19 Burst results for "Mahalia Jackson"

"mahalia jackson" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

04:08 min | 3 weeks ago

"mahalia jackson" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"I'm in Los Angeles and I haven't found all my hopes yet I haven't sold my car I'm still going to be here I got you to the station I love you dearly And I wish you well but I'm perhaps not jumping on this midnight train to Georgia That's always been my read of it even from when I was a kid I have to say I was so impressed by the way in which you seem to think so critically about music even when you were so young and the way that you talked about the ways that men who largely had all of the bylines back then were writing about women writing about black women artists writing about women fan bases and how they enjoyed music How did you start thinking about music in that way It's just so nuanced and layered Well what I appreciate that to I just have always loved music I've always been nosy So I guess it makes sense that I guess it makes sense that I would become you know a culture writer of music critic But it really started for me reading a liner notes of albums We used to have albums in the house my mother was very big with the Columbia club where you would like for a penny you would get ten albums whatever that call was We were in it deeply and my mother would let us pick three of the albums or whatever the ratio was And these things were treasures in the house And even before that I just remember songs in the key of life The album art and the lyric book and everything that came with Stephen wonder's songs in the key of life album These things impacted me The design I think it also contributed to me wanted to become a magazine editor The way these things were designed and there seemed to be so much emotion in there was so much poetry And then by the time I got to high school I would go to the library I write about it a little bit and shine Brian And I would look at the magazines the old life magazines the old Rolling Stone magazines And I would read about what people were saying about you know The Beatles and what they were saying about you know all the big groups of the 60s Motown and supremes And I would so rarely see a woman's pilot I would literally be searching for it I would literally go to the next collection of bound issues just looking looking for a woman's byline even something I could make up maybe she spelled it with an IE maybe it means it's a woman But I couldn't find it man and it made me mad You're listening to its been a minute from NPR I want a summers and I am talking to Danielle Smith about her new book Shine bright a very personal history of black women in pop I will say for me when I was reading this book when you got to the part of the book where you first started talking about the gospel legend Mahalia Jackson I actually had to pick up my phone and text my mom because I just have these very deep and vivid memories of remembering her putting on those CDs in our kitchen especially if someone had passed on I still can not listen to her singing sometimes I feel like a motherless child without literally getting goosebumps running down my spine And I'm curious if you can talk about her a little bit and what she means to you You know what's so wild about my relationship to her Jackson is that it's more new than a lot of the relationships I have to a lot of the women in shine bright I'm Catholic I tried if not by practice And so I didn't listen to a lot of gospel as a kid I wasn't in a gospel choir as a kid When I would hear gospel music live it was going to the churches of my friends but the thing about mahalia is that I realized as I was writing shine bright that I already knew of course that gospel was at the center of so much at the beginning of so much It's foundational to so much But what I began to realize it's not just gospel That's at the.

Columbia club Stephen wonder Danielle Smith Los Angeles Georgia Mahalia Jackson Brian NPR Jackson mahalia
"mahalia jackson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:13 min | 3 months ago

"mahalia jackson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"From NPR I'm Sam Sanders All right I want to take us to 1969 The summer of 1969 The summer that we went to the moon The last summer of a truly historic decade In the summer that saw a really big groundbreaking music festival in New York On highways leading to the result area I know the festival you are thinking of right now And it's not that one This music festival did not take place upstate And it wasn't just a few days This one happened in Harlem summer of 69 Every weekend for almost two months Back then it was called the Harlem cultural festival In the bottom half but now questlove calls it the summer of Seoul Okay hear me when I say this The Harlem cultural festival had everything Stevie Wonder playing the drums like he had three sets of arms Neighbor Staples and Mahalia Jackson singing a duet together with Jesse Jackson's band backing them up Nina Simone bringing the house down almost issuing a call to arms for black people Are you ready to call the wrath of black gods Black magic to do your bidding The whole thing was epic Questlove made a documentary about the festival called summer of soul It came out on Hulu last year and now questlove is out with the soundtrack to this movie which is just as incredible We're going to talk about all of that in this chat and we're going to spend a lot of time talking about why so many Americans Before this Doc had no idea one of the greatest music festivals of the past century ever happened I am so excited for this one Here's questlove.

Sam Sanders Questlove Neighbor Staples NPR Harlem Mahalia Jackson Stevie Wonder Nina Simone Jesse Jackson New York Hulu Doc
"mahalia jackson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:57 min | 3 months ago

"mahalia jackson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"But in terms of your messages about what you're doing to take yourself out of yourself, it's amazing. How many of us starts around the kitchen says Kate and cumbria are wondering kitchen designers will start to incorporate a disco glitter ball into kitchen design, food for thought. Another one here, Monday evenings is our she choir at Leonard's on sea, it brings joy, pleasure and giggles, and it is so uplifting, says Mimi. Thank you. And many of you really enjoying hearing Sarah Brown sing this morning and remembering your own memories of Mahalia Jackson. So more messages coming in. But Manchester United footballer Mason Greenwood has been arrested on suspicion of rape and assault following allegations of abuse by a woman that went right across social media and were widely shared. Greater Manchester police said it was made aware of social media images and videos posted by a woman reporting incidents of physical violence. He remains in custody for questioning and inquiries are ongoing. Manchester United earlier said the play would not return to training or matches until further notice. The club say they do not condone violence of any kind and has been made aware of the allegations on social media, but would make no further comment until the facts have been established, and I give sponsored Mason Greenwood since he made his debut for united in 2019 have released a statement to say, they're monitoring the situation, quote we are deeply concerned by the disturbing allegations of will continue to closely monitor the situation. Mason Greenwood has not responded to the allegations, the photographs recordings and an audio note that were uploaded on social media have since been deleted. Due process will now follow on this allegation, but I want to talk now in a more general way about the ramifications of making allegations on social media before going to the police. And this is something I discussed with the chief executive of women's aid, Farah Nasser, who I spoke to just for coming on air and I asked her reaction to a woman posting this sort of content rather than going first to the police. Well, I think the first, the first thing to really say is that when a woman has experienced any form of domestic abuse, there should be a range of options for them. Be at the police or the local authority or a women's service. And perhaps this is the route that the individual wants, perhaps it's not, but there should be a range of options for any given survivor. I guess, I guess what comes to mind is perhaps those options haven't worked for that individual, perhaps that's individual doesn't have competence in those options, perhaps that's perhaps this has happened to that individual who knows. But the real issue for me and for us as an organization is to ensure that when a survivor wants to want to talk about their experiences on these are support and that help and wants to be believed that there are a range of options for them. But coming completely away from this case because we can't talk about the specifics, we don't know. The details here yet, and I'm very mindful of that and also the fact that we aren't able, of course to talk about the alleged victim and we're also aware of the fact that the footballer hasn't made any comments in response to this yet. But I was just wondering from what you've just said that you say we don't know. And there's a lot we don't know here. Would you advise other women to do this?.

