14 Burst results for "Magnuson Stevens"

"magnuson stevens" Discussed on Harvesting Nature’s Wild Fish and Game Podcast

Harvesting Nature’s Wild Fish and Game Podcast

05:22 min | 2 months ago

"magnuson stevens" Discussed on Harvesting Nature’s Wild Fish and Game Podcast

"Oracle's he's been johnson fisheries articles lately and he pointed out an important piece of fish conservation legislation. Which is aimed to protect and manage for fish populations which i wasn't even aware of It's called the fourth fish conservation act. The bill was introduced by two. Us senator roy blunt a republican from missouri and richard blumenthal democrat from connecticut. So it has bipartisan support. It was just introduced an april This bill will provide much-needed management conservation measures four for fish species and it also provides some funding for states the bill to adequately monitor yearly runs of the bill is currently in the us senate committee on commerce science and transportation In the one one thing to point out why this bill so important was specifically as it pertains to american shad american shad address species limitation. They returned to rivers and streams the spawn other native to the east coast and dave were so appropriately named the founding fish by john mcphee in his two thousand book and they're historically very important source food source for native americans and early americans and they're reported to sustain general washington's army of valley forge the shad round in many eastern rivers currently is just a fraction of what they once were because of the klein's of war equality dams and overfishing in particular the delaware river here what separates new jersey pennsylvania and then further to the north at separates pennsylvania new york. It's the longest on. Dan river east of the mississippi. And it's historically been a stronghold for american shed and through history as the Water quality of the river especially lower river has improved through work by the delaware river basin commission and others and as many dance two tributaries the delaware river have been removed which should create additional spawning habitat for these fish. We would expect their population the be higher than it has in decades. But unfortunately it's not and there's a lot that we just don't know There's a lack of monitoring and conservation which has led to fluctuations and run size age structure and reproductive success. Currently the shad monitoring is conducted by the delaware river basin fish and wildlife management cooperative and. It's include several agencies by permit primarily. It's led by the pennsylvania efficient book commission operate on a shoestring budget. They don't have adequate resources to fully assess the run size each year and as a result. there's a lot of critical data that they're unable to collect In the big problem is american. Shad aren't classified as a ford's species even though they're important angle angling fish. They're not covered on their magnuson. Stevens fish conservation and management act. So therefore they don't receive the same protections and funding to states as other fish species and it's widely believed that the ocean estuary commercial fisheries are depleting stocks A lot of these ocean fisheries have very liberal bycatch of shad and other four species. And when you have some of the ron's on the east coast which measure.

senator roy blunt senate committee on commerce s army of valley forge richard blumenthal delaware river john mcphee delaware river basin commissio Oracle pennsylvania johnson connecticut Dan river missouri us east coast delaware river basin fish and klein pennsylvania efficient book co dave new jersey
"magnuson stevens" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

08:39 min | 3 months ago

"magnuson stevens" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Good morning, everybody. How you doing? I'm just waiting for Alan to put his head thought we just realized what time it was. And I was getting ready to hop in there and say Good morning, Everybody. Welcome to the outdoorsman show. Alan and Robin will be with us shortly. I was Well, we are buddy John Bees up in Maine. He and his wife have a pretty good could deal with a They like to go away on their wedding anniversary. And one year he plans a surprise trip for the next year. She plans a surprise trip. I think that's awesome. Very romantic and nice, and you have no idea. No idea where you're going to just get in the car and go So you know, Head north Head South Head East Head west. I think that's pretty cool. Alan. Yes? Hit hit. Hey, Robin. Covid covid. 19 times. Oh, July 1st, at least in the state of Maryland. All massacre going to disappear. Yeah, like if you want. Yes, Absolutely. Now, you know if if I'm if I haven't been vaccinated Yeah, I might want to consider wearing a mess. But, Robert, I've been vaccinated and you know The science tells us that we're safe. Mm hmm. Yeah, but now they're talking about a new variant. How they always I know it's Where is this? It's not going to end over here. It hasn't struck yet. But they I'm trying. Remember where they have found a new variant. It's like strain D or something. Delta or something? Yeah, exactly. Yeah, okay. Well. That will be Less than two weeks away, right? Yeah, of course. Yeah. Okay, good. Good. I haven't. I really haven't been wearing a mask and I don't see a lot of people wearing masks. Uh, there are some people who in the grocery store hardware store, you know, big box and that type of place are still wearing masks, and that's fine. All right for them. But you know, we're trying to get back to normal here. So Aren't we? Yep, we are. And I told you the day when we went out. It felt like we were. It just was nice to feel Semi normal. Yep, no question so Yeah, well, we'll try to manage our time a little better this hour. We, uh, we would like you to call in if you'd like to get in the, uh um Contest when some fishing tackle will be more than glad to do that will be picking the winner for that next week. I can't believe it's the end of June already amazing. I'll tell you some good news. Chris Marilyn loves crabs is at the printer. The magazine is at the printer. We've had significant growth this year were up 16 pages, which is wonderful, and we're up advertisers over 100. In Maryland loves crabs. It's online. The online edition is now available at MD. Loves crabs dot com. You can read the whole magazine. There you go to the website. When you look at the home page, you'll see on the left hand side. There's a photo of the cover. In the cover picture is if you ever go in the Maryland fishing report, and, uh Uh, Dang. Just lost it, huh? No Crabber. Jim. What's his name? Crabber man, Jim. I'm not sure which the the last name of the young man on the cover. Um, I don't remember. Cameron. No, I'll think about it. Just just surprised myself there. Livingston. Jim Livingston, his grandsons on the cover crabber man, Jim Livingston, if you ever go to Maryland Uh, the Maryland fishing report the photo gallery there, you'll see the gyms on there quite often with his family members. So his grandsons on the cover and you know, cute kid. He's adorable. He is. I mean, I got to pick this cover up. Yeah, you do. Yeah, you did. But this is our 10th edition. Our 10th edition of Maryland loves crabs. And the great articles on Crab and family affairs and management stuff. Profile. The, uh Magnuson Stevens, Um, act about fishing. There's some management stuff. There's some Facts about blue crabs. There's uh, There's an article by Senator Bailey and Bill Miles about the, uh, the on slot of commercial interests against the men. Hayden the most, uh Valuable fish in the sea. And so you know, we just got we've got. We've got a lot of stuff in there and I hope you enjoy reading it. You can read online. You can flip right through the Flip book. Now on the homepage. Left side is the photo cover it says view online. You click that you just touch your mouth to that or your cursor to that and click it that opens up another site, which is a flip book. And when you see the bottom of the flip book, you'll see arrows left and right. You can click on an arrow. Turn the page of time or you can just put your cursor on the bottom or your finger on your phone. You put your finger on the right. Bottom right corner and you can flip right through the book and turn each page. As you wish. You know a lot of good stuff. I'll tell you and you'll see two of my very best people in the entire world in that book to your grandchildren. Yeah, there's a picture of him. I was hoping you'd say three and include me in that, but forget that at the age of 10 Don't come back. Qualified, Mr Dales on the line. Hey, Dale. Good morning. How are you? Saving me? Probably can't top. You're snapping turtle for your first finish, But I'm close side American eel. I can still see my dad. Hmm. We used to catch them in our Mina pots. Yeah, Yeah. Yeah, but it would. It would curl up that line. He has the all time with the body fella Got it off. So, um I was curious. Have you heard anything else about that powerful new world record striped bass? I have not there. I saw the photo, but I did not see any more about it. You were thought that because that guy if it's uh Sanctioned cats will never have to buy another piece of fishing equipment in Russia. You're not kidding. That's right. That's right. But it's got to be on the up and up and you were thought that Official that promise somebody catching the world working like that. What do you you would have heard more about it. I'm going to Google it right now. Well, what I what I say about things like that. If it's on the Internet. It must be true. Yeah, right, right. Yep. So also two. I have a mild correction for Chris. I think the world of press he's a great yacht. But the, uh, days do not get longer and shorter. Unless you have an atomic clock, and then you're dealing with zillions of a second or something. What changes out is is something that we've talked about before. Can I guess? Yeah, yeah, That's what changes and I I tell you, the group that really ticks me that's kind of personal P B photo period right, so it appeared to deal for it to other people. They, You know, I mean, it's community for them to say it. But like I say the length of the day does not change. Hear that, Chris? Yeah. I'm sorry I missed that. I was screening a phone call. Oh, well, you were being you are being upgraded for saying, okay. No, no, no, I wouldn't now. Respectfully, Dale, it's okay. I'm open to learning. So tell me. What did I miss? What did I miss? Now? Chris Lengthen today does not change unless you have a comic clock, okay? The scene of the second. What changes is the amount of daylight in the 24 hour period? It's called photo period. Dr. Ordeal Period is city If you want a few period Yeah, I don't say that. I say that what changes and the other people are. Ones that are really guilty of this exactly Get longer and shorter. No, they don't. The hours of daylight gets longer than Yeah. Okay. Like I said, I learned something I never knew. Chris. Yes, Well, yeah. Thank you. That's this you were talking about? Was it a record for the Chesapeake Bay? Our world marker 80. What? £81.88 more 2020. Really? How many? How much was it 88? The last one was to 2020. Um, £81.14. I see 81.88 striped bass records. It's on.

