12 Burst results for "Mahmoud Darwish"

"mahmoud darwish" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

02:49 min | 2 months ago

"mahmoud darwish" Discussed on FoodStuff

"They're <hes> <hes> making a frozen foods that flat bread <hes> And they're spice is available at most whole foods if you're interested Whole foods listed satire as one of their food trends of twenty nineteen that same year. Mccormick brand came out with zad tire. Blend and End international day Made its debut as well and also yes. That's our has got mixed up in politics over the years particularly when it comes to israel and palestine and arguments around who's at tar belongs to and that is something we do talk about on here Palestinian poet mahmoud darwish mentioned in the poem on all's atar they can the case at things like agriculture are vital to things like identity and particularly In this poem references the former palestinian refugee camp learn mentioned to further emphasize. How important harvesting and eating are when it comes to the israeli palestinian conflict around national identity and land and traditions and history tied to all of that culinary and otherwise so yeah because of this why we are talking about herbs and spices. We are also talking about so much more something that can unite people and also be used to as a weapon against them. Yeah in twenty nineteen The israeli nature and parks authority did begin. Easing its policy on the collection of a zautar plant For personal use They said they were trying to separate personal. Use from like commercial collection so So if that if that is what is happening <hes> then that's great As always it's still moving. The situation is still ongoing Zitar the story continues. Yes but i suppose that's what we have to say for now it is We do have some listener mail for you. We do but i. We have one more quick break for word from our sponsors. We're back thank you sponsors. Yes thank you and we're back with the solicitor like a summer breeze. Yeah jared wrote. I'm writing in response to the recent episode bouillabaisse at various points in my life. I became aware of the concept of potato chips and fish stews as well as the terms of volume base in vichy.

"mahmoud darwish" Discussed on Small Doses

Small Doses

03:15 min | 3 months ago

"mahmoud darwish" Discussed on Small Doses

"Kaminsky. Funky got to another episode of small doses. We had an incredible run of this great guests. I mean the things we've discussed and learned about have been absolutely incredible. Shout out to everybody who has come through and shared their time and their minds with us. We got a great response folks about my sisters episode in regards to palestine. I know right now. That's a very hot button topic. And i'm really happy to just see a lot. More people including myself educating ourselves and also being being change agents to not only hopefully you know lead to the lead to the ending of the occupation of palestine but also in challenging the rhetoric. That says that if you are against the occupation of palestine that you're anti semitic which is absolutely not the case at all and i really wanna make sure that it's very clear that's understood because the truth of the matter is so many of us particularly in hollywood are working alongside folks that you know are part of the jewish faith and it's very important to me that my team member and the people that i work with. They understand that like i. One thousand percent support their religion and their right to live and exists in the world in a safe way at the same time that i also think it's important to acknowledge that palestinians also have a right to live and exist in the world in a safe way so you know hoping that Folks who listened to episode took some extra time to check out the script that never had suggested in terms of books and she also hit me up and asked me to give some more suggestions. She said the book of the palestinian table. By ren- kassy's palestine on a plate by judy kala. Palestine the special edition by joe. Sacco speak bird speak again by ibrahim howie and sheriff kanana and the butterflies burden by mahmoud darwish so she wanted me to share those other books so that people can get their reference game on because you know we are all about references and research information here as small doses that he said that extends to my new web series. These and i wanted to do an episode about these for land because doing this project and creating this was very very near and dear for me and it was a very different process. And i had employed in the past with anything else i had set forth on. That was going to be like my little independent thing. I know there. I gotta stop calling my independent things. Lil views are manned. Land is a web series that i began but launched last week on instagram and youtube and it was an idea that i had had floating around that i knew i wanted to do some type of show that would be my version of a talk show and hosting and people all the time particularly since i left the real saints me. Amanda you're on show when you can get your on show you need to be doing your show and it's like that's easier said than done particularly because i'm very particular about what i want to talk about when it comes to my own show so let's get into our first segment. Amanda having her own show. So listen here's small doses..