Mason Greenwood Mahalia Jackson Sarah Brown Greater Manchester police cumbria Farah Nasser Mimi Leonard Kate Manchester United Manchester united
"mahalia jackson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:10 min | 3 months ago

"mahalia jackson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Yeah. Sarah Brown, can you come in every day? Singing, I'm on my way from a new album, Sarah Brown sings Mahalia Jackson. And I've got to say for the bit where she wasn't singing there was some extremely good dancing going on. So thank you so much. Thank you. What a lovely, wonderful way to rouse rouse ourselves. And I have to say some music and to our ears is some of your messages this morning. Beth in North Wales says good morning. It's always music and dancing for me. Just at home in the kitchen that lifts me up if I'm having an off day and I really don't feel like facing the day. I know a little effort and putting a track on will work for me if it gets me moving, singing along and feeling better, I've had bouts of anxiety and depression over a number of years and music has helped me hugely because at the end of that message, thank you for a lovely show, Beth in North Wales. Good morning to you. I am also a fellow kitchen disco, if we can describe it as that. Keep those messages coming in. There is extremely lovely to read this morning and also another one just talking about swimming in the highgate men's pond. Done it today says Robin, thank you very much. And I think you're telling me it's 4° there is that what you're saying? I think it is. Not had a temperature come through on this test message console yet before thank you for that. Keep those messages coming in. Now, you may have noticed two big companies have recently announced a redesign in their branding in a name to appear more progressive. Mars, the maker of M and M's has launched a new look for the chocolate characters. The green M and M apparently losing her stiletto boots in favor of trainers, the Brown M and M, wearing slightly lower heels than before. Meanwhile, a couple of days ago, it was announced Disney's Minnie mouse will be swapping her iconic red polka dot dress for a navy blue and black trouser suit or as Americans describe it a pantsuit with a matching hair bow designed by Stella McCartney, something Disney is hoping will show it's a symbol of progress. But as any of this mean much to real life women, Lee Edwards, a Professor of strategic communication and public engagement at the London school of economics and political science. Good morning to you Lee. Good morning. Thank you for joining us. I'm also going to be getting the views of karli, Lewis O'Donnell, a freelance features writer Carly thank you for joining us today, good morning. Good morning. Let's come to you Lee. First of all, just about what this is and how much we're seeing of it. Do you think it matters that brands are doing this? Or do you think we've got people who are savvy enough to who say, I know why you're doing it, and I don't think it matters at all to me. Well, performance of activism is a kind of it's a strategy by brands that co opts social justice causes like feminism or like Black Lives Matter or mental health awareness to turn them into commodities that they can sell and make money. But it's not always as black and white as that. Some brands do this with genuine intent to be supportive of the cause and certain brands do it really with just a genuine intent to sell..

Sarah Brown rouse rouse North Wales Beth Mahalia Jackson Lee Edwards London school of economics and Disney depression Lewis O'Donnell Robin Carly thank swimming Stella McCartney Lee karli navy
"mahalia jackson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:48 min | 3 months ago

"mahalia jackson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Was raised in a volatile home. And so I was a fearful child. And I found that when I was at church, singing, I forgot all about that fear. I would forget all, you know, is my dad going to be in a good mood when I get home. Is he going to hit mom? Is he going to hit my brother? What kind of, you know, that fear that took me as a child wasn't there, but I was singing these songs. And when I was listening to these beautiful Rubin esque women yes, such a picture. I wish I wish I'd been there, I wish I'd stayed. It was really, it was like a sweetie shop seriously. You know, these women, they were stylishly dressed. They were very proud. They came to this country to make money to go back to wherever they had come from. And in the Caribbean. And I was going to say alongside the church that you started listening to the heliers, music. Was that at home? I was listening to mahalia from home. My sister, my one of my elder sisters Pauline, was an avid fan of Mahalia Jackson. And so she had albums that she would play all the time. And as young as I can remember, I was singing along to Mahalia Jackson. Because for people who don't know anything about Michele, I mean, what should they know about her? They need to know that mahalia was born into poverty, but she had a determination and a grit that enabled her to achieve her dream. She lost her mother at the age of 5. She was brought up by her grandmother in Louisiana by the riverside. And with 13 other children. So she wasn't. She didn't have a silver spoon in her mouth and for sure her path was mapped out. She was going to be a nanny. To these rich families, she was going to cook lovely food and gravy for these rich families. That was all she was allowed to dream about. But what you need to know to answer your question, Mahalia Jackson had a determination. She had that fire that flaming her that said, I am on my way. I am going to make it, whether I'm poor, whether my mother will come over my father will come, I am going to make it. And so she used a voice to take her out of poverty. Mahalia Jackson sold 22 million albums in her lifetime. Now we are going way back. You know, she didn't have the support that many bands today have. She had her grit and her belief. She was the type of woman where the record companies were saying to her, you can be as big as Ella Fitzgerald. You can be as big as Billy holiday, you can be as big as Bessie Smith. She said no. I'm gonna sing gospel..

