35 Burst results for "Magin"

Release Anxiety About Future Events

The Daily Meditation Podcast

02:10 min | 3 d ago

Release Anxiety About Future Events

"When you're wanting to manage your response to stress. It's easy to assume that you have to make these drastic changes in your life or stop. What you're doing and take a lot of time to figure out how to manage your stress when really It takes to create massive change in your life especially in regard to stress is to take small incremental steps consistently each day. Just as you do as you sit down to meditate in fact. I think you already know that. Meditation is one of the very best ways to manage stress and i would add to that if you could spend time in nature. This combination is powerful to soothe your anxiety. I want to share with you. From one of your fellow. Meditators this is from abigail from orlando florida. She writes to say that. One of the most stressful experiences for her is simply anticipating and event. She says i am magin. The worst and i work myself up so much. That i have a hard time calming myself down and i find that sometimes disaster does strike. Because i've anticipated the worst raining in my anxious. Thoughts and emotions is one of the main reasons. I started meditating. When i meditate now i visualize myself successfully achieving what it is i want out of an event. I'm feeling stressed about at. This has helped me enormously

Magin Abigail Orlando Florida
Massive Online Courses Got a Boost During the Pandemic. Will It Last?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

01:31 min | 4 d ago

Massive Online Courses Got a Boost During the Pandemic. Will It Last?

"When a couple of stanford professors founded core sarah in two thousand twelve. They promised to democratize access to higher education. By making courses from prestigious colleges available online now nearly a decade later many of us were thrust into the world of online education by the pandemic. and of course sarah saw tens of millions of new users join its platform some just looking for lectures to occupy their time other seeking new skills in areas like machine learning and data science. Jeff magin khalda is ceo. Of course sarah. He says states like new york and tennessee have also paid the company to provide free courses for their unemployed residents. governments have realized that online re-skilling programmes had a speed and scale and cost effectiveness. That is just not really natural. One of the exciting things after a year of seeing really growing in inequality and many women dropping out of the labor force to take care of kids. Who can't go to school what we've been seeing on chris. Era is the percentage of enrollments especially in stem courses. From women has gone up from about thirty. Three percent to forty seven percents. Almost fifty fifty so women are actually turning more to online learning and as we think about the future of work for states who are about reskilling being able to get your citizens access to jobs. That maybe aren't in. Your state is going to be much more possible with remote work.

Sarah Jeff Magin Khalda Tennessee New York Chris
New Tech Lets You Charge From Across the Room

Lew Later

04:37 min | 4 months ago

New Tech Lets You Charge From Across the Room

"Air charge. Claims it's capable of five watt wireless charging over several meters. You know people are very skeptical of this really. Yes you why i mean. People are scared enough about five g magin power just floating through the air stressed out. These people Apparently is is very difficult to do. And the reason we haven't seen it yet in a product is not that you can't do it but that if if it was to be successful in transferring power it would wouldn't be very efficient. I mean that said this people. It's still criticized. Just regular wireless charging on a charge matt saying. Hey that's less efficient. There's more power loss there than if you plug a cable in. This is another level of that especially when you see the the advertised. Five watt charge speed which is obviously not very compelling in two thousand twenty one but you would assume there would be some pretty strong technological barriers to rolling out some technology as cool nonetheless. You could play the video cool nonetheless. They're talking future talk now. You do have to have this. Big giant appliance. There in your house as well your apartment. Yeah and how cool would it be to walk and room and your phone starts charging with the animation. That's very cool. that's the future. I mean it feels. Amazing is just using like a hundred megawatts a day. Yeah your your your toes or tingling your toes. Her hair's just within a few meters. A five watt remote charged multiple devices by the way. You're just chilling your gaming whatever. You don't even have to think about it. Your devices just always charging staying charged. This is a demo will. this is a perfect scenario. Locale perfectly apartment is look at this guy. Everything is so clean. He's never even had anything. You didn't even have a pillow or a blanket on the couch and need have any garbage lane around. He charges wirelessly. Dude has got it all figured out. Yeah you have garbage. Oh yeah did you see the desk before we started rolling over here takada cups and things. Yeah but not on the ground. No not on the ground. But i'm saying he doesn't. I'm saying it's not lived in. Don't tell me that's lived in. I i know some people who have pull it off like that. But there's no personal there's no personal items true there's no knickknack or a trinket is no not personalized. They'll keep safe keepsakes. These keeping nothing. It goes straight out the door. Once he's done with this guy all you keep the me air charge So it's a huge device is important for us to say at this moment. That eight air charge is a huge device. It's about the size of a Fridge yeah many fridge. Pretty much is about the size of a mini fridge. Joe so you can have this luxury. So you've gotta find space for a mini fridge instead of just having cable. Coming out or a typical wireless charger. But you know me. I like that next technology. But i gotta tell you what. The potential drawbacks argue This story tex pop many have talked about this. The weights being advertised five watts to your device. The argument here is it. May require one thousand watts plus of input power just to get the five watts to your phone. That's an ugly figure. I don't think anybody's gonna like the. I've been dealer with watts lately. You have yeah and he got me. It's got me all stressed out. 'cause i've been trying to power some some really powerful stuff like kind of electric car type of power consumption and you need special breakers and you know you can't be going off a residential line for this stuff. I mean so to to give up now thousand watches. Okay you can plug that into a regular receptacle regular receptacle. North american eighteen hundred watts. Well i don't know if you know you signed up for what talk today. I didn't know. I didn't know i was gonna do what today but a thousand is just. It's just crazy for five. No one's going to be happy with that transaction. Certainly the environmental types are going to be very upset commenting below that particular video. Get on my face. Save the planet planet earth. Mother earth greengrass Blue ocean etc

Matt JOE Watts
The Southern Book Club's Guide to Slaying Vampires -- Librarian A - burst 02

Drunk Librarians Podcast

00:45 sec | 4 months ago

The Southern Book Club's Guide to Slaying Vampires -- Librarian A - burst 02

"So this is actually by grady hendrix. Which gig radi found out. Today was a white man. No humor favorite tiktok slow. I thought i thought there were parts where he described cubes in boobs. Thought you know this might not be a woman. This might be a man hugues boobs. Let's via white man. It's it's it's just like the eitel and dec- magin how pupils in boobs get into that hugues boob southern book clubs guide to slang vampires. Well if anyone could do it it would be a white man.

Grady Hendrix Magin
Verizon Business CEO on how 5G can solve the problems exposed by COVID-19

The 3:59

06:13 min | 5 months ago

Verizon Business CEO on how 5G can solve the problems exposed by COVID-19

"Thomas driving is on the topic of one ahead. Our companies have been testing it for a while. I think they'll the lockdown. But the social distancing status quo has made the idea of the self driving car former attractive. Here's how five helping to make a time. Striving more reality yes. This is one that i could visualize. I think about the difference between a four environment. Gene i did we talk about this for a long time. When will come to. Fruition will be real. We're seeing this being tested today in pockets throughout the country. And it's not just for driverless. Vehicles thomas eagles. It's also drones. Iii sauce announced this week. Work that we're doing with. Ups on jaw hit ability. When you think about four g Urine at a time of the world today in a forge ecosystem. You want clear the harm front of you on your clearances about four inches. They sung lazy kicked very inefficient to eat assistance. Because you bet latency Attended mills Also used to find yourself in environment where you've got four foot clearance to the carn- primarily because the low lazy kimberly allows that we're having conversations with cities of around the contrary to really understand their planning cycle. Talked about san jose this week at. Cbs in work. We're doing with them. Generally bills smart city capabilities. You build a smart city capability. Five g capability of low latency and bandwidth capability ability for the signals to travel at sea allows a barrier differentiated in a very real experience for smart cities or thomas vehicles and for jobs kicker to be very real as you think about the ups deliver against the demand that they have for home. Delivery drones will played important part of that worry. See not in project and testing. Come faster than you imagine. Because we're finding new in different ways to use power a and how much work has been directly inspired by what's been going on over the last year and in all these solutions are they quick fixes of the problems that we've seen exposed now or solutions that can be applied to society of the long term. I believe tree pandemic everyone was talking about digital transformation and we talked to that everybody will go through digital transformation. Everybody's planning board. What we've seen over. The last month is real time her information. When you're in the middle of a crisis we gotta see patients. They can't come into an office. Got to educate kids and they can't come into school environment when he watery magin entertainment. We've found all kinds of ways with the bronco system to reimagine. And i really do believe that. We've cut three four five years off of the planning cycle going from planning for digital transformation actually deployed digital transformation with our customers is. They're beginning to see possibilities of five jeep whether it's in our lab environments whether it's in cities were of actual diet deployed it's just creating warm more sheer yossi non-commitment to accelerate transformation. It's one of the reasons why i'm really excited about the work that we've done with. Aws in huge. His wouldn't rule that out. Is we now have developers access to whatever it is. They're developing they wanna pull in the power. Uwb work done with edge. The he do that through the normal process that they follow near all cyclone. So we're really bribing out crazy all kinds of exposure to what's possible and if we're truly power five g received look celebrate the potential and identification of those solutions igloos accelerated lead accelerate. Nali as we imagine a whole host code but really we reacting responding to reimagining. An reimagining is happening real time. We think about having dry cheese today. That's good for today and really crisis management to what will be good in different in the future that will have strong society benefits. It's one of the league's About strategy we've said we create the networks roll forward that's the nar defying purpose todd We live now ever before because we have a responsibility not only to employees customers. Shareholders that to society as a stakeholder all right lastly assuming five j works exactly as promise but snappy speeds responsiveness all the way and see. What is your dream application for this technology. What is my dream application. Well how much time do we have to talk about dream applications. I believe a feigen working exactly as we've defined it. I'm super proud of the ability for us to deliver on the timelines. The we've many brown. Deploying city's making the capability Incredibly appreciative for partnerships developed with aws with jerem with apple in same's on other ecosystem. Come to life because who in your law power ecosystem that you begin to imagine solutions. I read the things we talked about today. Healthcare education digital divide are the big ones. And i think five g will absolutely help solve the. We've also made predictions to technology. Used to help invited crew the environment as we think about how to make sure that we play a responsible role in using technology to solve. The world's biggest problems environment includes so we responsibility. We have not location. Were honored to be part of that. Stand that anything. The ability to use technology saul. Some problems is that ryan ismay because we understand and are honored to be part of serving society has a stake over

Thomas Eagles Iii Sauce Magin Entertainment Kimberly Nali Thomas San Jose CBS Jerem Todd Brown Apple Ryan Ismay Saul
"magin" Discussed on The Dr. Susan Block Show

The Dr. Susan Block Show

04:40 min | 5 months ago

"magin" Discussed on The Dr. Susan Block Show

"Pointed of view hutchins beautiful the mind nick comes in all shapes being called a hot chick they might do. We mean it in the best sense. I don't think like for instance minds being called hot chick. I think as long as you acknowledge her. I was a little kid. Goes off or more and more important qualities if you acknowledge that is well. Let's see you see. she nurses. She's a smart chick. it's like. Tell bala so yeah so. We have to try to talk to our representatives as much as we can about phones of the reality. That sex work is real work. And the mail for you yeah. That's the problem newer magin. We have to try. we return. now. I mean you can't be sure that you're going to win and sometimes you do have to surrender. You always have to try to serve.

magin
Where to Go When Centralized Social Media Kicks You Off Their Platform

Strength In Business

05:25 min | 6 months ago

Where to Go When Centralized Social Media Kicks You Off Their Platform

"It's hearty magin. You not being exposed to rack plea or indirectly to the shenanigans that are currently going on across all the major centralize social media networks. There isn't an individual or industry considered immune any longer. If you raise your voice and share an opinion that doesn't coincide with the mainstream narrative you're doomed to being blocked banned the monetize or deep platform amongst the first to come under the gunfire of the technocrats were independent journalist followed by doctors and medical professionals who share alternative view. Today even a farmer can be banned simply because he raises a supply chain issue. That might lead to serious problems in this tributing food. As this topic is often considered quote unquote sensitive. It can lead to censorship. Look we've certainly come a long way. What started out. As a supposedly genuine social experiment has absolutely nothing to do with social and human generosity anymore before i share a few alternative decentralized blockchain social platforms that you can move to in case you get the monetize and be platform from big tech. I highly suggest you use these networks even if you haven't been banned from youtube facebook twitter and all those other platforms. Some of these platforms have already consolidated their presence by onboarding major players from across industries and ecosystems. You might be surprised that video views on one of these blockchain based networks. I'll just mention a few seconds have become incredibly close to numbers used to seeing on youtube. Now okay so here. We go blockchain based decentralized alternatives to centralized social media as start with the first one. it's A proper youtube will turn it if and it's called a library and also odyssey so there two platforms but the main tack is on library for those of you who are tech developers or more tech savvy so it spelled. Lb so library can find library dot tv and the other one is odyssey spelled o. d. y. s. e. so if you're missing your favorite journalist or content creator that was banned from youtube due to his or her non-mainstream spin on current events. That i'm pretty sure you find this person on library and the respectively the cool thing about this blockchain based decentralized network is the fact that you can upload your videos to library i and use this source to redistribute to other channels including e too so for those of you who have video content and haven't been the platform to andy monetize from youtube. You can also choose another route. You can go to a library. So blockchain a loaded up on library and from there go library. I used to source code to basically redistribute to. Youtube is absolutely possible. Okay so that's the first network a library and odyssey the second one is a mine's mine's is a blockchain based decentralized social media platform that hasn't gained proper traction yet although they have a pretty neat product similar to facebook very similar to the facebook ecosystem. Actually you can create your own channel access your news feed and use discovery to find trending topics or content based on specific hashtags. Just like you would on instagram. For the more you can join groups that cover topics of interest to you or build your own group of like minded individuals more importantly you can use your minds token which is the native cryptocurrency to run ads across the platform now. The ads are super easy to set up. And they actually remind me of facebook's early apparat are backing twenty eleven. I've talked about mind several times on this podcast also written block posts about it and i highly suggest especially those of you who love to run facebook ads to check out the advertising. A product that a mindset delivers on their blockchain network. And i've written a blog post about also did the recording. It's cold why bother with blockchain social ads. Now if you're on your desktop or your pad you might want to check that out. Because i've also shared some screengrabs as to how i've set up the add on minds also with kind of settings i use so that might be of interest to you if you are interested in running ads on the block chain. It's really really easy okay. Number three is

Youtube Facebook Blockchain Twitter Andy
"magin" Discussed on Blocked and Reported

Blocked and Reported

04:13 min | 6 months ago

"magin" Discussed on Blocked and Reported

"Jesse house So so so so is that what's up. I've been trying to tell me if you've ever heard of this thing i'm struggling with it's called saladdin sat salad. I've never. I'm not familiar with that. What is that it sounds like like this is fucking crazy man. You take like just a pile of vegetables and that's a meal like nope no pizza or anything. Yeah as i'm eating at. My brain is so accustomed to eating other things that i have magin at some point. Some carbohydrates just fly into my mouth. They never do is shut. It's just vegetables and i don't know what to do. Okay so i have a solution for you and this is actually how. I know that your favorite food is pizza. Ninety nine percent of your diet is pure pizza..