Amanda youtube last week ibrahim howie first segment sheriff kanana judy kala Kaminsky ren- kassy palestine One thousand percent jewish instagram Land palestinian speak bird speak again joe. mahmoud darwish palestine on a hollywood
"mahmoud darwish" Discussed on UN News

UN News

04:46 min | 4 months ago

"mahmoud darwish" Discussed on UN News

"To do on the phone. Thanks to the. Un world food program's summer abdul-jabbar in jerusalem for sharing his precious time on the challenges facing his teams in gaza and the west bank and the people they serve in the occupied palestinian territory amid ongoing violence that un secretary general antonio guiterrez that's cool as senseless cycle of bloodshed terror and destruction. He's also call for israel and palestinians to return to negotiations for a two state solution of the conflict as agreed by the oslo peace accords from the one thousand nine hundred ninety s and overnight to from henrietta four unicef executive director gaza's one billion children are reeling from the mounting consequences of conflict with no safety turn. She says lives have been lost in families. Shuttered and at least sixty children in gaza have been killed another four hundred and forty four injured in less than ten days of this conflict. Now to wrap up the show. Let's bring in cilicia take a gutters from the information service. At u n geneva. Hi solarge we thought. The world has stopped with the pandemic. But it hasn't since nineteen forty eight. The palestinians have lost their homeland. They lands they water. They'd freedom at this moment. Food is one of the most pressing needs as we heard from some Abdul jabber words food program representative in palestine and as yes lurking from the un office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs. Said on tuesday in almost eight hundred thousand. People don't have regulate access to safe. Water in gaza is this. The lies really want what's left of palestine. What's left of the oslo accords for a two state solution and peace. One of the lessons learned from the current covid crisis is that it is necessary to return to the elementary and elementary is food health and dialogue openness to other cultures is essential and dialogue is the only valid response to the illusion that we can protect our culture only by looking it up. This is what the palestinian intellectual alias. Somebody said he's the winner with the bibliotheque icelandic of the two thousand fifteen unesco saratoga price for rob culture. Elliot's some bad was born in haifa in nineteen forty seven so he lived there only a few months before his family was displaced to lebanon during the arab israeli conflict in nineteen forty eight. Elliot's somebod- that's late into french. The work the great palestinian poet mahmoud darwish who died in two thousand and eight. I was at home when you told me that your interview was about. Gaza instinctively took one of my favorite books from edward sade. Lonnie's oriental ism. Then i found a video on the multi-media of unesco would he tells the story of april nineteen forty eight were hundreds were killed and many thousands become refugees. We might call them the others then..

edward sade Elliot tuesday palestine jerusalem haifa april nineteen forty eight Lonnie Abdul jabber two thousand two state less than ten days antonio guiterrez one thousand arab israeli conflict hundreds one billion children west bank one four hundred and
"mahmoud darwish" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:50 min | 4 months ago

"mahmoud darwish" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of rock and classical Arab music in a band called Aleph. L I F That's the first letter of the Arab alphabet and this is a group from Egypt and Lebanon featuring Tom are Abu Ghazala singing and playing the booze IQ, which is a long neck loot. Maurice Luca playing keyboards We heard from him in that set us well. But from the band Olle if that song is called Dar's mean Kama Sutra, a lesson from the Kama Sutra. Setting of a poem by the late great Palestinian writer Mahmoud Darwish. Before that. We heard from Maurice Luca, who plays keyboards in olive, but plays guitar as well. We heard him playing what seems like a retuned guitar in a song called The Palm of a Ghost, featuring vocals by Nada El Shazly. And that comes from Maurice Lucas record called Elephantine, which features musicians from Sweden and Italy, Turkey, Iraq and Denmark. In addition to the Egyptian guitarist and pianist himself. And on this edition of new sounds. We're hearing some music that has its roots in the classical instrumentation of North Africa and the near East but takes those Takes those sounds elsewhere up. Next is music by Sabri most to the Tunisian born singer and a ranger whose album never seen or my roots. Looks back to actually his family roots. He is the son of a pretty well known Tunisian musician named Sloan, most to He's also though inspired by trance music from places like Morocco and Yemen and trance music as it exists in the clubs of Western Europe. So let's hear this piece from an album that he recorded in Paris and Brussels as well as in Tunisia. The song is called Rock and Jared Maki Say you feel came in Mackey shaved Cam in Mikey, say if he came in whenever a King Neddy with Mana Kinsella with Mother Kinsella with Mana Kinsella Naked pool, old lady. Yeah. Will issue his it. Yeah, we'll hit it. I win it hit home Best, Maddie. There will again be you ever. Yes, it will be over. There really can be. Yeah. Better men. Surely now you say it's an in Harvard to say it's and in a hard error. You say you turn in a Harvard A was trying he met.

