18 Burst results for "Majkowski"

"majkowski" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

08:02 min | 2 months ago

"majkowski" Discussed on How I Built This

"Guy rise and on the show today. How a perfect storm of skill and luck trove Luis von Ahn to create capture than recapture and then duo lingo foreign language APP valued at one point five billion dollars think about the small moments or decisions in your life that actually had a huge impact on how your life turned out. Maybe it was a conversation. You struck up with the person next to you on an airplane. Maybe it was a party. You reluctantly went to only to meet the person you'd eventually marry or maybe it was a decision to stay on vacation an extra day that sparked a new idea for Kevin System. It was a random remark from his girlfriend that made him decide to use filters on instagram for Blake. Majkowski was a chance meeting with a group of young Argentinian who took him to the countryside where he saw kids with no shoes. That one day inspired him to create. Tom's and for Louis Fun on it was a free lecture at Carnegie Mellon University in two thousand. We'll get deeper into the story in a few minutes but that single lecture would lead him to invent to ingenious new tools the I was capture. Yes captures those annoying twisted and blurred letters. You have to type into a website to prove your human and the second one was duo lingo now. The biggest language learning APP in the world which is now getting even more popular because people are looking for new things to do now that they're stuck at home but was captured and duo. Lingo were designed to harness the power of crowdsourcing to solve problems. And I'M GONNA blow your mind here if you have ever typed in a capture or reused dueling go. There's a good chance you've taken part in a massive online collaboration that you probably weren't even aware of and it's amazing. How Louis came up with all this but let's start at the beginning. Lewis was born in Guatemala in late. Nineteen Seventy S. Both as parents were doctors and though he was surrounded by poverty violence in Guatemala City. Louis screw up in comparative privilege and as a kid. He spent a lot of time hanging out at the family business. My Mother's family actually had a candy. Factory everybody is always a Mesa. The fact that I grew up with a candy factory they think it was like Willy. Wonka or something. I was not all that much into the candidate. Self I was into the machines because basically the candies made by these gigantic machines. That bump out I don't know how many thousands of pieces of candy per hour and basically all my weekends. I spent playing at the Candy Factory and I would They the machines apart and put them back together they would be some extra pieces after. I put him back together on that. That would be a problem but what? What kind of student were you were? You were school pretty easy for you. Yeah I was pretty nerdy basically. That was really good at math. Math was just easy to me. I what I would do during the summers is basically get either next year or you know. Couple YEARS LATER. Math books on all the sizes. Wow it kind of came easy but the way I really got good ideas by doing hundreds and hundreds exercises. That's what you do in. The summertime was bored. I mean I was an only child I is. I didn't have that much to do. This is remember this is also pre Internet pre everything. So what was I going to do? Man That's what I did was putting playing cards in the spokes of my bicycle and by jolly ranchers seven. Eleven should math books. So you were. Did you just love math? I mean it sounds like kids. Don't think about their future. They're not like I'm going to study math so I can be in tech one day like unless I've really enjoyed it. I I enjoyed it was it was like a puzzle for me by the way this is not the only thing I did. I mean I I also played a lot of video games Pirated Video Games in my commodore sixty four like floppy disks. Floppy Disk loppy discs. That's right I wanted a Nintendo. When I was eight my mother would not get many intendo. She instead got me computer. Commodore Sixty Four. And I couldn't figure out how to use it but eventually I read like the manual stuff and I figured out how to use it more than I figured out. I could buy other people's video games. And so I became a little hub in my in my little neighbourhood but these were not other kids adults or kind of basically young adults who had a computer and they would come to my house and I would take their games and give them my games exchange so then. I collected a pretty large number of video games but sh- mentioned right that I mean because your childhood sounds pretty nice but but like as a kid I guess or even as a teenager there was a civil war in Guatemala right. I mean we know that today. There's a a lot of violence there. Obviously violence in the US and other countries to but Guatemala's has been particularly hard hit. I mean did it feel dangerous when you're a kid yes it did. There was a civil war pretty much since I was born in seventy nine to nineteen ninety-six. There was a civil war going on the whole time. It always felt dangerous when I was fifteen or so. My aunt was kidnapped for ransom. I mean she was gone for seven or eight days. Wow People's cars would be stolen. I don't every couple of months. Somebody's car would be stolen in my family. Going past seven thirty PM was rare games. You needed to go out in a large group. If you're going to go up at seven thirty PM and I did my house had walls and barbed wire yeah. It felt dangerous. I mean this is one of just one of the reasons I came to the US. Actually I mean I was. After my aunt was kidnapped I thought to myself. I don't WanNa live here. Yeah and I guess you did end up leaving Guatemala for college because you went to Duke in North Carolina and you describe yourself as a like a math nerd in school and and is that what you intended to do like to do something in math. That's what I wanted to become an economic math professor. I was pretty certain. I wanted to become a math professor at the time. I thought the best thing that I can do is really learn a lot of math and I really it and I thought it was futile to learn how to deal with other people. It is interesting because my job. These days is one hundred percent just dealing with other people's problems. I'm just trying to understand the so so by becoming math professor. You thought. Hey I wouldn't have to deal with people I would just deal with facts. Data and numbers. Yes yes and you know I. I'll do math research all day long. And every now and then after class of but whatever that's like a tax That's that's what I thought so all right so you are She gets your degree and you this path to go into academia and you go into a PhD program at Carnegie Mellon Correct and I guess you go into computer science right yes. I changed from math computer science because I visited a math Grad school and what people were saying the professor was saying. Oh I'm working on this open problem that nobody's been able to solve for the last three hundred years and I thought I don't think I'm smart enough if you haven't done it and nobody's done it in three hundred years that's Kinda not for me whereas when you visit in computer science I mean this is crazy thing before like. Oh Yeah I still have an open program yesterday. Well it's a much younger field yet so that I thought that was much more exciting for me. At least so you are a you start zero two thousand you start your program at Carnegie Mellon but I guess like really soon after you start You go to some talk by someone from Yahoo comes to campus to talk about your guy who was a big deal in two thousand. Who is that? What's the story? Yeah that was serendipity again. Most of most of the things that have happened in my life serendipitous. I was a first year student. I had been at Carnegie Mellon for maybe two months. I had you know the first thing you got to do. When you become issue soon as finding adviser I had found myself in adviser and we went to talk together. This guy from Yahoo was the chief scientist of Yahoo at the time and like you said Yahoo at the time was the biggest.

Guatemala Carnegie Mellon professor Louis Fun Yahoo Carnegie Mellon University US Candy Factory Luis von Ahn Guatemala City math Grad school instagram Majkowski Kevin System Blake Nintendo Tom Wonka
reCAPTCHA and Duolingo: Luis von Ahn