Jim Livingston Chris Robin Dale Alan Robert Russia Maine Bill Miles Chris Marilyn Chris Lengthen John Bees £81.88 16 pages Jim £81.14 Maryland July 1st Dales 19 times
"magnuson stevens" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

05:34 min | 3 months ago

"magnuson stevens" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"In the free market, everyone believes in more competition is better. Why would we take the single thing that's the most important way? That we run our society. And yet we we implemented completely broken system that rewards dysfunction. It actually punishes statesmanship right now, if you work with someone from the other party We'll get primaried even though most of us want you to do that. I love the fact that marginalizes the crazies in theory, But let me just play devil's advocate. Why shouldn't the people that are most engaged in politics? Whether they're deeply blue or deeply red? Why? Since they're out there they're banging on the doors are going to the meetings. They're engaged on social media. Why shouldn't they control the primaries? You know what we're asking is that the parties be treated like any other significant group. They're important. They represent important value sex. But right now, um, you know, for example, say you are, you know Your Republican on public safety and national defense. But you're very progressive on social issues you believe and, um a woman's right to choice you believe in a person's right to love who they want to love. There is no path for you to get elected in this world. You do don't exist. A moderate Republican cannot win a primary. And yet there may be many, many voters who want that choice on their ballot. So why would we artificially limit voters choices? Everyone got The same one vote. Why would we artificially limit those votes? And my argument to the parties would be, um, if you can't produce a candidate that you think can get 50%, plus one in a rank choice election. And what on earth are you talking about? Go out and get a better set of values that can appeal to a majority. The the politician you describe the hypothetical politician reminds me south of you in Washington state. Senator Scoop Jackson. You described him to a T. Yeah, I mean, the moderate and bipartisan legislator or U. S senator is becoming an endangered species. And yet, when you look at some of our best policy has been done, it's always been bipartisan. You know, we a up here, you know, we had former Senator Ted Stevens, who passed away I had the fortunate chance to work for him for a couple of years. He touched the Magnuson Stevens Act. Warren Magnuson, Liberal Democrat from Washington, Ted Stevens, Republican from Alaska, but because of them, we have sustainable fisheries, you know, just because these guys can reach out and solve a big problem, so we've got Immigration, education, climate change impacts and we don't even try to solve these problems anymore. Boy, Stevens really caught a bad break with the the The so called scandal about him that hit right before an election. He got bumped, and it all proved to be bogus. After Yes, It's an incredibly sad many of us who knew Ted and his family. It's an incredibly sad story. Um, of, you know, honestly, you know there was some prosecutorial misconduct and corruption. And literally got convicted seven days before the election and only lost by 3000 votes, but another interesting part to that story he lost by 3000 votes to former senator Mark Baggage. What people don't remember that Ted Stevens was pretty darn moderate on women's rights and on social issues, and that another candidate ran to his right and took 15,000 votes solely on the issue that he wasn't strong enough against abortion. And so a majority once again kind of a majority was undermined and you've got someone who was a plurality winner because, you know, frankly, someone came in and shaved votes off strategically, So it's just another example sort of of The voters not getting what most of the voters want. That's because most voters are engaged and don't understand what's going on. Frankly, yeah, and there has been a long tradition here in Alaska, I think in other places where You know, in any of the close races. You know, a Democrat may try to entice what we call in Alaska Independence Party or Libertarian into the race to harm the Republican. The Republican will try to entice in a Green Party candidate to harm the Democrat. And if you've got to win through tricks and chicanery, um Why are you running? Why are you running if you don't have a message that will resonate with 50% plus one of your constituents. Yeah, that's that's a great point. Scott. I really enjoyed it. And who is your partner in this op Ed? Um Her name is lobby nine lives, Medicine Crow. And she is she's an Alaskan native woman. She is an advocate on Alaska native issues, language issues, cultural issues. And one of the things we started united on was, um you know, Alaska, You know what people think of it as far from the reality, But, um, 40% of Alaskans are non white. We have an enormous and enormously significant Alaska native population. But that representation hasn't made it through into office in which primarily because of the barriers put up by the parties. So she was one of the people who joined with our campaign helped us get this thing passed, and we just sort of Came together to kind of deliver this message to the rest of the country, which is Hey, come on in the water's fine. We got a better way of doing things, you know. Follow our lead. You know, we made it the 49th state, but we're in the The first in terms of having the best election system in the vanguard of this, I think I think it's a terrific way to go. Thanks for your time. Scott enjoy what's left of summer in Alaska. Thank you. Probably eight or 10 days left, so enjoy that. Yeah, we'll do it for sure, Okay, and we hope to talk to again. I I I'm going to be very curious to see how it works out. I'm hoping there's no bumps in the road.

Warren Magnuson 15,000 votes 3000 votes Scott 50% Ted Washington Alaska 40% Ed Stevens Green Party Mark Baggage Senator Magnuson Stevens Act 10 days Republican eight Medicine Crow Liberal Democrat
"magnuson stevens" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:33 min | 5 months ago

"magnuson stevens" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That is where we can Recreate these instances through our learnings and through our scientific methods into our policy and management are conversations or dialogues and and make these things successful. Thanks. Let's go to the phones again. Now we've got color. Julia, who is eight years old calling in now, Julia, hi. Well. Hi, Julia. You have a question for us. Or a comment. Yeah. Had donation in November. TOC Ana So I'm wondering. Where they do with the donations that they get. From Other people. Well, maybe we don't. Okay, Let's find out. We have Daniel Polly, who is a board member at Oceana. Daniel. Would you tell us a little bit more about the stated goal of Oshi, Ana and As Julia asked. What do you do with your donations? The stated goal of a Santa is to rebuild fisheries, exactly like Adam described to rebuild fisheries in the world on, uh includes the world. The old Santa includes the U. S. The EU, the European Union, seven countries in South America, Peru, Chile, Brazil on day one country in Asia, Philippines And, uh, on Billy's. I've almost got so in these countries. We have teams that have to be paid that work to push legislation. That will do the same thing, as the Magnuson Stevens Act has done in the U. S enabled enabled, enable the fisheries to be regulated enabled abundance to be restored. Enhance the fisheries Toby system become sustainable Andre to earn more money actually on it works because many NGO they work with small fishes community, which which is a good idea, but actually, not many NGOs work at the level off countries. Legislation. Parliament Congress on to change legislation on with regard to aqua culture, for example, or Sana has a, uh Cleaned up helps clean up the user antibiotics in in in Chilean aquaculture. They used lots of antibiotics make everybody sick. And this is very dangerous. So Oksana specifically in their fight against the use of antibiotics in in And I quote culture. So in each country, it has been impossible to identified to identify issue that the major issue that keeps the fishery down on toe work against it. For example, in beliefs we have managed to To forbid patrolling. Trolling is a very, very wrong way to harvest fish and very destructive and we have abolished trawling and legislation has been passed. That makes it illegal to troll. Also, we work towards, uh What? Uh We have a plastic campaign we have against plastic. Obviously on. We have various campaigns, so the money is used to pay the people who fight toe for toe clean up the ocean and to improve the state of this exploded stocks so that everybody benefits for me. On the officials to the animals that live in ecosystem together with the fish. Thank you for that. Answer. Julia, Do you feel your question was answered. Yes, Definitely. Okay, great. Well, thank you for your time. Today we're gonna go to a comment now. Ah, listener has written in saying I watched the documentary I found the film alarming, But I think the overall point was the main problem is large scale fishing and the oceans can rebound amazingly quickly if we just give them a chance. Called to stop eating fish is valid, but it will only be for a short time during which we can review our fishing practices. I do not think small scale fishing it needs to be affected by this. And let's take another call. Now. I'd like to hear from Bobby Bobby. You're in San Francisco, and you have some thoughts about land based aquaculture. Yeah, I thought that the movie didn't really touch too much on land based on culture, and I know there's a lot of pretty exciting technological advances happening as it comes to land based on agriculture and water treatment. Specifically in shrimp. I've been hearing a lot about on. I wondered if the panel have any comments about the future of land based aquaculture fields like a natural way to boost the economy, but also Boost production of one of the most highly consumed pieces of seafood There is in the country and in the world, which is shrimp and Jennifer. Not surprisingly, I'm going to go to you with this. Comment from Bobby. But before we do that, I want to write, read another message that came in from Annie. She says the only sustainable fish farming are closed System carbon neutral, multi trophy IQ, land based fish farms. Don't be fooled by today's misleading show these farms and this highly litigious industry infused the ocean with harmful pharmaceuticals. Fish pathogens lead to inevitable. Non native fish escapes, attract and killed birds and ocean animals. That are associated with slavery, murder and mafia like corruption. This certainly makes it sound like you don't want to go towards sustainable fish farming at all. Well, I mean, that's the old, you know, I always say there's so many things that have been looked at the are dusting off the old playbook, and what I would really encourage her to do is look at what is happening on farms such as Quarry Arctic, You have a third generation family farm in the Arctic Circle that has never once used antibiotics or chemicals. There are not marine mammal interactions. You know, it all is based on site placement, having good future forward looking sustainable ethical feed models and again It is a enormously complex situation. And we certainly you know I would love to be able to continue that conversation. When we look at land based Bobby what I want to talk about what that is that right now we're in it. We are in a very good time in terms of the technological development around land based aquaculture. But I would also caution you because, like many of the things that we've moved on land, it is energy intensive, depending on where it is. It can be resource intensive from a water perspective. I would suggest aquaculture actually has less slavery issues to be honest and again. We're talking about those that are not commodity but that are rated at the end recommended at the very, very highest standard, so it's going to take all inputs to be able to get that seat at the table at the future of food, and so when we look at this, it's going to not be a single solution that isn't going to ensure food security. Rather, it's going to be reserving healthy proteins and nutrients for all of us, so we have to improve. We have to strengthen and we have to scale all of these systems, including aquaculture, So it's not painting a black or white portrait. There are incredible land based farms right now, Superior Fresh is one that is in Wisconsin. It is providing a land based multi Tropic system with vegetables, greens as well. A salmon that's going to festival foods, which is local, a huge local grocery group of sounds like the industry of certainly improving. On. Well, we will get back to that. We have a lot of colors to get to. And a lot of comments if you're just joining us, my name is Priya. David Clemens. You're listening to forum and we're talking about the true cost of the seafood industry and the controversial Netflix documentary. See Spirits see with Alan Love Well, the founder and CEO of real Good fish. Daniel Polly, a marine biologist. Fisheries scientist and professor at the University of British Columbia, and Jennifer Bushman, a sustainable fish farming expert and strategic development consultant with route to market. We want to hear from you. Have you seen the films? Conspiracy? Why reactions did you have And what do you think about when you consider what seafood you put on your table? Give us a call. Now. It 8667336786. That's 8667336786. You can also get in touch on Twitter and Facebook. We're at KQED forums. Or you can email your questions to forum at KQED dot or G'kar will be right back after a quick break with caller who says he liked the movie and thinks the show is missing the point..