Maurice Luca Brussels North Africa Sweden Paris Abu Ghazala Tunisia Turkey Morocco Denmark Mahmoud Darwish Iraq Maurice Lucas Western Europe Egypt Tom Yemen The Palm of a Ghost Sabri Italy
"mahmoud darwish" Discussed on VS

VS

07:39 min | 9 months ago

"mahmoud darwish" Discussed on VS

"And that feeling of expensive affection for the world. I think reading poets from other times and places gives us that appreciation back. Yeah are there other poets who you're going to for that these days so many. So so many I've found myself reading. The great palestinian mahmoud darwish with can get different sense of comprehension of his many many decades of exile. Because i think so. Many people in the world feel kind of just in exile from normalcy from their regular lives. Allow stuff they used to do. So when you read about exile or containment from someone who really grappled with that as a central theme of so much of his work he has felt very close during all this time and this morning a beautiful thing happened. Someone i've known a long time sent me a poem by a poet. I've loved for maybe thirty years. I'm not sure. I'm gonna say her name right-footer photos from iran and i've loved her poems. I think included one in my middle eastern thalji some years ago but my old friend sent me. This poem called window and she said she was very very moved by this poem reading it and just read you two lines from it. One window is enough for me. A window onto the moment of awareness and seeing and silence on and i know this poet lived through all kinds of struggling trauma during her short life so reading people i loved for a long time but reading them during a different time takes on meaning I want to ask a little bit about that You know that deep attention. That is a faruk. Sog that yes. That's how i pronounce it. yeah That that poet exhibited. Yeah i guess maybe the word is something like despite all of the horrors of of the world around them like. What is the relationship between those two things to like imperative to pay close attention and the horror of the reality that you might be paying attention to buy. I think like the non poet. Part of my brain says oh. Wouldn't you want to like stop paying attention. And then the poet part of my brain says but that's the thing that you have to be most attentive to well i. I love how you're referring to those different parts of the brain. And now i sometimes think about the pardon my brain that's responding to the news every day and then the part that's responding to the poems i'm reading and how when i start feeling really exhausted on the news channel of migraine. I need to give more time to the awareness poem port. No i think it doesn't take as much effort to regenerate our aware spirit in the poem part as some people think it. Does you know people make all kinds of comments about resistances to poetry will look at the world. It's so messed up. Look at all our problems. And how can we possibly give ourselves that little luxury of basking in a poem and know my instinct would be well. That's that's why you need because you're overwhelmed with all this other stuff you deserve the poem part more and you just you cultivate that feeling of awareness you know. Where do you go to sit and read something. Can you close your eyes and give yourself a little silence before you read it and give yourself some silence after you read it. Can you stop feeling so compulsive please. I mean that's something. I've always dealt with like the compulsion of every day. Oh well. I can't really work on my writing until i wash those dishes and clean up the joint But really you keenum and figuring out how to recalibrate all the tugs on you from different directions I guess we're forever in a process of figuring that out New we we really require a little more of our time with beauty. Beauty of language creative enterprise creative joy in discovery. Sometimes our grandson will just look at me in the course of day and he'll say i need to paint. It's never if i urgent. It's hard to get the water because he likes watercolor so i ris- to get the water. It's like okay. Where's the paper. Let's go and i just liked that sense that a child has a a need. I need to be with with colors right now. What is that like as we get older so back to that question of when we lose that co itself that poet joy with language. I think many times it's when we become too dutiful practice at talking to ourselves out of it too much saying oh. I don't have time for that and nobody can get away without with me anymore in poetry session. Because i'll say you know what. How much time does it take. You can sit down three minutes. Read a poem in two minutes. Read it again in five minutes. You could have a doubled experience with the poem and you can write lines. Give yourself one minute per line. You don't even have to think in terms of poems you can't use the time excuse Because you do have that time. We all have that time. It's a question of respecting those tiny increments. And i think that's one thing. The poems help us respect more. Those tiny increments your interview with page louis. Yeah oh shut up. Legend page louis yummy so such a great interview talking about timeliness anything's naomi. I'm miss nail. I should say Grandma smack me on the back of the head right now. I wish i knew her. Oh you don't give me some no. She's great I love my grandma. She's a little stern lady. I need to go see her today. Actually i miss yeah We were talking before Especially about like the parts of our brains right sort of the news new side poet side these parts that are always you know as saying like paying attention. I always wonder for folks that have been paying attention for a while. Because i am fearless myself. How we maintain our hope and optimism in that work to right. Because i feel like you've been even writing for so long about the world we see salons. Oh god oh no sorry. My age is as but a long time. I mean you deserve you know like at the point where like people are like giving you lifetime achievements and stuff like that right because the king.