How I Built This

07:01 min | 2 months ago

reCAPTCHA and Duolingo: Luis von Ahn

"Think about the small moments or decisions in your life that actually had a huge impact on how your life turned out. Maybe it was a conversation. You struck up with the person next to you on an airplane. Maybe it was a party. You reluctantly went to only to meet the person you'd eventually marry or maybe it was a decision to stay on vacation an extra day that sparked a new idea for Kevin System. It was a random remark from his girlfriend that made him decide to use filters on instagram for Blake. Majkowski was a chance meeting with a group of young Argentinian who took him to the countryside where he saw kids with no shoes. That one day inspired him to create. Tom's and for Louis Fun on it was a free lecture at Carnegie Mellon University in two thousand. We'll get deeper into the story in a few minutes but that single lecture would lead him to invent to ingenious new tools the I was capture. Yes captures those annoying twisted and blurred letters. You have to type into a website to prove your human and the second one was duo lingo now. The biggest language learning APP in the world which is now getting even more popular because people are looking for new things to do now that they're stuck at home but was captured and duo. Lingo were designed to harness the power of crowdsourcing to solve problems. And I'M GONNA blow your mind here if you have ever typed in a capture or reused dueling go. There's a good chance you've taken part in a massive online collaboration that you probably weren't even aware of and it's amazing. How Louis came up with all this but let's start at the beginning. Lewis was born in Guatemala in late. Nineteen Seventy S. Both as parents were doctors and though he was surrounded by poverty violence in Guatemala City. Louis screw up in comparative privilege and as a kid. He spent a lot of time hanging out at the family business. My Mother's family actually had a candy. Factory everybody is always a Mesa. The fact that I grew up with a candy factory they think it was like Willy. Wonka or something. I was not all that much into the candidate. Self I was into the machines because basically the candies made by these gigantic machines. That bump out I don't know how many thousands of pieces of candy per hour and basically all my weekends. I spent playing at the Candy Factory and I would They the machines apart and put them back together they would be some extra pieces after. I put him back together on that. That would be a problem but what? What kind of student were you were? You were school pretty easy for you. Yeah I was pretty nerdy basically. That was really good at math. Math was just easy to me. I what I would do during the summers is basically get either next year or you know. Couple YEARS LATER. Math books on all the sizes. Wow it kind of came easy but the way I really got good ideas by doing hundreds and hundreds exercises. That's what you do in. The summertime was bored. I mean I was an only child I is. I didn't have that much to do. This is remember this is also pre Internet pre everything. So what was I going to do? Man That's what I did was putting playing cards in the spokes of my bicycle and by jolly ranchers seven. Eleven should math books. So you were. Did you just love math? I mean it sounds like kids. Don't think about their future. They're not like I'm going to study math so I can be in tech one day like unless I've really enjoyed it. I I enjoyed it was it was like a puzzle for me by the way this is not the only thing I did. I mean I I also played a lot of video games Pirated Video Games in my commodore sixty four like floppy disks. Floppy Disk loppy discs. That's right I wanted a Nintendo. When I was eight my mother would not get many intendo. She instead got me computer. Commodore Sixty Four. And I couldn't figure out how to use it but eventually I read like the manual stuff and I figured out how to use it more than I figured out. I could buy other people's video games. And so I became a little hub in my in my little neighbourhood but these were not other kids adults or kind of basically young adults who had a computer and they would come to my house and I would take their games and give them my games exchange so then. I collected a pretty large number of video games but sh- mentioned right that I mean because your childhood sounds pretty nice but but like as a kid I guess or even as a teenager there was a civil war in Guatemala right. I mean we know that today. There's a a lot of violence there. Obviously violence in the US and other countries to but Guatemala's has been particularly hard hit. I mean did it feel dangerous when you're a kid yes it did. There was a civil war pretty much since I was born in seventy nine to nineteen ninety-six. There was a civil war going on the whole time. It always felt dangerous when I was fifteen or so. My aunt was kidnapped for ransom. I mean she was gone for seven or eight days. Wow People's cars would be stolen. I don't every couple of months. Somebody's car would be stolen in my family. Going past seven thirty PM was rare games. You needed to go out in a large group. If you're going to go up at seven thirty PM and I did my house had walls and barbed wire yeah. It felt dangerous. I mean this is one of just one of the reasons I came to the US. Actually I mean I was. After my aunt was kidnapped I thought to myself. I don't WanNa live here. Yeah and I guess you did end up leaving Guatemala for college because you went to Duke in North Carolina and you describe yourself as a like a math nerd in school and and is that what you intended to do like to do something in math. That's what I wanted to become an economic math professor. I was pretty certain. I wanted to become a math professor at the time. I thought the best thing that I can do is really learn a lot of math and I really it and I thought it was futile to learn how to deal with other people. It is interesting because my job. These days is one hundred percent just dealing with other people's problems. I'm just trying to understand the so so by becoming math professor. You thought. Hey I wouldn't have to deal with people I would just deal with facts. Data and numbers. Yes yes and you know I. I'll do math research all day long. And every now and then after class of but whatever that's like a tax That's that's what I thought so all right so you are She gets your degree and you this path to go into academia and you go into a PhD program at Carnegie Mellon Correct and I guess you go into computer science right yes. I changed from math computer science because I visited a math Grad school and what people were saying the professor was saying. Oh I'm working on this open problem that nobody's been able to solve for the last three hundred years and I thought I don't think I'm smart enough if you haven't done it and nobody's done it in three hundred years that's Kinda not for me whereas when you visit in computer science I mean this is crazy thing before like. Oh Yeah I still have an open program yesterday. Well it's a much younger field yet so that I thought that was much more exciting for me. At

Guatemala Professor Louis Fun Math Grad School Candy Factory United States Guatemala City Carnegie Mellon University Instagram Majkowski Kevin System Carnegie Mellon Blake Nintendo TOM Wonka Mesa
"majkowski" Discussed on The Nik Ingersoll Show