Mahalia Jackson mahalia Rubin Pauline Caribbean Michele Louisiana Billy holiday Ella Fitzgerald Bessie Smith
"mahalia jackson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

03:05 min | 3 months ago

"mahalia jackson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"One here, whistling and cooking, often simultaneously get me through, says Jenny, listening good morning in Scarborough, north yorks. Due to ME, I became unable to sing even a conversation shattered me, but I'm slowly improving after three years and I found myself spontaneously singing along to the radio the other day, I was delighted, and although it warmed me out, I see it as a marker of my recovery. Fingers crossed for dancing next, says Joanne. Well, we're having this conversation because of my next guest Sarah Brown a vocalist who has worked with some of the biggest names in the music industry. Mick Hucknall Bryan fairy Duran Duran Stevie Wonder and currently performing with Jim Crow and simple minds. But now she's stepping to the front of the stage releasing her own album based on the American gospel singer, the legend Mahalia Jackson and her music 50 years on from her death. Sarah grew up singing gospel in a Pentecostal church in the UK, which first inspired her love of Jackson's music. Sarah. Now I'm going to actually talk to you having had a blast of your beautiful voice just before good morning. Good morning, Emma. What was it like when you first remember being involved at church and hearing some of that gospel music? Absolutely. It was visually amazing as it was orderly. These I call them big black mamas who were wearing, you know, they looked like Audrey Hepburn. And they sang a song that was so moving. You know, the harmonies that would come out of these women that were full of hope. You know, this was the windrush generation and for many of them, they came into this country. They weren't Christians. They weren't religious, but because they're struggle was so difficult, they found comfort in church and in a type of church that was that would have the base guitar, the rhythm guitar, the Hammond organ, the piano, the drum. It was a rock and roll session. And it was proper hardcore music that lifted the soul. So these women looked as if they were going to a wedding. You know, the shoes would match their gloves. They had stockings on two piece suits, the hat. They looked amazing. And they would get together, congregate, and sing these hymns with such Gusto and with such flame. If they left there unhappy, it was because they had no blood in them. Really? Absolutely. And of course, as a child, as young as I can remember, you know, my mother would drag me along to church. Myself and my brothers and sisters, we had no choice. But I actually didn't mind because as I said, the music was infectious. It was incredible. I was quite a volatile..

north yorks Mick Hucknall Bryan Sarah Brown Scarborough Sarah Mahalia Jackson Duran Duran Jim Crow Jenny Stevie Wonder Joanne Audrey Hepburn Emma Jackson UK
"mahalia jackson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

03:22 min | 3 months ago

"mahalia jackson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Subjects are moving around again, but as things stand, it does seem like the sugra report will go to number ten later this morning. It's not quite the report people were going to be expecting because of the Met police involvement. But if that report does show in the subsequent investigation to show that the prime minister knew, especially that May 2020 gathering, I recognize when you are not there on maternity leave, but that he knew that there was a gathering and it was a party and all these details that have come out come to come to fruition. Do you think his position is untenable? I'm afraid I don't think that the leadership was the party and the position of the prime minister is one for me. I was a former adviser to two prime ministers and that's not appropriate for me to become. Would you have felt comfortable though working for somebody who broke the rules? I think that I think my comments today stand for that. You know, I would have been under difficult person that would be pushing people internally. And I know that that can be uncomfortable. So I would certainly have been making my views felt. It's just I suppose looking at what you've written today and hearing what you've just said as well. You said you returned from maternity leave and number ten was different. You'd been extremely lonely. You talk discussed about how you drive groceries to your grandmother living on her own. And you then get back to number ten and it's completely different. And I suppose it's that difference I'm trying to understand between the corridors of power and how people were living their lives. Were you disappointed by how different it was? Were you dismayed? No, I think, and I think and this is why I think it's so wrong how this has been handled because in the lack of leadership it is chucking the entirety of number ten under a bus in any way. And nullifying the extreme efforts that many did. So hearing from people that were there at the time, despite personal anxiety, they were saying, look, you've got to come into the office. There were no masks. There were no screens. They were just meant to get on with it. They all got ill as we saw the prime minister God ill. That just went through the building. They cut themselves off. And somebody said to me recently, even in normal times, we placed great emphasized on duty to prime minister in the country. And that's the kind of shield that you need to justify why you abandon every single family commitment why you never see Friends why you do it because you think it's the right thing to do. And that's what the same approach for the pandemic. And all of that has been obscured by the handling of what happened because the majority of what happened during that period was just sheer hard work. And so in terms of why I say surprise, it's because, you know, I was experiencing the pandemic and the communications campaign as a civilian. And I saw the impact in the loneliness. And then you come to number ten where everyone has had to just get on with work. And so the lives haven't changed. But that can mean that you don't necessarily know what an emotional level. What you have asked of people. But I suppose while you say it's hard work, people are working, you shouldn't overlook that. And that is an important point to make. At the same time, there were parties going on. It leads to there were some, yes, I'm afraid I don't know. And again, so we're also, when you say this has been outsource the.

"mahalia jackson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

04:34 min | 3 months ago

"mahalia jackson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"But what's happened is it's been outsourced, the moral responsibility for that response has been outsourced to sue great. And that's not a good thing for number ten. You know when you say apologize and then move on. Of course, if there's been the breaking of the rules, there wouldn't have been a move on situation expected by members of the general public or some of them. No, and there should be consequences. You know, I am very struck that the only person that has resigned so far is the person didn't attend a party, which is a legal Stratton. And we heard in her words, how much it mattered to her what the public perceive it and what they would take away from that. And yet, there are other people implicated. And I think one of the things here is that a language does, when you resign, as I have experienced before, you immediately do not have any salary. So it's a bold move because you are taking a fiscal financial hit. But it's also the right thing to do. And I think that a lot of people will have thought, do you know what I should probably resign? But I may not have. And you get all these sort of justification for why nobody's taking any action. And that doesn't sit well with me. What do you think should happen? What should be the ramifications? I think we have to wait for the detail. One of the problems here is that I am actually receiving these stories in the same way as the public because I was on maternity leave for much of the period that this happened. And for those events, for example, these two leaving dues that came to light. I was actually rather, I always wondered why wasn't there a leading do for James lack. Now I know and I feel rather naive about that. So I don't know the full facts, and I am in a position of needing to see the suit gray report. But I think that there needs to be two things. One that then needs to be responsibility for the events that happened..

