with okay so plasma volume fell sip from the one that sort of the worst has the shortest incubation period while plasma medium malaria has the longest that would make sense because you said full supreme replicate so quick.

camille cortisol malaria incubation period thirty days one hand
"malaria" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"malaria" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"Ooh what are we drinking this week this week is the fever reliever wonderful and what is in the fever reliever well since we're talking about malaria today we're drinking basically a gin and tonic okay and when i say basically i mean it it in and tonic people with a lime we s all right and we're gonna get into why that has anything to do with malaria yet later on in the episode mysteriously tuned tonic water has quinine in it now it won't be a um any sort of effective dose but mena now just enough to be delicious charles just charles you're s with a british accent for many reasons chill us delicious gin and tonic were when i was living in panama they were my drink too bad that you weren't living in an area panama were malaria was a real risk factor i don't think that's too bad selfmedication i'm pretty pretty okay we're happy effect cool got are quite dini's underway we're going to delve right into the biology aaron tell me about malaria i will try my best malaria is a big one and one of the things that makes malaria so interesting is the fact that it has a really complex lifecycle which means it's going to be complex to talk about today but we're going to simplified as much as possible yes so malaria is caused by a parasite this is the first disease that we're talking about on the show that's caused by a parasite can you explain to me the difference between a parasite and a pathogen yes so we usually use the word pathogen to refer to viral and bacterial diseases okay a parasite is usually referred to only four what are called protozoans or like parasitic worms and things okay and protozoans are not bacteria right so protozoa it's not a great term by it essentially means it's still a singlecelled organism but it's much larger than a bacteria or a virus and it's more closely related to plants and animals than it is to 'bacterial.

fever malaria mena panama aaron quinine dini
"malaria" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"malaria" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"That is the most beautiful introduction absolutely it was like textbook for foreign dan you for going very so that was incredible amazing thank you so much for sharing your story about malaria and wow when hi and welcome to episode eight holy crap holy crap of this podcast will kill you i'm aaron welsh and i'm erred allman uptake thanks for joining us were very excited this week we're talking about malaria yet which is a big one the oda we're going to have a good time today it's gonna be a really fun i'm thrilled about it malaria is fascinating it's a really it's actually one of the first diseases that made me want to study disease so i didn't like that yeah malaria anxious to some isis oh they're like very close to my heart that's so cool yeah all right i'm excited about it learned something new about your right but before we jump in we have a correction yes today we always say if we get something wrong please let us know and this is proof that we're not lying all all of this is outside of our area of expertise we expect to get things wrong so in the very first episode eight whole weeks ago at this point so i know rate we talked about influenza and i mistakenly said that influenza was a retrovirus that is incorrect thank you dustin for letting us know that yeah thank you but anyways that's our correction influenza is an arne virus but it is not a retrovirus so if you have a correction for us you can go ahead and send that to you this podcast will kill you gmailcom or you can message us on any of our social media profiles as well yeah that is all all right that means that were onto quarantine east.

malaria aaron welsh oda influenza allman dustin social media
"malaria" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

02:01 min | 4 years ago

"malaria" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

"Maryland what might you know my here's one thing about all that i would treat it like a treat malaria which is malaria is an issue other places but not really here maybe a couple of cases every once in a while but it's mainly abroad you know what i mean and then they go now it's a very real issue here and then you go well what about malaria in africa that's on we're focusing on and go whether or not folks i'm malaria and they're gone now vote on domestic malaria and like yet but that's not really it's a really a thing it's big over here but it's not really hit by white do you not like malaria yes i hate malaria okay and you're like a radical malaria yes but you want to focus on the orange county area and parts of manhattan right but if you really want to get you go to sudan yeah no not that not that malaria but i thought you hated malaria i we do with a passion mcgriff where to folks on clearing it up here stateside then maybe we'll take our game take our talents over to africa if we don't really have any oh yes we do we do yes it's an invisible you don't know you have it so people yes p it's all over college campuses it's all over the workplace but they have it or they don't know what will they it's there in so you want to hear that the s that's that's our that's our goal but how do you cure malaria of when larry doesn't really exist in the workplace art school oh we're going to fight to do it well what are you doing we gotta antimalaria march coming up mmhmm house hour we have a larry hats they're mosquito hats pink mosquito hats were put him on we hit straits we're gonna do we're gonna shut down a federal bellen.

Maryland malaria manhattan larry africa orange county sudan shut down