The Nik Ingersoll Show

10:18 min | 11 months ago

"majkowski" Discussed on The Nik Ingersoll Show

"I don't drink sparkling water so perrier and things of that nature but most of them him don't you know I think there was a might have been a Frito lay innovation. I think it was called the flat earth chips. I'm not fucking around by the way I soon chip. God recently no like. I don't know maybe a decade ago before this whole like crazy. People thinking of the earth is still flat. Things started happening which just sort of a negative externalities Internet but yeah you can imagine you know all these people that have you know maybe they got their bachelor's and they got their master's and they do their whatever whatever for Deloitte etc which you know no shade towards any of that but then they get into this big corporation and they're very good at their function and then the big corporation says hey we want you to be an entrepreneur now also make stuff and they're like there's no then like I've seen corporate handbooks at some of these big places about innovation and it's like you can and not create ten step step process to innovating in a category like you will never create something that is radically different if Hugh tryon engineer it I mean I don't know I my guess is with you guys. There wasn't like Hey let's identify bananas and let's jump into that category. How can we reverse engineer a chocolate banana snack that people are going to love like that. It wasn't there's only it was linear. I'd I love to hear you out of the initial inception of where that innovation came for you guys yeah. I think you know you hit the nail on the head in that it's it's much less prescriptive corruptive than these big companies tend to try to make it and and it makes sense that they would try and make a prescriptive right because everything they do is prescriptive. They usually have a big distribution system in all these different things and that it just does not one to one translate into things like innovation innovation of the very out of the box creative sort of process and so the first thing that we saw were bananas is it working wrapped up in cellophane and sold on street carts and where was that a niche words that first moment where you guys saw that we saw that in South America exactly yeah you notice and this is something that I've seen being because I just love to study entrepreneurs that most of these major breakthrough innovations happened when the entrepreneurs traveling abroad and like a couple of case studies like Howard Schultz discovering the romance the Barista Santa Milan in Verona Thomas Blake Majkowski discovering the Tom Shillue Beta in Argentina There's so many of these yeah. It's you know I I don't know yeah. It's either it's either that or they are. Somebody came from a country where that exists and it just didn't exist here rifle yeah exactly yep yeah great example and you know these these multinationals they also have some random brand you've never heard of in these foreign countries but they're too scared to bring it in the US and take the risk more shareholders shareholders right there you know they're worried about. Wall Street expectations or that that quarterly report that's GonNa say what's this weird. RND project that cost three million dollars ten million dollars. That's right so it's not profitable. What are we doing yeah exactly yeah. That's interesting and you know on the innovation piece. When I look at your pops there's one I'm very unique thing about it and so it's not just the substrate or just the ingredients or the way that you make them but the actual shape of the POPs and that's one of the very first things that I noticed at least being sort of a product marketing creative the guy I look at these pop. I'm like Oh those are just beautiful to look at unlike one of those rocket POPs or name your litany of obstacles. There's like this. Gio Dis thinks sort of and I don't know how you describe it but I would describe it. I mean that's exactly described. Love it. You frozen treats is what they look like and if if you look at it it's just a dream. POPs on instagram right and go to add dream POPs on instagram and just look at the pump itself. You're GonNa look at me like. I don't even know if I want to eat it because is it just looks cool. I appreciate that you know a lot of the inspiration came from got him. Kurt Jones who founded DIP DOTS has an amazing story and you should definitely check it what is heartbreaking with regards to the full entrepreneurial journey but with him you know and I was a die hard fan. I don't know if you ate them. Growing up. Oh Yeah He created created an emotional relationship with generation like Vic- dip in us now I will purchase them because it reminds me of when I went to six flags and I can remember the first day when I ate them that they've bottled the style and so in the same way in that that's a form factor that they you know they've they've really created and become a conic behind and so when we created dream. POPs about designing designing a product that psychotic in the same way that a Nike swoosh is iconic are the same way that a form factor you know brings a certain feeling or emotion to mind and you know really standing out from the respective competition. Most popsicles are the traditional moon shape so that shape actually require some unique manufacturing technology and it's it's what's really given us. What we believe is a unique delivery system and and away of standing out from the competition yeah? It's one way to stand out to without having to you you know. It's not like you're putting lipstick on elk or something like Dan. The pig is the actual thing not putting lipstick on a rainbow trout like the actual trout itself is really interesting looking by itself and I think that oftentimes oftentimes when people are innovating things in whether it's entrepreneurs or giant corporations or whoever it is it's sort of an afterthought as to the way the product looks because you could have made the same recipe right the same good ingredients the same sort of US peas in in terms of product but if you put it into a V. Otter pop style package it would just not be as sharable. It would not be as cool to look. I would not be one of those things that people looking at me like what is that you know I. I don't think we'd be sitting here. I don't think that the business would still be running to be honest with you and that was back to you know so many people by the way hundreds when we were first launching this were like why. I don't understand that's such unique manufacturing method and it's not scalable and it's not possible to scale it. You should just go to a CO packer and use the same closest formulation. Get traditional mooncake pop or not pop or some sort of a form factor that's scalable and then you know you'll be far more successful and frankly. I think that actually would have killed the company because because there's nothing that unique about it so I think that's right and it's easy to to sort of just you know. Take the easy road and that's often a lot of what I talk about is like yeah well. If if it's that easy it's probably not going to be as successful as it could be if at all because if it was easier to do easy thing well then that's way lower of a barrier of entry for anybody else to just go in and do the exact same thing and just knock your shit off and when you look at the market right now we are in the age of the KNOCKOFF Shit Golden Era of EP g go to you literally if you bring anything being innovative to an Expo West East any trade show there's three to five ten fifteen people copy that you know at the next show yeah so I guess I'd it actually ask you like what were some of your biggest supply chain challenges and I think that oftentimes as entrepreneurs you get so nervous because all these people say no you can't do it. We literally spoke to fifty industry. Specialists who most people thought said no impossible can't do in it finally took. You know we got lucky. We found one supply chain team. That eventually was like yeah. We can scale this. It's GonNa be a lot more challenging in the long road but if you do this then we think Cuba really viable business opportunity yeah. It's it's really easy to say. You can't do that and we used in my life. That's been the story might live you can't do that. We'll mccutcheon decrypted in all these guys. Are All these people just like you know. It's just like suck it right. It's like no. I'm a I'm going to do it and then in X. Amount of time. I'm going to send you some in the mail with a love note and then say enjoy this. Most people won't work for for two to three years to do it. Yeah Ninety nine point nine percent of people will give up yeah. That's right and it's you know the industry expert thing is a weird thing too to because a while it's valuable if you get somebody who's been in a sales position or a marketing position or a name your litany of positions at you know whoever smucker's occurs company it's Cetera. They're going to be seeing things fundamentally different wins. They're going to be seeing things in terms of okay. How do I reduce the overall risk here. Or how do why optimize every single cent of margin out of the gate. Which of course you need. Margin of course you should reduce your risk but not to the detriment of your actual business. Can I mean if you're you. Were trying to optimize for profitability too early. In Your Business Life Cycle you will go out of Business Ryan if you're not taking the land grab of opportunity and that small window where your product is relevant and scaling then may be too late or another company might jump on that I with yes unit economics for one two years. I'm not saying operate a business with negative union economics. What I am saying is like you just said sometimes bringing in the person with X. Pedigree. Can actually it's just the wrong part of the life cycle. The company Benia can be to the detriment yeah. It's true. It's it's weird because you don't know what you don't know but sometimes in not knowing it's it's a hidden strength in the weirdest way so true. I mean everyone's like yeah I was never in the food and beverage industry and then launched a food beverage brand and it was the best thing I could've done and it actually is because you're doing things that the blink corporate manual would think is a waste of time and sometimes those unskillful things that you're doing create long-term lifetime value the customer virology word of mouth something that's going to allow your brand to to to step outside outside of even food and beverage and maybe even create cultural relevance right in with your supply chain. Are you vertically integrated. We are new our factory in South Central Central and downtown. La in downtown La and what Compton Watts yeah in South Central Avenue South Central General yeah you know it's one of those things where oftentimes you go the two co packer and when you're dealing.

engineer US Deloitte Frito La Hugh tryon South America Nike South Central Central Gio Dis Howard Schultz smucker Verona Thomas Blake Majkowski Argentina Benia DIP DOTS Kurt Jones Vic
"majkowski" Discussed on Short Story Long

Short Story Long

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"majkowski" Discussed on Short Story Long

"Like when you watch show like everybody was against me man like, and they everybody was like man, I want anybody to win by Adam. What the fuck that? I do you know like I'm just a guy who was not too afraid to be himself. And you guys are all trying to be something on TV like that's why we didn't click. But now looking at it like everybody played the role. If it wasn't for me, the show would have been boring. I mean, I said the shit that people wouldn't say like if somebody was messing the kitchen, I'd say something I'd stay up two hours to clean the kitchen. Wake up in the morning and scold everybody the next morning at five AM that the kitchen was fucked up. Yeah. You know? So when I when I look at the show that it was an amazing experience. And it brought me to LA. You know, Gabby Reese was the host, and she was Hearn Laird took a fondness to me, and they asked me to become one of them to become their movement coach for their. Specialized training thing that they do that cost. Tonnes of money that you go and hang out their house Malibu, and you know, and have this incredible experience with top level coaches. And so I came out, and I did that and about six months later. I kinda went on my own way. And. Sorted training. Blake Majkowski the founder of TOMS. Along with some other incredible people you courting, I do train Courtney. If you know about six months ago, he kinda buffer a minute. That was me those. I haven't seen him in a while hurt. He got hurt. He he tore his ACL gut it. And then I I don't know. I mean, maybe not a bed. I don't know. It was like a weird adult injury. And I'm not joking when I think it was like something like very kind like freak accident. I can't remember. But I do remember like during his rehab. He ended up falling down the stairs. Then, you know. And just kind of like like kind of further injuring so, but he's now got a beautiful gym garage that I designed for them. And back in action is back in action whenever he's home. He travels a lot. So are you out here all the time? So no, I moved to Austin just recently. So I stayed here for three years. I was trained in Blake. I was trained some really cool. People got connected to some great professional, athletes and all this type of shit that happens out here. Right. And and it was awesome. And but I saw like I saw I saw short side of it. Right. And I might I don't want to be doing the thirty year old wasn't wasn't bad. It was now the forty year old in the taint top was now the problem to get a little iffy right now. Now, I'm the forty year old looking like twenty year olds doing flipped group. Yeah. It's like we're now it's like it's like so when I'm when I'm thinking about that I'm looking at my two little kids that probably will need braces or some shit some day. Like, I need to figure out something better. And I am never short on ideas. And when I owned drench. Ch-? I had an idea for a company called strong coffee company. Strong coffee co and it was a coffee shop, and we made different specialized coffees and needless to say, it's over to Ellen Wisconsin, Milwaukee wouldn't imagine. Nope. Not exactly a coastal sort of Austin. Exactly. Yeah. So we failed miserably and this time it was different though. I had a plan an incredible product and the way it all happened was funny. I mean, I I got introduced to Ben gold Hirsch who is the founder of good. And the former CEO of good up worthy..

