17 Burst results for "Main Street Alliance"

"main street alliance" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

02:59 min | 2 months ago

"main street alliance" Discussed on On The Media

"That story starts in 2013 when then governor Chris Christie signed the economic opportunity act. It was a bill that supercharged New Jersey's corporate tax break program. And the tax breaks were beyond generous. The bill was sponsored in part by Donald norcross, a brother of George. He was a state senator at the time, and now he's a member of Congress. And sections of the bill were written by lawyers at the firm led by a third brother, Phil norcross. The state owned L three. It was built in the 90s, and it looks like a bland office park. Two buildings, each three stories high, and made of brick. In 2014, the generous tax breaks for Camden were just going into effect. And L three was a one of a kind opportunity. Unlike most buildings in Camden, it was ready for a business to move in, obtain a tax break for doing so. And get its rent paid for ten years. And nobody knew that better than the local business group that had been trying to improve Camden for decades. Cooper's ferry partnership. It's a nonprofit like most towns have, like a business improvement association, or a Main Street alliance. For 30 years, Cooper's ferry has been the primary recruiter of real estate development in the city. And there was L three, a block from the river, with parking, a cafeteria, and a gym. And here's where John Sheridan comes in. He was the CEO of the hospital, and the reason he went to work there was to work on improving Camden. And one of the ways he worked on Camden was by serving as chairman of the board of Cooper's ferry partnership. The small nonprofit saw an opportunity. If the organization bought L three, they could use the profits from the rent to fund parks or farmers markets or other community projects. The nonprofit went to John Sheridan for help when Phil norcross, George's brother, learned about the L three deal. Coming up, we find out what was happening

Camden Donald norcross Phil norcross Chris Christie Main Street alliance Cooper New Jersey George Congress John Sheridan board of Cooper's ferry partne
"main street alliance" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"main street alliance" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Round of help for this economy. That the politics is covered extensively elsewhere on your public radio down, we are going to talk about the relief money actually reaching people and businesses. The small business Administration gave us an update this week on how the latest round of the paycheck protection program is going so far. Marketplaces Justin Ho has been on that story for us. In the weeks leading up to this latest round of P P. P loans. Dan Eaton at LaSalle State Bank and Illinois says he and his colleagues sent emails and letters to business customers, telling them to get ready. But I would say the response has been a little slower than we anticipated. Eden says. There could be a few reasons for that. For one. There are more restrictions on this round businesses at the show that revenue dropped 25% or more. And despite the bank's best efforts, I think we sometimes fear that customers air just any business in our community might overlook program like the second drop Tpp. The fact that three quarters of the available money is untouched is a sign that future aid packages should include different forms of relief, says Dede, a trend with the advocacy group Main Street Alliance. Something that we've been advocating from the get Go was a more flexible grants program grants would be less likely to restrict how business owners spend the money. Naomi Pomeroy runs a meal box company called Right Cooperative in Portland, Oregon, she says it's hard for business owners to meet peop e p spending requirements. It's fuzzy enough when you think about Telling somebody that they have to have 60% of their money spent on payroll when they can only have 25% occupancy, and one proposal in Congress would establish a dedicated grant program for restaurants, Pomeroy says. That would make a huge difference. We have enough debt on our plates. We have enough restrictions and hoops to jump through and at this point our share survival depends on getting some funding us Gramps especially, she says. Now that restaurant owners are struggling.

Naomi Pomeroy LaSalle State Bank small business Administration Dan Eaton Justin Ho Eden Dede Main Street Alliance Portland Congress Oregon Illinois
"main street alliance" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"main street alliance" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of help for this economy. That the politics is covered extensively elsewhere on your public radio down, we are going to talk about the relief money actually reaching people and businesses. The small business Administration gave us an update this week on how the latest round of the paycheck protection program is going so far. Marketplaces Justin Ho has been on that story for us. In the weeks leading up to this latest round of P P. P loans. Dan Eaton at LaSalle State Bank and Illinois says he and his colleagues sent emails and letters to business customers telling them to get ready. But I would say the response has been a little slower than we anticipated. Eden says. There could be a few reasons for that. For one. There are more restrictions on this round. Businesses at the show that revenue dropped 25% or more. And despite the bank's best efforts, I think we sometimes fear that customers air just any business in our community might overlook program like the second drop Tpp. The fact that three quarters of the available money is untouched is a sign that future aid packages to include different forms of relief, says Dede, a trend with the advocacy group Main Street Alliance. Something that we've been advocating from the get Go was a more flexible grants program grants would be less likely to restrict how business owners spend the money. Naomi Pomeroy runs a meal box company called Right Cooperative in Portland, Oregon, she says it's hard for business owners to meet peop e p spending requirements. It's fuzzy math. When you think about telling somebody that they have to have 60% of their money spent on payroll when they can only have 25% occupancy and One proposal in Congress would establish a dedicated grant program for restaurants, Pomeroy says that would make a huge difference. We have enough debt on our plates. We have enough restrictions and hoops to jump through and at this point, our share of survival depends on getting food funding of grass, especially, she says, Now that restaurant owners.