Jennifer Bushman David Clemens San Francisco Daniel Polly Asia Julia Bobby Bobby Wisconsin Priya Daniel Adam Bobby South America Annie Twitter Peru Facebook Chile Philippines November
"magnuson stevens" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:20 min | 5 months ago

"magnuson stevens" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A law passed last week in Florida is touted by the state's GOP as a riot prevention matter, But many civil rights advocates say it could have a chilling effect on protests. Takeaway looks at how more restrictive measures in the Sunshine State compared to protest rights nationwide. China, said one p.m. today Welcome back to Forum. I'm Priya David Clemens. We're talking about the true cost of the seafood industry and the controversial Netflix documentary. See Spirits See? Uh, needed to interrupt Daniel colleges going into that break, please. If you'd continue, sir. I was pointing out that the interest of a single Fisher or single firm on the interest of society at large to have abundant ocean ocean life are not Do not align and therefore it's necessary for for the state to intervene for government doing to be that's similar to driving cause. Collectively, we we don't We cannot have cars racing at incredible speed tow the city on but people have made me want to do that, Andre. The result is that you have Regulation about how fast you can speak. You can you can drive on similar similarly you You must run fisheries. You must manage Fisheries on the point is that in many countries of the world they are not managed. They are not managed, and the result is the mess that we have seen that we have seen in this movie. But to conclude from this mess that the only way can be it can be managed that you can sort out this mess is is not eating fish is completely observed. It's like saying that traffic And cannot be regulated. Uh, speed cannot regulate it, and we should all walk. And Julia. I want to point out a very important piece about regenerating our oceans with wild caught fish and the importance of that to our ecosystem. Could you talk a little bit about what it would take to restore abundance to our oceans in terms of wild fisheries and how sustainable fish farming makes that possible. Well, we know that demand is going to grow and we've talked about the billions of people whether it's whether it's indigenous communities. We have island nations many, many cultures around the world that rely on a sustainable fish supply, the majority of which comes from wild capture fisheries. And so when I look it what it means to be able to put different types of ethical, sustainable, regenerative aquaculture into the water. It is one where we really can fill the gap in the same way that we've managed to fill the gap with other types of food production. The reality is in the United States were already eating the majority of the fish and seafood that we eat is farmed. And so the question now is. How do we raise that? That expectation get educated around What feed models are what types of species that we eat and really support those farmers that are best in class. They're doing a great job and what it means, Priya is we have to be more educated. It means we're going to need to know a little bit. More about where our food comes from. And so one of the things that I encourage. The groups that I work with the farmers is to say, Get a brand out there we is. We love to have as Daniel spoke about simple answers to incredibly complex problems as humans, but one of the things we like to do is lean on branding. And so if we can tell the story of the farmer, if that farmer can look the same as the land farmer that you No, for example, from the farmer's market, and you can understand all of that hard work, then what it does is it supports great work on the water. We have feed models that do not need marine ingredients. The model of the future around sustainable ethical aquaculture is bright, and there is a lot that's being applied to it. Groups like Google are very involved in technologies around data collection. And water management and farming is happening both on land as well as on sea. So this could be something where we can get price lowered. We can develop more aquiculture even than the United States and what I feel like is it can make fish and seafood even that much more accessible so that we can fight nutritional injustice and be able to put an incredibly important Nutritive ingredient on the plates of those that need it so badly. Wanna go to the phones. Now We've got a caller Tom from Iran and Tom, you want to talk about sustainable fisheries? Yes, I I live in the Bay area, but I traveled to Alaska every summer to fish commercially for standing and I just think we should do a better job of holding up some of the examples of the U. S has done and sustainable fishing. For the past many decades. Bristol Bay, Alaska, for example, largest sockeye salmon fishery in the world, and basically, um, the fisheries growing inside the harvest is growing the past 30 years. It's increased 30%. So this is a model that we should show to the world that it is possible to have sustainable fisheries and should the myth to say otherwise. And Tom did you get a chance to watch the documentary and what were your thoughts on it? I did, and it just reminds us that in the information age sensationalism sells, that's what gets the eyeballs. And it's just unfortunate that that damages the true message that there are major problems in the international fishery fishing industries, and we need to focus on how to resolve this problems. Whether it's Geo, politically or otherwise. Thanks for your call Alan them as the CEO of real good fish, and with a lot of time in the water and your experience, What do you think of Tom's comments about sustainable fisheries and where that can be done? I think Tom did a great job, You know, Sort of illustrating where you know, we need to celebrate a lot of instances of success and to be honest here in the United States. We're lucky. We're privileged in the sense that we have actually done an incredible job rebuilding our fisheries. There's no question that in the you know, industrial age and a new era of overfishing that we did incredibly Uh, incredible harm to the oceans into its resources. And that was, you know, again through World War One World War two, you know, feeding armies. You know, we were really sort of exploring the limits of the ocean. In that sense as a food source Come the seventies eighties, we really took it. Start turning said Look, we got it. We got to fix this problem, and there was a global call The action to the U. N of the law to see was a was a paramount. Um No effort to extend our protected waters up to 200 miles for any given coastal community of coastal country, three United States In addition Put together the Magnuson Stevens Act, which is the cornerstone of sustainable fisheries in this country, and what l it dictated what it demanded was that every fishery that we are harvesting in this country is managed. By a thing called M s wire, maximum sustainable yield. What That means is that we're scientifically assessing these stocks to ensure that we're not pulling out. More fish in the fish were able to reproduce themselves, in addition to feeding the ecosystems that depend on them in it as well, and it's working, and, as Tom pointed out, is working in Bristol Bay. It's working here in the California West coast of the West Coast groundfish fishery few decades ago, which was declared a national disaster. There was really no hope to be seeing they thought that the fishery won't rebuild. Even with all these management actions until 25th year so and here we are in around 2018 2019 was actually declared a success. In fact, the fish in the resource rebounded. Right? And I think this is another lesson that we've learned over and over again is that these ecosystems are entirely resilient and robust. If we give them space, we leave them alone. Let them come back. And that is exactly what has happened here on the West Coast. And so we need to remind ourselves that we have the tools. We certainly have the need. We? You know, there's no question That sustainable histories and it's this that more sustainable rush into the ocean is necessary. It's done without a question, but back to you know what Daniel's pointing out that we have to look at this. The dissolution mind set Should not be part of the problem is different than being part of the solution. And so it's you know, important to highlight the success stories because that is where we should be putting our energy That is where we can find the light..