Courtney Blake Majkowski Austin founder Gabby Reese Hearn Laird Adam Ben gold Hirsch Malibu LA CEO TOMS Milwaukee Ellen Wisconsin forty year six months thirty year three years twenty year two hours
"majkowski" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:13 min | 1 year ago

"majkowski" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Ari Shapiro. And I'm Mary Louise Kelley in Florida. Several very wealthy men were charged with solicitation last week after a sting operation. They include the billionaire owner of the New England Patriots Robert Kraft, the former president of city group, John havens and private equity investor. John Childs the sting uncovered a twenty million dollar human trafficking. Operation women were brought from China with the promise of jobs at massage parlors, then their passports were taken and they were forced to do sex work. A warning this conversation contains graphic descriptions of these women's living conditions. William Snyder is the sheriff of Martin county Florida. His office opened this investigation that led to these charges sheriff Snyder, welcome, yes. Good afternoon. Good afternoon. So what tipped you off to sex trafficking in these massage parlors the original tap came in by way of a state. Nate healthcare worker, and when the worker when she knows suitcases and other indications that perhaps somebody was living in the small storefronts. She called us if the sheriff's office we began what turned into an eight month investigation. You described it as a small storefront massage parlor retaking brothels in a strip mall and described the conditions that these women were living and working in. They were staying inside the massage parlor for twenty four hours a day seven days a week to were actually sleeping on the tables were they provided the illicit sexual activity this investigation as you allude to it ended up involving massage parlors all over southern Florida. Right four counties, and you were working on this for months. Eight months in our case spun over into Palm Beach county, it also took us up into the Landau area. And since investigation began I've had calls from two other counties in Florida have similar activity looking to see our methodology was so successful. I want to insert here. Just for the record that the men who have been charged are denying this craft is denying an illegal active. Child's is denying the charges, but speak to me about how complicated it is to work on a human trafficking case like this where you've got language challenges and and women who don't necessarily want to cooperate with the sheriff. Well, that's one of the reasons why this sex trafficking continues at such a pace invariably. Our methodology has been up until we get this year will send a couple of undercover detectives in jail. Be solicited for sex will arrest the workers and shut the place down in the problem goes away, but not really goes away. And so in this came on major decisions that we would treat this differently. I know we would go after the traffickers and the man, Dan Jesus. And that's why we were so successful. We have over three hundred arrest warrants. What happens to the women now Dino wall as you, and I speak a one of the women. That's here. We're treating her as a victim is in protective custody. She said that she was offered a job making a lot of money in America nail salon before she came here sometimes herself in the sex trafficking industry in the softballs. We have NGOs helping us along with Mandarin speaking interpreters, and we're doing our very best stroke is these women some kind of help you alluded to earlier, and it's true. They tend not to want to cooperate because of the coercion point oftentimes in. This woman said she feels that a family China is at risk if she cooperative law enforcement is that what you mean when you say that coercion point Charta understand that what is it that causes a woman to stay in. These deplorable conditions were having sex with eight to fifteen minutes game with absolutely no protection, the doors are not law. There's no guarding them at night. We've had cases where they come up with the children. The children are being educated. But the cost is the mother is taken into trafficking. I was struck by the language you used when you announce these charges you called the men allegedly involved monsters, and it made me wonder, you must see a lot in your job sheriff, we're this chocking, even by the standards of what you see every day. There's some crimes that somehow able to get my mind around and understand the motivations. And they don't seem to me against the for lack of a better term, the transcend that laws of the moral universe. In this case when you have women that are held under coercion enforced to have repeated sexual encounters with men throughout the day for a man to go in there. And I believe in my heart hearts that. They know these women are traffic. I think there are the monsters. I said before there's no locks on the door locks. There's the coercion point that keeps them in bondage. And the person with the key is not the traffic alerts the man who go into this policy. Availed themselves of this union misery in the three groups. We have the winning. Traffickers and the man I believe the men are the most guilty. That's Martin county. Sheriff William Snyder Cherif Snyder. Thank you very much for taking the time to speak with us. Smart pleasure. You'll have a great day. The house of representatives is set to vote Wednesday on a Bill to require background checks on all gun sales, including those done online or at gun shows today for business leaders sent a letter urging congress to pass the proposal NPR's. Yuki Noguchi explains why the CEO's are getting involved. Blake Majkowski founder of Tom shoes supports causes like access to clean water, and I care in poor countries, but embracing something as controversial as gun control is different. He says his board of directors debated whether he should engage on a political issue unrelated to their business. Everyone is concerned about you know, doing something like this. But ultimately, we recognize that this is an opportunity for us to really be a leader business, and our customers that we're engaged in the issues. That matter most to them he along with the CEO's of Levi, Strauss Dick's sporting goods and our ex are realty sign. The letter calling on the house to pass stricter background checks. Majkowski says about twelve percent of its customers say they won't buy his company's shoes anymore as a result. But he says today CEO's need to accept that some customers will leave. But those who remain will be more loyal. Yeah. We we lost some customers by doing this. But I think we also strengthened our relationship, and then Wade it was far greater than whatever with boss. Scott rector is CEO of Rx are realty developer in the New York area. He has also become a vocal advocate for gun safety. Even though the issue has nothing to do with this business. I find it important for CEO's to take a greater level of social responsibility. But the decision to sound off comes with substantial risk Paul Argenti is a business professor at Dartmouth. He argues CEO's should be very care. Awful. You're basically, speaking out on something out of passion, not out of logic and businesses have shareholders, and it's really not worth taking a risk unless it's absolutely important to you. That may be why the number of executives who signed. Today's letter is still small and largely made up of executives who've already spoken out on gun violence. John fine Blat is president of every town for gun safety a gun control advocacy, group, he points to banks and other retailers that have adopted their own gun control policies over the last year dishes, a key moment very much like the moment when corporation support it marriage equality, which was often seen as a turning point for that movement. Find lot says he hopes to see growing business support for gun control. But he also acknowledges that even if the Bill passes the house if faces stiffer opposition in the Republican controlled Senate, you can Gucci NPR news Washington..

CEO Sheriff William Snyder Cherif Florida NPR China president Ari Shapiro Blake Majkowski John Childs solicitation New England Patriots John havens Mary Louise Kelley Robert Kraft Martin county Florida Landau Nate
"majkowski" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:29 min | 1 year ago