Naomi Pomeroy LaSalle State Bank small business Administration Dan Eaton Justin Ho Eden Dede Congress Main Street Alliance Portland Oregon Illinois
"main street alliance" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"main street alliance" Discussed on KCRW

"For this economy. That the politics is covered extensively elsewhere on your public radio down, we are going to talk about the relief money actually reaching people and businesses. Small Business administration gave us an update this week on how the latest round of the paycheck protection program is going so far. Marketplaces Justin Ho has been on that story for us in the weeks leading up to this latest round of P P. P loans. Dan Eaton that LaSalle State Bank and Illinois says he and his colleagues sent emails and letters to business customers telling them to get ready. But I would say the response has been A little slower than we anticipated. Eden says. There could be a few reasons for that. For one. There are more restrictions on this round businesses at the show that revenue dropped 25% or more. And despite the bank's best efforts, I think we sometimes fear that customers air just any business in our community might overlook program like the second drop Tpp. The fact that three quarters of the available money is untouched is a sign that future aid packages should include different forms of relief, says Dede, a trend with the advocacy group Main Street Alliance. Something that we've been advocating from the get Go was a more flexible grants. Program grants would be less likely to restrict how business owners spend the money. Naomi Pomeroy, it runs a meal box company called Right Cooperative in Portland, Oregon. She says it's hard for business owners to meet P P p spending requirements. It's fuzzy math. When you think about telling somebody that they have to have 60% of their money spent on payroll when they can only have 25% occupancy and One proposal in Congress would establish a dedicated grant program for restaurants, Pomeroy says that would make a huge difference. We have enough debt on our plates. We have enough restrictions and hoops to jump through and at this point, our share of survival depends on getting food funding US grab, especially, she says, now that restaurant owners are struggling to get through the colder months. I'm.

Naomi Pomeroy LaSalle State Bank Small Business Dan Eaton Justin Ho US Eden Dede Main Street Alliance Oregon Congress Illinois Portland
"main street alliance" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"main street alliance" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Little bit as John and Kathryn. I were talking about two big sticking points in this so far fruitless negotiations on Capitol Hill over a relief package help for states and cities. Need for which we talked about on this program a couple of days ago and which is the must have for Democrats and then liability protection, which is the line in the sand from Jordy leader Mitch McConnell and Republicans in the Senate, specifically What kind of liability if any, the GOP says Should businesses and schools and universities have if somebody gets sick or even dies after contracting the virus at work or at school marketplaces, Kimberly Adams has that one. Let's say you run a university. One of your students catches Cove it and sews, arguing that it's the school's fault he'd probably have the same concerns is Dr Reynolds Moret, president of Xavier University of Louisiana. Clearly we have concern about certain liabilities. For example, if someone were to catch cold in 19, it's not here where they were infected that we want to be sure that It's not normally attached to the institution. Dr. Moret is an immunologist by training, he says, assigning blame and potential legal liability is tough when a virus is spreading everywhere. When my next meal is coming. I think it's important that we should have a clear guidance from the CDC and others on one of best practices because that's been unclear from a legal standpoint. Throughout the pandemic. Various states and cities have different rules. Karen Harnett runs the small business legal Center at the National Federation of Independent Business. Which has been pushing for a liability shield. We think that it is important to make sure that if somebody is following a complaint, they have to really do their due diligence to prove they were infected at the business. They're suing. Other small business groups, including the Progressive Main Street Alliance, say business owners are much more worried about keeping their doors open right now and getting federal aid to help than they are about potential lawsuits. Davis Sense Min is a lawyer and works with Main Street Alliance of Minnesota. If you're acting reasonably, if your abiding by what your governor or your mayor whomever says That's gonna be something you can fall back on to say, Well, what more should I have done? And that says, since one is a liability.