Jesse magin
Why Reina Rebelde's Founder, Regina Merson, Chose Herself Over Everything Else

Latina to Latina

02:56 min | 6 months ago

Why Reina Rebelde's Founder, Regina Merson, Chose Herself Over Everything Else

"Two thousand eight. You were an associate at a prestigious law firm in dallas. You worked on lots of high-profile corporate bankruptcy cases. What did that look like. I was at the office till two or three every morning. i'd go home. I'd sleep with the blackberry under my pillow. Like at five i go back. There was one year where i didn't go home for dinner for like three hundred and forty five days in a row. I was actually hired out of law school to leeman brothers real estate attorney for their law firm so i did that for year and then we put men into bankruptcy so i became a bankruptcy lawyer so that was kind of the first sharp turn. We're thanks did nocco. The way i thought they were gonna go away magin they were going to go on a transactional attorney you know. I wanted to work on mergers on deals. I didn't wanna be stuck in litigation for decades of my life and your camp bankruptcies psychology about is very different and then you combine that with the two thousand eight financial crisis on what was happening around the country. It was devastating. Does to be especially difficult when you have your entire life. Wanted to be an attorney right when you had an idea of what being an attorney was going to be. So how did the reality compare to your imagined. Reality of what being attorney would be had a lot less agency over my life in the early stages of my career than i thought you know. And i think that's. That's the rookie mistake. You go to these schools. You have agency over your day to day. You have some pathway towards creating your major. What you're going to write your thesis about. I went to law school. I got pick my own classes on embarking on the amazing career every case i'm working on his on the cover of the wall street journal. It's amazing but by the same token i have no control over my life. I can't tell you how many vacations were cancelled at one point. I think my desire to step up to the plate with respect to what was being asked survey resulted in me actually having a pretty severe health crisis which is not uncommon in the legal world and associates get burned out and i my body literally started falling apart. What did that look like. I was breaking out in hives every single night. Like head to toe high waking up. My hair face was swollen. Went two hundred doctors. No one could figure out what was going on in order to work these hours and work them on a consistent day to day basis and the amount of pressure. I had this associated myself for my body so there were all these symptoms emerging like stomach issues mouth ulcers all of these things that just started sort of melting my brain. But i didn't associate at any point that anything had to do the stress and the pressure i was under

Leeman Dallas Wall Street Journal
The Other Big Apple

Gastropod

05:10 min | 7 months ago

The Other Big Apple

"Well i was kind of. I guess in inadvertent midwife that we at the at the fellowship that we did back in what year was two thousand thirteen although we agree time has ceased to have any meaning. And that is michael pollen of michael palin fame. He is indeed the advert midwife of guest or pod. Because nikki and i were together at uc berkeley that year in two thousand thirteen out of fellowship. Run by michael. That's how we met. And you discovered your shared love of science slash food. yeah it's one of the happier offspring of that fellowship. Obviously if you're into the stories behind food and farming as we both are michael's writing is pretty much at the top of your list. We've wanted to have him on the show for ever and this episode was the perfect excuse to revisit one of our favourite of his books. The botany of desire in the botany of desire michael traces the stories of four plants and their intimate relationships with humans. One of those plans is the apple tree. And i don't know about you. But when i think of apple trees the first person is of is johnny appleseed. This is a very american thing to think of. I'd never heard of until. I moved here so for our non american listeners. This is what americans are thinking of when they think of johnny appleseed well they would probably have the walt disney image johnny appleseed which is of this you know barefoot guy on the frontier bringing goodwill sweetness to people when people hear johnny appleseed. It's it's very wholesome. It's very Uncontroversial he's a disney character right very soft. But actually the the real. Johnny appleseed and i use that word advisedly because there's so much we don't know about him is much more interesting in his book. Michael traces janis path planting apples across the us. And we're going to do the same here but i. There weren't actually apple's growing here. Before europeans arrived there crab apples that were here in the sixteen hundreds but native people did not have sweet apples. This is amy traverse. Oh she's the author of the apple lovers cookbook and senior editor at yankee magazine. So apple's are we think of apples as this american fruit and american as apple pie and we identify closely with apples americans but it turns out. They're not they're from kazakhstan around town called alma mata which means father of the apple. I'ma autism now called amati and it's the largest city in kazakhstan. I've never been there but if you go. Apparently you will see whole forests of apple's fifty foot tall apple trees. Apple's coming up in the cracks of the sidewalks. It's like a weed there and these apple's most of them look nothing like our image of the apple. I mean there's some the size of there's there's big brown ones there's just this incredible range and they're apple trees that are kind of prostrate and grow along the ground and ones that grow vertically ones that have canopies. I mean it's just incredible diversity but a lot of apples weren't particularly sweet or delicious. At least not to humans. They were dry and hard so did survive the drop to the ground and often the flesh was kind of bitter acidic and tannock because these chemicals were preservatives that would also help to fight up worms and insects and that was all useful because the apples needed to be eaten by bears to spread their seeds. And if you would like to hear what the delight of a group of bear cubs that has just come across the pile of fallen apples. Sounds like which of course you would you need to be on our special supporters mailing list gastropod dot com slash support bears. Yes there are a lot of bears and kazahstan. They love apples but like humans they also prefer sweeter ones and larger ones and even retro ones. These big red sweet apples sometimes appeared in all the different ones that grew wild and bears chose those and help spread their seeds and so the bears hopes for just the kind of apple's that we wanted the large sweet red ones and so then people who tasted these bear approved. Apple's turned into apple fans to and not just the locals because that area of kazakhstan was right in the middle of the silk road. An incredibly important trading route that stretched all the way from china to europe magin stumbling across. I mean you're living in a world with no sugar ray or at least it's a very rare. That kind of sweetness is extremely rare and very fleeting and you stumble across a forest where you find these fruits that are sweet and that actually keep well. I mean not a lot of fruits that you might find in that same forest like apricots will rot very quickly whereas an apple would last for weeks or maybe months and so people would pocket them and bring them to the next trading ports or the next trading town and they really spread that way and they flourished wherever they spread. because apple's have a couple of botanical superpowers. Apples are unique in that they easily enter. Breed with the native crab will species of whatever region. They end up in. And so those crab apples within s- place in the genes that allowed to survive in their climate. So that's super useful. Those local crab apples had jeans. That would be perfectly suited to the local environment.

Apple Johnny Appleseed Michael Pollen Uc Berkeley Michael Kazakhstan Amy Traverse Michael Palin Nikki Tannock Walt Disney Kazahstan Yankee Disney Magin United States Bears Europe
COVID-19 in Victoria, Australia

Coronacast

09:23 min | 8 months ago

COVID-19 in Victoria, Australia

"Gratified Friday that's right. Twenty third of Tober pardon the PUN number really pushing towards the grand finale Victoria in terms of stamping out the lost. Stubborn pots of coronavirus is still spreading down there. Yes, and there's clearly still virus around in the northeast corridor. Expected of totally disappeared from there and the pop up clinic, and that's that's the way it's going to go forward US way it's going New South Wales in Swiss going to go forward in Victoria and it's a good thing that they're onto its and jumping onto things quickly. So what we're looking forward to on Sunday from Andrews hopefully is certainly moving forward the restriction relaxations he talked about November I this weekend, but I suspect you might see but more than that in terms of. Restaurants spars that sort of thing where you just might see a speeding up or much more much better defined pathway to those opening up in the near future because Victoria is in pretty good shape we did he gets day battle outbreak in a housing block area in Melbourne is this just like we don't need a look down to get on top of those riot if the public health machine is working better now than it was before the and also if you've got the community onside and they're willing to cooperate because the realized the implications of very much larger knock time. So it's the fuel for the fires. When people are living in densely populated circumstances so it could spread incredibly quickly. So going to get on top to get on top of it quickly, but the capacity to do so is much better and there's less distraction around in Victoria. There's a lot of distraction around when you those terrible outbreaks in addition to the other outbreaks in abattoirs and elsewhere in Victoria there's. A lot going on towards the last time there outbreaks in those densely populated towerblocks these days the capacity is there to focus more and have fewer distractions around because there's so much less virus circulating the virus is circulating you know where it's come from right and so I sort of moving towards our kind of steady state of figuring out our relationship with this virus here. And hopefully, looking at opening up our internal borders at some stage in the near future. WHAT ABOUT INTERNATIONAL BORDERS? There's still lots of Australians overseas. There's. All. Students. WanNa come here. Tourism operators here are really struggling and I'm sure there's some. Really want to go overseas as well. WH- should've reopening paddle clack for Ustralia more broadly. Well, it's a very complicated landscape. You Go to feel for these thirty odd thousand students who went back many of them are quite unwell. Don't be exposed to covid nineteen in the places where they're at and they desperately want to get home to their families and they feel cut off. The problem is that we tend to have a one-size-fits-all to our overseas entries and it should be possible to open up a more strategic way if the politics would allow it and I'm not blaming the politicians here is a difficult situation and you've got to do something about stranded. Australians. Overseas. But a lot of them are in countries which have a high prevalence of SARS covy to like the UK European, the US and places like that. Tends to be where strain school some of them are in Asia and lower prevalence countries. So when you're sending a Qantas plane over to London to pick up people, you're bringing back in the plane presumably, they could take three or four hundred people bringing back hundred and seventy five because the crews got to be protected and the people on board to be protected bear in mind that all of the tens of thousands of who've already. Return the only been three or four hundred infections in. Australia. Yes. We hear about the movie dates true but it's low numbers trouble with that is as we've seen Victoria, you only need one episode of escape from Whole Hotel, it's not the family escaped by the virus did circumstances and you've got a real problem on your hands. So the risk is high, but the risk is particularly high when you're bringing back people from high prevalence countries. You've got a lot of international students in China. You'd have to exclude those in India because that's a high prevalence country but China is a low prevalence country. The should be a way of bringing back international students quite soon from China with judicious testing intensive testing, maybe limited quarantine with intensive testing, and there are ways of doing that but perhaps turning over halls of residence colleges to their limited quarantine that you might. Introduce Singapore certainly New Zealand. Pacific. Islands that you could open up these places quite quickly, and of course, if a stranger stranded there, those would be your first priority. You could probably stand up on this plane over and fill it up particularly wear masks and bring it back with a far more than one hundred, seventy, five on board, and almost a full complement of passengers. Because the risk is so low, so should be possible to a risk adjusted system where for safe areas, you have one way of managing it and from high-risk is another and this probably no alternative if you're living in the UK or Europe and want to get back to coming back on a on a very low load plane. So this is different to travel bubble. Is that it's a bit more like you still have to quarantine, but it's just not does we don't have to have as high stringency because the risk is lower it needs a lot of thought it's not straightforward and the highest priority has to be stranded strings overseas. It's just intolerable that we don't solve that problem and it's a bipartisan shoes not party political but equally. Doing. This, which minimizes the risk from already low-risk countries. The should be a way to manage risk more carefully an a nuanced way depending on where people are coming from. So it's not an open bubble, but it is a lower intensity of corn team. So let's take some questions from audience and what better way to rip through a few to do him as a quickfire Friday round you ready ready to go now. Jeffries asking you mentioned the other day that masks need to be washed at sixty degrees Celsius to make sure the virus free but domestic hot water services limited to fifty degrees. So I wanted to be hand washing his cloth masks in water hated in the kettle or what I think that random mackel worked find that sixty degrees was what did the work but you'll find that detergent in warm water should do it the same way it's just that extended washing cycle I think. So fifty degrees, sixty degrees who knows whether it makes any difference the. Point that Ryan McIntosh was making here is a quick rinse in the hand basin. There's not enough specimens a farmer and wants to know why if humans contracted card from animals? Why are the mammals supposedly don't get the virus and has anyone bothered to test shaped cattle pigs and so on record low testing of animals corona there's a lot of coronavirus infection in animals. Pigs get a similar co diseased covid nineteen, and in fact, there is a pig vaccine as far as I'm aware to a respiratory syndrome similar to covid nineteen, but it's not SARS coffee to. are lower than will species have been tested and not find to carry this dogs can be infected but don't seem to retain the virus very well whereas cat. stew. Agricultural, animals don't seem to be a big problem to corona virus is prevalent in lots of different species. This person's flying to dial in from CD next week's visit family added about it. What precautions should they take for the flight? Well, I think for any flight my view is that you should wear a mask threat flight and just be careful about hygiene and Qatar saves on Colonel Cast a few days ago when you flush the toilet. Religious so you don't have an erase allies. And I think this question is asking about sewage testing how can test for the virus with all those millions of latest of water and other chemicals and just take a small test tube and still be able to identify the virus Yup it's mind boggling but they're able to genetically to actually look for the fragments of the virus I think that this is done with antibodies that pickup the virus, and then lie top when they've picked up the. Joys a big fan of Corona cast and her son is a paramedic in London and has had a very mild case of covid nineteen. But she's heard recently that everyone who gets five nineteen has long lasting effects in the front of their brain. Is this true please cleared up her because she's worried you can stop worrying Joe it's far from through a percentage of people do get long-term. Effects. And it's really not known yet what the percentage is, but it's not the of people and one more question Norman Magin one infectious person walks into a room with ten others spends a considerable amount of time seven, get the virus and three. Why don't those three becoming victim? Is it because I got better immune systems probably just the play of chance, but it could be that you've got some genetic. To the virus always somebody in society with a new virus, who's got genetic resistance to that virus by the play of chance, these are mysteries to which we don't know could be that they just didn't inhale quite as many viral particles as others who knows it is a difficult question hasn't indeed uses it. Just another one of the many mysteries that still surround covid nineteen

Victoria United States China UK London Covid Tober Andrews WH South Wales Qantas Asia Australia Melbourne Ryan Mcintosh Corona India
"magin" Discussed on Conscious Millionaire Mindset ~ Want High Performer Secrets of Millionaires?

Conscious Millionaire Mindset ~ Want High Performer Secrets of Millionaires?

05:24 min | 9 months ago

"magin" Discussed on Conscious Millionaire Mindset ~ Want High Performer Secrets of Millionaires?

"Now I have appointments with empty and the tax is two, three, zero three. Six four one. Zero four, zero one I want to give that to you one more time because I know some of you're GonNa WanNa talk three, zero, three, six, four, one, zero, four, zero one. Now here's our topic fear. Or possibility. I want you to notice when I say the word fear what happens in your body. Is there some place that just fear? That's right. I'll say it again that there's some tension notice where that might be did your breathing get a little shallower Did you feel like your whole energy contracted a little bit? Right. Now, let's try the other word possibility. Yeah. Just, at Magin, their infinite pass abilities for you for your business for your life. That the world is filled with possibilities. What happens to your body right now? Is there a little more relaxation? How about your breathing? Is it more relaxed? That's right. What I've noticed is that large numbers of people. Even not consciously it's not like we're sitting around and going, Oh, I wanna see I wanna live in fear nobody sits around and says that But. It is. Scary. But here's the point. It's only scary. 'cause I set that. Know what happened to you right it's only scary if you choose for it to be scary. Now this isn't. A lesson or limiting beliefs in fact, more and more because I do so much work with clients about the internal peace and then building their business bigger. That I don't think the limiting beliefs is really what's holding people back. I think there's two interrelated pieces and that's what we're talking about today. It's your perception of who you are. Combined with the personal reality. That, you've created. I want you to imagine for a moment. That everything that we see through the filters of our is our ears are. Bodies our tastes..

Magin
"magin" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

04:16 min | 9 months ago

"magin" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

"So be sure to visit their website and follow them on the ground for some info at express a girl who's Divino Telling me she was like saying something nice to me in a comment and somebody even came after her. For supporting me and she and she somebody who hasn't opened up her world to the criticism and opinions of others on her social media and she's still getting it. So it's like we all struggle with it at some point to some level Oh. Yeah. Even if you think about it in the sense of like, let's say you have a bomb ass over that. You love. But me bit different than what you've normally worn and you go up and you show up at your family party and that one relative says something like Oh. You're showing a lot of cleavage today or oh, you're this. It happens to us all the time we're. We're facing opinions and we're facing these like. Mild oppressions he's these little bits of things that are kind of like. That's not what I would have chosen for myself and I wish you would have chosen it for yourself differently and I think that what? What it brings me back to someone like you is dear. Gosh imagine if you listen to all the stuff that people debate that Magin, how small of a person you would be and how into a box you'd be and how not where you are right? Now if you actually listen to the criticisms and I think that's where we can actually outcome is what those words are, what where those words have place in our world, which is they don't they have an in and out but I do think that we have to process you have to digest them. They've kind of got to go through you and it sucks it sucks on the way down. But at the end of the day like I do think that. There something to the fact that you were hated enough that says that there something about you that people are scared of and need to kind of box you in because there's there's something there. There's a spark they're scared of there's there's a something about you. That is creating that type of reaction and great like the best part of it is there's enough people who actually aligned with that fire that align with that magic who are like you know why? Because she's unapologetically this that's why I'm here. That's why I'm here to stay and I think that's what I've learned over time is how I and maybe you feel the same way as how I come out of it quicker and like I said on my instagram, the other day I said, it's not it's it doesn't matter to me to drown in tears. I'm not trying to stay positive I'm going to drown in those tears but feeling my feelings in sitting in all of that..