"majkowski" Discussed on KCRW

"Again, looking at the roads. Well, we have a sore villa. Northbound sixty five just south of slauson glass reported in the number one lane. So watch out there also eastbound three four at the one on one a car blacked out in the carpool lane. All right. News on KCRW. It's six thirty five from NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Ari Shapiro, and Mary Louise Kelley in Florida several very wealthy men were charged with solicitation last week after a sting operation. They include the billionaire owner of the New England Patriots Robert Kraft, the former president of city group, John havens and private equity investor. John Childs the sting uncovered a twenty million dollar human trafficking. Operation women were brought from China with the promise of jobs at massage parlors, then their passports were taken and they were forced to do sex work. A warning this conversation contains graphic descriptions of these women's living conditions. William Snyder is the sheriff of Martin county Florida. His office opened this investigation that led to these charges sheriff Snyder, welcome, yes. Good afternoon. Good afternoon. So what tipped you off to sex trafficking in these massage parlors the original tip came in by? Away of a state healthcare worker, and when the worker went, and she knows suitcases and other indications that perhaps somebody was living in the small storefronts. She called us at the sheriff's office. We began what turned into an eight month investigation. It you described it as a small storefront massage. Parlor, we're talking brothels in a strip mall and described the conditions that these women were living and working in. They were staying inside the massage parlor for twenty four hours a day seven days a week. They were actually sleeping on the tables where they provided the illicit sexual activity. This investigation as you allude to it ended up involving massage parlors all over southern Florida. Right. Four counties, and you were working on this for months. Eight months in our case spun over into Palm Beach county, it also took us up into the Orlando area. And since the investigation began I've had calls some to other counties in Florida saying they have similar activity, and they're looking to see our method Ozzy was so successful. I want to insert here. Just for the record that the men who have been charged are denying this craft is denying any illegal activity. Child's is denying the charges, but speak to me about how complicated it is to work on a human trafficking case like this where you've got language challenges and and women who don't necessarily want to cooperate with the sheriff. Well, that's one of the reasons why this sex trafficking continues at such a pace invariably. Our methodology has been up until we did this year. We'll send. A couple of undercover detectives, then they'll be solicited for sex will arrest the workers and shut the place down in the problem goes away, but not really goes away. And so in this came in on made the decision that we would treat this differently, and that will go after the traffickers and the man, Dan Jesus, and that's why we were so successful we have over three hundred arrest warrants. What happens to the women now Dino wall as you, and I speak a one of the women. That's here. We're treating her as a victim. She's in protective custody. She said that she was offered a job making a lot of money in America. In a NASA long before she came here, sometimes herself in the sex trafficking industry in the softballs, we have NGOs helping us along with Mandarin-speaking interpreters, and we're doing our very best stroke is these women some kind of help you alluded to earlier, and it's true. They tend not to cooperate because of the coercion point oftentimes in. This woman said she tells us. Family in China is at risk if she cooperates with law enforcement is that what you mean when you say the coercion point. Charta understand that what is it that causes a woman to stay in these deplorable conditions were having sex with a fifteen day. And was absolutely no protection the doors are not law. There's no guarding them at night. We've had cases where they come up with the children the children are being educated. But the cost is the mother is taken into trafficking. I was struck by the language you used when you announce these charges you called the men allegedly involved monsters and are made me wonder, you must see a lot in your job sheriff, we're this chocking, even by the standards of what you see every day. There's some crimes that somehow able to get my mind around and understand the motivations. And they don't seem to me the against the for lack of a better term, the transcendent laws of the moral universe. In this case when you have women that are held under coercion and forced to have repeated sexual encounters with man's about the day for a man to go in there, and I believe in my heart heart's, if they know this woman of traffic, I think they are the monsters and more I said before there's no locks on the door locks. There's the coercion point that keeps them in bondage. And the person is not the trafficker. It's the man who go into these powers and availed themselves of this human misery in the three groups. We have the women. Traffickers and the man I believe the men are the most wealthy Hus Martin county. Sheriff William Snyder sheriff Snyder thank you very much for taking the time to speak with us. My pleasure. You'll have a great day. The house of representatives is set to vote Wednesday on a Bill to require background checks on all gun sales, including those done online or at gun shows today for business leaders sent a letter urging congress to pass the proposal NPR's. Yuki Noguchi explains why the CEO's are getting involved. Blake Majkowski founder of Tom shoes supports causes like access to clean water, and I care in poor countries, but embracing something as controversial as gun control is different. He says his board of directors debated whether he should engage in a political issue unrelated to their business. Everyone is very concerned about us doing something like this. But ultimately, we recognize that this is an opportunity for us to really be a leader business and short customers that we're engaged in the issues. That matter most to them he along with the CEO's of Levi, Strauss Dick's sporting goods, an RX are realty signed the letter calling on the house to pass stricter background checks. Majkowski says about twelve percent of its customers say they won't buy his company's shoes anymore as a result. But he says today's CEOs need to accept that some customers will leave, but those who remain will be more loyal. Yeah. We we lost some customers by doing this. But I think we also strengthen our relationship and in then way that was far greater than whatever week, boss. Scott wreck ler is CEO of Rx are realty developer in the New York area. He has also become a vocal advocate for gun safety. Even though the issue has nothing to do with this business. I find it important for she owes to take a greater level of social responsibility. But the decision to sound off comes with substantial risk Paul Argenti is a business professor at Dartmouth. He argues CEO's should be very care. Awful. You're basically, speaking out on something out of passion, not out of watching and businesses have shareholders, and it's really not worth taking a risk unless it's absolutely important to you. That may be why the number of executives who signed. Today's letter is still small and largely made up of executives who've already spoken out on gun violence. Don, fine, Blat is president of every town for gun safety a gun control advocacy, group, he points to banks and other retailers that have adopted their own gun control policies over the last year dishes, a key moment very much like the moment when corporation supported marriage equality, which was often seen as a turning point for that movement. Find lot says he hopes to see growing business support for gun control. But he also had knowledge is that even if the Bill passes the house if faces stiffer opposition in the Republican controlled Senate, you can Gucci NPR news Washington..

CEO Florida William Snyder NPR China Rx president Sheriff William Snyder Ari Shapiro John Childs Blake Majkowski solicitation New England Patriots John havens Martin county Florida Robert Kraft NASA
"majkowski" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"majkowski" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Yuki Noguchi explains why the CEO's are getting involved. Blake Majkowski founder of Tom shoes supports causes like access to clean water, and I care in poor countries, but embracing something as controversial as gun control is different. He says his board of directors debated whether he should engage in a political issue unrelated to their business. Everyone is very concerned about you. You know, doing something like this? But ultimately, we recognize that this opportunity for us to really be a leader business and to show our customers that we're engaged in the issues that matter most to them he along with the CEOs of Levi, Strauss, Dick's sporting goods, an RX are realty sign. The letter calling on the house to pass stricter background checks. Majkowski says about twelve percent of its customers say they won't buy his company's shoes anymore as a result. But he says today's CEO's need to accept that some customers will leave, but those who remain will be more loyal. Yeah. We we lost some customers by doing this. But I think we also strengthened our relationship, and then Wade it was far greater than different with boss. Scott wreck is CEO of Rx are realty a developer in the New York area. He has also become a vocal advocate for gun safety. Even though the issue has nothing to do with his business. I find it important for she owes to take a greater level. Of social responsibility. But the decisions I sound off comes with substantial risk. Paul Argenti is a business professor at Dartmouth. He argues CEO's should be very careful. You're basically, speaking out on something out of passion, not out of logic and businesses have shareholders, and it's really not worth taking a risk unless it's absolutely important to you. That may be why the number of executives who signed. Today's letter is still small and largely made up of executives who've already spoken out on gun violence. John find Blat is president of every town for gun safety a gun control advocacy, group, he points to banks and other retailers that have adopted their own gun control policies over the last year dishes, a key moment very much like the moment when corporation supported marriage equality, which was often seen as a turning point for that movement. Find light says he hopes to see growing business support for gun control. But he also acknowledges that even if the Bill passes the house. If stiffer opposition in the Republican controlled Senate, you can Gucci NPR news Washington. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. Targeting someone because of their dreadlocks corn rows or other hairstyle can now lead to steep fines in New York City among other things employers. There can no longer force workers to straighten their hair to promote a certain corporate image, the new guidelines apply to everyone, but they're specifically meant to protect black people who often face discrimination because of their hair Oluwa, a ladder sui visited a couple of New York City hair salons to learn what people there think of the new protections hair has often been a battleground I used to have to get my hot cold when I gotta Huggins was ganger. She went through great wants to get her naturally. Kinky hair to be straight. That was like torture a hot comb, literally put that on the stove a heated up, and then they call through your hair, you could hear like sizzling the worst the worst today. She's got dreadlocks that go pasture shoulders growing up straighter hair. Seemed like the most acceptable hair instead about natural kinky curly hair, which is also she sitting in a salon chair at the beans. Hallway waiting to get her neograph interlocked, it's Saturday morning and the salon. If they're women platinum quails in orange tip. Twist. Someone's getting a harebrained dry for that it floats up around her face like a cloud..