mahmoud darwish keenum iran migraine page louis louis yummy naomi
"mahmoud darwish" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:33 min | 11 months ago

"mahmoud darwish" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Say with This says Wait. And and scuttle. That's music, written by Jeff Beal for the Brooklyn Youth Chorus and Ice, the International Contemporary Ensemble, and the piece is called Hope. It's part of a larger work called firebrand and the first lady. Some of those words attributed to Eleanor Roosevelt, the others to her firebrand friend Paulie Murray. Prior to that we heard the sandpaper dolls vocal trio from Louisville, Kentucky, and they're setting of Hope is the thing with feathers. Emily Dickinson text The obvious What our theme is this time around on new sounds. Let's listen next to some music from Ryan Cohen. He's a pianist, bandleader composer. And his piece called the hours before dawn. Also has a title that bears a little explaining Cohen, who has Ah ah, Jordanian father is a big fan of Middle Eastern music, so you'll hear a lot of Those kind of near Eastern classical Arabic modes in this music for jazz band and string quartet and the title the hours before dawn was used by the great Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish. As a metaphor for the promise of the future. So a kind of progressive forward looking hopeful image from Darwish, which Ryan Cohen.

Ryan Cohen Mahmoud Darwish Eleanor Roosevelt Jeff Beal Emily Dickinson Paulie Murray International Contemporary Ens Louisville Brooklyn Kentucky
"mahmoud darwish" Discussed on The Slowdown

The Slowdown

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"mahmoud darwish" Discussed on The Slowdown

"Sometimes happiness comes up and shocks you. Pow like a fight scene in comic book. Something wonderful arrives and makes you stand up or sit down and say yes. Or Wow or thank you. That's one kind of happiness but happiness also exists sometimes quietly in the background so quietly. We don't always realize it's their contentment there in the middle distance. A quiet hum beneath the volume of the day's racket a bright spot unnoticed in the corner of an otherwise ordinary perspective. The other afternoon sitting at my desk I looked out at the bushes in the yard. Many of the leaves. I know to be Green. Actually shown bright white from reflected sunlight scanning distance. I saw this was true. Sunlight glinting high in trees and low down upon every other blade of grass sunlight leaping off from the lid of a grill from a bobbing wind chime sunlight everywhere not static but moving dancing like an exclamation or conflagration of joy. But most of the time. I'm looking the wrong way. News of the world has me worried. Or I'm in a rush saying only that I've not yet done what I must do. And so I miss all the happiness scattered before me but most of the time. I'm looking the wrong way. News of the world has me worried. Or I'm in a rush seeing only that I've not yet done what I still must do. And so I miss all the happiness scattered before me. I missed the focus on my daughter's brow as she sketches. I miss the mischief worrying behind. My sons is the smile just now stirring under his cheeks surface. Life is many things sometimes. It is work sometimes worry other times. The rewards life offers feel effortless and unending. Today's poem is and we love life. By Mahmoud Darwish translated by Fahdi Judah the love of life the love of all the miraculous offerings. That surround. Us Isn't always a given. But deliberately seeking out the joy pleasure and affirmation in what is available can be a heart filling enterprise and we love life by Mahmoud Darwish and we love life if we find a way to it we dance in between martyrs and raise a minaret for violet or palm trees. We love life if we find a way to it. And we steal from the silkworm a thread to build a sky and fence and this departure. We open the garden gate for the Jasmine to go out as a beautiful day on the streets. We love life if we find a way to it and we plant where we settle some fast growing plants and harvest the dead. We played the flute like the color of the faraway sketch over the dirt corridor. We write our names one stone at time. Oh lightning make the night a bit clearer. We love life if we find a way.