Magin
Ice, Ice, Maybe? The History Of Keeping Cool

American Innovations

06:22 min | 10 months ago

Ice, Ice, Maybe? The History Of Keeping Cool

"It's May eighteen o one, an Vanna Cuba John and Frederick Tudor the teenage sons of a wealthy lawyer in Boston or lying in the shade on their deck trying to find relief from the Heat John Shifts in his chair and MOANS. This is not making me feel any better in fact I feel worse. Nineteen years old John has a bone illness that's attacking me making him an invalid. His father had suggested that his younger brother Frederick accompanied him to a warm climate or John could convalesce relocating to somewhere warm was a common prescription for all kinds of ailments frederick advocated for Vanna thinking they might be able to get in on selling coffee or sugar but the heat and humidity are unlike anything they've felt before John's health is worse than ever. Frederick props himself up and takes a drink fruit juice from the glass next to him. I can't stand that all the drinks are warm here, but I wouldn't do a piece of ice from Rockwood. The tutors own a farm outside Boston called Rockwood that has a pond nearly every winter the pond freezes solid and they harvest the ice storing it in an ice house to preserve it through the summer. It's a common custom among well off new Englanders and allows them to enjoy cold drinks and ice cream even when it's hot outside Oh, don't even talk about ice it's too painful to think about it if we can't have it Frederick sits up. You, think we could sell ice here. I don't know maybe. Frederick is nothing if not full of ideas, John used to love plotting like this with him, but his illness has worn away at its enthusiasm for the future Frederick continues talking. We could ship it from home magin. What a luxury ice would be here I think about it isis free. So we just have to pay transportation costs we could make a fortune. Frederick dropped out of school at thirteen spurning plans for him to follow in his father's an older brother's footsteps to Harvard. He chose instead to apprentice in a store hoping to make a name for himself as an entrepreneur. He's now seventeen and in the four years since he started, he's made little progress. He spends most of his time hanging around Rockwood dreaming up schemes. John is skeptical of this latest idea. It would melt on the journey. You'd have nothing to sell by the time we got here I bet that's a solvable problem. John can't focus on that right now he's in too much pain feels to poor. He doesn't like the idea of returning to a Vanna even if it would make him rich, it's only may I can't bear to know how hot it's going to be in July or August we need to get out of here. You're right. It'll be warm enough by now. that. Boston can't do you harm. Let's go home and get you some ice. Not, much later, the two brothers were on a ship bound back to the United States. But John's health continued to deteriorate. January eighteen, O two, you passed away. But the idea Frederick hatched during their time together in Vanna lived on. Eighteen Oh, five Frederick had convinced his older brother William and his cousin. In on the proposition, the other two would sail ahead and find buyers and a place to store the ice. When it arrived Frederick would get to work arranging the shipment from. Boston. Their. Plan was to promote their product as a luxury good to the rich French colonials but selling ice was going to be harder than Frederick. Matching. Ice Come try this exotic northern delicacy I from Boston. It's march eighteen o six in the bustling market Saint Pierre Martinique, and Frederick is desperately trying to sell the ice off his boat. When he arrived in Pierre Three days before you learn that the only buyers, William and James had secured were prominent people who had been promised free box vice not to mention they hadn't found anywhere to store, and now he's stuck with a boat full of melting cargo. He's been reduced hawking an expensive luxury, the marketplace where common people by common goods. This was not plan. Thrusts the flyer toward a man walking through the market and caused him in French i-it's direct from Boston three days. Only the man pushes the flyer away ice. What am I supposed to do with that? Enjoy it in a cold drink. It's refine refreshment. You can even make ice-cream cold drinks. Why would I want that? Besides doesn't Melt if you wrap it in a blanket, it will protect it from the sun on the way home slow the melting it's all on the fire. He tries again the hand the man has pamphlet but demand waves it away doesn't matter. I, have nowhere to store it anyway you walks away shaking his head and muttering about what a fool Frederick Hitz. Frederick size and frustration. He had projected that he could sell ten thousand dollars ice on this voyage so far he sold fifty. A man approaches him. Are you the owner of the boat with the ice in it Frederick? Perks up I am. Can. I interest you in a block? I'm selling it for sixteen cents a pound it's the highest quality ice. Sixteen cents, it's much luxury as stake. If you say so anyway, no, I don't want any ice I just figured you'd be heading back to Boston soon, there can't be much of that ice left right I'm looking for a ship to take a load of sugar projects. Face falls taking this load of sugar back to Boston, is not a bad way to mitigate some of his losses but he's still disappointed. Yes I i. think we can come to an arrangement. Fantastic. Ultimately Frederick lost four thousand dollars on its first attempt to sell ice for those dollars was about four times what an average worker made in a year, but he didn't give. Over the next six years, he made progress in storing the ice both on the ship packed in. SAWDUST and building ice houses with better and better insulation to store it while he sold, it is marketing skills. We're getting better to you pitched cafes on making ice cream and offer chill drinks for a higher price. But despite the progress he was still failing to turn a profit. Meanwhile, Frederic's father lost most of the family fortune in a real estate deal without the. Family money to cover his losses Frederick couldn't pay his debts and in eighteen twelve, he was thrown into a debtor's jail

Frederick Vanna Cuba John Boston Frederick Tudor Frederick Hitz William Englanders United States Saint Pierre Martinique Harvard Frederic James
Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