Stratton James
"mahalia jackson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:34 min | 3 months ago

"mahalia jackson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Hello, I'm Emma bonnet and welcome to women's art from BBC Radio four, and we find ourselves at the foothills of another week, and on this Monday morning as we face it together, I want to know what it is that rouses you that gets you out of yourself when you're having a hard time or you just need to shake things up, what do you do? For one of my guests today, the vocalist Sarah Brown, it is singing. While she has worked with some of the biggest names in the music industry from Mick Hucknall to Stevie Wonder, she's now stepping to the front of the stage releasing her own album based on the American gospel legend Mahalia Jackson and her music 50 years on from her death with Sarah having grown up here in the UK, attending Pentecostal church. She is going to talk more to me later in the program as well as perform for us, but when she walked into our women's our office this morning, I asked her for a line that makes her walk a little tall, a feel a little better. And if she wouldn't mind sharing it with us now. A little high yeah. Gonna meet the woman. Love it. That is it always start on Monday morning. Here on woman's eye, I don't know what is Sarah. We'll talk to you very shortly, looking forward to it. That is, move on up from Mahalia Jackson's repertoire much more of that to come. But let that flow through. You just singing release you. Are you part of acquired? You sing alone are you in the shower with it? What does it do for you? Has it got you through some really tough times or is it something else? I mean, I'm thinking about starting to do some other free form dancing, just something to move, not with choreography just to get moving. I've said this before, but I'm going to try and do it. This is the what about you? Tell us here. At women's text me. 8 four 8 four four. That's the number you need to text will be charged at your standard message rate, do check for those costs on social media at BBC women's eyes what you need or email us through our website..

Emma bonnet Mick Hucknall Mahalia Jackson Sarah Brown Stevie Wonder Sarah BBC Pentecostal church UK
The Queen of Soul: Aretha Franklin

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:02 min | 10 months ago

The Queen of Soul: Aretha Franklin

"Aretha franklin was born in memphis tennessee on march twenty fifth nineteen forty two barbara seekers franklin and reverend clarence levin franklin by the time she was four a wreath as family had moved from memphis to buffalo new york before. Finally settling in detroit michigan growing up. Aretha was surrounded by music. Her mother was a gospel singer and played the piano and her father. A minister saying to at the age of six a wreath as parents separated and read the state with her father. Her mother passed away a few years. Later are rita's father's house was often home to visiting musicians. From dino washington to sam cooke to mahalia jackson aretha sisters erma and carolyn were also musically inclined and saying and wrote songs throughout their lives. Aretha had an amazing ear for music. Despite the fact that she never learned to read music her brother later said that by the time aretha was ten years old she could hear a song once and immediately be able to sing it and play it on the piano. Aretha made her performing debut as a member of the choir at new bethel. Church or her father preached. It didn't take long for her incredible talent to be recognized when she was twelve years old. She went on tour performing with other popular gospel artists. That same year aretha got pregnant and hundred first child at the age of twelve. A son named clarence two years later she had a second son. Edward throughout her life aretha would return to her roots singing gospel nusa when she was eighteen years old. She switched her primary focus to secular music. She moved to new york city parting from her son to state with her family in detroit that year in nineteen sixty aretha signed a contract with columbia records. Her early albums touched on all sorts of genres from jazz to blues. To broadway to aren

Aretha Barbara Seekers Franklin Reverend Clarence Levin Frankl Memphis Dino Washington Aretha Franklin Mahalia Jackson Sam Cooke Erma Tennessee Detroit Buffalo Rita Michigan Carolyn New York Clarence Edward New York City
"mahalia jackson" Discussed on Charlotte Readers Podcast

Charlotte Readers Podcast

06:20 min | 10 months ago

"mahalia jackson" Discussed on Charlotte Readers Podcast

"As a rider. If that makes sense does and as a recovering trial lawyers always been a linear thinker. I thank you for that. Appreciate appreciate appreciate that chronology. I can pick it up whatever year. I want to pick it up in and start reading right. So we're gonna talk about some things like you mentioned music and sports just a moment but I wanna talk about an aspect of the book. That's a i think a little theme attic because the sixty s was a period of change and it seems like change has been kind of a theme in your own life you went from being a reporter to an editor the charlotte observer for many years then shifted and took that late to become an author fulltime and then you're riding residents teacher you've written books That focus on you know the political issues and struggles and and then You know later you wrote some some catchy and folks a song. I mean there are a lot of change going on. Wanna start with this theme of change from minute because it's really a part of this book and say you know if we start in the sixties with the young frog gallia. There's a saint on page one thirty six of the book where you kind of wave memoir into the story which you do throughout the book and you credit. The events of nineteen sixty two particularly the right shoulder demonstrations in mobile alabama. Where you lived at the time and seeing dr martin luther king being treated roughly on the sidewalk by two policemen is events. Which you say looking back. Set you on the path to becoming a writer Can you talk about that for a moment. also how it said it made you feel in the book that history had a face to face had the power to touch a conscience. Was that just drew me in curious. If you could speak about that. Sure so i was. I grew up in mobile On the in the southern part of alabama part of a a an old white southern family entrenched in the status quo. Good paypal and i was taught never to mistreat anybody but at the same time That sense of privilege was all around. And i absorbed that like you. Breathe the air you know. And i as a result head not carefully thought about some of the dramatic news headlines that were taking shape us particularly with regard to the civil rights movement. I mean i knew it was important. I knew it was happening But i had very I had the preoccupations of a kid right. I was fascinated by sports. And was i wasn't very good at it myself. But you know dabbled in it even even at that. And then i went on a high school field trip to birmingham and saw martin luther king being arrested by two birmingham policemen and they were trading in roughly in disrespectfully. Not i wouldn't say it was police brutality but but it was just a kind of districts disrespectful and i thought on the edge of violence kind of moment as they were shoving him along toward a police paddy wagon and it just so happened that they shoved him right past where i was standing on the sidewalk with a couple of my friends from mobile and i just found myself looking into the face of martin luther king. Three feet away through no premeditation. A no planning. No no nothing. I i knew vaguely that there were demonstrations happening but i didn't expect to encounter them and there there was and i thought i saw i mean who knows what he was really feeling but i thought i saw this deep sadness in dr king's very expressive is and i don't know all of a sudden It it was like it was like he was the face of history. I mean i didn't quite have those words for it but it was. It was all of a sudden human and real in a way that it had not been before. And i would love to say that. I knew exactly. Then what think about all of this. And that i became a committed civil rights activists on the spot. I i didn't. I just became a troubled kid on the spot. Who knew that something was amiss in in our corner of the world assenting from and i want to ask another question dr king because this is a little sane in the book that i think adds a little something to to the to. What actually happened that. I wasn't aware so it has to do with his speech You know have a dream speech The march on washington. And i always thought as you hear about it over and over again. That was sort of a central planned tenet to what he was going to say that day. But but you're sitting you're writing about and it struck me that it was unrehearsed. The mahalia jackson's decide saying tell them about the dream. Martin tell them about the drain. And as i thought about that i just wondered is that also one way to think about the sixties. There was a period. There was sort of unrehearsed as it. Sorta unleashed all this change on the world. I think absolutely. That's that's right King had had used that. I have a dream riff. That he did in that speech a time or two before But but he hid he was going through more of a plodding text up until that point. And i guess we don't know if he would eventually come to it but mahalia jackson who had sung at the march and was one of his good friends was standing right next to him and she thought it just needed more. Umph and so she whispers. Are you know gives you a mistake. Whisper and says tell them about the dream martin and so he does and the rest is history. I think that those kind of human anecdotes that just you know that make Historical figures real to me or you know they. They just add.