Alaska Daniel Google Priya David Clemens Tom Julia Florida last week Magnuson Stevens Act Bristol Bay Alan Iran GOP Andre Netflix Sunshine State 30% billions Fisher Priya
"magnuson stevens" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

07:59 min | 1 year ago

"magnuson stevens" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"78 100. This is Jared doing and show So last week, we talked about fish. And avoid the green ones. They're not right. Um We talked about fish, mostly because I get sick of talking about credit cards all the time. And as it turned out, people like the segment on fish. I got lots of positive feedback. Aboutthe segment on fish. So you know, as we like to say in trading, do what works and don't do what doesn't work. So fish works. Fish plays my friend. Fish place. We're going to spend more time talking about fish. But this time, it's actually even more interesting the last time because we're going to talk about the economics of fish. And the economics of fish are fascinating. Believe it or not. So Yeah, we did not get into the economics aspect of fish. First of all, Let's talk about a concept known as the tragedy of the comments. Let's say you have a coffee maker in your office. It's an office coffee maker. It belongs to the office and you get coffee and the guy next to you gets coffee and everybody gets coffee You got like 30 people getting coffee out of this coffee maker. And since it doesn't belong to anybody, nobody takes care of it, and it lasts about a year. Then you have to throw it away and get another coffee maker because people just abuse it because it's not theirs. They have no incentive to take care of it. It's it's a common It's a common coffeemaker. So If everybody had their own coffee maker, it would be their property and they would take better care of it. Now the same applies to fish. One of the most fascinating things about fish is that in recent years in the last 20 years, people have tried to Introduce property rights into fishing. And the result is fascinating. So Now for most of history. People who believe that the fish belong to everybody. Now back. I don't remember the year I think was in the eighties There was a law passed in the United Nations. It was called Unclos, United Nations. Contract on law of the sea or something like that. And that established national rights to fifth, and it talked about the concept of the easy which stands for exclusive economic zone. For every country that borders the water. They have right. They have rights to the Fish within 200 miles ashore. All the fish out to 200 miles out. So you know the United States we have you on the West Coast. We have the 200 Miles and all our fish, the East Coast 100 Miles. That's all our fish Gulf of Mexico. And also Alaska, which is a huge area and there's lots of fish up there. So we have 200 miles up there. It's called the exclusive economic Zone. Every country has the right to all the natural resource is 200 miles from shore outside of 200, Miles, you are in international waters. And everyone gets to fish there. This is also known as the high seas. The high seas. Now there is there's a lake in Massachusetts. And this is the name of the lake. The lake is called Chicago. God, Man. Chicago. God, Shabana Gonna mark that's that's the name of the lake. It has. It is. Let me say that again. It's late to gaga Gaga Man. Chicago got to bang Agong amok. And it is the lake with longest name in the world. Believe it or not, And it's in Massachusetts and what this means is you fish on your side in I fish on my side and nobody fish in the middle of all the rules that we have internationally. Is that you fish on your side. I fish on my side and everybody fishes in the middle. Came So the United States has everything within the easy which is easy enough. Same with all the other countries now in the U. S. There was a law called Magnuson Stevens that was passed, I think in 1987 and this established what was called regional fisheries councils, so they have one for Alaska. It's called the North Pacific Regional Fisheries Counsel. They have one on the West Coast. It's in California. It's called the Pacific Regional Fisheries Council. There's I don't remember how many There are. There's like 10 or something like that, and these fisheries councils make the regulations for fisheries in their respective areas. Now I have been to these Fisheries Council meetings. It is the most boring. It is so boring. It is the most boring thing in the world. And this is back When I was 24. I could fall asleep at the drop of a hat and I would be sitting there doing the head Bob in the Fisheries Council meeting, and it was it was boring. On the fisheries counsels. You have three groups of people. You have fishermen in scientists in anthropologists? A fisherman in there to represent their interests. The scientists are there to talk about the science and the anthropologists are there to determine the impact of the regulations on the fisheries communities. So they're kind of speaking on the fisherman's behalf. The scientists do science. They typically work for Nim Fous, which is National Marine Fisheries Service. They work for Memphis. They have their own vessels. They go out to see they do statistical sampling of the fish to try to get an idea of the health of the fishery. An estimate the size of the population. And then they determine the catch limits. So there are regulations on how much you can catch in an individual trip. But there are no limits to the number of trips and there are no limits to the number of fishing boats, which means the catch limits are basically useless. They're totally useless because if you're if you can catch £500 of thorny heads You can go out catch £500 Come back! Go out! Catch £500. You just keep doing this. So the catch. This is a terrible system. His stupid system. There are no limits to the number of trips and there are no limits to the number of fishing boats. Ergo, you have tragedy of the Commons. And the species constantly get over 50. So someone came up with a better idea. They said, What if we could set up property rights for fish? Property rights. So for a couple of fisheries, they have something called an I F Q, which stands for individual fishing quota Now, in the beginning what they did wass they had data on how much fish All the boats caught and they basically gave people rights to catch a certain amount of fish. Stay like £80,000. So you can catch £80,000 of halibut based on their historical activity, and that is their fish they can make in fish £80,000 a year if they don't think they will fish £80,000 a year. Taken cell £20,000 to another boat or if they want to fish Mohr than £80,000. They can buy £20,000 from another bowl. And this is these are property rights. They're tradable there, Transferrable. Property rights for fish. Here's the amazing part in all the fisheries we've had that have been on the West Coast. That's halibut and sable fish. Those fisheries are the most healthy. It solved the problem of overfishing. Problem solved..

Fisheries Council West Coast Chicago Pacific Regional Fisheries Cou North Pacific Regional Fisheri United Nations United States National Marine Fisheries Serv Massachusetts Alaska Miles Jared Mexico Magnuson Stevens California wass Bob Mohr Nim Fous Memphis
"magnuson stevens" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"magnuson stevens" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"On station Street. The child was med flighted to Boston Children's Hospital with non life threatening injuries. No criminal charges have been filed against the driver in New England counsel is planning to make a final decision this month on an amendment to the fisheries management plan. But local ground, Fisher's say the change will mean an end to their livelihood. Sze W. B. C's Kendall Buell reports the measure being considered by the New England Fisheries Management Council, his opponents say against the law. Specifically the Magnuson Stevens Act, which says no one necessary burden should be put on fishermen or The local economy at large feet. Ojea Colonias, executive director of the Gloucester and Community Preservation Fund, he says, requiring fisheries monitors to be onboard for 100% of ground fishing trips at the vassals expense is just such a burden, smaller vessels or even medium sized vessels that only have to a three crew. Don't gross enough to be able to absorb the daily costs. This wakes and 16 state legislators called on the council to reject the amendment when it makes the final decision at the end of the month, saying it would mean the end of the local ground fishing fleets as we know it. Kendall Bjork W. B Z Boston's news radio, a new warning about a dangerous sea creature at Horse Neck Beach in Westport, and it's not a shark. The Portuguese man of war, which is said to look like a jellyfish has been spotted in the water. The Department of Conservation and Recreation responding by posting purple flags at the beach to warn about the presence of the marine animal. Some beaches in Martha's Vineyard were even closed on Thursday after large amounts of the man of war washed up on shore. As families get ready to send their kids back to school, their nerves air reaching new heights. So how can you settle the jitters about the first few days back in the classroom? Well, psychiatrist, Dr Leila Lease is also an assistant professor at New York Medical College, she says. Sometimes people can get caught up in worrying before they need to be. I think the worst part is anticipatory anxiety that's way worse than the actual event happening. Abel anticipating things bad things happening, and that can really set up a lot of worry and panic. I'm detoxify zing. You know what if all everything goes wrong? Well, you know the chances that your kid will get covert or get very 16 profit are very low. You have to focus on what's probable not was possible, and for those who are anxiously waiting for businesses to open their doors. Suburb Ville will begin Phase three Step one of reopening this Tuesday..

New England Fisheries Manageme Horse Neck Beach Dr Leila Lease Ojea Colonias New England Magnuson Stevens Act Boston Children's Hospital Kendall Bjork Department of Conservation and Kendall Buell large feet Sze W. B. C Gloucester and Community Prese Fisher Martha's Vineyard Boston New York Medical College executive director Abel Westport
"magnuson stevens" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:19 min | 1 year ago

"magnuson stevens" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Held in Brockton for sergeant elder Fernandez, who was found dead last month near Fort Hood and fear surrounding the process for creating a cove in 19 vaccine as some think it's being rushed for political reasons. Now, The Wall Street Journal and New York Times they're reporting that several pharmaceutical giants will sign a pledge to not propose a vaccine for government approval until they're proven to be safe. ABC is emergency room physician, Dr Darien Sutton. Talks about how the promise could make a big difference with the recent missteps that the FDA regarding the president releasing incorrect information of the benefits of convalescent plasma, as well as the CDC, releasing confusing guy land over who could get tested. I think public trust right now has never been Maurin important. President Trump is promising a vaccine before the elections, but health experts warn that would not be enough time to ensure that any vaccine is safe. With less than 60 days until Election Day, and an ongoing public health crisis. Voting by mail options are centre stage and voters air struggling to decide how best to cast their ballots safely. And on time, Amber McReynolds of the National Voted Home Institute says one critical issue comes up when voters do not sign their envelopes before mailing in their ballots signing where it says the sign is absolutely critical. Some states also require witness signatures. Just ensure that you read the instructions and you follow the procedures as outlined by your local election. Official. Mail in voting kicked off in the key swing state of North Carolina yesterday, with a record 600,000 absentee ballots sent out. President Trump has consistently attacked voting by mail. Well, a New England counsel is planning to make a final decision this month on an amendment to the fisheries management plan. But local ground, Fisher's say the change will mean the end of their livelihood. Sze W. B. C's Kendall Buell has the story the measure being considered by the New England Fisheries Management Council, his opponents say against the law. Specifically, the Magnuson Stevens acts, which says no one necessary burden should be put on fishermen or the local economy at large. Mitoji Colonias, executive director of the Gloucester Fishing Community Preservation Fund, he says requiring fisheries monitors to be onboard for 100% of ground fishing trips at the vassals expense is just such a burden, smaller vessels or even medium sized vessels that only have to a three crew don't gross enough to be able to absorb Daily cost this week. Some 16 state legislators called on the council to reject the amendment when it makes the final decision at the end of the month, saying it would mean the end of the local ground fishing fleets as we know it. Kendall Buell W. B Z Boston's news radio in the face of strong criticism, President Trump and his allies are strongly denying reports. That he insulted dead U. S Service members. I'm Tom Foti. President. Trump insists that never happened in the magazine report, matched by other news organizations of him insulting American war dead from the man who wants to replace him. Democrat Joe Biden, If was written landed, his.