How I Built This

1:03:33 hr | 10 months ago

Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

"Oliver Karaz was born and raised in Germany mostly in rural parts of the country his mother was German and his father was from Iran in came from a long line of doctors. For me, it really starts in some ways with my dad and. The timing rapidly had every reason to become a social activist and and so he came to Germany from the Middle East when he was very young around twenty with no money in his pocket no language skills. And you personally then worked on of odd jobs, but he eventually became a psychiatrist but what has really shaped me much more than being born in Berlin is. Social. Active. Isn't that I that I saw him live and that he really made our family mattress we always talked about talent responsibility and the need to use. Whatever telling behind to help those. Around us that we can make a difference. Given that your father was Iranian and your mother was was sort of. German. An Uber even though you were born in Germany, did you feel did you feel as Germany everybody else? So I didn't have a second identity. We only used spoke German at home and yet. As you say I was also a not always fully accepted. So if I give you an example, my school twelve hundred students and you could pick out to the didn't look like everyone else and I was one of them right and even an enlightened country like Germany. That is notable. So I had what I call a visual accent would people would see me on the street and they would ask me how to speak German. So well and But they also school the skipped my name when reading out scores because they weren't sure how to pronounce my last name and opportunities taken away and even at was physically threatened so i. I think that really shaping in many ways because I realized. Very early that in order to be as successful as everyone around me I would have to be dramatically better in really work much much harder than anyone else and so that used to be strong work ethic in me. For the record Oliver is somewhat down playing his work ethic. Because just out of high school, he actually started his first successful company. It was the early clunky days of the Internet, and he designed a way to help people send emails more easily and he wound up selling that business not for a ton of money, but enough to get him through medical school. But. After practicing medicine for a couple years Oliver realized he couldn't stop thinking about that first business he'd started and how he wanted to start another. So he quit his job in medicine and consulting job with Mackenzie and eventually moved to New York. That was my goal was actually to start another company that that's A. Healthcare, but I I'd also realized at the time that I sold my first company and far too cheaply in that I should learn more about business I and at McKinsey God exposure to balance sheets and panels and hit a lot of very practical experience and what it means to manage business. And I think they fondly of my time at McKinsey was one of my better decisions. McKinsey GonNa Mackenzie is a little bit like going to business school. A lot of people at McKinsey have come from business, schools. In that. Many people go to business school thinking they will find a co-founder. Did you were you actively looking around at your colleagues to think maybe I can do something with him or her you know maybe that person. Absolutely and were you just thinking about different business ideas all the time? Well, it is actually very hard to find good ideas and my definition of a good idea was that it needed to have a great mission I. wanted to make sure that we actually do something good in that. We stayed true to sort of talent breaks responsibility, but also wanted to be a large market and to have a great motor rounded and also I wanted to be based on contrarian inside. Because I thought that all of the best companies have that at its core. While she wanted mission, you wanted a company that could kind of dominate its field by building a motor around it, but was also contrary and that's that's that's those are some interesting. Criteria. And that's why I screen for several years rejected pretty much every idea that that I came across And meanwhile. While you're going through all that I guess you meet this guy Cyrus Masumi. WHO's another McKenzie consultant and and just you just. Become friends like he's like somebody like in and you guys start hanging out. While we got put on study together that required us to travel globally and you've ever done that it meant frost were sixteen eighteen hour days together for three four, five months on end and we really. Got To become great partners in that and and what we realized that we had some. Very complementary skills. Cyrus is one of the most charismatic and gregarious individuals. You'd ever meet his very passionate. He could be more forceful, which sometimes was needed to be effective with clients. And you've talked to me now for a little bit as you can probably tell. More dispassionate and logical and more measuring. German? More, German in many ways, right. also was effective with clients by by. and Cyrus is American right? He's American this but that That close listened and how we work together that really started friendship and we stayed close for the study and be caught up over lunch pretty regularly denounce different business ideas off one another and. I think we connected because we had similar interests because. On. Some levels We were equally passionate about what we're doing higher says, passion was more visible to others than mine but we. Were close enough together that we both accepted. The other as. individual that that we could learn a lot from. Was it was it clear pretty soon after you start hanging out, Sarah's that this was the guy because you were. You're on the lookout for a partner. They I think it was was absolutely an option I know reality is that. With. Both founded companies before Mckinsey and we both knew that we wanna do it again and as I. was always great about being. Very honest. Rather than just nice and and I value that a lot. Yeah. All, right. So So this guy, Cyrus Super Charismatic, really smart clearly, the two of you start to to work together. And what what kind of business ideas are are you coming up with? While we kind of fell in love with a new idea that came about a one of these launches were Cyrus. Told me about how he recently ruptured his eardrum by flying with a cold and then found it very difficult to actually find a doctor and he had asked for recommendations and called down his insurance directory listing started with the as. Doctors weren't accepting new patients some no longer accepted two centurions one provider Pasta Way and so he said, well, why does it take four days to the doctor when I'm in pain right? And why can't this much easier? And we. Both very quickly. realized the potential of this idea from. Working at project be new helps us the for actually spending millions of dollars for marketing to grow their patient base because they had wasted inventory, right they had something that I like to call hidden supply, which is these last minute cancellations no-shows reschedules. That the that go to waste, and then on the other, there are the patients who had a hard time accessing this. You thought it immediately clicked with these my God. Yes. Doctor's appointments connect patients to doctors. Yeah. Well, look if you go through the forfeiture that I had read, it's a great mission right? We're making one of the most personal needs more accessible for for patients we can help patients to get in fast we can help the doctors become more efficient. We can make the entire health care system more cost effective people out of the emergency room things like that, and it's a marketplace. So there is a strong mode and clearly anything in healthcare is a large market and I think the contrary and inside that we had. was. The fact that. Most people thought it's normal that people have to wait twenty four days to a doctor because there's a doctor shortage in read our inside was really no doctors have asthma debate ability because of these last minute cancellations, no-shows reschedules and so I felt very about this idea. So. So you member like how long between the time that the you had that first conversation To the time were both you said, let's start this business was like monster or weeks or days. was was weeks. We what we what we started doing is actually. Mocking up the side in how imagine back then in powerpoint pointing just the wire. Website. Yeah. Wire frame. Exactly. We would. We'd go into starbucks and we'll chat up strangers and say, Hey, here's a five dollar gift card. Give me your thoughts. Sorry I'm GonNa. Go back. You just go to people in starbucks Gift Card and say, can you give me your thoughts? Random Person? The absolutely that's that was sort of our market testing. They wouldn't. They would be like excuse me this is a little weird. You're my space. Might also happen from time to time but you know there's lots of people on starbucks is very in German of you. That's debris because usually he would be to report tentative about doing that. Well, you know I think there was a lot less rejection than you think people actually quite open I. Suggest you try this out but if you If you're unthreatening in Luke harmless as we probably dead and then they'll be pretty open. You went up to and starbucks and you'd say, Hey, we're thinking about a company here. Can you just look at his powerpoint give you five dollars Gift Card and what was in the powerpoint, the popcorn and was just what we thought. This website would look like and we would ask them is the set service that resonates with you would you use it and and we got an incredibly valuable feedback here and really set us in many ways on the on the right track right? So and what pointed to the two of you decide let's quit McKinsey. Let's. Let's pursue this. Probably a month or two after we initially discussed idea did anybody say you were crazy for quitting? Everyone. Everyone told us. Crazy and got a lot of negative feedback on the idea to write people would say this is Bloomberg out I would never pick my doctor on the internet or I already have a doctor or you know doctors wouldn't accept patients that that are looking on the Internet of all kinds of protections that people had when they were thinking about their own situation by. When when you talk to people and starbucks, they actually thought about it much more positively. So we were encouraged enough to say, well, this is going to work as long as we get out of our circle and don't ask McKinsey consultants doctors. The responsible be better. All right. So you are in your thirties at this point. And presumably were making pretty good cash at McKinsey because you were probably you'd know expenses you're on the road all the time so. When you quit, I'm assuming you had some money to launch the business and probably live off for a while. Yeah. So I very deliberately had never raised my living standard to the money that the paying McKinsey and I had saved every dime so that I could. No be in a position where can fund this embraced can afford not to take a salary for a couple of years. Wow. So so a couple of hundred thousand and you saved. You know. Maybe. I'm to Germany to discuss personal finances but. I had. Built this. Radio, you can tell the. Story Yeah I I had I had enough money to live off for for several years but I also Saturday night both finance the company early out of our own savings so that clearly diminish We had leftover after that. So now, you both decided to quit. and. You have some technical expertise because you had. You had done some coding but this is next level stuff. Were you able to be that technology founder and Cyrus was going to be the the sort of the business founder? Absolutely not as I add coated but at that point, I had not touched a computer for a long time We knew we need to have a technical co founder and so Sarah's knew a guy named Nick Guanzhou from the time together, trophy software, and this is another company that they would both worked at the that's the company that they're both previously worked together and Nick just brought a totally different perspective and really educated Addison me on a lot of things and and he was really the one who understood a building a seamless experience for the consumer and ends May. Zach Docs. Early Genius, did you did you have the name dock from the beginning? Not, not initially we we went to several phases on on what the right name could be for for while we wanted to have a descriptive name. So we looked at physicians, dot Com Doctors Dot Com, and we actually tracked down the owners of one of these domains and they wanted several million dollars for the domain name. And and we were finding the company ourselves. So that was out of the question. So then we just sat in a room and we brainstorm a list of fifty or one hundred names, and then started eliminating names until we arrived at Dr. What does it mean? or it doesn't mean anything which was the WTO bit we could. There were zero search results. Okay. There's no meaning behind his ACH. There's no meaning behind and and in hindsight it was precisely the right thing to do because it really was a blank slate for us to fill with with meaning and really build a brand around. Zero such as October we started. It address nate the right lake once you know that it takes more than three weeks from picking up the phone and dialing for doctors till you actually see someone you realize Oh, this really not much else that we have to wait so long for to get. And this is more important than most of these other things you already have. Fantastic access View Magin. If air travel way that healthcare workers that wouldn't be an expedia that wouldn't even be Delta Dot Com that would be individual phone numbers for every plane. Imagine. If that happened, you know a half the planes would fly empty it would be a massive pain and that was actually the state of health care before sock. Is Amazing that that the nothing like this was out there in two thousand seven. I look at I. Think. In many ways you couldn't build it a much earlier. In the early days. When we went out there, we were the ones installing Internet of the doctor's offices. We. They they were a many times just migrating from a paper books to scheduling systems. We were at the cusp of digitisation for healthcare. We were just lucky in our timing to get this right in and start offering the service when that also happened. All right. So you decide to pursue Zach dock and it's the three of you. I'm assuming really just at the beginning and were you working out of out of one of your apartments? Did you guys rent space? No, we worked out of respect for. Many. Times we came to make yet the nicest apartment and and we could bring breakfast Burrito and bake him up and you know the the reality is that we originally had a pretty ambitious launch plan right so we got together around July. We wanted to launch by December of two, thousand seven. Something interesting happened were nick send an email suggesting to look at what was then called techcrunch forty. Take is is now a household name but the draw for us back then was there was a fifty thousand dollar prize now it's called tech crunch disrupt think. So it's a major a startup competition. It's a startup competition and we were the first class of this was much less known be budgeted two hours to fill in the application in really which will send it off. He didn't think about it anymore that there was an early July and early August we've heard that we had been accepted, but there was a complication we'd have to be ready by September eighteenth or. That was three months sooner than we had originally planned to launch. So you'd have a live website by September that is right that is right with doctors with doctors, right So we actually debated for a few hours whether we should even tried to go for that but we ultimately said, yes, we can get the website working and we wanted to have enough doctors just a bars wouldn't look pathetic. Brayden. Coded Night Neither Day and nick really busted his but he did the patient facing side of the website and that was the programs. What was potentially even harder because we're tried to launch a marketplace was to actually get the initial supply on there and remember the website wasn't there yet so. Tires ended up going door to door for doctors offices. Excuse telling them a powerpoint page, and this is really a testament to cyrus sheer willing determination if you think about what it means to really start a company early on, there's nothing to show right you may be a powerpoint but there's no website there's no patience. There's no other doctors no social proof and it has to run on passion and very clear that that is Cyrus superpower. He just went to random doctors offices or he had like a list of doctors offices and he started kind of walking block by block. Well, there's a lot of walking involved a we launched in Manhattan so you can literally go down the street and you see. The signs and you walk in. And he was basically saying look, it's a way to connect you to patients. How was how many by the way? What was your objective? How many doctors do you need to sign up to have this website look okay by September Between six and ten was our goal. Okay. So just doable it is a was extremely hard really. Is telling doctors is one of the hardest things to do why were they saying? Well, first of all, it is baby very hard to even speak to a doctor they are being shielded. Their time is very valuable. Office managers are trained not to let anyone talk to them to protect the doctor from people walking in selling them stuff shirt them. Secondly, they many didn't want to give up control over their calendar which has to write. We ask them to post times that a patient could book into it and it was just a far fetched idea for many of them the patients would actually do this. So he got a lot of knows he got a lot of knows. He'd go there and he just simply not leave until he got a chance to speak to the doctor and a few times. It was even escorted out by security. I really think one in a million could have put this off. I mean was he going to particular kinds of doctors or was he generally focused on an Internet general? Practitioners Ob sobe began with dentists Okay. Because our thinking was that. People go to dentists most often, and we wanted to make sure that we have an offering that is relevant for patients as often as possible. I. Got you so so eventually unassuming, you do get what six to ten or how many did you get by September of two thousand seven Eight. In the meantime, you inequity doing the back end stuff you were doing the coding and building the website does right and as you were building it. How did it look? So. The bit that Nick Build looked awesome for the time I think. It was impressive. We were. Very. Satisfied that we had a scroll bar that we had a map that we had back then already the insurance selector and a lot of feature that. Weren't to be found really anywhere else. All right. So September two, thousand, seven, you are ready to reveal. This service at. Tech. Crunch. And Doth Review present or did did Cyrus kind of wishy the spokesperson? Cyrus. I presented Nick stayed behind in New York to make sure that the less the website was actually up and running This is in San Francisco that you went to the we flew out to San Francisco and So we lost sock talk in front of Eight, nine, hundred people. A lot of them were journalists when the judges opened up with feedback guy covers ocoee who we newnan in valued. As embezzles forever apple he came out to said he he didn't get it. He would never use this in front of everyone right and. His direct load something like honestly Oh, it just never occurred to me to go to any doctor that's really burned in in my brain and what was worse is that he seemed to be right we didn't get a single booking. We were hoping that this PR would get us out of our initial batch of users, right because your other. So many tech journalists there. So you know the publicity may be would would would lead to bookings and that was the hope but. It actually took three days before regard our first legitimate a patient, and and in the entire first month, we only got five bookings. You come back from San Francisco and. You know you had Guy Kawasaki. Say I don't I would never use this service? I'm sure he feels differently today but man maybe then Ezio said that but did did you come back feeling like like dejected like losers or or were you excited like how did you feel coming back? While you know I think we obviously hoping we would eventually get more bookings and In the beginning you probably refreshed. The Bookings Report Hundred Times a day by as we were thinking through what we realized. It was really a typical two sided marketplace challenge It's just a classic chicken and egg problem. You need the supply to get the demand and you need the demand to entice them supply and for dark was even trickier. Right when you think about it, healthcare is hyper local. Very complicated. So you have to match. Supply and demand on a Zip code specialty level, and then we have thousands of insurances take. Until we realized that our odds of actually finding a patient that wanted. An offer there. Quite low, and so the best path forward was to methodically build up supply, and so we just kept going put up a huge map of Manhattan on the wall, and then a sleep put little flags on of where the doctor's brother we're on the website in which insurance is accepted and we just we knew the perseverance. Is the name of the game. Back in just a moment how oliver and Cyrus Begin to drum up interest in stock and how they even start to raise some money at figure out how to dress differently, stay with us guy rows and you're listening to how I built this from NPR. Hey everyone. Just a quick thanks to our sponsors who helped make this podcast possible I to epic provision maker of epic bar beef was nature's idea the epic bar was. The new Vif Sea salt and pepper bars have three grams total carbs why it's in their nature after all, they're made with one hundred percent grass fed beef, and nature's Metro's three grams, total carbs, eleven, grams of protein find them in the bar borrow or at epic Bar Dot Com. Thanks also to stand for Small and American Express. If you're a small business owner head to stand for small dot com slash partner for resources, offers and tools from a growing group of companies that want to help your business get back to business visit stand for small dot com slash partner to get started. Thanks also to Microsoft, the world has changed and Microsoft teams is there to help us stay connected teams is the safe and secure way to chat, meet, call and collaborate to learn more visit Microsoft dot com slash teams. Here, at life, we know that getting your financial house in order can feel painful. Now, there's this whole corona virus pandemic. The deal with our personal finance tuneup series will help you feel more confident and get you on the right track listen and subscribe to NPR's Life Kit. And just a reminder, you can preorder the how I built this book right now, and if you do I'll send you a free signed book plate to go inside the book. The book is a collection of insights and wisdom from some of the most incredible and inspiring makers, inventors, builders, and dreamers on earth to preorder and to get your free signed book plate while supplies. Last, please go to Guira DOT COM or how I built this dot. com. Hey welcome back to how I built this from NPR Cairo's. So it's two, thousand, seven and Oliver. Cyrus. Nick are basically powering through with Zach dock going door to door trying to convince doctors. It's a valuable service and the thing about doctors even though they're really smart and capable and we depend on them. A lot of their offices especially back in two, thousand, seven or sort of technologically in the Stone Age. There was incredibly complicated to sink the doctors calendars with ours. Because none of the software was actually made to sink. Were even in the places where we had syncs up and running, we would frequently get. Feedback while the punishment didn't happen because the doctor wasn't available and we really couldn't figure out why this was the case because when we did screen chairs with the office to their calendar and and our calendar, it was identical right and couldn't figure out why that's happening. So I decided to sit next to the office manager I went there and got to know him and his family photos of his dog. I fixed the printer taught a better strategies to play minesweeper still couldn't figure it out. Until one day, the doctor would come out and she'd say, Hey David I'm out next Friday. And then what does David do does he go into the calendar and block out next Friday or does he take a post? It note On a doctor out next Friday and sticks this too is monitor. In the real world. These post it notes, of course happen and but once you know that Matthew Friend, you can start filtering this out and that's one example they were literally a thousand point, one percent solutions that we had to figure out to make this work. Wow. That sounds I'm getting exhausted. Just hearing about that because this is like even like Google calendars, right? Yeah. Yeah. That was that was early days and what we were extremely focused around were making show the experience was fantastic. If something went wrong, we fix it. Right. So I was our customer service I personally would call the doctor and and confirmed the appointment was all said if it wasn't I, personally contact the patient to let them know and then I would offer them. Amazon Gift Card alongside with an apology those actually one case where it didn't catch a patient in time. and. The were in the subway to the doctor, and so I raised them to the doctor's office and picked up a bouquet of flowers on the way there and met them in person to apologize. And that was really a turning point burs. The service has to work and we need to be have this patients I attitude in in terms of how it works completely ingrained in the company. All right. So you clearly need to kind of grow this Were you offering this service doctors for free at the time? Initially. We for free by we eventually started charging fifty dollars per month. But Sam doctor you come into my office and you say, Hey, if you pay me I can bring you more customers. I would be skeptical I would've said to you you who whose, who even knows about you. You'RE GONNA you're asking me to pay you money for Phantom bookings for maybe no customers I mean did some of the doctors say Many. The US summarize our sales challenge. Right? It was very hard because even if you wanted to, we couldn't easily share how many patients their competitors are down the road God like that was something that was confidential. All right. So you are you got this chicken and egg problem. Not, enough people signing up and he gets skeptical doctors but you know that the service could really benefit the doctors, but you also need them to pay for because otherwise you know but business. Meantime at a certain point I'm assuming you guys start to think we'd better go out and look for money if we're going to really make this thing work. Yeah. Yeah. That that happened in the spring of two, thousand, eight we decided we raise series. And we we make the rounds we get in front of a number of the big name, BC New York the also go to Sandhill road in impel. Toho Santo Road we leads and road initially were very successful at all we got Polite knows. and. Ray No feedback control someone took us as I told us you know what the idea seems. Good. But you're consultants I'd and the perspective of its consultants can't get anything done and what realized is that even though we had both founded companies before our Mackenzie Pedigree in our keys and button down shirts, they were really hurting us, and so we wait rank Khakis and button down shirts. It sounds crazy. Were they pleaded pants or were they at least nine pleaded please. Yeah Yeah. Yeah we after hearing that feedback We very quickly just went to the next gap and bought jeans and t-shirts and from that on the combos with VC's when but a lot better. So you went from McKinsey consultant look to this are the tech casual uniform of jeans and t-shirts that that's exactly right and we introduced ourselves not as NBA's and McKinsey Consultants but we introduce ourselves previous entrepreneurs that are starting their next company. was was anyone biting? Were there people who were like? Yeah there's a great idea I'm in. So interesting enough we had raised some money from. Friends and colleagues, and many of those they invested in US business plan unseen just based on the fact that we. Were giving up our careers at McKinsey to pursue talks. So that felt really a great. and. As we started changing how we appeared in how we introduced ourselves to venture capitalists L., we started to get offers and so in August of two thousand eight, we ended up raising five million from KHOSLA ventures expeditions mark. Wow Mark Banya Jeff bezos, and Venus is. All their. Funds are in which sounds like a lot before you WanNa do it's actually. Kinda limited because you still it seems to me in two thousand eight even though you have five million dollars a lot of money you still have this problem which is you've gotta get. Customers, and then to get customers, you need lots of doctors had lots of options but to get doctors, you need lots of customers booking through the site to you do that precisely D- These five million dollars per lily earmarked for making New, York, work, right, Miguel, I market work but. immediately after raising the money the financial crisis hit. And You may remember there was rest in peace a memo that went around about startups, right? Yes. About start ups, never being able to raise money arrested in peace good times. So we got this job is to make the money stretch in. We probably learn not during this time This was really our first go round making hard choices and what I want to be frugal and not to do things we can't afford and We learned to not let money replace critical, thinking and creativity. But now we continued to grind away at New York and at some point felt while if you want to get. To the next level we have to prove. Dr Isn't just a New York City phenomenon. Right? We had to prove that it would work in a second city But at that point, we didn't have the money to do this anymore, and by the way you're still your approach was still the same. It was door to door. That's right door to door and how how you building awareness about the about the fact Zach existed with customers with potential customers. So we it was day very difficult to get someone. To the website. Yeah but when they did. They loved it because it was such a step change from how healthcare used to work for him. Right they used to have to pick up the phone and wait on hold and then plays scheduling. tetris. With the office manager, can you do Wednesday morning about Thursday noon? Friday afternoon, and now they could do the same thing in a minute and have complete overview about the ability patients loved it and they told their friends. So we we started to get word of mouth. Going, and so we saw New York really taking up and we felt like, okay, this does this go into work in New York. At a minimum rate, but we also realized that it took us a fair bit of time. And money to get it going. In New, York and do we couldn't with the money we had left from the five million easily expanded into a new city at the same time. Raising money was going to be difficult because the next generation of investors wanted to see that it works and other cities as Walter. So we were a little bit in this catch twenty, two we ended up. Applying to. Force boost Your Business Competition Four. Forbes has his competition as sell to where they give away money right to they were promising a hundred thousand dollar prize. And at this time. We won. And Yeah what did is they gave us one of these large publishers. Clearinghouse is sex and very useful actually used to cover a hole in one in our only conference room. There was a hole in the wall and we covered it with that. At, this point you are, you are working out of an office, not not an apartment at this point we were working out of A. Shared Office space we work. Yeah. So they had given us publisher clearing house is is check but they fail to give us the small check for three months and we were getting really nervous, but it would still get it but. But ultimately, we got that one hundred thousand dollars and that's what we used to launch and our second market in DC in Washington DC and would did it require you guys to move down there or were you did you hire because I'm assuming you had to? A lot of your early capital was going into sales. Business Development hiring sales reps, is that right? Right, we had a couple of sales reps at the time. A. Very first employee ever was a sales rep is still with the company today and He was great. He figured out how to. Really charm his way. To the doctor. So there were no more security guards escorting anyone out. When did you? I'm assuming that even in two, thousand, nine, two, thousand, ten, and beyond we're not yet profitable. Far From It? Yeah. Far from it right because it's a capital intensive business. Yes. We obviously invested heavily in customer service wanted patients to have a great experience. And we had a quite sizable engineering team because that was actually a major engineering effort. So what started to happen when did you start to kind of see? A real turning point. Yeah. So we we we had launched New, York successfully with. Years. Of hardwork, we've gotten it off the ground is transported that to DC at work well, in DC, and now he said, well, why are we not in more cities and so we actually we raised serious be with fouled respond and We used to expand off the East Coast Francisco then Chicago and we just got better better at it. So we then ended up raising serious and two thousand eleven from Goldman NTSC, and we primarily use this to grow our sales team and sign up more more doctors in from two thousand eleven till two thousand, thirteen, we launched roughly thirty new cities I read that by by two thousand, fourteen would covered. Like forty percent of markets in the US, which is huge I mean that's right I mean that's a huge number of cities. And in that year evaluation. Of tzakda. Past Billion Dollars I mean that's That's pretty remarkable i. mean you were kind of on this like really rapid trajectory and you a pretty straightforward model right and you were charging doctors a flat fee every year and then. They could take all the bookings they wanted and I think that by that point like by two thousand, fourteen knew it was not cheap. It was expensive viewed really raised the price it was like three thousand dollars a year, right? Something like that. Yes recharged Dr Three thousand dollars a year and and there was a flat fee. No matter. How many bookings Actually facilitated for them and and the reality was for some doctors that got a lot of bookings that was a great deal. Yeah. But but there were also doctors that God a lot fewer bookings and for them that fixed cost was actually too expensive and some of them were starting to leave the service, and so we got into a situation that required us to invest a lot to stay where we are and then invest even more to continually grow our overall provider base, which means we had to build out a massive sales team to always sign up more doctors right and. Some point during this time L. Nick actually ran an analysis showed that it would take several years if ever fries to make our money back on on many of the doctors we signed up because you would have to sign up. X number of hundreds of thousands of doctors paying that amount every year. To make your money back to to make sort of our the cost of the sales team back. Wow and L. it. This was pure that would make us dependent on external capital for our very long time, and now it's a clearly there are many companies that have taken. Grow fast at all costs approach. And They Held onto this forty extended period of time by L., it clearly puts talking to a dependency to. Investors in their mind says, yeah. So. Meantime. You know I I from what I understand. There's disagreements I mean there there are you know the leadership team including Cyrus he he's I. Think he's he's sort of his position as the flat fee model is actually the best way to go is that a fair assessment of of his position? Yeah. I think that's right. I. Mean there were two fundamentally divergent ways held the business could go forward right. One way was to continue to work on optimizing the unit economics of our subscription model and the other way was to think about how to make it more transformative leap and then find a new more profitable. And more sustainable model and. Their. Look I can certainly understand The reluctance and taking this leap if companies rechange their underlying business model once they have a certain scale and then live to tell about it, right. We know the names of the companies that have done this net flicks, but from DVD's to streaming adobe. From box software to the cloud, but there's not a lot of companies that do that. and. Needed to make a choice which which direction I wanted to go. And and I should say over that. Became intensely personal for you because hugh and Cyrus really disagreed on on on the direction of the company should take. Steps down he he left the company and you moved into the role of CEO. Those right and what ask you about this neo. Beauty's in the flies of this show is its simplicity and we talked to one person or sometimes too. It's a single narrative, and so we don't have cyrus with us to tell us what happened but I wanna ask you about this time because. This was your co founder. This was your partner This is your friend and he was leaving the company. How did you feel at that time? I all I can say was a very hard and very emotional period for everyone involved and It was certainly a departure But how was through that given these two divergent choices you you couldn't. note, both of us could be useful to talk and. I have to imagine that for for period. China. was sort of the friendship. Look been we were very close we. Were not only friends we had worked for eight years believe together fourteen hours a day, and we probably talked more to each other than to anyone else in our lives but you know. Still touch from time to time and. I think he's joining us on from sideline. He still at prison million owner of the company Yeah, he's still. Here's the thing I mean we've we've told stories about breakups we've had we've had episodes were there were married couples who split divorced but continued the business e O products. Susan Griffin Black and an her husband Brad They continued the business stacy's pita chips continue the business after the divorce sold it for a quarter billion dollars. You guys were worth value to one point eight billion dollars at this point. was was ever party that just thought you know, God look at what we're doing on the core we're going and. I mean did you in service it down and say you know this thing is just growing and? Let's just figure this out. I think the challenge is that it's not as if there was an article way to decide what the right path forward is. As long as investors wanted to give us money growing all costs was yeah. Fine Strategy. The question was just how dependent you wanted to be on the continued goodwill of investors. It sounds like you were tired of going out raising money. You didn't want to do that anymore. Oh, not at all but I think you want to raise money from a position where you know what your turn to is and and. It wasn't clear that the business model would work in in a way that that we could just flip a switch and be profitable. Yeah. So. That was a tough year for you. Two, thousand fifteen. There was an article in business I think business insider, and it was about the sales team. It's October that year and it was. It was some allegations that you know Pete member sales team using adderall even cocaine they were under immense pressure. They were working all the time when you saw that article. And I'm not saying you even aware of any of this. You may not even aware of it but I. have to think that that article really alarmed you and and maybe even embarrassed you. Look A. There were a number of articles in two thousand fourteen fifteen. Didn't absolutely get everything, right but Budweiser I can say is that At. The time doctor had their sales team and we're. Getting very quickly and Your maybe maybe. Too focused on. L. Hitting targets and. Not. Focus enough on creating a strong culture the I hear these stories from six years ago from from time to time and from from now from candidates and and really every time. This happens like a Gut Punch. Because, this we know we're completely different company now. On on so many levels, but clearly, you saw that in new that you had to change something. While yes, I look I l there's a there's a couple of things about this. Right? We are a technology company, but we had said ourselves up too much about. Instead of writing wins and really too little about being adaptable and darning and and building the trust required to try things that now pet the risk of failure. and. So one of the first things I did is to change core values. You know to emphasize those behaviors each one of our values adaptable, not comfortable and other one is progress before perfection learners before masters right and. We only kept really one DIA CONSTANT DEL patients I. Personally that. That was more of the culture that I thought was right for Doc to succeed on many dimensions. So, you take over the company it's got high valuation, but you're still not making money and you know that you've gotta change the underlying business model you're never gonNA make money. And from what I understand this is the beginning of what you have internally described as the second founding of the company. That is right. That is right and that basically happens in in two thousand, eighteen you you launch this new business model where instead of the the dollar membership fee. Basically, you would charge doctors a lot less like two hundred or three hundred bucks, but then every booking you, you would take a cut from that booking. So like a travel agency. A little bit charge for new patient booking. So the existing patients to practice we made free but yes, there was the fundamental idea and. It sounds like such an obvious thing to do but but here's the problem with it and why why are we thought it was incredibly risky to try this. Our best customers that had been on for a long time. They got lots of pockets right and if we start charging them per bookings, their prices go up very significantly in some cases ten times more and that seemed. Competing, insane to us. In. Particular because when we talked to other companies that were at gone through similar changes and even pricing experts, they're number one advisor was make sure whatever you do never charged your best customers more and frost would be precisely. The opposite. In the thing that was counter-balancing this in our mind was well, maybe we'd be able to bring on a lot more doctors because the barrier to entry is now much lower that was there was the back and forth in the team to figure out whether that's the path we want to want to go. So, this is still a risky strategy because you're depending really on new bookings because the two hundred dollar annual fees dramatically lower and I have to imagine in year one, you actually saw drop in your revenue in the year one of of this curve. Second founding. Right. Well, it's from a risk profile worth at that. Right the warriors that you lose all your best customers in with it, all the bookings day used to be getting. and. So we needed to be ready for a very significant drop in bookings and revenue and the second Challenge was here that. The beauty of this approach modest and we got all this money upfront right and Sharon. Now to bond, we're getting paid after the booking with with a thirty day payment periods, we had a huge working capital requirement to make that happen. So did you see a drop and revenue in two thousand eighteen when you rolled this out? No we didn't because we actually didn't see the doctors leave the way that we hit on -ticipant did in fact, you know while we had very much worried that they would be upset and some of them certainly were upset. We were providing so much value to them that. You know what? What took you. So long I knew as getting a great deal all along. So that worked really well, and we had piloted in Georgia initially in April. Two thousand eighteen and then that had worked. So we we then all allowed in Colorado a few weeks later that work to, and from there we went to Washington state and again, very positive results and after these three days. Okay Great. We know this works does it out in our largest most important market? Let's go to New York and that and terribly horribly wrong. They the doctors in New York. Not only were so pissed off they actually I read. mounted a change dot org. Petition I. Don't know what to to to end this practice or something. They were really mad. They were really really mad and I guess you guys responded you said, are we won't we won't roll this out in New York for a while. Yeah look in New York. We. Facilitate Roughly, one in five new patient doctor relationship in the entire city on dock and so. The economic impact for the providers in. was much greater than for the providers in Georgia Colorado Washington. So yes, to give you one example, there's a dermatologist and so and he paid under the ultimate model ten doctor say paid thirty thousand dollars and under the new pricing model, his cost was going to go up from thirty thousand dollars to roughly three hundred, forty, thousand dollars. Wow. So what was your response to that? I? Mean it seems like a pretty reasonable. Concern. Yeah. So look after the conversation with the Dermatologists I. Actually. Put down the phone and I thought you know what? He's right. And so I pause and we regrouped and. We did a couple. Of things during this time, like the first one is we just went on a listening tour. You know we talked to provide their feedback and we just adjusted our this plan to give providers a much longer grace period to decide whether the wants to addition to the new model or not, and then. So then we read on New York six months later and and when dramatically better. So the strategy works and you see results from the strategy pretty quickly like within a year. Within a year, we had we finally at some incredible momentum was really going better than we had expected in our wildest dreams. Our existing client went down to essentially zero. I mean people still retire and and move jobs by no one really left the service and we were adding more and more providers because the barrier to entry was low and So in two thousand, nineteen we began growing profitably. It sounds like two thousand and nineteen was really the banner year. Two thousand nine hundred was a was a fantastic year and honestly we had so much momentum coming into twenty twenty and feel like, Hey, we worked really hard for three years and profitable and now the sky was the limit until. Tells Sam until March of two thousand twenty. Two Marjo twenty twenty and that's. That's really maybe the third founding DOC right? Well, I want to ask you about March twenty twenty because. Your Business is based on people booking with doctors and going to the doctor I have to imagine your revenues must have plummeted like every other industry like I mean doctors offices are still in most of the country. Slow or are trickle of patients coming in. With the lockdown started happening we saw impersonal bookings declining anywhere between fifty to ninety percent by the end of March I'm not surprised and lot of that buys I was getting was to. Lay off people and make sure that we hunker down to weather the storm but I saw an opportunity to build windmills, right so I thought well, we need to be there for our patients. We should be expanding into telehealth and I need every team member to help me do that and so we. Really went all important and supporting video visits and I'll probably June eighteen began redesigning the tire marketplace support virtual care, and so we actually released. Doctor Video Service and we made this available to. Any. Physician whether they are on soccer. for free. And by the way head, you plan to do this. How long would would I mean I'm imagining if you said in in February district I really want to focus on telehealth Would you have expected that by May would have been ready to go. Absolutely. Not I think what has been really fantastic to see is how? We really finished two years of roadmap in two months. Wow, and it's great because it's just gives us a window on what the next phase of doctor will be and really looking forward to that in my mind were the point were Amazon started from going. Books to also adding CDs. We have just gone from doing only in person to also A. Doing telehealth and I can't wait to see how this unfolds. It sounds like you. Might be reading between the lines but. You. Really, admire and respect your co-founders particularly. Cyrus and the work that he did to to build this company but I wonder if do you think that you will a I dunno, rekindle your friendship i. Is it something that is in the cards because a break is? Is Emotionally, it's hard Mesa really hard. Yeah, look I Do I think we'll work fourteen hours together again maybe not but you know I I've gotten through tougher breakups and reconciled in my past, and so I think we are we're in good shape and honestly know we are meeting were talking from time to time Yeah. We both have things to do and places to be so we're. Not, hanging out all the time. But it's now also five years ago So We are we're merch focused on making our join the baby successful. When you think about your journey and All Its happen to you how much do you think this has to do with? with luck and how much do you think it has to do with with the hard work you put in your your skills. Well I'm going look I I believe that there's really three ingredients to success. In order importance there are lock the talent, then hard work and. The only one. That's comedian. You control his how hard you work right and Now working hard to gives you more shots on goal It helps his day on the top of what you your talent allows and absolutely restarted at the right time the right place. So What what I'm proud of an all that journey has only that yet when we were wrong and when be had to revise and. When we needed the grit to actually make it work. I L we lived up to that and and that's really The all that anyone can ask themselves to. Oliver Karaz co-founder of Zach Braff by the way, remember how they originally wanted to call it physicians dot com or doctors dot. com. COULDN'T AFFORD THE MILLION DOLLAR PRICE TAG to buy the domain name. DOC DOT COM wasn't only available the price they paid for that domain name. Six Bucks. and. Thanks so much for listening to this show this week, you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You could also write to us at H. I. T. at NPR DOT Org. If you want to send a tweet, it's at how I felt this or at Cairo's can also follow me on instagram that's at Guy Dot Roz. Our show was produced this week by Jet Anderson with music composed by Tina. Bluey. Thanks also to Julia Carney Candice Limb Neva grant and Jeff Rodgers I'm guy. Roz even listening to how I built this. This is NPR. Black voters play a crucial role for any Democrat who seeks to win the White House but some big devise amongst that block and some serious influence