dr martin luther king alabama charlotte observer birmingham paypal mahalia jackson washington Martin Umph King martin
"mahalia jackson" Discussed on The Nix

The Nix

04:50 min | 10 months ago

"mahalia jackson" Discussed on The Nix

"It's not brain dead but then it's so jokey and dumb that there's definitely the culture. The marvel clash of like tones that way which in a comic or something might have gone better. I will say. I know scar. Joe's entre thing. Actually this was. She was pretty good in this. I enjoyed her in it. She's fine she's not a good person but she was findings moving on summer of soul. God i love this movie. This is a documentary about the music festival. That happened in nineteen sixty nine. I believe in harlem and marcus. Garvey park nobody really knew about this thing. It was sort of a black woodstock in harlem They filmed it with the intention to make a kind of woodstock like movie about it and the studios passed on it and it sat in some archive for however many years fifty years at this point which is crazy this has stevie wonder gladys the pips sly and the family stone fifth dimension so many amazing performances of black just like the entire array of black sort of pop and soul singers of that time staple singers mahalia jackson And it's so amazing the framing of this movie is basically people that we're at this concert as kids and talking about this is the part that said of everybody gets caught up in it. So good is where this kid is. Like i d- ramped. I thought i dreamt this. I didn't know that it was real. Because i was at a festival of light. Amazing black artists with amazing like audience of like ninety nine percent. Black people sort of come together and enjoying music. And he's like. I didn't trust that it was real and he gets so moved by watching it again. There's a lot of footage of people watching the footage again and it's so fucking good and mahalia jackson. There's a scene where she's kind of older and she's basically you know not feeling great or whatever and she gets mavis staples to sing with her and mavis staples like okay. You're like malia jackson mavis staples because he was much younger at that point and she gets up and sort of sayings this part and kills at jackson steps into the frame. And you're like oh is she like all you got to fix this. She's not doing me justice or whatever and then they just sing together and she just sort of looks at her and they dislike and mavis staples is talks about. That's the highlight of her entire career. Fucking sly and the family stone like you forget. How amazing and revolutionary..

Garvey park mahalia jackson mavis staples harlem marcus stevie Joe malia jackson jackson
"mahalia jackson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"mahalia jackson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In America. It's from the number two man at the FBI, and we have to use every resource at our disposal. To destroy him. MLK. FBI enhances this very specific material with vivid examples of the way these FBI missions were sewn into the popular culture more on that in a minute. The older documentary came a filmed record from Montgomery to Memphis, released in 1970 is fascinating in other ways made with the directorial participation were told of Sidney Lumet's and Joseph L. Mankowitz. And many film editors. It's a stunning compilation film marches, struggles, meetings songs like this one with Mahalia Jackson, along with days and weeks of months in the life of Dr King. And in the spirit of the time, not only the political spirit but the filmmaking style of that moment, the film has no commentary. We're talking heads. There are brief staged moments with celebrities who recite the words of Langston Hughes or Dick Gregory or hear Belafonte reading some words of Ralph Ellison. Master doesn't make many like that, because that kind of man is dangerous to the sloppy ways of the world. The kind of man who loves truth even more than he loves his life or his wife or his Children. King,.

FBI Dr King Mahalia Jackson Sidney Lumet Langston Hughes MLK Ralph Ellison America Montgomery Dick Gregory Memphis Joseph L. Mankowitz Belafonte
"mahalia jackson" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"mahalia jackson" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"But what most people don't know is that his prepared speech didn't actually include the phrase. I have a dream at all. He improvised the line gospel singer Mahalia Jackson was there next to Dr King, and when he paused, she yelled out. Tell them about the dream. So he did have was one of the most important speeches ever. And it happened on this day in 1963. Time for another. Check it your drive. And for that we go to detour down in the Valley Chevy dealers Traffic center. We aren't without our problems this morning, but they guess they aren't as bad as they could be. No. I've seen lighter Friday Lights where There's been nothing but boy, This is pretty close. Do it on the freeways. There is no longer any flowing left over on the one of one of the North Valley that just cashed out. So the 51 it's recovered. Some pound 17 got an extra minute Central Avenue construction, but I do see a little bit of light slowing east on I 10 from 59th Avenue to 27th Avenue. That'll cost you two extra minutes. 15 minutes total 101 into the 51. Now there are some wrecked out there. We've been working Surface Street Rex throughout the morning, but only Ample 12 Street and Missouri crash record Indian school in Literal Road, Carefree highway at Central Avenue, Iraq, 67th Avenue in Glendale, a crash and a structure fire left us with restrictions on Indian school west of 19th Avenue. Try Camelback Er Thomas. This traffic report brought to you by the love mortgage team. Increased property values mean you might be able to finally drop your mortgage insurance asked the loan Mortgage steamer. You can start saving hundreds of dollars every month Cost 623875 99 40 today deterred and your news Some scattered showers this morning, but mostly clear with an excessive heat warning this afternoon. I have won 12 tomorrow High of 10 Ford a chance for thunderstorms.