President Trump New England Fisheries Manageme president Kendall Buell Joe Biden ABC Dr Darien Sutton Fort Hood elder Fernandez Brockton The Wall Street Journal New York Times Tom Foti FDA Amber McReynolds North Carolina CDC Mitoji Colonias
"magnuson stevens" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:10 min | 1 year ago

"magnuson stevens" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"His base in Fort Hood, Texas, fear surrounding the process for creating a covert 19 vaccine. As some think it's being rushed for political reasons. Now, The Wall Street Journal and New York Times are reporting that several pharmaceutical giants will sign a pledge to not propose the vaccine for government approval until they're proven to be safe. ABC is emergency room physician, Dr Darien Sutton. On how the promise could make a big difference with the recent missteps of the FDA regarding the president, releasing incorrect information of the benefits of convalescent plasma, as well as the CDC, releasing confusing guy land over who could get tested. I think public trust right now has never been Maurin important. President Trump is promising a vaccine before the elections. But health experts warn that would not be enough time to ensure that it's safe with less than 60 days until the election and an ongoing public health crisis. Voting by mail options are centre stage and voters Air struggling to decide how best to cast their ballots safely and on time, Amber McReynolds of the national vote at Home Institute Says one critical issue comes up when voters do not sign their envelopes before mailing their ballots in signing where it says to sign is absolutely critical. Some states also require witness signatures. Just ensure that you read the instructions and you follow the procedures as outlined by your local election. Official mail in voting kicked off in the key swing state of North Carolina yesterday with a record 600,000 absentee ballots sent out President Trump has consistently attacked of voting by mail a New England council's planning to make a final decision this month on an amendment to the fisheries management plan. But local Fisher ground fisheries say the change will mean the end of their livelihood. Sze W. B. C's Kendall Buell has that the measure being considered by the New England Fisheries Management Council is opponents say against the law. Specifically, the Magnuson Stevens acts which says no one necessary burden should Put on fishermen or the local economy at large feet. Ojea Colonias, executive director of the Gloucester Fishing Community Preservation Fund, he says, requiring fisheries monitors to be onboard for 100% of ground fishing trips. At the vessels. Expense is just such a burden, smaller vessels or even medium sized muscles that only have to a three crew. Don't gross enough to be able to absorb the daily cost this wakes and 16 state legislators called on the council to reject the amendment when it makes the final decision at the end of the month, saying it would mean the end of the local ground fishing fleets as we know it. Kendall Bjork W. B Z Boston's news radio in the face of strong criticism, President Trump and his allies. Strongly deny reports that he insulted dead U. S service members. I'm Tom Foti. President, Trump insisted never happened. The magazine report matched by other news organizations of him insulting American war dead from the man who wants to replace him. Democrat Joe Biden. If what is written in.

President Trump president New England Fisheries Manageme Fisher ground Fort Hood Joe Biden Texas ABC New York Times FDA The Wall Street Journal Amber McReynolds Dr Darien Sutton Kendall Bjork CDC Ojea Colonias Gloucester Fishing Community P Magnuson Stevens
"magnuson stevens" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

14:25 min | 1 year ago

"magnuson stevens" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"O. R. T. F. M. dot O. R. G. so I'm I have talked about the farm bill on on other additions of a public affair and so I'm wondering our fishery use a part of the farm journal or who actually kind of maintains the overall I guess policy control of our fisheries where does that reside in the government and Nick can you yeah there's a fish bill so just like the farm bill which is a new piece of new deal legislation there is a similar there is a similar overriding national fish policy wow that is also sometimes called the fish bill and it's it's it's legal name is the Magnuson Stevens act and it was passed in the nineteen seventies and is re authorized every five years and it is it is under the is that the department of in its is that the department of interior Ryan no it's not the department of tear it's department commerce right yep yep said apartment number so it's the national marine fisheries service and which is actually and a department of Noah okay national oceanic and atmospheric administration under the department of commerce the manager fisheries using the fish bill so if you think of the farm bill that's that's the department of ag and which is under the interior right I I think the department of agriculture is its own entity okay it's the USDA and I'm pretty sure it is it has its own department yep so we enter another so we have a fish bill and and it is under the department of commerce which is under no well which is the NASA main fishery service okay and what the what the fish bill essentially does is it it as Ryan mentioned there are these thirteen regional policy councils and these thirteen councils are in their place based meaning that you know there's a council and there's a council and the north Atlantic there's a council in the mid Atlantic there's accounts on the Gulf council for the Great Lakes does that count so the Great Lakes is its own management area that okay actually does not have that has a totally separate a set of policies they and the rest of the coastal United States so it is managed by the great I think it's the Great Lakes fisheries commission okay and so the Great Lakes were excluded from national marine fisheries policy because the Great Lakes had its own set of unique conditions okay that that the the federal government wanted to manage for as well as the Canadian government wanted to to manage for so I'm less familiar with Great Lakes fisheries policy and management then I am with any any other policy and management in the United States because it is a totally separate system while they and the rest of coastal America which is managed by our our our fish bill and the Great Lakes fisheries are managed by this Great Lakes fisheries commission which was also set up at about the same time to deal with things like invasive species in lamb Bray and competition like a lot of the same it a lot of the and awareness that that happened in the nineteen sixties which in large part because the the fish bill to be started and passed on that same environmental awareness was an impetus for our our Great Lakes fisheries management but they're totally separate systems of our management and they really don't interface with one another very often and but from what I know about Great Lakes fisheries the the plight of these fissures who are still out there commercial fishing both native and non native is very very similar he may have tremendous challenges with access to markets meeting that others every every it in my understanding of it every Great Lakes fishermen that does fishing is a relatively small scale operation their mom and pop they a large part don't have the same type of access to markets that they should many in these types of artists no markings and you know they fight many of the same battles as it relates to you know resource consolidation a lot of times you know I know they have a lot of issues with with with access rights granted to recreational fishermen or you know cop charter fisherman but it's it's it's a it's a very separate system with similar with similar themes running throughout and we do have a caller on the line with questions so and it it kind of ties into this so Ellen please go ahead with your question hello yes hi okay you got me we've got you yep my question is is about the you were talking a little while ago about a you know oceans being being commonwealths and so I was wondering came to mind you know you talk about the fishing rights or yeah like fishing licenses or rights being sold I was wanting to get some don't like his would be the state that it joined that portion of the the sequels or or who I assume that the government entities but you know just wondering if that could be if you know who gets the money and what happens to it if it's you know delegated for certain purposes or just goes into general you know funding and that was it okay thank you Alan right and you want to give this a stabber sure so it it you know it that's a it's tricky because it depends on if the species that was privatized is a federally regulated or a state regulated it should and so for instance in Alaska the federal government regulates how the and that was that was sort of the big one that went first and so basically the when you're buying the right to those fish you're buying it from another fisherman or entity that owns the right to catch those does fashion when they first allocated those right they took historical catch rate and then divvied up the total allowable catch as a percentage to those folks that have been harvesting it so right now I believe you know just aside from management fees and things that most of the money goes to whoever owns the the right to catch the fish now yeah I was one of the big critiques of the system is that the the wealth that's been generated a lot of times by the the buying and selling of these access rights is is enriching private entities and private corporations and are not as much the the citizens of those who actually are the owners of this right but that's a great question that Allen had is yeah you can think about fisheries management it's it's very layered right there are some there are some fisheries that are managed internationally there some fisheries that are manage federally and there some fisheries that the federal government allows states to manage and there's there's often times not a lot of good reason for why a state manages a fishery and why the feds manage another fishery usually international fisheries are managed because the fish are a very very high value and because they they they're very internationally you know they they travel across oceans bluefin tuna is one of them how that is one of them king salmon or or one of the mother those are three big interview internationally governed fisheries but yeah I mean one of the issues with which catch shares in the privatization is the the wealth that is been created by these fisheries and the access rights that have been you know can increasingly bought and sold is are going to private individuals and corporations and not to the public how much would it cost like if if if I were Ryan if I were a fisherman and I wanted to buy on an access right to to say hello but that I that I wanted to fish them how much would that cost what would I be looking out well that so it can you yeah you've opened another pet can of worms and got right now can you can you can talk speak to this as someone that's struggling with this yeah yeah this is part of the reason that I'm down here doing this is because you know I never really wanted to stop fishing I wanted to keep going but to buy one pound of how to catch every year and that that number goes up and down based on that the total allowable catch to buy one how to how they I'm the last number that I heard was around fifty dollars per pound and when I first started fishing your dad about thirteen dollars a pound well to just to go catch it and so you know takes many years to pay that off depending on market what pricing fluctuations but also you know you can buy that pound in it it's a pound this year but if the total allowable catch go down it could be half a pound next year but you still paid you know for a pound access you paper percentage of the catch so it's a bit yeah like it's a whole can of worms and and to have a viable how about operation you need to hold about ten thousand pounds so well to be able to get into that fishery anymore is at least a half a million dollar investment and so socially one of the other huge problems as it's creating tremendous barriers for the smaller guys in for younger fishermen who want to access these fisheries there's no feasible way that they're able to get in to you know how they say it'll be out to start off and and and how that fishery which you know today you really need about a million Bucks to be able to buy that permit tend to get the gear and take it you know to be able to invest in the boat and that's something that you didn't need twenty or thirty years ago thirty years about thirty years ago all you needed was a boat ten a hundred dollar permit and that and now you need that boat and need a bigger boat because you have to invest in so much on the property right to be able to make it worth it and and so it's really creating a class of very disenfranchised younger fishermen who don't have the same opportunities to fish as their parents and grandparents and you know if you Google grain of the fleet it's the same ways in which land values have kept a small scale farmers in younger farmers you know this is the Michael fields institute right right they all kept younger farmers as a game the access to these property rights and what they're what they now costs to be able to get into the fishery isn't feasible for a lot of young guys and can a permit be held by a family like if if a father has a permit say Ryan's father was a fisherman and he had a permit could he then pass that permit down to Ryan and would there be any expense to to passing that on Brian could you I can yes a stabber you could speak to it yeah they they could for sure what what happens specifically in my case with my uncle had fished in Alaska for thirty years and he he game companies right to crab in Cuba and to help it but you know he had a white in Mexico who ended up deciding to to sell all the at that and then just you know not not pass the mind and her quote to me was you should go work hard and and get your own rights for the fish what was lost in translation there with that you know I didn't have the up front capital to to purchase that sage and that's what happened you know that that's why there's a grain of the fleet that's why the average age of fishermen in Alaska is fifty years old because it's very similar situations yeah yeah yeah think about it you know most of you know it's up to the face the to say the devil's advocate but you know a lot of a lot of these fishermen who god and to these fisheries in the eighties and nineties as these policies were being implemented I mean in some on some levels the guys that have stuck with it over the last thirty years they've kind of been given a little golden parachute here and a lot of these fishermen who aren't incredibly wealthy and who have hard years this is part of the consolidation they see this access right much like farmers see their land as their savings account raises the retirement account yeah and and these guys just day to day when you look at well how do you do annually right a lot of them yeah especially the individual holders of this quote a lot of them aren't you know they're not flush with cash but they know they own eighteen thousand pounds of Halliburton fourteen thousand pounds of access rights to black cod and as soon as they're willing to retire and and sell that that's you know a million a half for two million Bucks and and they feel like well they have been good stewards of the resource in.