Mahmoud Darwish Jasmine Fahdi Judah
"mahmoud darwish" Discussed on The Promised Podcast

The Promised Podcast

11:51 min | 1 year ago

"mahmoud darwish" Discussed on The Promised Podcast

"That song is Lil- Elul Lule by cure hillel. And now time for our second discussion. So hot a memoir by a Jew forced to leave Baghdad for a hard life in Israel made Palestinian President Abbas cry. What are we supposed to make of that yes? So this is a story Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas resolve recently to to republish a long out of print memoir written in Israel by a now deceased rocky Israeli writer journalist editor and diplomat named talk about Moshe. The book is called quote. The exodus from Iraq Obasa turns out has long admired the author. What's more according to? A man named Ziada wish cousin of late. Great Palestinian Alestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish and a member of the Palestine Liberation Organisation's Committee for interaction with Israeli society. The Palestinian President phoned up bomb which has living relatives lives and quote. He told Bausch as family yesterday that he I read the book when he was living in Syria and that it made him cry. He said he thinks it is so important. Because it shows how the suffering of Iraqi Jews is not different from that of the Palestinian people now Belmont show was an extraordinary man lived an extraordinary life. He was born in Baghdad. Daddy nineteen twenty seven and was only nineteen when he finished his law degree there in nineteen fifty. He moved to Israel as part of the great wave Iraqi immigration and lived with his family in a rundown transit camp or Ma inch foam. He went into the army and after that started working in the Arabic language section of the broadcast authority in time bomb will sheff founded in Arabic language. Daily newspaper newspaper called. I'll UNBE and edited it for a couple of years until it folded. He went back to the broadcast authority where he continued to write. And edit all this time like most Iraqi intellectuals electricals he was a communist beginning. Nineteen eighty-three he became the press adviser of the still new Israeli embassy in Cairo and later became the embassy functionary in charge of hospital. After this he became the editor of the Arabic language versions of two foreign ministry literary and arts journals all the while he wrote stories and novels and articles in a trilogy of memoirs of which the Exodus from Iraq was the first as a scholar of Arabic. Language is rarely literature. Reuven sneer described it. The book is quote a personal account of the events leading up to the tragic end of the Iraqi Jewish community which was descended from the ancient Jewish Babylonian community as described in the Old Testament. The book Bommel she says is quote inside I to quote a novel or a collection of short stories or personal history but in the final analysis it is perhaps a mixture of all these things together and quote inside quote it describes the events that preceded the mass immigration of the Iraqi Jews to Israel in the early nineteen fifties following a wave of harassment and systemic persecution. In all their long history Iraqi. Jews had never experienced such significant discrimination from their Muslim compatriots moreover the reader is led to the conclusion that the Jewish immigration was not at all the result of an inner Zionist drive on the part of the Iraqi Jews but rather the result of sheer stupidity and blindness on the part of the Iraqi authorities at the time and they're shortsighted policies and cynical opportunism. It seems the US. Jews a scapegoat for their own problems and failures in order to protect themselves from the anger of their own people and quote. And doesn't that sound familiar Bomani. It was not as ionised and disillusioned with Israeli attitudes towards Arabic culture which he loved and heartbroken Rabin's assassination. He spent the last years of his life in the Iraqi Jewish community of Manchester England but all of his life he was deeply engaged in Israel at the very least displaced remained the home of his children and grandchildren when Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas spoke on the phone with D. Chamyl by almost fifty eight year old daughter. He told her that her father's book had made cry. He wanted other Palestinians to read it to understand Dan. The hardships that Israelis from Arab lands suffered and to understand that they were not in the end very much different from Palestinians he would give it to visiting dignitaries from Arabic speaking countries he would give it to Palestinian leaders in time. Perhaps it would become a part of the Palestinian curriculum which is remarkable but confusing. Some see it as a cynical ploy a former advisor about Palestinian matters to the government coordinator of activities in the territories named CEO NEAT fertile. Kuperwasser wrote that a buses affection for Barbara Shea is cynical and hypocritical Fidel Kuperwasser whose parents emigrated from Baghdad around the same time. But we'll shedded and who herself wrote a book about the years of the Iraqi Elia routed. A bus has a fetish for Iraqi Jews. The reason he has a fixed notion a narrative that Zionism is a form of racist European colonialism that Jews were victims of it alongside Palestinians Abadan condescending story but one that seems warm and embracing and yet must be a good thing for Palestinian leaders and intellectuals and everyone else to be reading an account the travails of Jews with our own multitude of disasters. Big and small all in the same year as to which Palestinians the flowering of despair and at a more basic level. What is it the fellow? Feeling that Mahmoud Abbas feels Jews from Iraq and likely from Syria Yemen Egypt. And all the rest does this sympathy hold any political value or potential. I think it really it does. I've been rolling this around my mind for days and weeks since I first read about it and it's a little bit astonishing. I think that that the criticism that this is something cynical is entirely wrong. It doesn't sound cynical at all but the criticism that it it does support and comport with a narrative that Zionism was this European thing foisted upon the Middle East in general with its or foisted I sit upon Arabs who are both Muslims and Christians and Jews at once. I I think that something like that is certainly behind. It and that narrative