Dr King Mahalia Jackson Camelback Er Thomas North Valley Indian school Ford Missouri Glendale
"mahalia jackson" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"mahalia jackson" Discussed on WGN Radio

"All time Chicago musicians well and it's come down to a bracket the whole thing and I this is the start yeah you you as an animal artists I know yeah yeah but this is this people are just thrown out every book if you're number one seeds for if you're gonna do a March madness bracket Elian this through but a March madness bracket the number one seeds for the best Chicago musicians of all time wow buddy guy I guess yeah right check up in Chicago and Chicago this Dennis de young stick I guess I would throw on that list I saw Dennis de young at a free concert a prescriptive alien about six years ago and he was phenomenal yeah yeah it doesn't slow down enough to question about which sixty put in de young and Tommy Shaw sticks there's a lot going on there just I would have to say Diario state regulation that here yeah and and I mean hell Jack Mahalia Jackson someone point out done the jazz greats like Ramsey Lewis yep yep yep lose guys of course Buddy Guy so it's it's that the chance chance is going to be and then hip hop guys Kanya west and chance the rapper yeah you started something here I know I don't know how many do it's everyone's gonna get mad is gonna get the hot dogs then yeah after that any or any any style March madness bracket should be stressful so this ship yeah yeah Dave flyer going up next athletics news engine born in the WGN radio newsroom the news is sponsored by antenna TV Chicago police officers been.

Elian Chicago Jack Mahalia Jackson Ramsey Lewis Buddy Guy Kanya west Dennis de young Tommy Shaw Dave WGN
"mahalia jackson" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

03:33 min | 3 years ago

"mahalia jackson" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"And you're listening to Andrea Bocelli his version of amazing grace. This is the story of song, which is covered John Newton's life. He wrote the words what about the music where did it come from and headed to come to America? How did this Merican essentially American song get here from Great Britain? Well, that stories chronicle Stephen Turner's amazing grace pick the book up. It's terrific. Great Bookham an called cash. There's a finer music writer in America than Steve Turner. Well, he started off with a quote from George Pullen Jackson who wrote the book spiritual folksongs early America. This is a nineteen thirty seven book musicologist Niro, quote, the poem is by Newton, but the tune sources unknown to the southern compilers another he'd searched he couldn't find it. And so we're not going to spend a lot of time on that. Because there are some breakthrough artists. Take this song into the twentieth century. Propel it into every room every bedroom in America and the world. One of the first is a gospel singer named a Haley Jackson who had this to say about the song and about the types of music that imbued the song with its melodies and its rhythms. She said, quote, I believe the blues and jazz music, and even rock and roll stuff all got their beat and their melody from the sanctified church. We've Baptist sang sweet. And we have the long and short meter on beautiful songs like amazing grace, how sweet the sound. But when those holiness people tore into I'm so glad that Jesus lifted me up they came up with the real jubilation. Let's take a listen to Mahalia Jackson version. May. See? Five. See? And.

America Andrea Bocelli John Newton Steve Turner Haley Jackson George Pullen Jackson Mahalia Jackson Stephen Turner Niro Britain Baptist writer
"mahalia jackson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:50 min | 3 years ago