O. R. T. F. M. dot O. R. G. farm journal Nick
"magnuson stevens" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

11:59 min | 2 years ago

"magnuson stevens" Discussed on FoodStuff

"By e farmers and ranchers and we're back. Thank you sponsor yes. Thank you so history kind of briefly open. Yeah very briefly. Because fishing is one of humanity's oldest industries uh-huh Yep teach Amanda Fish and all that Catching and eating fish was first and foremost a means of survival. As opposed something done for profit for a long time I mean yeah because it dates back to before profit was a concept. Yeah and depending on where you were. Eating fish was either a last resort or a first resort. Some people really dug up some people really. Didn't cha well. Our early ancestors most likely fish up to five eight hundred fifty thousand years ago. Fishing didn't really develop gas. We know it until somewhere between forty thousand and ten thousand B C. Oh so recently I remember it like it was yesterday evidence uncovered at a cave in South Africa dates shellfish consumption to at least one hundred and forty thousand years ago and some of the earliest evidence of Hook. Fishing was found in South East Asia about sixteen thousand years ago. Okay perhaps obviously asleep a lot of early fishing and even modern fishing took place in areas with access to bodies of water makes sense that makes perfect sense at first people seemed to have done a a lot of fishing just with their hands nets line spears and rods used for fishing. I appear in our historical records around three thousand five hundred BC in ancient Egypt of note historians believe that in some places people started noticing declining populations of fish around coral reefs and bays and other close to shore waters basically places they could see as a result some ancient civilizations establish fishing grounds. The only places someone could legally go to catch fish Yeah Around the same time three thousand five hundred BC ear so The each Chinese gave us one of the first examples of fish farming with a carp that were bred in ponds an agent Egyptians developed. Something similar the first known treatise on sea-fishing was written during ancient Greek and Roman times by the poet. OPN the Romans were big consumers rumors and traders of fish which they primarily caught through the use of nets. They also like to showcase their most prized fish at over the top bank with that doesn't sound like the ancient wrong. No silly however actually eating fish especially certain types of fish was often associated with the poor or soldiers as their rations included a lot of fish. No refrigeration meant that a lot of fish was firm and for later or perhaps made into the popular condiment. Garum CR Ketchup episode sued for more on that one plenty and homer also wrote about fishing. According to plenty some fishermen would take nets and spears venture out into the water and wait for dolphins and to Dr Schools of fish into their nets. That's great and then it gets better. Dolphins would be rewarded with bread dipped in one. What a life hanging out with? Some dolphins catch some fish and get the dolphins drunk love it. Yeah that sounds like a regular Tuesday to you mean hunters in New Guinea also used a kind of spectacular about the They would build these wooden frames and then leave them somewhere where they knew that like spiders hung out and then the spiders would spin a net over the frame spider. Silk is very strong And Yeah it looks amazing. Using it does Illustrations yeah also. In Japan the practice of fishing easing trained birds specifically comrades was documented about one thousand awesome seven hundred years ago. Yes and I read that some. It's still practiced in some areas so I would love to hear from listeners. Yes that's true. That's delightful Gosh. Oh there's a whole world out there. During Europe's feudal system of the Middle Ages Lords owned lakes and rivers that at mead fishing tightly regulated religious communities that practice periods of fasting or meatless days where some of the few allowed to fish at one point in time over half the days of the calendar year were meatless for practicing Christians which really helped increase the popularity of fish Yes S.. Oh I want to do an episode on that right now I do too okay. All right anyway interesting here. As farming techniques in water management technology technology advanced around the tenth eleventh century archaeologist can track changes in fishing in places like England where people kind of suddenly around that time switched from eating freshwater fish to eating saltwater fish like archaeologist think that the pollution from farms and environmental changes due to dams being created it'd caused freshwater fish populations to collapse and necessitated a move to saltwater fish. Ancient Hawaiians practice in an advanced technique of fish-farming fish-farming by the thirteenth century see. And they did this by creating seawater ponds fish could access through a series of greats canals. Young fish could get in but as they grew and got bigger they could not get out. Yeah I know almost every native Hawaiian at the time participated in fishing. Overfishing wasn't a problem though There was a sense sensitive stewardship and responsibility to natural resources enforced by community and religious leaders. AH though deep sea fishing existed as early as the Fifteenth Century It didn't really get started in in seriousness until like the nineteenth century because that's when steamboats elevated and popularized arised it Because it was much less of a butt pain at that point end more profitable With a massive trawlers pulling nets. Trawlers would later be I used to sweep for mines during World War One. To perhaps the first instance or recorded instance of modern fish farming took place in Germany in the mid seven. Earning hundreds when a German farmer successfully fertilise river trout on his land. Huh Native Americans who lived near water of course engaged in fishing A way of life that it was threatened when votes from Europe began to arrive up north. America's first large ish fishing communities formed in the eighteenth century for the most part around the New England area however One of the first established fishing communities was in. What's now Washington state? Founded by explorer James Bernie through salting and packing fish in part traded raided from native Americans. The industry took off by eighteen. Sixty one people started stock ponds and open bodies of water with fish feed them and harvest to them and yet The industry only grew as more immigrants came from Europe bringing with them their fishing know-how forty-three distinct fisheries were up and running across the country by eighteen. Eighty employing one hundred thirty thousand people who commercial fishing time could be dangerous. An anonymous reporter wrote in eighteen. Seventy six the history of the glouster fisheries has been written in tears. Almost two thousand five hundred fishermen from Glasser which is in Massachusetts by the way never returned home in the years from eighteen. Sixty six to eighteen ninety. This led the community to come together to create the Gloucester fishermen's and seamen's widows and Orphans Aid Society Fund in Eighteen. Sixty five win. Will the slaughter cease Captain Joseph Collins Collins wrote and the Cape Ann Weekly advertiser in eighteen eighty two technological improvements when it came to ship design and fishing equipment did help improve the situation in the following decades in various ways safety overall hall processing packaging. A lot of canneries were opening at this time which you can see some past episodes for that Storing and shipping those kind of things. Yeah and several of the fisheries that thrived during this period. Atlantic hodges peak oster is Columbia River Salmon End. The whaling industry would go on to be an crisis later due to overfishing Wailing was such a huge industry in America from the late seventeen hundreds to the mid eighteen hundreds by which time the whale population was decimated in the Atlantic All parts of the whale were used But they were primarily sought after for their blubber which was made into oil bill. which fed the whole gaslight thing yeah So many specialized tools were developed for processing whales whale. Boats were sometimes toad for miles by an angry whale. All these were called Nantucket sleigh rides since the industry in the states originated in Nantucket Ho- Future Episode Moby Dick Reading. I Yeah Yeah Yeah we were talking about that before. This started and I kind of forgot that was a real just. Seems like a dark Victorian era fantasy moby. Dick a horror novel and it couldn't possibly happen but it did. And there's this wonderful if you're interested the Smithsonian has it was a past exhibit that they did about basically all humanity in water but there's a specific section on fishing in past industries of fishing. They have wailing thing about wheeling and I went on a very deep hole but I did find some wonderful sea shanties which I hope we get to us one day. Oh man see shanties. That's great. All right okay anyway in eighteen seventy one the. US's first Fisheries Laboratory Tori was established by the US Fish Commission which was itself established earlier that year making it the first federal agency set up around a natural resource president. Teddy Roosevelt signed a law for the construction of a second Federal Fisheries Laboratory in Nineteen hundred by the way I are co workers total aside coworkers. Just put out an awesome new podcast. I called history versus Every season tackling different historical figure. And I bring it up because the first season it's about Theodore Roosevelt and it's awesome because that dude got up to sub stuff you did. Gosh Gosh it's also it's hosted by whatever friends over at mental floss Aaron McCarthy Yeah if you dig history stuff you should definitely check it out anyway. Yes say yeah. Japanese immigrants introduced longline fishing to Hawaii in nineteen seventeen at the time called flagging fishing. This method involve a section of a long mainline segmented with sections of tarred rope that was in horizontally suspended in water with floats complete with flags like fishing attached to the roots for numerous leaders as an baited hooks. There were forty two of these ships in Honolulu after world. War Two after a dip in the seventies and eighties that number each one hundred sixty four vessels in nineteen ninety-one anyone as boat-building technology materials improved. One of these improvements was in the line itself which was updated to a monofilament mainline. In hydraulically powered reels reals after World War Two regulations limiting the freedoms of Japanese immigrants involved in fishing helped along the incorporation of spam into Hawaiian cuisine gene. And you can see our spam episode for more on that Yeah who've Okay so as technology advanced and thanks to the increasing popularity of tuna hand line fishing which is this method of deep sea fishing that goes back to ancient Hawaiians Became commercially important in Hawaii in the nineteen seventies and it's really environmentally valuable. Because it lets you catch specifically the fishy want without bycatch. Because what you're doing is drawing a vertical line down into the water catching catching a single fish on that line. And pulling up there either manually or mechanically these days. It's more likely right. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration or no uh-huh uh-huh was set up in nineteen seventy in nineteen seventy six the US government enacted the Magnuson Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act to provide oversight for fisheries in American federal waters one of the biggest impacts that this had was doing away with foreign fishing in..