Dr Reynolds Moret Mitch McConnell Main Street Alliance of Minnes National Federation of Indepen Main Street Alliance Xavier University of Louisiana GOP Karen Harnett Senate Kimberly Adams John Kathryn CDC Cove Davis president
"main street alliance" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:26 min | 1 year ago

"main street alliance" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Jersey's governor? This Thursday? December 3rd will air the next ask oven. A Murphy are live monthly call in special and you couldn't submit your questions about the covert 19 pandemic legalized marijuana or any issue facing the Garden state. Just go to ask Gove Murphy daughter Warg. 55 degrees cloudy. Now it's one o'clock. This'll is w. N y C FM HD and AM New York. Thank you think that it's your idea. Worked nights Weekends holidays through your son's baseball game to your daughter's wedding. So maybe just maybe. You get the big prize with this we can snap way played a little game way had plans to go out to this area anyway. To search for this silver cash that we hit somehow heard about. She mailed us a copy of that map. We made an arrangement that if we found him or found any of this alleged treasure that she would get a certainly get a split of it. Day on staff judgment, Brad Great step judgment, storytelling with the beat. Day too. Live from NPR news. I'm Barbara Klein. The Ethiopian military says it's captured the capital city of a rebellious regional government roiling the Horn of Africa. NPR's later Peralta reports. It comes after a day of intense fighting. The Ethiopian military made a move on Makayla early Saturday. In a statement, the TP left a group fighting. The Ethiopian government said they were attacked with machine guns and fighter jets. Shortly after sunset. The Ethiopian military announced it had taken control of the regional capital. State TV played celebratory music communications are often that region, so it's hard to independently verify those claims. This three week war has already killed hundreds and displaced tens of thousands. It's unclear what this military victory means for the country because the rebels have said they will keep fighting. Analysts fear this conflict could now morph into guerilla warfare where the TPLF continually launches hit and run attacks to Peralta. NPR NEWS Nairobi Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamanei is calling for definitive punishment of those behind the killing of the country's top nuclear scientists. Most sin Focker Azadeh Iranian officials are blaming Israel for the assassination. 13 Roman Catholic priests have become Cardinal's Today those who received their red hats have been quarantining ahead of the ceremony because of the pandemic. Among them is Washington, D. C. Archbishop Wilton Gregory, the first black American to be elevated. Thousands of mostly masked demonstrators are in streets across France, protesting police violence, including in Paris, where police have fired tear gas. Protesters appall oppose a draft law that makes it a crime. To circulate images of police officers in some circumstances. Small businesses across the country are struggling to remain healthy amid a record and sustained period spread of the coronavirus. NPR's Amy held reports today's small business Saturday comes at a critical time. Already, tens of thousands of America's small businesses have not survived the pandemic. Others are limping along. Amanda Ballantine, executive director of the Main Street Alliance. Book to C SPAN, There've been public policy shutdowns of businesses. There's been a huge decrease in consumer demand for small businesses in the nation's most populous county. LOS Angeles. A three week health order starts Monday banning in restaurant dining. Retail businesses can stay open there, but only at 20% capacity. As the CDC warns against shopping in crowds. More businesses are relying on online sales, but whether they can count on Congress is another question. Lawmakers remain deadlocked on new relief that could provide a lifeline. Amy held NPR news. This is NPR. This is W. N. Y. C. In New York. I'm lance. Lucky Friends and colleagues of the late New York City Mayor David Dinkins, gathered at Reverend Al Sharpton is National Action Network in Harlem this morning to remember the city's first black mayor, who died this week at age 93. The city's first lady. Sure, Lane McRae served in the Dinkins administration and said they had to work to keep up with him. We had to learn about the history of our city. We had Learned about the community is the strength, the assets, the obstacles to their hopes and dreams. McRae said She admired Dinkins incredible energy and the joy he found in working for the people of New York City, whom he called a gorgeous mosaic. New York City Board of Elections will miss today's deadline to submit certified election results to the state as W. N. Y. C is Bridget Bergen reports. State lawmakers want that to change? Facing a record breaking 700,000 absentee ballots. The city Board of Elections has been working since November, 10th to count all the votes. But Deputy Senate Majority Leader Mike Generis says the county needs to start sooner. He's proposing a bill that would allow boards to process absentee ballot envelopes as they arrive. Begin counting it's six PM on election day, three hours before polls close. That should at least get us past this idea that don't take weeks on end to tabulate the absentee ballots and will get US results more. In real time. The city board plans to certify results Tuesday and submit them ahead of the State board meeting Thursday. 55 degrees. Now we should have a little son later on where around our high of the day it'll be sunny and 55 tomorrow and then rain all day Monday and it could be heavy at times with some very gusty winds in the afternoon. This is W N. Y. C. Support for NPR comes from Merrill Merrill Edge Self directed investing has tools to help clients find answers to questions more at Merrill.