"mahalia jackson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all of it on WNYC. My guests are narrower award and Gary carry on their Yari. We're talking about the new museum exhibit narrow award read the people it's open now open until may twenty six Mary. You must like history. Yeah. I think history. I like the fact that his tree is is always being made up the idea of revisionism is inherent in his should always be revised. It should always be updated. And I and I like that. I think all artists earn some ways historians. The kind of they're dealing with on a formal level. Maybe it's the history of material. But on a social political level is it's a history of how we think and relate to each other. So I feel like there's so much room to to to add to the narrative that exists. So in other words, like everything's starting with history. Everything is a kind of molding of history. So I like to play with the expectation of history. My guess are now award and Gary Carey, I'm Marie Yari. We're talking about Norwich's retrospective. We the people which is at the new museum. It's open now. And we'll be on until may twenty six Gary the show is called we the people as referring this big piece of work that we walk in. And we see we the people as people are used to seeing it. And then as you get closer, you realize that the material it's shoelaces, what are the dimensions? Do offhand of the dimensions of the Pedo know the dimensions that piece off hand. It's probably something like twenty five. Thirty in in length changes, according to the space. We you know, it is possible to adjust it. But I did always wanted to be live like human scale, then the idea of how Brinda body back into the conversation was really important, and the shoelaces that does that, you know, in a way people recognize it as shoelace connected back to their experiences of tieing shoes or divide in some way. But I did want it to. All of the works about body about how in the early works were modular things that was collecting and creating the environment for the body to move around in the viewer to move around and experience it, and then breathing pounds later works some reference to the body through the imprints on the copper panels themselves. So that's always the starting revolving point for me when you and I I'm sure this is purposeful. But when you come out of the elevator and the elevator doors open. We the people is the first thing you see it's almost like an unveiling like a production. Every time the elevator doors open. Edison him of the show. Why? I think from an installation standpoint, we do tend to like our architecture lens to these kind of dramatic moments. But we we didn't have a long conversation with Mary about we the people as a title. We had a lot of back and forth about it. You know, I think that floor in particular that works installed kind of. For us. Kind of makes the case why the show is titled that that way. Because in many ways, you know, we think about areas and artist who is very much rooted in in Harlem in that community. We also think about him, you know, even in like, art art, historically, as a figure who really kind of represents a generation who kind of emerged on the international stage. He's done works all around the world. And by any ills and residencies and his work. I think does. Speak to lots of different kinds of cultural experiences. And we the people I think kind of gets at how he's able to work in both of those as how he is able to instill be an artist too. You know, who's important part of what is happening in Harlem and also an artist who can work on this international stage because he's asking questions about who we are as a community, and you know, what kinds of communities do we belong to and how are those communities defined, and how can we use objects and sculptures and artworks to kind of talk about those relationships in some ways, you know, make those relationships stronger. So for us it made a lot of sense to title, the chair that way and actually have that piece of part of the show. One of your pieces deals with immigration, but it's a piece from two thousand four when you think about that piece. Now, the naturalization drawing table did it did it when you met it again like you said. Did it feel different to you? Love the pieces. We the people also is a very early peace now has a whole nother read and residents, and I think the same happens with naturalization drawing table, I was it was a personal. It all starts a very personal space. Zayed's about applying for my citizenship. And wanting to figure out how to make that into an art experience as well and complicated. And so that the entire more for that piece was coming from that personal space that now when it's activated. I think there's a real. There's a much more of an initiative to think about the current political climate, which I could never predict it, you know. So it's it's unfortunately timely piece in a way, you did you one piece specifically for this show. Correct. Yes. What is that? Well, it was a piece that. It was actually it was actually inspired by something. I've found across from my studio. There's there's the Mahalia Jackson school PS one twenty three hundred and forty first street, and I remember picking up this small plastic medallion of. Martin Luther King that was discarded, and I had it on my my studio door for give my demand for these new four or five years, and it's just the current climate. I felt like there was something about Dr king's sort of selflessness that I felt would an inspiration that felt was really necessary. And so I wanted to do something with this medallion. And so when they were showing me this small space in the museum. I said, you know, I think I have an idea that I want to do here. And so there's a piece is called take my hand. And it's. It's the medallions behind the scrim. And then there's a sound component with Mahalia Jackson because the school's name was male Jackson. Haley actually the gospel singers sung at Dr king's wake. So I wanted to bring in extra to song was purchase Lor take my hand. So that's very title comes from. So as an instrumental component of that within a piece, so you can't really seeds their semi hidden is kind of like using his you can't really see medallion. But behind you as you're looking at this installation behind you smallest relation. There is a framed version of one or two of the medallion and over covered with the particular kind of plexiglas, and it's called a king mission that particular piece, and that piece is a piece that I'm hoping that people will want to purchase because all the proceeds of its of the purchasing of it goes to the about our mission vanished. Streets are really wanted to idea of how to use this image of king and have it become using a kind of social Justice cause. And that's also just that's great with where the new museum is. I mean, in a way it's located in New York I witnessed couple Sundays ago. And I was walking all the way up from downtown. And it's really interesting how that area has changed so much the new ICP's down there. And it's that trying to. Sort of celebrate the neighborhood. But also recognize it's issues and problems. I think that's an interesting choice that you may have go towards the Barry mission. What did you think when you heard that idea? I mean, we thought it was a fantastic idea. I mean, you know, we've been neighbors with the mission for over ten years now, and you know, as much as the neighborhood has changed and the new museum has been part of the neighbor changing the need for the mission hasn't changed and the work. You know, they've been in existence for over one hundred years, and we do. You know, we do value value that relationship we have with them. So usually once a year, we do kind of a coat drive with them and get free admission for that. But when we had this idea, we thought it was a really wonderful way to take what I think he does. I think that's you know, he's done a lot of projects and let 'em places that engage with local community. But to do something in our neighborhood was really special. So and it's a it's a beautiful piece too. So. There's one piece I stood in front of for a long time. It was iron heavens. Oh, yeah. So it's I there's something about a lot of something. Also. That's so it's baseball bats. And they are charged right? Is that? Yeah. Okay. And then so they're sort of at an angle, and then almost like a headboard of a bed only, huge up a wall, our racks and grills from Penns. Yeah. Been pan. Why those two together I love it. I don't you know, you know. No question, all of my. I think the emphasis is trying to create a kind of visual intensity and energy and a fire of us fire and fire hose as a way to sort of. I guess frame that out that that notion at a immagination for the viewer. And so that that beats piece actually started out as a two part piece. I was thinking about loss and the oven pans became a framework for thinking about loss because I remember in grade school the teacher talking about the stars the light from the stars when you look up in the night sky, but a time those that light has gotten to the planet earth. They no longer exists inside never saw two stars the same. We always felt kind of melancholy beauty about it. But also sadness, and that sort of sense of the beauty of loss, maybe came out that he's and then there's the the bat, which is this kind of primal club. And so the idea was to try to take this thing about violence and put a notion of transform it into something about curing or caring for. So if you look carefully. Undischarged Baxter's dirty this little cotton's elements took a picture right now. Yes. So each one has these little contacts that they're like ironed cotton. That's that's on nailed on that. And so his idea of dressing a wound. Right. So they're distressing wound that they I wanted to describe to it. So they're they're they're being transformed, and they're also being conjured with this this element of loss. Okay. Now, I can look at it differently. Now that I know of the mischievous part of that is like baseball is all American sport. It's also talking about the sort of maybe a kind of the violence of the birth of this country through the native Americans, and and slavery as well. Yeah. I thought I thought with with the burning of the bats and the oven. I thought like sort of a loss of something or a transformation of something that's sort of normal and in our everyday life into something else. Right. What I what I like about that piece. Also narrative of those that, you know, there's a lot of room for you to kind of find a a narrative within a lot of the pieces, you know, especially with something like amazing grace to you know, depending on how you relate to those materials. But also, I think that pieces look very it's beautiful on like, even though it's like, she pans like it has this does create this sort of celestial sky for you. So there's a certain language of almost abstraction that I think about when I think about painting that Nari brings to like sculpture, which I think is really. And I think our inheritance is a really wonderful example elegant too. I remember I I was at the Whitney when it was first shown and this gentleman came up to me and he's year two artists. Yes. And he goes, I know what you're doing. I know it. I know what you're saying. Really know what I'm saying? And he goes Shangahi, it's Sango the, you know, the the sort of the of war and so for him it may looking at him like, you're right. This is fan go. So there's a lot of room culturally for other. Hopefully says about the reserves a friend of ours who in the Cadillac, you mentioned like coming from Africa. He reads it as a shrine like immediately like that forum is a shrine, which I don't necessarily my background doesn't mean I read it that way. But I think it does operate on these different levels depending on where you're coming from. But isn't that interesting? Your people bring themselves to the piece of work. I was thinking about with Manila Jackson thought people would know that song certain people would know what that is right away..

new museum Martin Luther King Mahalia Jackson Gary Carey Harlem baseball Mahalia Jackson school Africa New York ICP Norwich Edison Mary Zayed Nari Barry mission Shangahi Marie Yari Haley
"mahalia jackson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"mahalia jackson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Org slash newsroom. I'm tweeden. Thank you for joining us. Years ago. Many of us know, even verbatim. Martin Luther King's I have a dream speech from the March on Washington in nineteen sixty three what many of us don't know is that there was a man named Clarence Jones who wrote the first draft of that speech, momentous decree came oral histories can often give insights into the stories behind the versions of history that we learned at school and from the media, I'm Jim Michener, and this is the pulse of the planet Clarence Jones business system to king as he often did he wrote the first draft of a speech that king was later to give oral historian David Klein, Clarence Jones told the story of how as he was standing in the wings of the stage at the March on Washington watching Martin Luther King. He saw king shuffle. The papers of this speech and begin to read it and it was word for word. How Clarence Jones had written it which? Alarmed Jones greatly. Because king rewrote every speech. Why was he reading this verbatim? But very soon into the speech Jones and king and others on the stage heard the singer Mahalia Jackson, call out tell them about the dream Martin Thome about the dream and Jones watched as king actually, shoved those papers to the side of the podium and went into what we now know as one of the great pieces of rhetoric that we have which was from his heart. I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up live out the true meaning of its creed. We hold these choose to be self-evident..