Europe Amanda Fish Dr Schools of fish Teddy Roosevelt US Fish Commission US America Hawaii National Oceanic and Atmospher East Asia Honolulu Egypt homer Japan England Germany BC South Africa Massachusetts
"magnuson stevens" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

05:06 min | 2 years ago

"magnuson stevens" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Book six twenty five here. The iheart media empire. Again, captain Dylan Hubbard from Hubbard's, marina. My guest here this morning. If you love to fish offshore today, it'd be a good day. If you got questions about how to catch him where to catch them when to catch them while you can't catch them all that good stuff. He is one of the gurus in our industry today. So today's a good day to call. Again, we're Facebook live. You can bring your questions and comments there as well. Dylan always active on social media hill. He can chime in later. If you've got questions for Dylan stuff, that's above my pay grade. He cannot definitely help you out. Let's jump on the phone to try to get one in this morning. It's going to Donald in loot style. How are you, buddy? Great. Hey, I was out last Monday, catching some beautiful bass or buckle. Polk County, hembo, very cool. I've heard of our Boko. Where's our buckle Polk County. I proof frost reform. Nice. Yes. Battled trap and I knew they were going to be deep water. I retried some worms participate network to shallow Williams like three or four feet of water. So we gotta get out with six to seven feet, and we gotta get down deep but not worms. You gotta slow rich retrieve either rattle-trap or, you know, like deep, deep kind of deeper, plug and got more on Reynolds, shepherd's very cool. Dylan, I booked a twelve hour trip last week for July. Nice. Yeah I'm looking forward to. I was about to say it's been a while. Donald it has been well, I've been, you know. I'm sure you heard what happened. Take it easy. So I've got a that's why you're bass fishing. Can I get back out there and do some some deep sea fishing? I did book a five hour trip for me thirty I protect got cancelled that weather has been crazy for sure. But I got the twelve hour trip comeback for July. But we we've got from what I understand. We've got his American Red snapper couldn't be open sit in. Yes. American Red snapper. Have two different seasons in the Gulf of Mexico for recreational anglers, well a couple of different seasons. If you go cross the entire Gulf. But for our local area, we've got private recreational red snapper, from June eleventh, to July twelfth at twelve oh one AM. And then we have federal for higher recreational season from June first to August second at twelve oh, one AM, so August. I is affecting the last day to catch a red snapper on a federally permited four higher charter party boat as a recreational angler, and then June, July eleventh would be the last day as a private recreational angler on your own private vote or your buddies, private boat. Okay. Chris, I'm we'll set for you, then. Yes. In one unicorn that not a lot of people have figured out, yet is August. I that day, August first and August. I alone from midnight August twelve one AM August. I until eleven fifty nine pm that day you can go out and catch anything you wanted except for grey, triggerfish, everything would be open that day. The unicorn the unicorn one day. Yeah. That's awesome. To. It's just so weird way they did. They managing fisheries managing quotation marks, you know, I think from what I can gather Donald. And thank you for the call, buddy. Always good to hear your voice. I think. From what I can gather the more I talked to you. We're just constantly paying for the mistakes the laziness of those that came before this group now. Yeah. I mean it's basically what we're doing. We're getting her head kicked him because a bunch of lazy jackwagon didn't do their job to begin with, well, a lot of a lot of it goes back to just figuring it out. I mean alternately the fisheries management in the federal waters. Isn't that old? I mean they've only been doing this for thirty forty years, and we've been fishing for a whole heck of a lot longer. And the red snapper kill that took the red snapper out of the eastern Gulf was before that time in Magnuson Stevens was only seventy six something like that established all this. So it hasn't been that long. They still should've we're up against the clock. They still should have made a point to make sure that the information they add was correct. Yeah. Instead of just throwing stuff up against a lot of our problems come from Magnuson Stevens, and the way they manage fishery managed to poor science. We'll be back kept. Mike Ron Ron taco box up on the other side, nine seventy WFL. News, traffic, and weather. Tampa, Bay's News Radio. WFL a making good una campaign promise. Governor desanto sign the Bill.