CEO Yuki Noguchi Blake Majkowski Scott wreck Blat Rx Tom shoes ta Huggins New York City Paul Argenti NPR founder Wade Senate Gucci NPR Levi New York Washington Dartmouth
"majkowski" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:49 min | 1 year ago

"majkowski" Discussed on KCRW

"Hello, holly. Hello. I thought we do a couple of drive times eastbound ten Pacific Coast Highway to the one ten downtown one hour and three minutes northbound four or five from the ninety one and went through this bath. Fifty minute drive five zero and the southbound four or five hundred ten to the six zero five and seal beach is one hour and thirty minutes. Yes. All right, Holly, keep us updated. Please. As we move on with the news. It's four thirty five from NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Ari Shapiro, and Mary Louise Kelley in Florida several very wealthy men were charged with solicitation last week after a sting operation include the billionaire owner of the New England Patriots Robert Kraft, the former president of city group, John havens and private equity investor. John Childs the sting uncovered a twenty million dollar human trafficking. Operation women were brought from China with the promise of jobs at massage parlors, then their passports were taken and they were forced to do sex work. A warning this conversation contains graphic descriptions of these women's living conditions. William Snyder is the sheriff of Martin county Florida his office opened this investigation that led to these. Charges. Sheriff Snyder welcome yes. Good afternoon. Good afternoon. So what tipped you off to sex trafficking in these massage parlors, the original tip came in by way of a state healthcare worker, and when the worker went, and she knows suitcases and other indications that perhaps somebody who was living in the small storefronts. She called us at the sheriff's office. We began what turned into an eight month investigation. You described it as a small storefront massage parlour, we're talking brothels in a strip mall and described the conditions that these women were living and working in. They were staying inside the massage policy twenty four hours a day seven days a week. They were actually sleeping on the tables. Were they provided the illicit sexual activity this investigation as you allude to it ended up involving massage parlors all over southern Florida. Right. Four counties, and you were working on this for months. Eight months in our case spun over into Palm Beach county, it also took us up into the Orlando area. And since the investigation began I've had calls some to other counties in Florida saying they have similar activity, and they're looking to see how on nothing so successful. I want to insert here. Just for the record that the men who have been charged are denying this craft is denying any illegal activity. Child's is denying the charges, but speak to me about how complicated it is to work on a human trafficking case like this where you've got language challenges and and women who don't necessarily want to cooperate with the sheriff. Well, that's one of the reasons why this sex trafficking continues at such a pace invariably. Our methodology has been up until we did this year. We'll send a couple of undercover detectives they'll be solicited for sex will rescue workers and shut the place down in the problem goes away, but not really goes away. And so in this came in on the decision that we would treat this differently. And that we would go after the traffickers and the man the end users, and that's why we were so successful we have over three hundred arrest warrants. What happens to the women? Now, Dino wall is you speak one of the women. That's here. We're treating her as a victim. She's in protective custody. She said that she was offered a job making a lot of money in America. In a NASA long before she came here. I'm Tom Tra south in the sex trafficking industry in the softballs, we have NGOs helping us along with Mandarin-speaking interpreters, and we're doing our very best to target these women some kind of help. Alluded to earlier, and it's true. They tend not to want to cooperate because of the coercion point oftentimes in. This woman said she family in China is at risk if she cooperates law force is that what you mean when you say the coercion point. Charter understand that what is it that causes a woman to stay in? These deplorable conditions were having sex with a fifteen minute Dame with absolutely no protection, the doors are not law. There's no guarding them at night. We've had cases where they come up with the children the children are being educated. But the cost is the mother is taken into trafficking. I was struck by the language you used when you announce these charges you called the men allegedly involved. Monsters are made me wonder, you must see a lot in your job sheriff, we're this chocking, even by the standards of what you see every day. There's some crimes that somehow able to get my mind around and understand the motivations. And they don't seem to me against the flock of a better term, the transcendent laws of the moral universe. In this case when you have women that are held under coercion and forced to have repeated sexual encounters with men throughout the day for a man to go in there. And I believe in my heart of hearts that they know this woman traffic. I think they are the monsters and more I said before there's no locks on the door locks. There's coercion point that keeps them in bondage. And the person with the kids not the trafficker. It's the man who go into these policies in availed themselves of this human misery in the three groups. We have the women traffickers, and the man I believe the men are the most guilty. That's Martin county. Sheriff William Snyder sheriff Snyder thank you very much for taking the time to speak with us. Smart pleasure. You'll have a great day. The house of representatives is set to vote Wednesday on a Bill to require background checks on all gun sales, including those done online or at gun shows today for business leaders sent a letter urging congress to pass the proposal NPR's. Yuki Noguchi explains why the CEO's are getting involved. Blake Majkowski founder of Tom shoes supports causes like access to clean water, and I care in poor countries, but embracing something as controversial. As gun control is different. He says his board of directors debated whether he should engage in a political issue unrelated to their business. Everyone is very concerned about, you know, doing something like this. But ultimately, we recognize that this is an opportunity for us to really be a leader is nice and short customers that we're engaged in the issues that matter most to them he along with the CEO's of Levi, Strauss, Dick's sporting goods and Rx are realty sign. The letter calling on the house to pass stricter background checks. Majkowski says about twelve percent of its customers say they won't buy his company's shoes anymore as a result. But he says today's CEO's need to accept that some customers will leave, but those who remain will be more loyal. Yeah. We we lost some customers by doing this. But I think we also strengthened our relationship. And then Wade it was far greater than with different. Scott wreck is CEO of Rx are realty a developer in the New York area. He has also become. A vocal advocate for gun safety. Even though the issue has nothing to do with his business. I find it important for she owes to take a greater level of social responsibility. But the decision to sound off comes with substantial risk Paul Argenti is a business professor at Dartmouth. He argues CEO's should be very careful. You're basically, speaking out on something out of passion, not out of watching and businesses have shareholders, and it's really not worth taking a risk unless it's absolutely important to you. That may be why the number of executives who signed. Today's letter is still small and largely made up of executives who've already spoken out on gun violence. Don, fine, Blat is president of every town for gun safety a gun control advocacy, group, he points to banks and other retailers that have adopted their own gun control policies over the last year dishes, a key moment very much like the moment when corporation support it marriage equality, which was. Often seen as a turning point for that movement. Find lot says he hopes to see growing business support for gun control. But he also acknowledges that even if the Bill passes the house if faces stiffer opposition in the Republican controlled Senate, you can Gucci NPR news Washington. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. This.

CEO Florida William Snyder NPR China Blake Majkowski president Rx Holly Sheriff William Snyder John Childs NASA Ari Shapiro Martin county Florida John havens
"majkowski" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"majkowski" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Could be very expensive. What what's going to be? The problem is what the legislature wants to. Probably want to spend a lot more than the governor in Sacramento. Doug, sovereign KCBS. California's Senate has paid three hundred fifty thousand dollars to settle a workplace discrimination lawsuit. The LA times reports who was filed by former legislative aide to democratic state Senator Bob Majkowski, a Fremont the eight alleged that she was fired after she claimed that she was sexually assaulted by an assembly staff member in late two thousand sixteen as part of the settlement the woman agreed to drop her claims against the Senate and the individuals named in the lawsuit and attorneys representing a Google shareholder are suing alphabets board of directors for allegedly covering up sexual misconduct claims against top executives KCBS Kerry, who has more the lawsuit filed in San Mateo county. Superior court by Google shareholder. James Martin seeks three new board directors attorneys during a news conference in San Francisco argued the company had breached its duty to share. Holders when it approved large exit packages for former executives after determining that there were credible allegations of sexual misconduct. Attorney Louis Rennie the perpetrators of the sexual harassment have been rewarded handsomely in one case by ninety million dollars payout. And that's just wrong. She's referring to Android creator. Andy Rubin who received a ninety million dollar exit package from Google despite asking for his resignation after finding sexual misconduct claims against him credible. Attorney and Ravel says it just shows the board is enabling discrimination by protecting those at the top environment where people who are not at the top are going to receive retribution. They're going to feel intimidated that they can't speak up and everybody else gets free pass in San Francisco. Carrie Hodousek KCBI coming up on KCBS channel lane.