NPR New York City Peralta Gove Murphy Amy New York David Dinkins Ethiopian government marijuana Ayatollah Ali Khamanei Lane McRae Board of Elections Africa TPLF State board Israel Makayla
"main street alliance" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"main street alliance" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is, they are doing about a new relief bill. We're learning more about how the last one played out specifically about the Paycheck protection program, a new congressional report says. The Treasury Department suggested banks favor their existing customers when considering applications for PPP loans, which meant A lot of businesses, especially companies owned by women and minorities. Kind of out of luck marketplaces. Justin Ho has that one. Back in April, J. Craig Gordon tried to apply through a bank for a P P P loan for the home healthcare company, Iran's in Savannah, Georgia. It wasn't even a situation where we could even get on application in. He didn't have a relationship with that bank. He tried applying through another bank. No luck there, either. Gordon cut his own salary and put expansion plans on hold. The next layer cuts, unfortunately, was gonna probably have to be some administrative layoffs. But thank goodness you know, we weren't in a situation where we have to get hurdles. Like the one Gordon had to clear discouraged many black business owners from applying for PPP loans, says Amanda Valentine, executive director of the small business advocacy group Main Street Alliance. Black business owners were 50% more likely than white business owners to believe they wouldn't be approved. And we're three times more likely than white business owners to be unaware that the program even existed. A Main Street alliance poll found that almost half of black on small businesses have either shut down already or will soon And even for those that managed to stay open the pandemic recession is likely to do long term damage, says Rashad Robinson, president of the racial justice, nonprofit color of Change. They maybe lose connections with some of their customers with the supply chain, maybe for materials or other things necessary to keep the business alive and that damage to businesses, Robinson says, makes black communities more susceptible.

J. Craig Gordon Main Street Alliance Rashad Robinson Justin Ho Treasury Department Savannah Iran Amanda Valentine Georgia president executive director
"main street alliance" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"main street alliance" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is, they are doing about a new relief bill. We're learning more about how the last one played out specifically. About the Paycheck protection program, a new congressional report says. The Treasury Department suggested banks favor their existing customers when considering applications for PPP loans, which meant A lot of businesses, especially companies owned by women and minorities. Kind of out of luck marketplaces. Justin Ho has that one. Back in April, J. Craig Gordon tried to apply through a bank for a P P P loan for the home healthcare company, Iran's in Savannah, Georgia. It wasn't even a situation where we could even get on application in. He didn't have a relationship with that bank. He tried applying through another bank. No luck there, either. Gordon cut his own salary and put expansion plans on hold. The next layer of cuts, unfortunately, was gonna probably have to be some administrative layoffs. But thank goodness you know, we weren't in a situation where we have to do that hurdles. Like the one Gordon had to clear discouraged many black business owners from applying for PPP loans, says Amanda Valentine, executive director of the small business advocacy group Main Street Alliance. Black business owners were 50% more likely than white business owners to believe they wouldn't be approved and were three times more likely than Business owners to be unaware that the program even existed. A Main Street alliance poll found that almost half of black owned small businesses have either shut down already or will soon And even for those that managed to stay open the pandemic recession is likely to do long term damage, says Irshad Robinson, president of the racial justice, nonprofit color of Change. They maybe lose connections with some of their customers with the supply chain, maybe four materials or other things necessary to keep the business alive and that damage to businesses, Robinson says, makes black communities more susceptible.

J. Craig Gordon Main Street Alliance Irshad Robinson Justin Ho Treasury Department Savannah Iran Amanda Valentine Georgia president executive director
"main street alliance" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"main street alliance" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is they are doing about a new relief bill. We're learning more about how the last one played out specifically. About the Paycheck protection program, a new congressional report says. The Treasury Department suggested banks favor their existing customers when considering applications for PPP loans, which meant A lot of businesses, especially companies owned by women and minorities. Kind of out of luck marketplaces. Justin Ho has that one. Back in April, J. Craig Gordon tried to apply through a bank for a P P P loan for the home healthcare company, Iran's in Savannah, Georgia. It wasn't even a situation where we could even get on application in. He didn't have a relationship with that bank. He tried applying through another bank. No luck there, either. Gordon cut his own salary and put expansion plans on hold. The next layer of cuts, unfortunately, was gonna probably have to be some administrative layoffs. But thank goodness you know, we weren't in a situation where we have to get that hurdles. Like the one Gordon had to clear discouraged many black business owners from applying for PPP loans, says Amanda Valentine, executive director of the small business advocacy group Main Street Alliance. Black business owners were 50% more likely than white business owners to believe they wouldn't be approved. And we're three times more likely than white business owners to be unaware that the program even existed. A Main Street alliance poll found that almost half of black owned small businesses have either shut down already or will soon and even for those that managed to stay open. The pandemic recession is likely to do long term damage, says Rashad Robinson, president of the racial justice, nonprofit color of Change. They may be lose connections with some of their customers with the supply chain, maybe four materials or other things necessary to keep the business alive and that damaged the businesses, Robinson says. Makes black communities more.