is is is definitely not entirely right though. It's not entirely wrong either but really whether or not this thing made a bass cry because it supported this view that he had that is partly wrong. It is something that seems to me to have political potential. Like right now at this moment what we need to do here. All of us on all the sides is fine these fragments of possibility of finding common cause and they're there and because our history does run together because because more than half of Israel did live in the Middle East for generations and generations and are are part of Arab culture and there is this potential. That was systemically for reasons. I understand the and that are understandable. Wiped out over the course of the first two or three generations of the state. We need to try. Try to find ways to to reinvigorate to relight these little sparks of potential. And I think that AH bosses as-as onto something there. I really think that there. There is this way in which Jews from Israel and Muslims and Christians from Palestine. Nine can look at one another and say you know what we do share a lot of history. We're not just foreign fighting factions but but were people that came in some ways. A lot of us from the same place and went underwent the same horrible experiences. I don't know I think it really is powerful. I mean just to devil's advocate because somebody somebody has to represent this point of view. You don't feel like it's just another tool in the in the anti Israel toolbox saying these these terrible double European colonialists trampled all over everybody including the Palestinians including the Middle Eastern Jews and just kind of You know just being used as a way to make the Israeli leadership slash government slash elites A. Look bad I don't think this book actually does serve that. I'm not I'm not. I'm not talking about the book itself. I'm talking about a bosses affinity for the book. The desire to distribute the book using the book as You know the Anti Israel has Berra tool. I'm not necessarily believing everything I say here. I'm just I think it's a point of view that needs to be represented hod. You're the one who thinks about literature. I think the the books are by their nature and this book in particular is more subversive than that. But what do you think I agree you know I. I was mostly happy about this that I learned about this person in this book that I didn't I know about it just goes to show you know part of this razor or the that you talked about of culture but to be honest this might surprise you well. By this point I extend the same amount of suspicion suspicion towards any Meta narrative that tries to cash in on my family story. I mean I just really wished that everybody would get their dirty hands off of our complex nuanced and diverse heritage heritage. And and this is. This is interesting because this this doesn't putting this book in the hands of people do that. I I'm not exactly sure because I think that this inviting fighting of his daughter and making a whole press deal out of this. I mean. Listen this story of Iraqi jewelry. The story of Mizrahi Arab Jewish jury call call it. Whatever you will has been has been used in the service of the Zionist narrative in the same way that we we studied very certain books in school? We study Donegal a couple of specifically and that tells a certain story and the fact that the Zionist or Jewish or or you know administration uses this narrative or or promotes this narrative that on the the other side of buses using a kind of counter intuitive narrative where subversive narrative to say something opposite. I don't like the messengers more than I have a problem with the specific experiences in the specific books in the specific stories because there are stories that were Iraqi. Jews at resigning Iraqi. Jews were not scientists. There were communists they were poor people rich people religious people secular alert people. We have a much larger and more complex history than picking out these little different pieces of the story in order to tell a larger story which I just think that printing a book a full book by a guy who reflects the complexity is a little bit different than spouting the slogans about the I. I agree but I I can't help but feel like lately and this is something I would never have said a month ago that maybe this Arab Jewish culture and Arab Jewish identity. We like to talk about. We long long for isn't really a political option. Maybe just doesn't really even exist anymore. I mean huge majority of Jews. Don't speak Arabic. Most of our culture has been reduced to orientalist folklore. Specificity and nuance have been all but erased and he's trend seemed to be strengthening as time passed. Not Not going the other way around well especially because because you know intermarriage in a sense of Ashkenazi Mizraki people of various ethnic Jewish backgrounds. Marrying each other. It's sort of natural than that. It's you know there's less loss of this quote Unquote Peer Culture. That that you're talking. I don't agree with that. I don't think that intermarriages the thing I think it's it's a very. It's a very much a case of systemic. The stomach of a certain kind of culture and oppression and history my fifteen year old says they learn nothing about the European Jewish history up the WAZOO and nothing about Mizrahi Jewish Jewish language. Yes I just WanNa say this last thing and and I I see. I'm very really pained by by this by the thoughts. I've been having on this lately. He but I feel like as all these different stories. Egyptians Moroccans and Yemenite Senior rockies are are are important and powerful politically. I feel the the the greatly surpass the variety of flattening them into a coherent narrative. I feel like we. We need more than anything right now. Is Specificity telling real stories true stories and stop you generalizing and reducting and and maybe we need to instead of looking back on on this kind of culture that our grandparents had maybe our parents had and maybe was an option at some point. Join and just doesn't seem like an option anymore. Truly sadly I say this maybe we need to start trying to create something new. Maybe start new cultural bridges and building new cultural ways ways of making a conversation instead of looking back and saying okay from were from similar places. Because I don't think that's enough anymore. Sadly now listen to this.