Google San Francisco Senate Carrie Hodousek KCBI Andy Rubin Attorney San Mateo county Senator Bob Majkowski LA times legislature California Doug Sacramento Ravel Fremont James Martin Louis Rennie harassment Kerry
"majkowski" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"majkowski" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

"And tag it on your Instagram story, tag you as well. I don't know if you check your in all the time. Yeah. So tag Blake are you at Tom either at Tom's your app Blake Majkowski, Boca, Blake Majkowski, make sure to tag Blake in myself. Let's get this message out there for in wide on ask three final flushing. Okay. Great. This is called the three truths. Oh, cool. Okay. Three truce. So I want you to imagine that it is you get to choose the day that it's your last day on earth. Okay. Okay. It can be five hundred years from now. Okay. You want okay future. Okay. You've achieved everything you want you've grown the businesses helped the entrepreneurs solve human problems. Yes. All the things that you want to do in your lifetime. You've done it. And it's a beautiful moment. But it's your time to go. You gotta go. For whatever reason all the things that you've created in your life your books, your videos, your work, your businesses. They have to go with you. So no one has access to your information. Okay. Okay. But you have to leave behind on a piece of paper three things, you know, to be true. All your experiences in life. Wow. These would be the three truths or three lessons that you would leave behind to the world. And you know, when you get to share three things say are your three truce. Wow, issues question. Well, I think I was start with the phrase is used a lot. But it's been really important to me in my life since I was eighteen I had one of my best friends pass away. When when I was eighteen and I could have been on the plane. It was a plane crash. I could have been on the plane with him. And I wasn't. And I realized that I could never predict when that day would come in. So that I should make the most of every day. And so when I was eighteen s started signing every letter because we didn't have Email back, then carpet diem, seize the day and to this day every Email I ever, right? I sign carpet. Diem every thank you note. I write I signed it Carpe Diem every book I signed on carpet diem because I believe that, you know, the greatest honor week in give to the people who've come and pass before us in the greatest kind of honor, we can give to whatever your spiritual belief in terms of how you've been created is to seize the day is to truly live every day as if it's your last and so. This is the last conversation. I had with someone that gets recorded. I wanna make it the best one in no tonight. When I go home, and I read my son is story. I want to be present to that. Because I'm going to be the best ones. So carpet diem would be my first truth. My second truth was also has been very influential in my life. And it was given to me by great entrepreneurs. Bob deadman, Bob deadman started coming out club Corp. And he was one of the largest donors to SMU the college. I went to and I got to meet him when I started my first business was a laundry business. And and I asked him for a piece of advice and say he was probably in his late seventies, very successful billionaire. And I said I said, so if you give one thing right down your piece of advice calling me, and he wrote down on a piece of paper, the more you give the more you live in that. I think is absolutely true. Like there is nothing that has given me more joy more of a film int-.

Bob deadman Blake Majkowski Tom SMU club Corp five hundred years
"majkowski" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"majkowski" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"Great. Band of the seventies and eighties. You hear these songs earth wind and fire on those eighties. Classic hits stations all the time using the seventies eighties nineties were big contributors in that era. So they deserve the attention earth. When advisors hit September debuts on Billboard's digital song sales chart at twenty six. Wow. There's a big surge there, and as the lyrics go they managed to bring the song back just in time for the twenty first of September the song concurrently hits number one in the R&_B digital song sales chart as well for the first time September also debuted at number seven on the R&_B streaming songs, set eight and a half million streams one hundred percent this week playing into the fun earth wind and fire's Twitter account posted a poll on September twenty first asking followers. Simply you remember. Could play on. Only eighty eight percent of people said, yes. Why are you following earth wind and fire on foot, or if you don't even know the remember? Yeah. Right. Hey ray. So that's the story is wind and fire returning to the charts with September think part of the surge is because of weddings because this is like a Denver. Yeah. Weddings in September. For some reason. Always this song. Why what is there by the song? A dance and yeah. And a lot of wedding bands play it, and people know it and everybody dances to it. So I think that's probably part of it. All right. Okay. Let's move onto another lady of the more. Guess current music scene. Katy Perry is in the musical news today as we work our way through musical news every hour. Out of things to talk about the world of music because it's so much a part of all of our lives, different musical, focus. So Jennifer, Victoria, Karen, I now focusing on Katy Perry honored at the amfar gala October eighteenth foundation hoses ninth annual benefit for aids. Research in LA event will pay tribute to Perry into Tom's founder Blake Majkowski is hanging. Oh, yeah. The owner representing the founder of TOMS. Yeah. Okay. So there are fewer assumptions here Victorian. I'd like you to straighten out, for example. What Tom's Tom's. Oh, the it's it's a shoe brand. It's they make like those slip on shoes that everybody wear there. The the benefit of Tom's though. Is that every pair that you buy another pair goes to someone homeless or two children around the world? John have shoes. Yeah. So he's very philanthropic. With the Tom's brand is did he originally he came up with the idea for these? Yeah. Right. So they're going to honor Katy Perry in the past. Julia Roberts has been recognized for their own Jennifer Lopez Miley Cyrus. The foundation Braves research is also announcing at Occlusive musical performance by Dame, Shirley Bassey following a cocktail.

Katy Perry Tom Jennifer Lopez Miley Cyrus Billboard Twitter Julia Roberts Braves founder Shirley Bassey ray Denver John LA Blake Majkowski TOMS Karen Dame Victoria eighty eight percent one hundred percent
"majkowski" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"majkowski" Discussed on KTRH

"They nearly wind remembering type into the internet is july twenty ferried twenty twelve um this uh into then i'm about to tell you with the press and all media for two years uh not one not two but three m e in a row came off time they passed by between uh in the moon laugh a hundred and thirty thousand mt why he reluctantly and in it takes a couple of days for the x flirted get here right exactly that well about uh route working hours green i let's not travelling at the speed of light just so people here under yeah uh ilk across mine 3 million mile in about fourteen hours and um the math of a of a crime at digestion fight them weight of it is equal to mount average while the threeman i ever came out of just under like feed pass the earth left behind thirty thousand miles away come on ninety three million miles away from the fun the of vat a close eye caning give me the eye on it but if they would hit a it would event van the everybody would have died the first one would have stripped the ban alan reviews from belka awake from our the fact on whether we can all the upper atmosphere the ionosphere stratosphere mr trump and then the third one on a cat gated over the surface at full power our and everything that was like chronic for the bug that buying earlier in the first minute what would happen but fia me in a million times worse than andy impey bakov amp will strike basically uh a con a themey will cover the entire earth that's what cared an event was y'all or change weather i got a couple of emails apparently lisa majkowski it was her father who have test on not her husband all chester just so you know uh anyway uh i'll be somebody from lafayette calling him let's go to david anchorage speaking of alaska west of the rockies go ahead david yeah i i've met leaked a couple of.

chester andy impey lisa majkowski lafayette david anchorage alaska fourteen hours two years three m
"majkowski" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"majkowski" Discussed on KTRH

"They nearly wind remembering type into the internet is july twenty ferried twenty twelve um this uh into then i'm about to tell you with the press and all media for two years uh not one not two but three m e in a row came off time they passed by between uh in the moon laugh a hundred and thirty thousand mt why he reluctantly and in it takes a couple of days for the x flirted get here right exactly that well about uh route working hours green i let's not travelling at the speed of light just so people here under yeah uh ilk across mine 3 million mile in about fourteen hours and um the math of a of a crime at digestion fight them weight of it is equal to mount average while the threeman i ever came out of just under like feed pass the earth left behind thirty thousand miles away come on ninety three million miles away from the fun the of vat a close eye caning give me the eye on it but if they would hit a it would event van the everybody would have died the first one would have stripped the ban alan reviews from belka awake from our the fact on whether we can all the upper atmosphere the ionosphere stratosphere mr trump and then the third one on a cat gated over the surface at full power our and everything that was like chronic for the bug that buying earlier in the first minute what would happen but fia me in a million times worse than andy impey bakov amp will strike basically uh a con a themey will cover the entire earth that's what cared an event was y'all or change weather i got a couple of emails apparently lisa majkowski it was her father who have test on not her husband all chester just so you know uh anyway uh i'll be somebody from lafayette calling him let's go to david anchorage speaking of alaska west of the rockies go ahead david yeah i i've met leaked a couple of.