J. Craig Gordon Main Street Alliance Rashad Robinson Justin Ho Treasury Department Savannah Iran Amanda Valentine president Georgia executive director
"main street alliance" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"main street alliance" Discussed on KCRW

"House do whatever it is, they are doing about a new relief bill. We're learning more about how the last one played out specifically about the Paycheck protection program. A new congressional report says. The Treasury Department suggested banks favor their existing customers. When considering applications for PPP loans, which meant that a lot of businesses, especially companies owned by women and minorities. Kind of out of luck marketplaces. Justin Ho has that one. Back in April, J. Craig Gordon tried to apply through a bank for a P P P loan for the home Healthcare company. He Ron's in Savannah. It wasn't even a situation where we could even get on application in. He didn't have a relationship with that bank. He tried applying through another bank. No luck there, either. Gordon cut his own salary and put expansion plans on hold. The next layer of cuts, unfortunately, was gonna probably have to be some administrative layoffs. But thank goodness you know, we weren't in a situation where we have to get that hurdles. Like the one Gordon had to clear discouraged many black business owners from applying for PPP loans, says Amanda Valentine, executive director of the small business advocacy group Main Street Alliance. Black business owners were 50% more likely than white business owners to believe they wouldn't be approved. And we're three times more likely than white business owners to be unaware that the program even existed. A Main Street alliance poll found that almost half of black owned small businesses have either shut down already or will soon And even for those that managed to stay open the pandemic recession is likely to do long term damage, says Rashad Robinson, president of the racial justice, nonprofit color of Change. They maybe lose connections with some of their customers with the supply chain day before materials or other things necessary to keep the business alive and that damaged the businesses, Robinson says, makes black communities.

J. Craig Gordon Main Street Alliance Ron Rashad Robinson Justin Ho Treasury Department Savannah Amanda Valentine president executive director
"main street alliance" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:08 min | 2 years ago

"main street alliance" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Are going to do a couple of stories now about gaps in this economy gaps on the personal economy side. And gaps on the business side. It has been seven weeks now, since those extra unemployment benefits that tens of millions of people had been depending on one away. Neil had talked about that. It's been five weeks since President Trump's temporary and partial replacement took effect using FEMA disaster relief money. And it has been 5.5 months since Congress passed, the cares act and as to deepen Neal and I were talking about We are nowhere on more government money help for this economy, possibly not till after the election. So how is that working out in our personal economies? Here's marketplaces, Mitchell Harmon. At the end of July about 25 million jobless Americans suddenly lost $600 a week in federal benefits from their weekly unemployment checks, leaving the typical recipient with 3 25 a week on average across the country. President Trump's Pandemic Unemployment replacement scheme, announced in early August was slow to get off the ground, says economist Andrew Stettner at the Century Foundation, the stop gap that was put into place Was tardy and insufficient and is already running out. So far about 20 states have distributed the FEMA benefits most at $300 a week. More states have applied for their FEMA money, which is captained 44 billion nation wide enough to cover just six weeks of benefits. Almost as soon as he will get the money, you know they won't be getting any more. Bystanders calculation about $10 billion in extra jobless benefits have been paid out so far under Trump so called Lost Wages Assistance program compared to 68 billion that would have gone out if the original 600 a week payments had continued. Johanna mayor, health Care worker is trying to cope with the loss of that extra federal money. She lives in Maryland and has three elementary age kids all at home right now. She and her husband have been out of work since the pandemic hit. Both have received unemployment. She's been struggling since their federal pandemic benefits ended in July. I mean, it's a significant difference. Our rent alone is $2000 a month, Maryland just announced. It'll start paying out the extra 300 a week in benefits, but it hasn't cut any checks yet. For mayor and her family. So now I'm trying to survive K r vent or build on our food on what amounts to $645 a week. I mean, it's not survivable year, according to a poll by Ipsos three out of four Americans support additional payments to people unemployed due to Corona virus. My mental Hartmann for marketplace. Okay, Mitchell did gaps in personal economies. Kimberly Adams is going to do gaps in business economies, Brick and mortar retailers are doing everything they can to get by. We've been telling you about that. And yet some of those retailers aren't getting by. We told you yesterday about the clothing change century 21 shutting down and Yes, there is. The pandemic has a cause. But the company also said in its announcement in pretty direct language that it's insurance company was to blame as well. Could police Kimberly Adams explains that one Century. 21 really didn't mince words saying it's insurers had quote turn their backs on us at this most critical time. The company says that despite having business interruption insurance when business was interrupted due to Cove in 19 claims weren't paid out in this case, like many others around the country. Insurers, saying they don't have Tio Loretta Worters is with the Insurance Information Institute, which represents the industry, because it's a pandemic. It was never taken into the rates. When an insurance company provided that kind of coverage in court fights all over the country. The industry is pointing to clauses and exclusions and contracts, arguing the industry isn't obligated to nor can afford Tio absorbed the pandemic losses. In the meantime, business owners are wondering what use their insurance even is and then you also see a lot of folks are getting renewal notices for their policies for next year and a lot of them. The rates are going up. Davis since Min is a lawyer working with the small business advocacy group Main Street Alliance, in some cases, 2 300% And so it's understandable that small business owners you're saying Wait a minute. If the industry didn't pay out because of these exclusions, Why are the rates going up? Both insurance companies and business organizations are lobbying Congress for a fix. Leon Buck with the National Retail Federation says insurers need a federal back stop using the program developed after 9 11 as a model. If there's another terrorism event in the insurance companies will cover a portion and the federal government will cover the majority of the cost. And that's key because, after 9 11, no one was able to get insurance century. 21 noted that it's insurers did help it recoup losses in New York after 9 11. But the pandemic was the crisis it.