Israel Palestinian President Mahmoud Baghdad Iraq Palestinian Authority Iraqi Jewish community of Manc Mahmoud Darwish Mahmoud Abbas Syria editor President Abbas Palestine Liberation Organisat President Mizrahi Arab Jewish Middle East Ziada Bausch Cairo US
"mahmoud darwish" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

16:34 min | 1 year ago

"mahmoud darwish" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You find out all the way from Morocco in the west three North Africa and then on into Yemen and and the Arabian peninsula but there's something else going on here you listen to this kind of ritualistic repetitive sound and it's all being driven by an electric car it's called rock I'm John a combination of rock and north African music by some of the most fun I will be hearing it on this edition of new sounds along with a number of other works that combine the sounds of traditional north African or classical music of the Near East with the sounds of western jazz and rock electronics I'm John Schaefer glad you've joined us for this edition of new sounds let's begin in Egypt sort of that's where Maurice Luka is from he's a guitarist pianist composer arranger but his album elephant team includes musicians from around the Near East and from Europe and Scandinavia because he's inspired not just by classical Arab music but by the sounds of the so called spiritual jazz of John Coltrane pharaoh Sanders Alice Coltrane and the sounds of minimalism in trance music so we'll hear a piece called the palm of a ghost featuring vocals by nada el sharply and on this piece Maurice Lucas plays a guitar are currently re tuned one but then we'll hear him playing piano in a different band a group called aleph which is the first letter of the Arab alphabet and which is a band of musicians from Egypt and Lebanon led by Tom are Abu Ghazaleh who plays the pursuit a long neck loot and also sayings from their album called item all right Thomas which means wherever it falls we'll hear a setting of a poem by ma mood dar we each called dollars mean kama sutra a lesson from the kama sutra so that's from the band all life first here's band member Maurice Luka from his own record called elephant team this is the the big fish this though the by cool cool the good on combination of rock and classical Arab music in a band called aleph A. L. I. F. that's the first letter of the Arabic alphabet this is a group from Egypt and Lebanon featuring timer Abu Ghazaleh singing and playing the blues took which is a long necked lute Morris Luca playing keyboards we heard from him in that side as well but from the band all life that song is called dollars mean kama sutra a lesson from the kama sutra a setting of a poem by the the late great Palestinian writer Mahmoud Darwish before that we heard from Maurice Luka who plays keyboards and aleph but plays guitar as well we heard him playing what seems like a re tuned guitar in a song called the palm of a ghost featuring vocals by nada el sharply and that comes from Maurice Lucas record called elephant team which features musicians from Sweden and Italy Turkey Iraq in Denmark in addition to the Egyptian guitarist and pianist himself and on this edition of new sounds were hearing some music that has its roots in the of the classical instrumentation of North Africa and the Near East but takes those takes those sounds elsewhere up next is music by sub Remos by the Tunisian born singer and arranger whose album male last seen or my roots looks back to actually his family roots he is the son of a pretty well known Tunisian musician name slon mozda he's also though inspired by transmissible from places like Morocco in Yemen and trance music as it exists in the clubs of western Europe so let's hear this piece from an album that he recorded in Paris and Brussels as well as in Tunisia the song is called rock I'm John red makes you say you care I mean make sure you can you can make use safety I mean when he said he.