Cyrus Masumi Mckinsey New York L. Nick Germany Starbucks Oliver Karaz Partner Office Manager United States Dot Com Doctors Dot Com Co-Founder Amazon Zach Dock Manhattan Middle East Sarah SAM Co Founder Iran
Why do we dream?

Tai Asks Why

05:14 min | 10 months ago

Why do we dream?

"Okay, I know that dream stories sometimes you like really really boring but like just bear with me the rest of back. The other night i. Always just walking out of my. Book in my hand, and then suddenly I see a spider. And I accidentally just dropped the book down on him squishing him in the way picked him up. You know WHO's dead. But the remember hearing this thunderous roars something slowly approached. An this huge cockroach top hat, which is like. I had no control. Eventually he he got many pin me down. They started like attacking their woke up before anything bad. All of the nightmares I have they make no sense. There's these horrible entities that are like all powerful and it's just weird 'cause I. You know it's scary and it's on enjoyable. So why do we even have nightmares? Why don't we dream in the first place? I'm this is my podcast. Asks what? There are so many good questions out there these answered. What is love? Turns Cooler. What happens after we die? How do we fix? and. Why do? I think dreams help us make sense of the world. Things happen in your life, your brain will store them for a timer can think about the work might be puzzling might have a deeper error wound or dreams could be aspirations like what you want to achieve or pursue in your waking life. I used to think that dreams main a lot of things and there are super important. But now I just think that they are your brain filtering themselves. WHY WOULDN'T WE DREAM? When I was little I had a dream about. My House kept on rolling around a dog. What kind of dreams do you have? Their weird. That kind of goes with the territory, right? But like I don't really understand why we'd need to like see dog bowls from dreams or just really weird because the like these movies. That are head makes and like. I know our brain is working really hard to make these. But like twice dozen our brain. Power down. Teams figment of Magin nation when you asleep. Now this is my brother key. I've talked to him a lot about dreams lately he's got a lot of interesting ideas. It's a picture of like like what you see on. Your dream. It's it's a nightmare maybe who feeling Sattar that note or like maybe it's telling you to like. Strangers are dangerous. Maybe it's like maybe it tells you about lesson something. You. Dream. About I think they'll way of your brain trying to communicate something maybe not something important but maybe just something. and. Then you can remember how we look at you your brainwaves. So. We can learn about James Wait. What? It's going to be held onto your face with a little bits of tape. So I dragged my brother Ken to Sunnybrook Sleep Clinic Talkers Brian Woods in an e g machine. Here's earned irs I will extract fried at home 'cause the machinery so you'll just be drawing on your brother's head. For. Sixteen seventeen wires this so many wires on wikipedia around. By the time technician has done is covered in these wars. Looks ridiculous this. Test the liars make sure everything's connected probably gonNA move around too much. Why head into the lowered tweet eeg results as they come in. And while we're waiting I decided to ask Dr Mark Bolles about why it is. We sleep at all during the day these harmful toxins accumulate in our brain and when you're sleeping you actually clear these toxins sleep is also thought to help consolidate memories. So if you go to task or an exam without having slept, you actually do more poorly compared to someone who's actually slept and had time to consolidate their memories

Sunnybrook Sleep Clinic Dr Mark Bolles Technician Sattar IRS James Brian Woods KEN
Why do we dream?

Tai Asks Why

05:14 min | 10 months ago

Why do we dream?

"Okay, I know that dream stories sometimes you like really really boring but like just bear with me the rest of back. The other night i. Always just walking out of my. Book in my hand, and then suddenly I see a spider. And I accidentally just dropped the book down on him squishing him in the way picked him up. You know WHO's dead. But the remember hearing this thunderous roars something slowly approached. An this huge cockroach top hat, which is like. I had no control. Eventually he he got many pin me down. They started like attacking their woke up before anything bad. All of the nightmares I have they make no sense. There's these horrible entities that are like all powerful and it's just weird 'cause I. You know it's scary and it's on enjoyable. So why do we even have nightmares? Why don't we dream in the first place? I'm this is my podcast. Asks what? There are so many good questions out there these answered. What is love? Turns Cooler. What happens after we die? How do we fix? and. Why do? I think dreams help us make sense of the world. Things happen in your life, your brain will store them for a timer can think about the work might be puzzling might have a deeper error wound or dreams could be aspirations like what you want to achieve or pursue in your waking life. I used to think that dreams main a lot of things and there are super important. But now I just think that they are your brain filtering themselves. WHY WOULDN'T WE DREAM? When I was little I had a dream about. My House kept on rolling around a dog. What kind of dreams do you have? Their weird. That kind of goes with the territory, right? But like I don't really understand why we'd need to like see dog bowls from dreams or just really weird because the like these movies. That are head makes and like. I know our brain is working really hard to make these. But like twice dozen our brain. Power down. Teams figment of Magin nation when you asleep. Now this is my brother key. I've talked to him a lot about dreams lately he's got a lot of interesting ideas. It's a picture of like like what you see on. Your dream. It's it's a nightmare maybe who feeling Sattar that note or like maybe it's telling you to like. Strangers are dangerous. Maybe it's like maybe it tells you about lesson something. You. Dream. About I think they'll way of your brain trying to communicate something maybe not something important but maybe just something. and. Then you can remember how we look at you your brainwaves. So. We can learn about James Wait. What? It's going to be held onto your face with a little bits of tape. So I dragged my brother Ken to Sunnybrook Sleep Clinic Talkers Brian Woods in an e g machine. Here's earned irs I will extract fried at home 'cause the machinery so you'll just be drawing on your brother's head. For. Sixteen seventeen wires this so many wires on wikipedia around. By the time technician has done is covered in these wars. Looks ridiculous this. Test the liars make sure everything's connected probably gonNA move around too much. Why head into the lowered tweet eeg results as they come in. And while we're waiting I decided to ask Dr Mark Bolles about why it is. We sleep at all during the day these harmful toxins accumulate in our brain and when you're sleeping you actually clear these toxins sleep is also thought to help consolidate memories. So if you go to task or an exam without having slept, you actually do more poorly compared to someone who's actually slept and had time to consolidate their memories

Sunnybrook Sleep Clinic Dr Mark Bolles Technician Sattar IRS James Brian Woods KEN
Should we trust our gut?

Tai Asks Why

08:53 min | 11 months ago

Should we trust our gut?