President Trump FEMA Tio Loretta Worters Johanna mayor Maryland Kimberly Adams Mitchell Harmon Congress Andrew Stettner federal government Insurance Information Institut Neil Century Foundation Leon Buck National Retail Federation President New York Neal
"main street alliance" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"main street alliance" Discussed on KCRW

"We don't know the exact amount it's categorized as between 2 to $5 million. Expensive private schools were on the list law firms, including what then represented President Trump and the reason we're learning about this now, sir breeze that the Treasury Department under pressure released data for who got the biggest loans? Yeah, I remember. A few weeks ago, We were talking about some big restaurant chains taking people's phones. I mean, are these revelations particularly surprising? Well, they're confirming some of the criticisms about the PPP program that money was flowing to bigger businesses than perhaps Congress intended. The issue is that the program was supposed to be for firms that didn't have other options for quickly raising cash to continue paying employees and staying in business. And we spoke with Sarah Crozier about this of the Main Street alliance, which is an advocacy group for small business to see that the most well banked businesses you know our best represented in getting that money and ultimately, maybe didn't need it as much as other businesses, particularly in the service industries. I can see where that outrage has been justified. And closures Group now wants Congress to target age, for example, geographically, perhaps to small businesses in infection hot spots where the aide maybe most needed All right, Nova. Thank you. At the end of this month, millions of unemployed Americans will get their last $600 a week. Federal pandemic unemployment check. That is unless Congress acts to extend the program. Marketplaces. Mitchell Hartmann has more Jody Soul L is 64 works for a solar energy installer in Maryland. He was furloughed in March and recently got called back for a very partial reopening. One Wake. I had 2.5 hours another week, two hours. He is still getting $880 a week on unemployment that includes 600 in federal pandemic benefits. What will his family do if that runs out at the end of July? I haven't even thought about that. That's why they make credit Cone. Financial advisory firm. The ascent has surveyed unemployed workers and research analyst Dan Albright says almost 2/3 and go less than three months. Without the extra $600 they would borrow more money and take more drastic cuts in their expenses. A recent survey by the Urban Institute finds more than four in 10 American households have suffered job or income lost during the pandemic. I'm Mitchell Hartmann for marketplace. Let's take a look at the numbers this morning, The Dow Jones industrial average is down 221 points. That is 8/10 of a percent. The S and P 500 is down 3/10 of a percent. The NASDAQ is up 3/10 of a percent..

Mitchell Hartmann Congress Sarah Crozier Trump Treasury Department closures Group President Main Street alliance Urban Institute Maryland Nova Dan Albright research analyst
"main street alliance" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"main street alliance" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We don't know the exact amount it's categorized as between 2 to $5 million. Expensive private schools were on the list law firms, including what then represented President Trump and the reason we're learning about this now, sir breeze that the Treasury Department under pressure released data for who got the biggest loans? Yeah, I remember. A few weeks ago, We were talking about some big restaurant chains taking people's phones. I mean, are these revelations particularly surprising? While they're confirming some of the criticisms about the PPP program that money was flowing to bigger businesses than perhaps Congress intended? The issue is that the program was supposed to be for firms that didn't have other options for quickly raising cash to continue paying employees and staying in business. And we spoke with Sarah Crozier about this of the Main Street alliance, which is an advocacy group for small business to see that the most well banked businesses you know our best represented in getting that money and ultimately, maybe didn't need it as much as other businesses, particularly in the service industries. I can see where that outrage has been justified. And closures groups now wants Congress to target age, for example, geographically, perhaps to small businesses in infection hot spots where the aide maybe most needed All right? No, thank you. At the end of this month, millions of unemployed Americans will get their last $600 a week. Federal pandemic unemployment check. That is unless Congress acts to extend the program. Marketplaces. Mitchell Hartmann has more. Jody Sel L is 64 works for a solar energy installer in Maryland. He was furloughed in March and recently got called back for a very partial reopening. One Wake. I had 2.5 hours about a week, two hours. He is still getting $880 a week on unemployment that includes 600 in federal pandemic benefits. What will his family do if that runs out at the end of July? I haven't even thought about that. That's why they make credit cones. Financial advisory firm. The ascent has surveyed unemployed workers and research analyst Dan Albright says almost 2/3 go less than three months. Without the extra $600 they would borrow more money and take more drastic cuts in their expenses. A recent survey by the Urban Institute Finds more than four in 10 American households have suffered job or income lost during the pandemic. Mitral Heart mint for marketplace Let's take a look at the numbers this morning, The Dow Jones industrial average is down 221 points. That is 8/10 of a percent. B S and P 500 is down 3/10 of a percent of the NASDAQ is up 3/10 of a percent..