Clarence Jones Martin Luther King Martin Thome Mahalia Jackson Jim Michener Washington David Klein one day
Dionne Warwick Franklin, Detroit and Franklin discussed on Nick Digilio

Nick Digilio

05:27 min | 4 years ago

Dionne Warwick Franklin, Detroit and Franklin discussed on Nick Digilio

"The Queen of soul has passed away. At seventy six she died yesterday She was. A once in a generation singer, it says here which is absolutely true she was the Queen. Of soul. But also ventured into and mastered virtually every style of music, from jazz to classical and rhythm and blues she passed away at her home in Detroit from pancreatic cancer according to the late singer's publicist, the singer was in and out of ill health for. Years last summer In Detroit she asked an audience to keep me in your prayers she. Had to take several breaks, during the show and appeared frail earlier. In the year she announced that she. Would cut back on her schedule two thousand ten she underwent surgery to remove. A tumor and cancelled six months of tour dates. Yet last year before performance of the Chicago theatre she told the Tribune I'm not quitting. And she, said she. Was working on new music with Stevie Wonder. Her musical contributions, were diverse ranging in. Tone from spiritual to gaudy her, singing style came from single source she practically grew up in the church and the emotional intensity and personal. Connection she nurtured there and the music never left her it. Informs her virtually every one of, her top seventy seven one hundred songs including Twenty-one number one Rb hits The thing many people don't understand about this change in my. Career is that I, never, left, the, church, Franklin, once told author David Ritz about, her transition, to secular music, in her late teens the church stays with me wherever I go wherever I sing critic Anthony halibut who has. Written extensively about Franklin's life and career over the decades. Has called the singer a pivotal figure in the way women and African Americans were perceived. In popular culture Franklin's role was such that such that a history of. Black America could well be divided into pre and post Aretha she won eighteen Grammy awards and was the first female artist inducted, into the rock and. Roll Hall of fame and that was in nineteen eighty-seven not only was her multi. Active measures soprano an instrument, of stunning beauty range in power but. Her piano playing often encounter points to. Her singing was Justice accomplish she influenced countless singers Whitney Houston Adele Patti LaBelle. Natalie Cole shock on Mariah Carey Luther Vandross Jennifer. Hudson Fantasia but her legend was forged not just on her ability to hit all the. Notes and, embellish them With establishing technical flourishes but also to convey emotion Nuance and deep feeling Her fame seemed destined she grew up in the household, of, the famed, preacher c l Franklin and was mentored by his friends who included gospel greats Mahalia Jackson Clara ward and Albertina Walker as a girl Franklin mesmerized congregations of her father's house of worship in Detroit. New Bethel Baptist church but her career. Was not without hardship Aretha Louise Franklin was. Born on March twenty fifth nineteen, forty. Two in Memphis Tennessee, second youngest of five children or family moved, to Buffalo New York and then to Detroit. Where her parents divorced her mother died when she was ten and. Because we're fathers travel she was primarily Ray reared by grandmother and has a teen Franklin was a soloist in her father's church and. Began recording gospel songs she dropped. Out of high school, she toured the gospel circuit singing in churches around the country was a hard life during which she learned firsthand about racism while traveling the back. Roads of the south the young singer also learned how to interact with an. Audience even at fourteen she was, in viewing the power, the power gospel song there is a fountain filled with blood with drama dread beyond her years in her Her late teens she, toured alongside the staple singers and Sammy Bryant was second Bill to her father the star preacher then much like the gospel circuit contemporaries such as. Sam Cooke David Ruffin and Dionne Warwick Franklin shifted to popular music with her. Father's blessing and moved to New, York at the age, of eighteen leaving her two young children in the care of her grandmother in Detroit She was wooed by Motown a small hometown. Label but it turned out but it certainly turned it down because it wasn't properly established yet and. Instead signed with. Columbia records there she was overseen by the legendary producer and talent scout John Hammond appears who saw her as an immense talent who shouldn't be wasted on pop triples trifles Hammond made a number of fine recordings with Franklin that bridge the world of gospel and jazz but Columbia grew impatient for hits in the. Orchestral embarrassments in choice of material that noise. Underlying strength her contract expired she moved. To Atlantic records and became under the Super Bowl supervision of Jerry Wexler who, admired, her, gospel recordings and. Wanted to update their field to a pop market Atlantic was an iron be juggernaut with a roster that included Wilson Pickett Otis Redding who was affiliated with Memphis based Stax label And. Wexler immediately paired Franklin with the muscle shoals rhythm section in Alabama a one night recording session in January of sixty seven yielded the landmark song I never loved a man the way I love you a smoldering performance that seemed to address Franklin's deteriorating relationship with her husband prevent husband Ted white Recording. In the south, during the height of the civil rights era proved overwhelming for Franklin however and she, left, the next. Day Wexler knocked out was knocked out by the performance came up with a, solution he would bring muscle shoals rhythm section to New York, where his price singer could be more comfortable. Another classic soon followed respect, a cover of reading song that Franklin transformed in, tandem with her sisters Carolyn and Erma the siblings call and response chemistry data to the, days

Dionne Warwick Franklin Detroit Franklin Chicago Allstate Memphis Jerry Wexler Nick Gilio New Bethel Baptist Church Stevie Wonder Aretha David Ritz Grammy New York Whitney Houston Natalie Cole James