chester andy impey lisa majkowski lafayette david anchorage alaska fourteen hours two years three m
"majkowski" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"majkowski" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"Emails apparently lisa majkowski it was her father who have passed on not her husband now as stamina just so you know any an army somebody from lafayette column in let's go to dave in anchorage speaking of alaska west of the rockies go ahead david yeah i i met leap a couple of times i i we're not let's put it that way she the reason i resign i was a republican i'm not anymore uh a hearty i actually i think you mentioned but that's the site of my father was the rocket scientist florida and um that's where i grew up and uh so because without i was i've been in touch with other people that were scientists and you know we have a secret space program let's just put it that way we are in space and uh uh get back to the to the enp thing um from what i understand now you don't need to reenter a nuclear bomb to detonate if you in fact you don't want it to if you'd detonate this thing this nuclear bomb um several hundred miles up which is in outer space uh you'll you'll have the uh gamma ray bursts spread over more of an area is is you've got a wider possibility that way and so it actually does more damage so this nonsense about the koreans not being able to reenter a nuclear bomb and so we're okay is is absolute nonsense they are the biggest threat david the deer and say yeah they are um and friends neimke device they're probably uh there are probably hardware capable now they've definitely got the mindset for it and um i'm afraid he he's going to do something um very soon uh because um the pressure than being put on him if he enormous and trump is he's doing his job but it's really uh aggravating um north koreans cam young factory um does young on understand the ramifications if he does something oh you know that fencing excellent question um you would think.

lafayette column david florida lisa majkowski dave anchorage alaska scientist
"majkowski" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"majkowski" Discussed on KTRH

"They nearly wind remembering type into the internet is july twenty ferried twenty twelve um this uh into then i'm about to tell you with the press and all media for two years uh not one not two but three m e in a row came off time they passed by between uh in the moon laugh a hundred and thirty thousand mt why he reluctantly and in it takes a couple of days for the x flirted get here right exactly that well about uh route working hours green i let's not travelling at the speed of light just so people here under yeah uh ilk across mine 3 million mile in about fourteen hours and um the math of a of a crime at digestion fight them weight of it is equal to mount average while the threeman i ever came out of just under like feed pass the earth left behind thirty thousand miles away come on ninety three million miles away from the fun the of vat a close eye caning give me the eye on it but if they would hit a it would event van the everybody would have died the first one would have stripped the ban alan reviews from belka awake from our the fact on whether we can all the upper atmosphere the ionosphere stratosphere mr trump and then the third one on a cat gated over the surface at full power our and everything that was like chronic for the bug that buying earlier in the first minute what would happen but fia me in a million times worse than andy impey bakov amp will strike basically uh a con a themey will cover the entire earth that's what cared an event was y'all or change weather i got a couple of emails apparently lisa majkowski it was her father who have test on not her husband all chester just so you know uh anyway uh i'll be somebody from lafayette calling him let's go to david anchorage speaking of alaska west of the rockies go ahead david yeah i i've met leaked a couple of times i i we're not france louis but if that way cheaper grieve i resign as a republican i'm not anymore uh either hearty i actually i think you mentioned but at the site of.

chester andy impey lisa majkowski lafayette david anchorage alaska france fourteen hours two years three m
"majkowski" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"majkowski" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"Straight to hell as he said the first day back wasn't really nice of them and that's i consider a com and then he considers people like a wacko bird but putting all that aside he did make this promise yuban best friends with the guy you got it begin got to be able to tell me you can get mccain and more cow ski or or randers somebody who you you need to who are the two going to be sean at the end of the day we're gonna vote and all i can tell you is that i believe i've got a better idea than obama care about fact your hand and i didn't come on his show to beat anybody up i came on the show to tell you that we've got a historic opportunity now i'm i'm actually over lifting i i just want to thank john here's what i think of alvin or mccain i think he believed in federalism uh anneke life bipartisanship but i just don't see a pathway forward there's a way schumer can do anything major cost the democratic or go to and what does he said to you in what does he set up to now he is looking at it and let me tell you what he said i like the concept of grant kathy what governor do the and let me say scott walker it's been a hero here but governor doocy from arizona came on board and that really helped the live coffee believe this will work prayers on after work on a boat the role will be called and everybody will be held accountable and i look forward to the debate i am so excited finally as the republican have something that i'm far not just against of parma care and let me tell you they're scared to death you think president obama would come out against this bill if it did thank you had a chance i listen i agree with it at the end sullivan the nabis what is the later majkowski we had a really good top with her alaska's the unique state it's about fifty percent more for patient call sculpture so few people such large territory we're trying to be fair to alaska and give them what they need culture just soaked right i'm excited.

mccain john alvin schumer scott walker arizona parma care obama sullivan alaska sean kathy president fifty percent
"majkowski" Discussed on KELO

KELO

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"majkowski" Discussed on KELO

"And that's i consider a common and then he considers people like neurons a wacko bird but putting all that he didn't make this promise yuban best friends with the guy you gotta gotta be able to tell me you can get mccain and more cow ski or or randers somebody who you you need to go the to going to be at the end of the day we're gonna vote and all i can tell you that i believe i've got a better idea than obama care about back your hand and i didn't come on the show to beat anybody up i came on the show to tell you that we've got a historic opportunity now i'm a i'm actually over listening i i just want to thank john here's what i think of alexander mccain added i think he believed in federalism uh i think he liked bipartisanship but i just don't see a pathway or if there's a way humor can do anything major cost the democratic or go what does he said to you and what does he set up to now is looking at it and let me tell you what he said i like the concept of aid what the governor do the and lemme say scott walker's been a hero here but governor doocy from arizona came on board and that really help the live coffee believe this will work prayer zona we're gonna vote the role will be called and everybody will be held accountable and i look forward to that debate i am so excited of the republican they have something that i'm far not just against obama care and let me tell you they're scared to death you think president obama would come out against this bill if he didn't think it had a chance i listen i agree with it at the end sullivan the nabe what is the later majkowski we had a really good caught with her alaska the unique day about fifty percent more per patient calls sculpture so few people in touch law large territory we're trying to be fair to alaska and give them what they need culture just so different right amic sided and then i think you can't you think it's going to pass you think.

john alexander mccain scott walker arizona obama sullivan alaska president fifty percent
"majkowski" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"majkowski" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"And that makes them the person behind the one for one business model which helps person need with every product that is purchase but there are many many stats and some very impressive numbers related to his bio and his business and we'll get to that shortly i'm going to keep this initial intro very very short in this episode we cover a lot we talked about earlier enterpreneurial ventures us rather again english early on toilet paper new year i think that's french english our anyway early entrepreneurial ventures the power of journalism how the stool analogy changed blake's life lessons from ben franklin and much much more this episode comes from my new television show fearless ten episodes to fullseason season where interview worldclass performers onstage in front of a studio audience about how they've overcome doubt conquered fear and made their hardest decisions you can watch the entire first episode of this tv show fearless with allusion is david blaine where he actually performs magic onstage with guests from the audience as well you watch it for free at att dot net forward slash fearless at at t debt net ford such fearless to watch all of the episodes and a lot of them are physical or involve demos on stage please visit direct tv now dot com only one t in that not direct space tv but directtv won't work directtv now dot com or you can go to tim blog forward slash fearless and we recorded three hours of material for this particular session with blake all of it was awesome we used one hour for tv so this podcast episode is not a duplicate it is almost entirely brand new content that did not appear on television so i hope you enjoy this chat as much as i did with blake majkowski.

ben franklin david blaine directtv blake majkowski forward slash tim three hours one hour