Congress Mitchell Hartmann Sarah Crozier Jody Sel Urban Institute Trump Treasury Department President Main Street alliance Maryland Dan Albright research analyst
"main street alliance" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"main street alliance" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"We don't know the exact amount it's categorized as between 2 to $5 million. Expensive private schools were on the list law firms, including what then represented President Trump and the reason we're learning about this now, sir breeze that the Treasury Department under pressure released data for who got the biggest loans? Yeah, I remember. A few weeks ago, We were talking about some big restaurant chains taking people's phones. I mean, are these revelations particularly surprising? Well, they're confirming some of the criticisms about the PPP program that money was flowing to bigger businesses than perhaps Congress intended. The issue is that the program was supposed to be for firms that didn't have other options for quickly raising cash to continue paying employees and staying in business. And we spoke with Sarah Crozier about this of the Main Street alliance, which is an advocacy group for small business to see that the most well banked businesses you know our best represented in getting that money and ultimately, maybe didn't need it as much as other businesses, particularly in the service industries. I can see where that outrage has been justified. And closures Group now wants Congress to target age, for example, geographically, perhaps to small businesses in infection hot spots where the aide maybe most needed Nova. Thanks. At the end of this month, millions of unemployed Americans will get their last $600 a week. Federal pandemic unemployment check. That is unless Congress acts to extend the program marketplaces, Mitchell Hartman reports. Jody Soul. L is 64 works for a solar energy installer in Maryland. He was furloughed in March and recently got called back for a very partial reopening on Wake. I had 2.5 hours another week, two hours. He is still getting $880 a week on unemployment that includes 600 in federal pandemic benefits. What will his family do if that runs out at the end of July? I haven't even sold about that. That's why they make credit cones financial advisory firm The ascent has surveyed unemployed workers and research analyst Dan Albright says almost 2/3 could go less than three months without the extra $600. They would borrow more money and take more drastic cuts in their expenses. A recent survey by the Urban Institute finds more than four in 10 American households have suffered job or income lost during the pandemic. Mitchell Hartmann for Marketplace Let's take a look at the numbers. The footsie in London is down 1.6%. Dowels and P and NASDAQ futures are down in the 3/10 to 1% range with a dark future down. 251 points..

Congress Jody Soul Mitchell Hartmann Sarah Crozier Mitchell Hartman closures Group Trump Treasury Department President Main Street alliance Urban Institute Maryland London Dan Albright research analyst
"main street alliance" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"main street alliance" Discussed on WTOP

"Dot com here's Hilary Howard hello with Memorial Day weekend our site another of our region's normally packed beaches is about to allow more fun on the sand Virginia's governor made the announcement this afternoon and to WTOP's Michelle bash has that story beach will ease more corona virus related restrictions in a few days as of Friday may the twenty second which is this Friday I will allow the city of Virginia beach to open its beaches to recreational activity sunbathing will be allowed along with swimming surfing and fishing but governor Ralph Northam says tense groups of beach umbrellas and group sports won't be Northam also announced that a group of state and local education leaders including representatives from K. through twelve schools and colleges and universities are meeting to figure out what classes might be like this fall this group is meeting regularly together with our public health team they'll be laying out specific next steps over the coming weeks Michelle Basch WTOP news Virginia's news follows Delaware beaches which re opened for residents this past weekend in the state's biggest coastal town this first four wait for ray into loosened restrictions showed what worked and what didn't the beach and boardwalk in Rehoboth Delaware have reopened this past weekend was trial weekend I think you worked out well Paul Kuhn says there were large crowds and while most people deprived of social distancing he's hoping to encourage more visitors to wear masks that's the only thing that was missing this weekend we had a lot of the restaurants open for curbside some more shopping at curbside retail stores to shop I think all in all it was successful tells remain closed the curtains message to folks heading there next weekend practice safe distance including Jordan Melissa Howell W. two opinions for those of you who owned property along the Delaware coast you can head fare but the state does recommend a fourteen day quarantine once you arrive many small businesses in the Washington area continue struggling to hold on during the pandemic and they could get some help to keep workers on the payroll under a new proposal in Congress WTO's peas Mitchell Miller has details today on the hill the work sure proposal for Maryland senator Chris van Hollen is supported by Amanda Ballantyne with the main street alliance which represents thousands of small businesses that create a pathway for many employers have the certainty they need to begin rehiring Ballantyne says one problem for small businesses is getting funds so they can adapt right now our country have it figured out how to keep the doors open included a lot of the restaurant industry where people are shifting to delivery are trying to shift to grocery the legislation would allow businesses to get.