"My Gut is this big pile of intestines that digest my food I. Don't really know what to be trusted. They're they know that I get these feelings in my got like butterflies when nervous. Or. When I'm hungry like my struggle, I crank feel like squeezy. But like why is my gut able to make decisions like tell me what to do? That seems pretty crazy because I means it has a brain. And that that seems glad you know it's just like it's my intestines but like maybe there is a brain my gut. But at the same time, it's kind of farfetched and wacky. So I decided to take this theory to the park and see what live friends There's a break. In your stomach. Know. What what? Who had your brains in your head? I, think your brain makes. Everything you feel possible. There could be a brain because there wouldn't be space or else you'd have like a big lump on ever side. My feelings and anxieties and stresses they become from here. My God your stomach does not. It set when it's hungry I think there is some sort of connection Fram Magin by cells. As Like wow. You, know I think hires onto something. It is like really complicated and I did a little bit of research. Apparently, there are little creatures in our guts and they're called microbes are remember reading this one factoid from science center saying that all the microbes in your body where about a kilogram. That's crazy. These microbes, their apparently lake all over our body in there like inside US everywhere therefore supposed to trust our gots. Then does that mean that we have to trust all of the little microbes do the microbes have grain? Are they sent? And as was doing this research I saw the scientist called Dr Embry at Hyde. For My pc I studied the microbiome. So I decided to call her up what is microbiome so you can't see it because well, for one it's inside of you but for to they're invisible to the naked eye. So as all of the microbes that live in an on your body so that includes bacteria, viruses, fungi, some parasites, and it's not just the microbes, but it's the things that they do in your. Body. So the micro Byron or God is responsible for a lot of processes in our body. But I wanted to know do the collection of microbes form like a brain. Your Gut is full of neurons which are the same exact cells that are in your brain, and there's this amazing nerve called the Vegas nerve which connects your brain to your digestive tract and your brain can send signals directly to your gut. And your gut consensus directly back to your brain through this nerve, and they're always communicating talking to each other. And because of that, a lot of people like to call this system, the second brain in your gut but I think is probably more appropriate just to call it an extension of your nervous system. Does our gut brain have like a conscience? Sent you. We don't fully know the answer to that. Yet microbes live in your gut and they help affects this communication between your gut in your brain and people are wondering if maybe microbes have a mind of their own and if they do then maybe you know you could extrapolate a little bit and say, well, if the microbes have a mind of their own and they're affecting how my is talking to the brain, then maybe that could be the conscious aspect of it but we just don't know yet. What do you think the brain and the gut are communicating is the Gulping like We're able to process that pizza that you. A couple of hours ago now bring on more and they send it to your brain and then your brain tells you hey, I'm hungry. Grammar. Word is out. It's like. Well, that's definitely part of it but I, think it's just a little part of it. So have you ever I don't know you seem like a very good podcast or interviewer but maybe if you've ever gotten nervous before giving an interview or having to talk to somebody and maybe felt butterflies in your stomach, that is a result of your brain in your gut talking to each other. In addition to giving signals about whether or not, we should eat or whether we're hungry, there's a lot of emotional input as well at between your brain and your gut if you are stressed out or you're really sad about something, you'll notice that you're not quite as hungry It's really amazing. The ways that your brain and your gut can talk to each other. Yeah because like you know if you're sad then the guts like, oh, man, my partners bombed-out. No, I'm bummed up. Remember seeing my best friend at spirit of math new looked bummed out some. Oh Dude what happened and then he said, Oh, my hamstring. Then, he was just green me the whole time interest made meekly music ono. When he said. So. If my gut brain my head brain relic close friends. Do I make my head brain. Sad when I eat something, you know kinda nasty. Let me ask you a question. Have you ever eaten a food that you used to like and now you don't Wanna eat it at all ever again just thinking about it makes you feel sick no. Well, that's happened to me and it's happened to one of my best friends. She hates macaroni and cheese which I think is crazy but she just doesn't like it anymore because one time she ate it made her sick. And this has to do with really intricate and elegant way that your memories are formed. In how they make you react to certain situations and the gut brain axis has a very important role in that. So our eyes and our senses are tied to our head brain and those will help make us recognize the MAC and cheese. Right? Right. So the GUT brain needs to communicate with the head brain 'cause they head brain can recognize it. Yeah. So the next time, the food goes into your brain will say last time I. Am you system it told me this. So maybe just have bad memories associated with this, and then completely affects whether you want to eat that food or not. You know when like your own don't WanNa buy the candy bar or save money you're stuck with the indecision and then like if you're with like your parent or a friend, they'll just be like, Hey, do trust your gut Do you think that's like scientifically accurate? Any think scientist was actually like I am smart scientists. Your has brain trust. Your Gut because it has brain you know a lot of it has to do with this memory formation. Sometimes, we don't remember the memory, but our brain subconsciously remembers it and our gut awesome remembers it and so together, they are able to tell us that, hey, trust us on this point and you know make this decision versus that decision. When you say trust your gut do you think that's the brain thinking and then the message get sent to the got? Or do you just think it's the GOP itself? Your Gut doesn't come up with it on his own. Your brain sends a message Cheer Gut. You're just not aware of it, and then you're then response sends a message to your brain and you're aware of that one. and. Then you get that feeling from it and and you make your decision whatever it is that you decide you know sometimes people fight against their gut feeling. And they go with just their head brain half the time it works and halftime the time it doesn't does that mean? Do you think you should trust the got it self or the brain if you take one away, you break that whole. Cycle of communication, and then the messages you get are Gonna be different. They're not going to be full. You're going to be missing part of the story and so I really think it's both you have to trust both. and. Then if your gut brain is gone on your head brain is sad because he does never friend yeah. Exactly. Maybe, the gut brain is the head brains only friend and only possible friend. It's a very interesting way of putting it I liken. They've been with each other through. So many are Chitty half. Grumble grumble saying.

Scientist Fram Magin United States Byron Chitty Dr Embry GOP
When Healthy Eating Goes Too Far

Food for Thought

08:19 min | 1 year ago

When Healthy Eating Goes Too Far

"Going Vegan Veggie. You simply eating more veggies can all be healthy lifestyle choices but if doing so gives you. Zayed he about hanging out with friends makes you fear certain foods. It can actually be quite dangerous because yes being to healthy can actually be unhealthy for some restrictive. Eating is a short live stage that ricochets into a junk food rebellion for others. They find their way back to the middle of the road. But for some money the so called healthy way of eating can become a true obsession and at its most extreme. An eating disorder known as author. Xia this week's food for thought explores when healthy becomes unhealthy with Dr Nikki Stump Surgeon TV presenter and author of pretty unhealthy. Helen Nikki. Hi Thank you for having me. Really Nice debate here per exciting. I am beyond excited. I think since receiving your book getting to read it in being completely inspired and upset fully instagram Graham Wall. And just seeing what you've been getting up to you it's a pleasure to have you in the. Uk's at thank he owner thank you. I think we'll start with whether someone who's we'll go right him. Web someone's been diagnosed with an each use solder or slightly lesser degree. All serve preoccupation of being unhealthy. One is that unhealthy the occupation of being too healthy. Yeah I think that's a really good question because I think you've kind of alluded to it. Then you in in that question that use. You're walking a fine line. It's it's It's very easy to step from one thing to something that is is not so great for you. So you know. It's reasonable to be conscious and observant. About what you ate and making sure that you're exercising not smoking and drinking and all those kinds of things that's important but then when you get really caught up in it to a point where it is impacting your mental health. Your physical health. Your social well-being forget about that. A Lot. That's why. I think we start to get into territory where you are you looking at something. That's possibly not that good for you. You'll completely right the so many factors involved. I think for anyone to just identify acknowledging themselves. I'm not quite happy right. Now is quite a big step because often people in this country. We still have a thing as what at the moment weight is often seen as such a defining health. I don't know what your thoughts are. Matt Yeah I think white is is not going anywhere as as something that people Reach full particularly In an instant to to make a judgment about their own health or somebody else's health but it's really just not that simple econ deny that in some situations in some circumstances. Some people yes. Your weight is a factor in that can be at either end as well But I think that to look at someone and say Oh look at yourself and say I'm unhealthy because of I figure on the Sky Oh That's not rise. It doesn't really have have the support that we think it does. Yeah I think so. We use Via Mind it. It's so tricky because I got a lot of clients coming in clinic saying all the doctors told me. I'm just above the BMI. Actually have any health problems yeah so I mean BMI. I think is rightly criticised and analyze. And I think that if you're applying it to an individual it's a tool that has very little use if you're applying it to screen someone so looking for problem if you're applying it to perhaps population level or re as a research tool that has validity. But you know I think one of the things that people don't always understand about science and research and medicine and so on and so forth is that you know our tools always in perfect and one of the things that makes perfect is the way that we use them. So if we use be my willy nilly then yeah it's not. It wasn't designed for If we use it to look at an individual in front of us and decide if they're healthy that's wrong but if you're using it for the things that's been designed for it has some Information giving capability. And that's where we need to be using it I completely agree. It's just a wider understanding because things can be taken so literally all the time. Want to believe in one number having the solution or absolutely everything without simple you can be over way to be very fit. Yeah absolutely I you know. One of the things that is important in your health is not necessarily that defined. Yes Oh no I'm I'm above or below a number It's actually what you do and we know in particularly for women that no mash. They're they're they're white so their their body composition that if they live a healthy lifestyles in they take all the boxes for nutrition darn smart etcetera that they have a very significant health benefit. So I I'm I've really moved away from from that kind of thinking that you know. We have to get you to a low beam. I will take into account solely secretly with my patients. I'm very focused on what they're doing. Now I'm just trying to get them to to be. Active for example is is just one simple thing that's so refreshing into comfortable adult as well because this is something that unfortunately we see such a lot of this country because medics in this country. Don't get enough nutritional education. Yeah lifestyle education and to hear you say that is wonderful. Yeah even with that in mind. I'm just one piece of the puzzle. You know so if I identify that someone Is is needing some help. With what eat or exercise you reach for your for your experts. Now I'm sure like like the NHL. We're pretty eater stretched with results. So you know. It's not always easy to do that. And I. I think that doctors should be able to give out the basics just like You know my allied health colleagues give out the basics of what I do as well you know. We all work in this together by. I think it is time to to sort of change up our thinking and the way we give advice across the board. Yeah completely. I think is often a misconception. As well that it's all about overeating Ashley. You can be overweight and be quite malnourished as well. Connie that for me. I don't think people realize no and I think the way to to look at this is to Magin if you are overweight and you your diet consists less assay solely of takeout food so that that's all you rating by doing that by eating that very Calorie dense food You are unfortunately missing out on a lot of nutrients So for example you know are based on our. That's a word that is very loaded by mere medically speaking someone who paps has a extra white in the medical complications of it they can be still lacking in in Macronutrients. They can still be lacking micronutrients. you know so. It's not that straightforward to say to say that all that they're very well nourished nor that actually might not be exactly. You can be both ends of the spectrum I said and be completely malnourished. Do you see this getting worse and Western society off. I mean that's sort of what the data suggests you know so if you look at you know. Uk Australia us now. We're all fairly on power. We have pretty similar Spectrum of issues I think health issues and outside of the sphere of food and weight and so on and so forth with pretty similar and I. I do think that that it is the all of these things are increasing And then not just about US eating too much You know all of these choices that we might happen in a system. That is designed to make eight to macho exercise too little. I mean near tobacco. Advertising is literally designed to get. You know it's you know we're not we're not failing ourselves we are filed by system at lodge.

UK Dr Nikki Stump Helen Nikki Zayed Graham Wall NHL Matt Connie Ashley Australia
"magin" Discussed on Can I Pet Your Dog?

Can I Pet Your Dog?

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"magin" Discussed on Can I Pet Your Dog?

"Nineteen ninety though we don't know the exact date because almost thirteen years old but she thinks she is to go figure talk. Probably say something like. GimMe food now. I want food patron to me and give me food. I think it's good that she can't talk because part of the family and we all offer so much. She knows she control the House. I love nickel being a lot. Oh Boy Kimba on listen to me a bit of a home run. My mom is in a really good for tax and tip to predate knowing what am I mean? It was a little bit. Yeah we've got A. We've got a real Trailblazer on our hands on the term. I like it. I think that if you were depressed me on that and be like. Do you know other words for trailblazer. I'd be like a forward thinker. Some someone with a vision. A wizard was really pretty accurate. I think you know I mean yeah. I wouldn't be surprised at all if that came out. And that tracks for me Regal Bean. What what did include a picture tell you what. What a good looking pub I. I love when fourth graders writing a report because at that point they kind of know they know they know what's funny and they'll toss him a little joke me like. I'm glad she didn't Magin little tenure and thirteen regal bean doing just fine for your cell eight thriving. Excellent loved it excellent work okay. Well so I think this adds to the myriad of ways you can turn into my minute. If our listeners wanted to send in my from the past present or future how could they do such a thing? Yes please I would love him in it from the future sorry slurred all those words together but I would love it if you want to submit in my minute. All you have to do is recorded on your phone or whatever recording device you have and email it to us at. Can I pet your dog? Podcast gmail.com perfect him. That's easy hey.

Magin
Political Power Player Cecilia Muoz Reminds Us That We Are More Than Ready

Latina to Latina

08:47 min | 1 year ago

Political Power Player Cecilia Muoz Reminds Us That We Are More Than Ready

"How Did you stumble into advocacy? I was very sure that I was going into what I think of his direct service like that was my thing. I was aiming towards it. I I could picture myself in an office. Like seeing clients of some sort and helping them with the stuff. That's why I volunteered at the legal clinic. When I was in graduate school I found myself a job with archdiocese at Chicago right after graduate school and that was just very sure that that was my path and I ended up until literally got intervened got actually kind of way intervened. It's a very strange story. So I'm I'm working as an organizer for It's called Perez Community Services and the sizes of Chicago and an immigration law passes and because I have been working as a lowly volunteer in a legal clinic in graduate school. I knew a tiny bit about this law and my boss's boss was the guy responsible for building up the legalization operation to help. Undocumented people become legal residents so I was asking him questions just because I was curious about like how you GonNa do this because there was a way that law worked the application period started by law on May Fifth Congress decided to open it on Cinco de Mayo. You know for symbolic reasons and so they had to be ready to start on that date weather. The regulations were ready whether the agency was ready so I had questions for him in this poor man had the cardinal breathing down his neck. Saying we have to do this. Half of the Catholics in Chicago are are Hispanic and this is our moment to show our flock that we are with them and he so he called me into his office and said the Lord sent me a dream and I want you to lead this legalization effort. I was twenty four hours of my first job out of graduate. School did not have illegal immoral. No I've been like a paralegal way in the bowels of this little organization. I'm very good at collating papers. You'll right And I have no management experience at all and I also don't have mentors so like an idiot. I take this job because I cared about what I cared about. What was happening. I don't believe the Lord spoke to Father Ruby. I think he was desperate But I threw myself into it and it was an amazing challenging experience and we crushed it but I learned a lot about myself. I learned a lot about the Catholic church. Some of which I wish I didn't know and I learned I suck at direct service. I mean my program did really well there were. There was a universe of people who qualified under the law in a lot of people who didn't qualify under the law. And the thing that I couldn't do is like go of the people that we had to say no to because they didn't qualify. I lost sleep. I agonized and I realized people who are good at this are able to live with the reality of what they can and can't do and they were able to test themselves often. Get up every morning and do it. I wasn't so I this thing. I thought I was supposed to be good at that. I believed in. I discovered. I wasn't good at it. I wasn't cut out for it. Turns out on an advocate and I'm a structural reform and I just didn't know until I tried to do what I thought I was meant to do and failed and I I tell that story all the time because I think it's important for people to know it's okay to try something discover. It's not what you cut out for it. That's how you one of the ways that you land where you're supposed to let you have this realization. You also realize it requires you to move to Washington. Dc to really do you want. Do I love the fact that part of your resistance to moving. Dc was just that you're introverted and didn't WANNA make new friend turned not be more sympathetic to that but then you end up NCR for two decades when you first get there. Lobbying is the type of loving you. Reduce very much defined by men totally. Yes I was the only woman in the room all the time. And so how did you have to personally adapt to meet that moment? So there is a section. The book called Sharp Elbows and other tools and it refers to the fact. I'm not actually sharp elbows person but there was literally a point at which the group of men that I was working with that were sort of coalition partners we were at congressional markup where they literally mark up a piece of legislation. And when it's over everybody stands up. In the guys stood in a circle they formed a little huddle to like compare notes. And do all the things you do afterwards which are important and I couldn't get in the huddle and I was frustrated. Went back to my boss and complained and he said he who is my height. Said you just gotTa just elbow you weigh-in that's like it's not personal. He said they're not but you're short. You're a woman you're Kinda knew so elbow one of them and say could you let me in here and be fine and I I did. I had to do that the next time. And I only had to do it once But that kind of stuff happened all the time. I was in a board meeting where I was ten years younger than everybody. The only woman the only let the And they're making decisions about board officers and the head of the organization pipes up and says up secretary while. I guess that Cecilia should do that job. And my first thought was oh come on. Are you kidding me so but what I remember about those things from thirty years ago now is that I didn't feel I could I am now I think? Why did I feel like I couldn't do that? I thought the thought that somebody else said. If I were giving advice to my younger self now it would be you can say it. Of course you can say it And to you know give yourself the confidence to recognize that I like. I didn't have a voice in my head saying you. This is a group working on immigration. And you're the only Hispanic person in this room. A vet gives you standing. You can either say I'm the only Latin and that gives me twice as much room to say what I need to say or the only one here so I have no cover. And that's what makes us nervous exactly and over and over again from that point all the way through my timer. The White House. It's not just the I might not have cover. It's also the and I don't WanNa be the gadfly that is always pushing everybody so much that the next time I when my mouth? They're all gonna just roll their eyes and not listen. That's the other thing that I feel like my you know. My radar is always going for because hall point of being in those places to be effective and so I also feel like I was aware of not overstating my case so as not to get to the place where nobody. Here's you anymore because they've turned you out blackness isn't just about race. I'm Denise Milner and I'm a New York Times bestselling author on my podcast. Speaking with Dean I dive into the beauty and humanity a blackness with people like writer tyree Jones journalist Dmitry Lucas and rapper. Killer Mike Listen to speak easy with Deneen from Georgia public broadcasting subscribe for free at GP Dot Org Slash podcasts or on your favorite podcast APP when you look at AMC or Jessica. She's nettles whose primary Democrat Texas. It feels like we are in a moment where they're more. Latina's saying I'm ready. Yep I deserve to be a part of this conversation and I'm not going to apologize for attempting to take my seat at the table. Would he make I have this combination of great pride l? Bit of fear for them and a little bit of worry especially in the case of. Afc that the spotlight is so shining on her and And she's she I think she's amazing. But but I think it is hard to live your life in that spotlight especially when you're so young so I have this combination of like super-duper proud of these women and I feel like I know a little bit about what might be coming for them. I I have confidence in their ability to to endure it but there is the I guess the mom part of me feels like there's there's going to be some some challenges. I had maybe some pain and the envy no no Grande Magin though if you would have started if you the point now if you could have been at that point in your mid twenty s can you imagine if you knew that you were more than ready in your mid twenties. Yes and in some ways. That's why are written. The book is because I want all of us to know

Chicago DC Perez Community Services Sharp Elbows Cinco De Mayo Congress Grande Magin Latina Catholic Church AFC Texas Washington New York Times Cecilia Secretary Denise Milner White House AMC Mike Listen
An Invitation to a Free Virtual Meeting on Digital Health