Dylan Hubbard Donald Gulf Polk County Facebook Mike Ron Ron Magnuson Stevens WFL Governor desanto Tampa Williams Reynolds Chris shepherd twelve hour thirty forty years seven feet five hour four feet
"magnuson stevens" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

13:03 min | 2 years ago

"magnuson stevens" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"So did you do your homework? Learn what m r I p is anybody will. It's a division of Noah fisheries division, marine, recreational information program state regional federal partnership that develops improves and implements a network of surveys to major the number of trips. Saltwater anglers taken the number of fish. They catch recreational catch and effort. Estimates are combined with commercial catch data biological research and direct observations of fisheries to help scientists and managers assess and maintain sustainable US fish stocks. What prompted this was a letter that I got last night from called Fisher port from captain. Monty hawkins. Greetings, all. What up on today? C couple days had some fishy. Business on my mind thoughts, I needed to share with my senators and congressmen spend a day touring with guide extraordinary, Tracy Dunaway. She's serious good at what she does meetings. With DC staffers went very well. Also, those folks are professional not many people get it. But we're getting hammered by 'em are peas cast mates. I see New York had close to two million pounds of Qadri gently, but only a couple thousand pounds or caught on party and charter boats. What's chance of one point six million pounds of cod crossed recreational docks from private boats in a hearty winter weather and a party boat fleet. Didn't get on it. What he's saying is one point six million pounds of cod were allegedly cut by private anglers. But only a couple thousand pounds cut by party and charter boats that targeted cod. Zero those no chance no chance at New York's for higher guys told Noah. M p how many they caught the entirety of that one point seven million pounds of private boat. Catch is ninety nine point nine percents that tickle allusion of farce, actually, then two. There's the recent hubbub over striped bass, teeny tiny tip that iceberg in twenty seventeen m RIP has Massachusetts and Connecticut at nearly a million pounds of sure catch while Rhode Island's sure landings early three quarters of a million that get this. Here's the average size though. Shortcuts. Stripers Connecticut, nineteen point six pounds, Massachusetts, thirty three point four pounds and Rhode Island thirty three point eight pounds and the Grandpa's for average short stripers is Rhode Island in twenty eighteen at forty five point. Point one pounds of shortcuts. That's their average side of striped bass caught from the shore. So how about Maryland, sure? Anglers caught more than three years worth of Maryland party Ciba's, and the average one point four pounds of peace from shore. Maryland, Eggers, Maryland, angler, sure, anguish cut more than three years worth of Maryland party and charter sea bass averaged one point four pounds of peace from shore. What that means is according to 'em, rip or MRI p sure banned anglers in Maryland, cut bigger sea bass from shore and three times as many sea bass from shore as the party boats that go after every single day. Offshore on the reefs where they live in Delaware last year. Sea bass caught from shore average one point nine pounds. All these estimates turn into pounds Canada, get star recreational quotas. And that's always been the case. Now, I'm alright peas recreational cast estimates of grown so bad. They're influencing species population estimates well says Mr. Fisher scientist, if they cut that many fish in our population estimate number here needs to be a lot bigger. That's why commercial fishers just had a forty nine percent increase in their summer. Flounder quota their fluke quota. And recreational got nothing. We're already catching ours. Of course, according to the realm recreational. Merrill, recreational information program. Maybe you don't see a lot of people don't it's gonna take a heck of a lot more than just Migo into congress to complain. There's no recreational marine species. It's not affected by 'em rips. Estimates management has quite nearly completely lost faith in the data. If we will not call and write our state fishers and congressional representatives Noah will never change them. At the rate. They're increasing. Our catch will soon have a ninety percent of our quota caught on only a computer and commercial interests are mopping up all their increased quotas. It's been happening for a long time. Now, it's getting worse. Every year. The more info redfish reports. Three twenty seven nineteen MorningStar fishing dot com. We force change with a two thousand seven rewrite of the Magnuson Stevens act, Noah made a change. All right. A sharp. Smelly stick right in her. I needs fixing letters to congress only thing I might work tell congress needs a way to test their data away to truth it and soon. Regards kept money Hawkins party boat. Morningstar? Fisheries biologist weigh in on that for me willia-. You're hearing these numbers in your calculating them in your head which you've done for aeons. We've got at least two maybe three recreational. Fisheries biologist in the listening audience. What's kept in Monte, telling us translate it for listeners, please. I know Dale you're out there. A new you're listening. I know Rudy you're out there. I don't know if TOMS out there. I don't know if Marty's out there, but you guys are you guys know? About the stuff gives a hand here. What our listeners think of this basically what captain Monty is saying is that the recreational catch? Is. So over estimated that the scientists are saying, well, if you're catching this many fish, then we need to reassess what we think the population of these fish is. And we must have far more fish out there. To reflect these kind of numbers, therefore, the recreational guys are catching their quota. But the commercial guys aren't. So we need to increase the limits for commercial anglers to catch more of this increased population that we're hearing from the recreational surveys. What? What? Does does that even make? I mean, it's federal government. I mean. Yeah, I get that. Okay. But the question is. And that's the question that captain money's asking he saying. On sea bass. Which you can catch casually from shore. You know, if you're fishing Indian river inlet or something like that you may catch sea bass every now, and then you may target sea bass and catch couple. Okay. But they're not one point nine pounds of peace. Ellen average and the shore bounding aren't catching three times what the party boat angers are catching who target CBS every day and go where they live offshore on the Rex. South screwed up here. So the federal. Recreational informational program is that skewed. And these are the guidelines that the state fisheries managers are using. How screwed up is the whole system. I hear you. Screwed up is it. What do they say? Well, they say about statistics. I can't remember what the quotas about statistics. But. These estimates are just off the charts. So I would like to hear from our fisheries guys. I would like to hear from anybody listening on that side. We would like to talk about this every time we have a fisheries person on here. And we haven't been too successful with that this year. Okay. They talk about the anguish log, they talk about the surveys talk about checking out the website. You know, go on taking survey krill surveys and things like that. That's what you're talking about. That's why you had to have your social security affiliated with your fishing license. So you could get on this this program that monitors everybody who's fishing and saltwater. Remember that couple years ago, the big controversy fish life. I give nobody my social security number. So you know, that type of thing that was to get on the on the anger survey program. You know what Chris? Say today. I really don't. Unin Spiratou today. But this would be something. Man. That's right. Not people figured doesn't affect me. So I should have done affect me. Why should I worry about it? You know? But you'll miss it. When it's gone. I don't care about handguns. I don't have a handgun. I don't care about handguns. I don't care about them black rifles. I don't have one of them a our guns. What do I care? Have salt weapon. What do I care? I don't fish for Sheba's. What do I care? Fish off. Sure for striper off off land for stripers. What do I care? I go out in the Bank trophy. So why do I care about what the what they're doing with these numbers? You're gonna care when it's gone when the commercial fisheries gets their quota increased because of a recreational survey, you're gonna care. You're gonna care when a big females are caught before they can spawn and sold on the commercial market before they can spawn reproduce. You're gonna care when the when surveys. Young of the year surveys. Come back reduced reduced reduced reduced reduced reduced reduced over ten year term, and you're gonna go. Well, why the increasing size limit? Why are they cutting pack. Why cutting recreational season? You got care. Some very wise person said one time people only care when it's their oxygen being gored..

Maryland congress Noah Noah fisheries Monty hawkins US New York Tracy Dunaway Massachusetts Rhode Island Ellen average Indian river inlet captain Monty Connecticut Morningstar captain money Mr. Fisher Delaware
"magnuson stevens" Discussed on Important, Not Important

Important, Not Important

04:09 min | 3 years ago

"magnuson stevens" Discussed on Important, Not Important

"It really seems like in light of the fact that nobody you know has. Obviously, you know, I think it comes back to stop emissions and we'll stop acidifying the the oceans and obviously do what you can. You know, we recommend checking out project draw down for for that stuff but, but because that is a contributor and again, the ocean has always and continues to take the brunt of of those things in has clearly just about how the Nuff. But it does sound like education is educating yourself and just being in in touch with the ocean, whether it's whether it's watching these things, or like you said, going to an aquarium, supporting an aquarium learning from their programs, taking your kids, and then just go in yourself in some way. Those things should hopefully give you a better connection to to what is out there in what's happening, even if you can't feel the water warmer or right or or see the fight, oh, plankton that are suffering, at least at least you can experience what is out there and what is what is it. Risk, and I think it's so awesome that your your kids are into the octave nuts noted. The children can run off enough. I got. It's it's so bad you? Yeah, it's on. You can find out on I tunes or net flex. It's it's so great. There's I just wanted to be my job. Oh boy, I need to check check into that. I'm currently into building remotely operated vehicles and ships out of LEGO doing. Wait, hold on. I've got five kits in my wow by LEGO building room that I need to get to, but I'm working on a ship in a bottle right now. It's awesome. Holy cow. God, I just want to hang out. Incredible would big actionable steps can. Can we be doing what? What? What? What question should we be asking of our of our representatives specifically, we we like to send people like if they're going to work with five calls dot org or something like can actually talk to them. Well, what are the questions they should be asking? And I know it changes depending on where you are. But yeah, the the idea of of a carbon credits looking into looking into into that issue looking at maintaining the current legislation, four, because one of the things that we're we're faced with right now is that the recurrent administration wants to roll back protections, better already in place for a marine protected areas offshore, and for our marine parks. So we need, they need to stand firm and not let that happen. Not let that go away. There's the Magnuson Stevenson fisheries act that helps keep us in check in terms of of our fisheries and maintaining the essential habitats. It helps us to we. We take fish from the ocean, but it has to be sustainable in. So that's what the Magnuson Stevens fisheries conservation act is about. So the these things we we're, we're making we, we also had a national ocean policy that is has fallen by the wayside. Perhaps all of these things that we were making such good progress and then and then we were either stopping or we're rolling back. I think I think this week the rollbacks included mercury and something else did I literally felt walking home over the next thing is going to be as best us, but didn't they do think that, yeah, a few months ago, which is just like, what is this. I don't know like a satire. It's insane to me anyways in the fuel emission standards for our cars. Yeah, they the federal government would sit wants to roll that back. We can't do that. It's not enough anymore. All right..

Magnuson Stevenson Magnuson Stevens