Morocco North Africa Yemen
"mahmoud darwish" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"mahmoud darwish" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"On. A combination of rock and classical Arab music in a band called Alif. Af that's the first letter of the Arab alphabet. And this is a group from Egypt and Lebanon, featuring tomor Abu Ghazala singing and playing the blizzard, which is a long neck lute MAURICE, Luca playing keyboards. We heard from him in that saddest. Well, but from the band olive that song is called Dr Smith Kama Sutra, a lesson from the Kama Sutra, a setting of a poem by the late great Palestinian writer, Mahmoud Darwish before that we heard from MAURICE Luca who plays keyboards in olive, but plays guitar is. Well, we heard him playing what seems like a retuned guitar in a song called the palm of a ghost featuring vocals by NADA, El Shazli, and that comes from MAURICE Lucas record called elephant team which. Features musicians from Sweden and Italy Turkey Iraq in Denmark, in addition to the guitarist and pianist himself, and on this edition of new sounds were hearing some music that has its roots in the classical instrumentation of North Africa and the near east, but takes those takes those sounds elsewhere up next is music by Sabri Mosbah, the Tunisian born singer and arranger whose album never seen or my roots. Looks back to actually his family roots? He is the son of a pretty well known Tunisian musician named slum Mosbah. He's also though inspired by trance music from places like Morocco in Yemen and trance music as it exists in the clubs of western Europe. So let's hear this piece from an album that he recorded in Paris and Brussels as well as in Tunisia the song is called rock Jared. Shea. Shea. Shea if he..

Dr Smith Kama Sutra MAURICE Luca Shea MAURICE Lucas Alif Tunisia Mahmoud Darwish MAURICE Abu Ghazala Sabri Mosbah Egypt El Shazli Morocco Europe writer North Africa Sweden Lebanon Iraq Yemen
"mahmoud darwish" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Arts Review

Monocle 24: The Monocle Arts Review

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"mahmoud darwish" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Arts Review

"The beach situations being funny is there is there a sense of culture as a coping mechanism that it is a way of dealing with setting aside something that otherwise you wouldn't be able to cope with absolutely i mean the irish say that whenever life gets hard comedy does very well and i really believe in that if you look at all the places around the world when they've had difficult conflict you find that their cultural production is really important and high the irish are good example and i think palestine is another good example since nineteen forty eight has been a huge cultural productivity and creative creativity amongst the people we've had posed like mahmoud darwish our national poet who's one world prices he's been translated to over thirty six languages are fiction for example our fiction writing is is very well established and they are boiled and in the world we have a sanctifying who was assassinated for his writing back in nineteen seventy seventytwo just for writing fiction i'm i'm myself a writer that's what i try to do i try to write about human story so i think yes you're absolutely right it is a coping mechanism and it is a way of living through this conflict i haven't seen my family for the last four years in gaza and the more i write about it the more i feel i'm connected with them when i ride when i sit down in dark room somewhere i i connect myself with my people with my family when we sat down for dinner when we loved together i don't remember the conflict much i remember my mother my father my siblings and how much we love how much we talked what we did together so it is coping mechanism for me and in fact this year is the seventieth anniversary of this catastrophe since nineteen forty eight and then we've got the demonstrations in gaza happening right now my friends getting shot as they demonstrate peacefully by the border we've got the trump decision to move the embassy to the american embassy to jerusalem and all of that is happening in the world is watching my only way.

writer gaza american embassy jerusalem palestine mahmoud darwish four years
"mahmoud darwish" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"mahmoud darwish" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Mahmoud so spare inside his elegance suit stepped across stony fields bent to brush the pedal of flour didn't pick it closed his eyes though holding one hand with the other carrying the presence of blossom back to the page for those who would never walk a field never been down he found a way to carry the cry of lost goat and the cry of a people without stumbling don't forget the streets of tears mapping his soft cheeks his large and somber glasses the edgy poke of his thin shoulders how he stood a bit to the side hand over heart his delicate hand on the stem of glass toasting the roads and the wandering winds mothers and fathers enduring without justice felt his decker presence sustaining them though they might have found it hard to name the unchinese in beauty of struggle and love mixing in a fresh tonic any might drink his brilliance spilled in every language though arabic owned him he became a perfect country moving through the world wherever he was and he it's ruler teacher and prophet he it's infinite dusty workers pausing with shovels to steer beyond the ruined they could see to what they will always believe in you know i have to say that one of the greatest days of my own life will remain the day the lannan foundation out of santa fe new mexico gave mahmoud darwish the cultural freedom award and to be present to see him except that award with such he was so touched by that and for me as an american to see american supportive group of literary wizards honor him in that way that was probably my most touching day.

Mahmoud lannan foundation mexico mahmoud darwish one hand