Outcomes Rocket

06:34 min | 1 year ago

An Invitation to a Free Virtual Meeting on Digital Health

"Hey man thanks. I suppose you're pleasure anti-revolutionary back you'd be successful in. This is such a great platform to be showcased on. So we're we're honored. Thank you my pleasure. My pleasure Soliloquy were sitting back and realizing that our world has been turned upside down world of orthopedic care. It's not just the planet out there but were canceling cases. Were sending people home. Who are who are needed to address Missouri. Way For us to rethink the way we deliver care rethink the care model and of course being in the digital orthopedic space trying to catalyze the adoption digital health tools. We thought it was a great opportunity for us to put something together for our audience Worldwide scale to give them some tools and ideas that they can use to address the challenges posed to our musculoskeletal P patients by Derek yet as Stefan. Oh it's it's It's really great that you guys are doing this and and you know I had the privilege of being there a couple years ago for your conference and I've gotta say the quality of the panelists. The speakers was just awesome and then the forward thinking of of some of the companies that that were there as well as the company sponsoring the the the the program just extraordinary if you had to highlight sort of the top two to three things that that are what makes this conference attractive and why people should be streaming it. April second and April third What are those two or three things that you want them to know? First of all where it'd be focusing on the challenges at covent maintained puzzles to surgical patient. That people are not really talking about with the from Pulmonary Perspective infectious these perspective magin patients really close up and potentially getting infected. That's something we'll address. We'll also bring forward some of the really top wine telehealth companies that are working in the space out there that people should be aware of these tools exists to get a sense of what technologies are available to you. It beyond just video visits is a lot more than that than shouldn't for that but also some really amazing partners in this whole event including zero and bts Ma. You guys did a really awesome ideal. A focus group. Last time I was there and I mean that brought about some great ways for me to think through things. I've shared some of that stuff with my team. And just brilliant stuff their idea for those who don't know came up with the concept design thinking that designed the first mouse for Steve Jobs. They have since gone on to be leaders in in how to use that thinking principles to solve problems. And what to do with this time to coming on early in the conference and they're going to be crowd sourcing from the people in log in challenges facing Ron Kovic. Deniger offline and in the background to a Hacker. Thon with their community to solve the problem showcase to us with design communicant do for healthcare and at the end of the conference that come in and finish the confidence. Show us the examples of what they've come up with with the whole community very exciting should be funneled to think a first. That's cool yet. You know and and today has never been I mean it. It's best time in history. I think to engage with with a program like this You know as far as details on on how to access it how much it costs all that stuff can you? Can you level set with US absolutely first of all it's free? We wanted to make this accessible to everyone with no barriers is the purpose of this share ideas of nations. So people can borrow steal build on. These concepts are in descends for. What does it stand for as a rip off and deploy? I love it and we're GONNA try to capitalize that as much as possible these great solutions so it's free the best way to access it is to go to. Www dot gov the health and for timing is right that these are folks that just make sure you're right. Www DOT DOC SF dot health in Australia The WWW D. O. C. SF DA health and the front pages link you'd like that will be streaming on crowd cast streaming on A twitter believe will be stinging on Youtube and facebook and all the material will be later available to registrants. Nossa others eventually Chula for on demand. That's awesome the final and so give us a little insight like you know. Many many of us haven't done a meeting like this. Wha Wha what can be expected are their interactions like todd. Tell us a little bit more about logistics and what that looks like a great question. You're good at this. So here's the thing This is really super platform relatively straightforward two years. You'll be able to see the speaker. You'll be able to see their slide back at the HAB one. Maybe more than one speaker on the screen the same time and the right side. The Spain there's a social Networking section was very much a streaming a male chain of comments. And we'll have a question answer session. We can ask the audience to rank ideas and thoughts. So there's a way I interface. Not Quite we can go off from the side and have a meeting but you certainly can Communicate from amongst members of seen people Answer each other's questions and engage in conversation we will have moderators on that side to answer questions. We know the answer to and some of the More relevant questions can be asked to be actual questioned button and then people can up rank and Dan. Rank questions really liked this question when they click on it. When you click on it goes to the top and then will spend over half the time with each speaker answering questions. So it's a each segments forty minutes long of which fifteen minutes is given to speak speak in the rest of the time will be to share an answer. Direct questions from the audience

Pulmonary Perspective Ron Kovic Bts Ma Steve Jobs Missouri Thon Derek DAN Spain Twitter Todd Youtube Stefan Facebook Australia
Josh Taylor Links Up With Ben Davison After McGuigan Split

TKO with Carl Frampton

14:04 min | 1 year ago

Josh Taylor Links Up With Ben Davison After McGuigan Split

"Take a call off. Imagine this week for Especially very pleased to welcome to the show. Just could thank you yet we give. Thanks for joining like price-fixing more this is about. We're not seeing you guys phones. Justin comes first because you've adds an amazing eighteen months class equation for. Why did you leave safe home? Promotion Day just. They actually going to do that yet. My first congratulations on amazing. Twelve months you sit in the unified. Wbrc F ring magazine Super Low in the world. I imagine that still a bit weird area sounds good for years. Since oh boy dreaming become chopping. Never for a minute margin that'd be unified in Ring Ring magazine a something. Just dreams of dreams come true but I never met for rain magazine. World champion the rocky. Bill uncle is just amazing. Everybody of Bell. It's just been like superstars of this book. You know not just from prison in Scotland Jo. Say is crazy. Yeah ever start. They're like you've added. Obviously. Don't concedes things that happened outside the ring of Split with Wiggins Cam but the show has to go on and oversee you have responsibilities multiple belt holder one of them being humanitary challenges and from the touristy strict on those you've been ordered by the bathroom ready to defend the thing so they was pressuring you regardless of of the split actually find a China but general new maneuver was WANNA go anywhere. How to for a long time and a new team? That was going to be leaving Shane. Mcguigan jus just was very unhappy. First choice was so an. We've come over one hundred weeks trial and a and Dubai enough. The second session was fluent. You know just can click new. Wanted to to go stray away but in a book and a week rather than other booth as well with what to do to make up their name. After about Bannon I come here. I just think in the spelt just jail. Because obviously trains Billie Joe Israel on La Custodial his speed and combination and food work. You know so. I thought it'd be a good match up and feel comfortable in annex eight further. She hopes I was glad. You Want Obama. Wilton it over the of the war you were going to go to Uber doing recession with with autumn trial as well. I just think that ban status John is more suited. Do not take anything away from on Burke's coach but a lot of failures have a certain standard yeah. I don't think you'd better. Yeah but I'm not no automatic coaches. Well it was. It was very good. I haven't been seeing similar things you need to do. A Walk Cohen again was sort of shoulder stale. And it just wasn't my style until you go rape a couple of teams a job and stuff fell real good but just two different from Aachen and style and billy Joel and South Pole and seeking combination fast punches with good feet walk so under the weakening going to stay in the second week. I'm going to train here. This is what I'm going to go. We'll Ben Weapons. Take out. Congratulations on this new partnership. Also want to say a big congratulations for the weekend. Because of course you're in the Corden last by that but I think anybody watching these knows anything about. Boxing understands the totally invaluable contribution that you made progress and twice in achieved on Saturday night and so low you for from us. Congratulations must be a great fien. Yeah of course you know tossing a fringe as well when Keep putting these right because it does simply bow down to that just because I'm not financially benefiting from a situation doesn't mean he's not my friend anymore. I've always the French. It was completely fake. And of course I wanted to win an annuity to do good number because fame to be able to do what he done. That tops fifty percent in the I knew it was gonna be. What are they now? He's going to be as dominant as that news going to dominate and get good win. We'll come on to that because I know you toss fury fantasy. We'll come into the fight. Second offer the show for those of you watching and listening. We don't often hear about the side of the train is experienced. When there's a split with the fights over they retire or whether you part ways Tyson. Speaking stay co about the void that was left when Belgium hung them up last year. And how that's been a big adjustment period for him over the last twelve months for you. Obviously we've talked for years and years and years but journey was so intense and so hands on and so committed from both of your sides that when that comes through in our magin takes a bit of adjusting for us. Well Yeah of course. She knows it was a twenty four seven job literally twenty four seven three hundred sixty five days a year so it took up a Omar. Tom The last couple of years and I was walking again. We believe in being contacted about the judge situation as well and it was. Actually that wasn't nice to part ways we talked and it was nice to have a little bit of towns myself over the Christmas period as well because for the last three years. Christmas is both days all of that of always been away so it was Nice Avenue bad time to myself as well call you know yourself. You're in a similar situation to Josh where he left the train. But you're the peak of your career. So uconn yeah. We see prospects changing coaches nearly stages of their careers trying to work out. What's best for them? But at this stage of your career when you're changing trainers there's very low margin for error because you're essentially going into big fight off the big fight. There's no easy ones from from this point and the stakes. Obviously a high they she if you particularly and I know you had the same when you left and found. Jamie more you have to fit that has to be has to be someone that you work well with and you agree with their methods and their approach to Faden and the approach they take to fight and training camps and everything else and even just as well so I had a few trainers in mind when I when I joined Jimmy Mira when I left the mcguigan. Sorry Jimmy was the first one that I want on. It just felt a real quick and someone. I didn't do the Josh John Was. He went to show morale's I really. I felt like a fitted in well not jim elect. Jimmy was saying and that was enough for me maybe another two or three guys and manned and everything's a lot of contacting a member of the thing that just just well Jimmy. You obviously need that time to Joe did you. Fought for the Horatio Garcia. I'll say the thing short camp and the approach gender did for a faith and I had six weeks and it wasn't like wasn't forced and the woman felt like the right decision for me to make but it was fast approaching my return defect and again. I knew I needed a coach as well so it was kind of half blood that he was the first guy. Because maybe if I'd have went with someone else with a short space of time I made a one of them because I was getting close. The approaching afraid of in my head. Peter has one solace was one because he was given. Hey and autumn booth was in my head as well as a potential trainer but gave me was the first one to. I'm glad that by the time he then had to build towards the thought. You need that nine months together to Joe was a pairing the two big Of You guys will have the same thing when you come to. Maybe that fight with Ramirez. If he's later this year were next year so in it in a sense. Who's this happened? On some of that you've been mandated for these fights. The ones that you want to have as your first one together. Because you don't really ben one walk into a fight with Joseph Ramirez after you know working with someone for for fourteen sixteen weeks yet your son degree but I feel like she's a similar character to us. Latino Arkansas of quickly understand what type of person he is emotionally how he's mentally and you can see in the build up to previous fought speak fuzzy's had how approaches those flights in that mine and stylistically. I understanding on the standard shrimps on the season. He's the level of far to where you can make adjustments. And of course you can improve them. I do believe even without those adjustments. He's good enough to beat Ramirez in my opinion. Okay but I mean the criticism that you had when you first came on the scene was always baseness your age and your relative inexperience coach and obviously ninety nine percent of thousands. Of course after that I say while to fight for you was the way the Ben led the corner that night and the call. Mri showed on the the highest lakes possible. Was that one of the things that made you think he could guide meter in these big before. It was so a clips trained Tyson. An over the belly. Joe's will stay there. Were walking on the combinations of movement head movement and the speed and the feet were really similar that we can boxing can train. You know. So he's going to move up. Can I WANNA go with an officer? The Way Komo boat and then you hear his vase in the corner breaks the FE and just this knowledge of this book is broken these on the twenty seven. Yeah SMARTS WAY I. How actually apologized when he billy Joel was an was fighting. Someone in eastern. And you're in the corner and it was the first real appearance from you. Remember thinking it was a bad reform from billy Joel but remember thinking urgency in the corner but enhance sake. We nine Billie Joe wasn't fed and there was no word because every fucking if you'd have been too on top on the corner of Blue Gosden. Yeah you may have lost a fake. I have apologize for for what would be joe quite a few years before that and new obviously spend that training camp with him along with Jimmy Tibbs couple of weeks before five ways we Jimmy and I knew what was in the tank and I knew that we had to efficient in getting around management was very in Poland. Now what might be Joe take some out take and I know what doesn't so I knew when to push him on because the bill judge J fogg told him you'll stay around he was gonNA thank you ever to win the next round. We couldn't afford to do that. She was just about around. I think people always associate age of experience but I was lucky enough to spend time around people Jimmy Tubes and very knowledgeable guys which I gained a hell of a lot from a non round management. They something picks up from Jimmy tibbs unquote. That's the best about will the faces a new face on the managing high profile fights is that had it been Jimmy Tibbs in the corner. People would've assumed they obviously there's something going on with because it's you the first people reach for is does this guy know is doing and they look at your age and then say that's the about faces of training. I would like to think the performances in the corner over the last couple of years of giving people realize the what you're about the same as forty one performance and people jump on until fully. Understand that it's the same for everybody and anybody in high high profile situation. There's going to be downstairs. This'll your options for this year. And so this apponaug on some who's been mandated by the whole hangs told me there's there's no much online a couple of eight and it's only a few Ranjha so it does vary toll but it looks like he punched his heart but very wailed in so it raw keith. My on the ball. Nothing I don't think I can handle and I'm sure we'll get him and it's GonNa be if Shedu lineup is going to potentially a week or two before Pasta and Ramirez do you think about what's Outgo. Yeah it'd be for going and build for Boeing and I am to life and then pick up tips and hopefully put myself a fight after the end result and get myself a fight for their unification of the belts. It's good to be there as well as trying to make and just to be present. Boca players and people started talking about the more that Josh and say. I don't even know manufacturer with Sixteen Sixteen years. He's been completely undisputed author. Maybe a teen fakes. Yeah on real. It will take a little bit affirm- playing out. Because they're oversee mandate she's on both sides. Wbz will be cool next the winner of Possum Ramirez the WBO. I think we'll be called. Tau Closest amount in your Camp Castro. Do feel like he's been mandatory since time began and he's been waiting very patiently for quite recently sunny front war and said in an interview that John Wooden necessarily step aside. Fay So would mean that. Potentially you'd have to face. He would have faced winner. Puzzle Ramirez Wbai Mandatory. Which could be Whitson? If you Kinda plan this out and you're listening to oversee. Ideally I'd WanNa go forth Ramirez fake and obviously Kado take a step back and make the shot for all the marbles but please you know Jack Jack. Idaho's wait that long thing for today's short has been mandatory for a good while. No so is Joe. Short so happens I then so be it. They don't have to Ma other mandatory against a written or someone you know so I'm about what we goes day. I'm confident in every single.

Billie Joe Joseph Ramirez Josh John Jimmy Billy Joel Jimmy Tibbs Tyson Ring Ring Magazine Billie Joe Israel Bill Uncle Ramirez Wbai Boxing Rain Magazine Justin Dubai Barack Obama John Wooden Mcguigan Jimmy Tubes
"magin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"magin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of the people that are not getting paid. And these people are living from paycheck to paycheck, especially like the coastguard glum-faced stance. How that kind of stuff they need help. And I asked if if she still supports Trump in cheat. She said that she does. But then I said, can you look ahead twenty twenty a bit for me. Will you be voting for him again? And she gave me a look, and she she said it is way too early to think about whether she's going to do that. So she's. Wavering. Interesting. I mean, you talked with without cross section of people. There are are people really thinking about twenty twenty or are they more like like her and saying, you know, just give me some time. They're they're certainly watching the debate in Washington over the wall, very closely twenty twenty has crept into their consciousness, whether they like it or not and some are quick to say, hey, I voted for the president. And I'm with them again. But again, there is an awareness that a choice is coming up in. It's gonna be on them before they know the shutdown is playing into into their calculus at least. Absolutely. Absolutely. Okay. NPR national political correspondent, Don gonyea. Thanks, don. The pleasure. So there are two people claiming to be the president of Venezuela right now. And as you to magin, there's all kinds of chaos as a result, nNcholas Maduro was re elected president. But the socialist government that's been in power for many, many years has been accused of rigging elections and also changing the rules when they lose and the leader of the legislature one why don't has declared himself the interim president..

president interim president Don gonyea nNcholas Maduro Venezuela national political corresponde NPR Washington magin
"magin" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