Chris van Hollen rehiring Ballantyne senator Maryland Washington Jordan Melissa Howell Delaware Michelle Basch Hilary Howard Amanda Ballantyne Virginia Mitchell Miller Congress WTO Paul Kuhn Rehoboth Delaware ray Ralph Northam
"main street alliance" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"main street alliance" Discussed on WTOP

"Continue to struggle to hold on during the virus pandemic they'd get help to keep workers on the payroll under a new proposal in Congress let's find out more from WTOP's Mitchell Miller on Capitol Hill the work sure proposal from Maryland senator Chris van Hollen is supported by Amanda Ballantyne with the main street alliance which represents thousands of small businesses that create that pathway for many employers to have the certainty they need to begin rehiring Ballantyne says one problem for small businesses is getting funds so they can adapt Americans have it figure out how to keep the doors open if you look a lot in the restaurant industry where people are shifting to delivery are trying to shift to grocery the legislation would allow businesses to get federal assistance to share payroll costs and keep paying workers by trimming hours until operations fully re opened on Capitol Hill Mitchell Miller WTOP news on the economic impact delivered by covert nineteen a wreaking havoc on government budgets across our area today DC leaders presented how they plan to balance a one point five billion dollar shortfall and still make good on promises to residents like other cities DC has to balance the budget for years out city administrator Rashad young outlined the numbers the revenue loss in fiscal year twenty which is the fiscal year that we're in now it was seven hundred and twenty two million dollars he says the city use nearly all its rainy day funds budgeted surpluses froze district workers wages through twenty twenty four and refinance debt so we could still deliver on education healthcare and affordable housing commitments priorities of mayor Bowser's administration while this is not the budget that I expected to send to the council earlier this year it is a budget that I am proud of and that the city can be proud of Meghan clarity WTOP news DC's department of corrections had been ordered weeks ago to do a better job cleaning and improving conditions at its jail facilities to limit the spread of covert nineteen now the ACLU claims things have gotten worse in April when the judge ordered DC corrections to do more cleaning and for residents had access to medical care and keep their distance from each other five inmates were sick in DC's trails one month later the ACLU says one hundred eighty inmates have confirmed cases of twenty five fold increase making the risk for inmates thirteen times that of everyone else in DC the ACLU is asking the judge to appoint an expert to help determine how many and which residents to be released so the DC corrections.

ACLU Meghan mayor Bowser Rashad young administrator DC rehiring Ballantyne Maryland Congress Amanda Ballantyne Chris van Hollen senator Mitchell Miller WTOP
"main street alliance" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"main street alliance" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Effect from this evening through tomorrow afternoon right now is your stepping outside just windy but a band of heavy rain will arrive by early this evening in some parts and don't break out the rest of the timing for you in just a couple of minutes your local main street maybe a ghost town were not essential businesses have been forced to shut their doors downtown areas throughout the garden state are coming up with ways to keep local customers in the no because a closed sign doesn't always mean doing business is impossible in some towns websites have been created specifically as a database for customers to see what's open downtown and what's not and what's still available when doors are closed Rebecca Hirsch with main street Highland Park says they've increased presence on social media and through email going from business to business to see how each can still serve the public to lose our downtown because of this pandemic and if people are able it's really important to support them main street alliance says there are plenty of examples of main street helping main street one business helping with the supply order if another supply sources disrupted Dino flam me New Jersey won a one point five news Wildwood boardwalk is open kind of restaurants can now offer takeout service some worry it'll attract crowds to the boardwalk to get a slice and then they will go home the mayor tells NJ dot com was only fairly boardwalk restaurants offer take out like other places in town but they're keeping a close eye on gatherings Asbury park is resuming metered parking in town parking it been free but city officials are hoping the paid parking bull deterrent out of towners from coming in as the weather gets nicer nearly three hundred thousand new Jerseyans eligible for food stamps aren't enrolled in the program almost three of every ten that was before the upheaval caused by this pandemic I don't want to read of hunger free New Jersey says the state's not program needs new technology a simple application and more outreach workers I waited in the time I think you need one unprecedented numbers of people are trying to access the benefits watercress is the state also needs to provide larger benefits those payments are temporarily enhanced during the pandemic.

Rebecca Hirsch Highland Park New Jersey Wildwood boardwalk Asbury park