08:23 min | 2 years ago

"magin" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Arizona's afternoon news with magin, Gaydos. News ninety two three FM. Mac and Gaydos on the program. All right. So this time tomorrow, we'll have miracle county. Sheriff Paul Penzone in studio for his monthly exclusive also on the show tomorrow. We're expecting Meghan McCain her first. Yeah. Monthly exclusive with us in two thousand nineteen that should be good stand by for that. So today if you're asking, well, what's the big local story? I think it's governor Doug Ducey, obviously, having the state of the state today, and we aired it live at about two o'clock. And I think we should kind of go through what Arizonans can. Kind of figure from this speech. What's important? What's going to happen? This year. What's the number one take away or the number one thing that governor Doug Ducey is looking at all, right? Let's go through what he talked about. And I'll just give you a rundown, right? He started off with water the looming water crisis. He then went to his commitment to education funding waters, boring, then he went to wariness about spending and taxes than an emphasis on job school safety plan revival ideas for criminal Justice reform, not not not a lot of sparks not a lot of sparks flying. Not a lot of. Wow. Especially when what you said you start off with water. That's what you start with. But he's given these states or the states before and there were some sentences that kind of caught our ear. So we'll go over that. I think the one thing that I liked that I heard from Doocy. Was that if you are thinking in the legislature to take any of the money that's going to go towards teachers? Yeah. You better think again now, I'm just giving you a kind of the how I heard it. Governor Doug Ducey wants his legacy in Arizona as the governor to be a good one. Right. And it cannot be a good one. If he does not come through on the second half of his promise to Arizona, teachers. He's come through with the first ten percent twenty by twenty twenty. Alright teachers have made ten percent more this year. And so we're looking at five percent and five percent. He has to get that done. He says the economy will help him get that done. And if anybody tries to touch that money, you better, you you. He was he was threatening. And again, that's gonna touch it. That's what he's got to do. So I did like that part. Because again, if teachers here that here that are they going to say, oh, well, we're all good probably not but Arizona has ripped off teachers for so many years. This governor does not want that to happen again, partly because he thinks yes teacher should make more. But the other big big part seventy five percent of it has to be ego and legacy. He does not want to be remembered as the guy who who went halfway and got teachers ten percent. And then couldn't do the rest one of the things that I heard that. I thought maybe could be used as as some kind of agenda down the road is he says he wants a billion dollars in a rainy day fund a billion dollars who else wants a billion dollars because I'm proposing that we secure future and prepare responsibly for the unexpected and the inevitable. By bringing our rainy day fund to a record breaking balance of one billion dollars. Now, you know that's going to be used by. The people who represent teachers or some some group that saying what? We're just going to let a billion dollars over here. And nobody touches it. Why don't we use that to fund education? Why don't we use that for the school safety program or build something else to me that was kind of? I don't want to call it a veiled threat, but he has a goal but the goal also matches up with what invest for Edward wanted. They want at least a billion dollars per year and they're challenging the legislature. When I heard a billion dollars in a fund that does nothing a rainy day fund. I was like. Interesting chooses a billion dollars as the goal. I don't know. I don't think that's a shot at anybody. But there have been other states where teachers wanted raises or they need money for education or infrastructure, and they never touch the rainy day fund because they say, well, it's not that bad yet you had people lined up on your front porch last year. They were dressing redback. Yes. It was read for Ed. Yes. It was. And now you want to put away a billion dollars. And he said it was for Arizona's future. Right. Is that education is that? No. I don't on his future makes me think children. I don't know. But I've seen other states have this same debate of well, how much money do you need to keep when I'm making such and such and I've gotten to pay do, you know, how many state employees have not gotten raises for a decade or more? I bet you they're saying, well, why can't we have some of that money? So I thought that was interesting that he has this goal of a billion dollars. Let's see if he gets to it. Or does somebody else say, hey that money should be used over here? Governor Doug ducey's twenty nine thousand nine state-of-the-state address. We're in a nineteen year drought. I don't wanna talk about water. It's going to get worse before it gets better by turn the tap on kinetico's not gonna come out dust. It will be nothing but dust Arizona. And our neighboring states draw more water. Let's steal from our neighboring states from the Colorado river, well, they steal from us. That's mother nature putz back. Well, I can have a talk with mother nature. It's time to protect lake Mead. Okay. All right. So what that means is you've got lake Mead up north you tell me what that mean. Yeah. Las vegas. Las Vegas is taking a lot of that water out and California what some of that water. And we give some of that water through the Colorado river are we going to get into a blanking contest with Nevada, Colorado and another state or even Mexico because Mexico gets that water to I forbid you'd ever talk about water on the show again, I forbid you to talk about kinetico there were even that's awful. That's no, it's it's refreshing. I will burn. All right. Let's also talk about this clip. From governor Ducey is getting a lot of play. And that's why and it's not water. And that's why we're including enough dollars to put a cap on every campus that needs one. Okay. So. So resource officer cop every single campus tomorrow, we'll ask Penzone about that. He'll be five fifteen does just does Arizona need a police officer resource officer in every on every single campus Ducey says they've they've they've got some money to do that. That's more than the amount that he wanted last time with that plan last year. I think that's a no brainer. If you can put a cop on every campus, you absolutely do it. Yeah. But remember we talked about this last year after the parkland parkland high school shooting, we thought it was a no brainer. He'd get something passed and didn't the legislature didn't pass it. No. I, you know, I I'm just saying you say, it's a no brainer. I'm shocked. We have a plan in place to begin. I'm saying if you can do it you should do it. Okay. That's an over. What do you think this legislation legislature will try to get that passed because I was surprised they didn't after the parkland? I think the Arizona legislature hot garbage. Okay. And it will they ever get anything done. Probably not we got morons in. They're trying to sue teachers or get fired or we got some of them are driving around drunk. I mean, they're feeders. Yeah. So do I think they'll get anything. Probably not. But if you can do it, and if you've got the money that sounds good to me. So governor Ducey state of the state address twenty nineteen. There are some of the highlights. All right coming up next. You know, everybody's still is talking about what happened with Hocine into healthcare and the woman in a vegetative state raped. She gave birth to a baby listen to this. The former head of the Arizona department of economic security wanted to shutdown hacienda healthcare three years ago. Why wasn't he able to do it? Well, ask him next..

Governor Doug Ducey Arizona Las vegas Sheriff Paul Penzone Colorado river Meghan McCain governor Ducey Arizona department of economic kinetico lake Mead Gaydos Mac magin twenty twenty front porch officer parkland parkland high school Doocy
"magin" Discussed on The Pulse

The Pulse

04:26 min | 2 years ago

"magin" Discussed on The Pulse

"Social magin is one of the things that you know, a head Dickey of a. Shopping. I mean, like shopping used escape a lot world escape, I can't amidst those things, but it ain't over for me. This time is this, you know, right now, I can't do it. It's just Tim porary thing was the one. He won't go. She can communicate with me. Sometimes we actually hold a conversation, maybe two or three minutes, and we just talk like mother and daughter, and I'd be just so amazed because she's holding the conversation, and I. Wow, that's rewarding. A her being heavy is basically my reward. That's Sharon wage. He takes care of her mother, Martha shayla Farzana of Saint Louis public radio produced this piece. You're listening to the pulse. We're talking about aging and a lot of us feel some anxiety about this topic. Here is Barbara Resnick with prescription for getting older with ease. She's a geriatric nurse practitioner. So I think the best things to think about aging are to think about building your resilience. How are you going to cope with aging? How are you gonna deal with the changes are you gonna fall apart? Are you going to not be able to read the the phone book anymore? If you can find a phone book and get angry. Because if you're gonna do that, you're not gonna win aging being resilient means accepting the changes and optimizing what you've got to work with. If you get bad arthritis instead of sitting down and cry in and shake in your fists, you need to keep walking and keep moving and utilize interventions that help you manage the pain. Be able to ask for help appropriately. And accept that help and go with the flow. It's a life process, and you have to embrace it. Enjoy it eat, well, particularly a high protein diet and engage in physical activity and keep doing as much as you can do. So you got to fall in love with that old car. Exactly. By Resnick is a professor at the university of Maryland school of nursing. Finish out today's show. We wanted to get a perspective from somebody who is a long way away from old age reporter shy. Ben Yaacov sat down with his son Gill who's eight. Gil. Yes, what does it mean to you to get older now? Actually, never thought about that means to me that om I'm able to do more things in able to less things to what do you mean less things any in like, maybe when your kid you can like go out and play baseball all the time with your friends at school when you're grown up you have to go to work and actually work the whole day. And what about like when you're even older than that like an old person? No, I think when you're retired. You might wanna go to a retirement home, which. Sounds better than not having a home. How do you want to grow old on a live a happy life in good health with a good family? Do you think you'll feel different when you're an old person? Oh, yes. I think that will feel how do you think you're gonna feel different? Is it hard questions? I mean, they are once in pest twenty one I can drink which. Which actually..

Barbara Resnick a. Shopping Gill Martha shayla Farzana Tim porary university of Maryland school Sharon Ben Yaacov Saint Louis baseball Gil reporter professor three minutes
"magin" Discussed on Tara Brach

Tara Brach

05:11 min | 2 years ago

"magin" Discussed on Tara Brach

"Bring the image sensor, this person close in since persons is as they look at you. How they look when they're looking lovingly. The felt sense of what you share what you appreciate. Letting yourself notice whatever goodness about them comes up. Whatever you sensors. They're goodness. Most deeply how they touch your heart. Help your heart. Mentally whisper. Thank you. Mentally whisper their name, and I love you. Magin incense them receiving that. Receiving your appreciation of and just deepening that sense of connection. Notice how that feels. Just the warmth tenderness ever feels in your heart. Feeling that hearts face that feel that sorts waking up as you sense that benefactor bringing your attention to this being right here yourself embody being. Regarding yourself looking through the lens of care and love to see your own being unsure own goodness. That you want to low that you love. Whatever qualities you're being you pre. She ate your honesty humor appreciation of beauty. If it helps looking through the eyes of the one who loves you. Adding that dimension. Offering yourself. Well, wishing and you might gently put your hand on your heart. Really communicating from your big heart right to this human heart. With as much sincerity as you can some like to their head on their cheek or both hands on their heart. However, you feel intimate with your own being experimented. If you haven't done this, really experiment. Syncing what you want to wish for yourself? Just says some phrases that many find resonant. And as you mentally whisper them it helps to imagine yourself. With the qualities you're wishing for yourself visually and to feel it in your body. The possibility.

Magin
"magin" Discussed on Critical Role

Critical Role

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"magin" Discussed on Critical Role

"Previous magin. They're speaking of the previous owner of this temple. The here. Why is she looking like, you know, she? What do you do? I wish to know what could just bucking said the award then. We are the warden right now. We've got two wardens. Guys are the war. Then. My this is what I'm estimating. I don't. I think anyone the war. I'm going to take a look I'm I think we have yet to meet the world. There's a strange moment as not kind of cold sensation your back year. Like, oh, that's kind of tickles. Begins to constrict, and you guys glance over and you watch not one of the vines kind of curled up around not. Tighten around. Feels like this. You take fifteen points of damage in our grapple Yasha. You are so right. The ground 'cause I'm next to Caleb. All right. Josh runs over to not. And with the go for you. Then swings on L vine. You got you. Hold point Bovine vying. wraps up around your body after that it's going to be a sixteen to hit. Kick it off and kinda pull away and you can now see this. This. Thick vine. That's kind of rising up was it as a kind of curls around almost almost like an its own right towards you other vines begin to thicken in the area around you, and you watch as the roots begin to turn the area into hard terrain to walk through like the floor of the forest seems to briefly come alive and these large too thick entangling vines one that's wrapped entirely round not constricting her.

Yasha Caleb Josh
"magin" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

09:12 min | 2 years ago

"magin" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Magin, Gaydos. TA our news ninety two three FM. Straight them MAC and Gaydos on the program. Oh, Arizona votes in like four weeks. Mac MC Sally cinema. Do see Garcia. The ads that are out there. Ridiculous. Yes. Every single week. We speak with MAC and Gaydos, political insider and former Arizona governor Jan brewer we talked about all that stuff. You wanna play a portion of that for you. Now, governor brewer with MAC and Gaydos, and we started the interview just welcoming her to the show, I'm fine. I wonder if you've gotten this ad there's a male or put out by political action committee against Kirstin cinema. It's got a nice picture of Phoenix on the front and it says at the top Kirstin cinema won't protect Arizona. And then it's a hologram if you tilted a little bit it changes into a nuclear mushroom cloud in the middle of the valley. Getting something out of a cereal box. Play with it. And then on the bottom of the attitudes appears to keep Arizona's say have you gotten the ad and be is this the most ridiculous ad you've ever seen because I it cinema doesn't have access to any kind of nuclear weapons. Nuked right on the no, I I wasn't the recipient of this at. So fun. I wish I. Dot net McClure walking in for the mailbox and thrown in the garbage. The bottom line is is is gonna be. Donen out there, you know, and a good cinema supported bombers a nuclear plant, if you will with Iran, you know, when we sent over plane loads of millions of dollars Iran is not our friend. There are our enemy. They don't like it. President Trump Joe coffee cart blinds of becoming the builder of nuclear weapons, but anybody really going to believe that right? President Obama anybody really going to believe in the middle of Phoenix Arizona that Kirstin cinemas going to get us. Bob. Well, she gets elected to the Senate. She's going to be voting on these things. And and cinema has a long history of not supporting our national defense. I don't have to support our national defense. But that doesn't mean I'm going to get a new bomb the city our country our country. My goodness. I mean, I can remember way back when she posed an American flag and the constitution in our classes you own putting the American flag in our here urine as you never supported our border patrol, and she's supportive. The closure of Luke air force base or defense been on the air force base. Arizona depends on Luke air force base is a billion dollar economic boom that it puts into our state at all the jobs. I mean if nothing else. Arizona better thing is a mess. Cinema cannot be trusted G is. Belongs to the. Cinema party. It's all about cursing cinema is not a team player. So gubernatorial race Dorothea. She hasn't endorsed him gathered endorsed him MC went into the democratic headquarters, and he added signs up there there, and she walks in and she puts her side where on top of Garcia is that true that true. Yes. Yes. It is true. He is all about Kirsten, cinnamon. She does that she started out as a as a socialist. Inner core is socialism, and it continues, and it's about cinema. She has to go, right? Right. Right. Does he still a liberal is still a liberal Democrat? I work with somebody where it's all about them. That's for sure. But not you're going liberal saying you talking about me, I'm saying I'm saying I'm saying if I had a book at changing hands, and you had a book come over and put your book on top of my. Mac is right as upset former Arizona governor Jan brewer's. Joining us. Here's the last thing about the the ad that says cinema is gonna get Arizona nuked. So we can all agree even though governor brewer urine mic Sally's corner. If someone were to go to the polls and vote for Kirstin cinema cinema bean in Arizona, Senator won't get Arizona nuked, you would agree with that. Right. I don't know that. Wow. Vote and the Senate is the firewall and she wants to be over there. And she's been through raider self around professing to be you know, this person that we know that the. People have figured it out. They have bigger duck. You ought to be an actress. Political insider Jan brewer joins us as she does every Wednesday. Governor today, we get a poll and it says Martha mcsally up six points against Kirstin cinema. The democrat running for Senate, you have endorsed Martha mcsally you've been campaigning with Martha mcsally governor. Why is she doing? So well is it because maybe Trump's ratings are up. I think it's not only the Republicans. I think it's our country as a whole and particularly here in Arizona with the tax cuts and a low unemployment Martha's out there working day and night telling the story, she's going to do what's right for our country and Kirsten is just wrong for our country. Do you think governor that Republicans have seen what happened with Brad Kavanagh and haven't liked it and said, you know, what we do need to make sure that there is a Republican Senator in there that has a vote for the next supreme court Justice. And that would mean voting for Martha mcsally, if you're a Republican, I think, so I do I believe that that process that we all were part of in watched so diligently that it generated a lot of enthusiasm out there in electric, they paid attention. Because of course, we are a country that believes that people are presumed innocent until proven guilty and that Blue Wave has gone away. My bread. I think the Blue Wave is then crashed former governor of Arizona and MAC and Gaydos, political insider, Jan brewer joins us as she does each and every Wednesday. Why hasn't Donald Trump visited Arizona? He is crisscrossing the country stepping up his travel schedule, the key states around the country one month before the midterm elections. But no announcement for AirAsia what's going on. He's coming. He's coming to do it. You know in a couple of weeks, I know from factors things are in most. And you'd be more specific I can't. On his way. Can you say with some kind of metaphysical certitude hundred percent hundred percent? He will be here before the election for November. Oh, yes. I think so. Say absolutely, positively knew things happen shows up if he shows up this Kirstin cinema have this whole place nuked. Oh, jeez. Forever. Zona governor. Jan brewer is joining us. How about the gubernatorial race we've seen twelve points? Maybe more Doug Ducey is leading Garcia governor you've run in in these races. Can anyone overcome a twelve point deficit a month out? It's gonna be really hard. It's going to be really really tough has not raised a lot of money. And we all know that it does take money to run in the election. And he sort of bloom stuff. I love the water with his comments. And then he doesn't have his party, including that that star of the party, which is Kirsten. I mean, it's all about. Are you ready to call the race and say, listen, this is a done deal? I am I think Bobby going to win that race unless something extraordinary illegally Athens. And I don't see that on the full side. Governor you're going to get your flu shot this year. I got it yesterday. I'm trying to get back to get the flu shot. They're giving the shot out today at KTAR here at the station. He won't go down. I think he's scared of needles. Governor. Can you help me on that? You gotta do that. You shouldn't do it end up. Sick. You're going to be old. And then he's going to have to carry the weight for you, like, I know it, I know it. Okay. Governor rose again, it's all about Gaydos once again. Governor great to talk to you. We'll talk to you next week. I got the governor to shame. You get the shot. We got we got the governor to say Okie Doke that is actually kind of five never heard that before if anybody if anybody could could get you to go get that flu shot 'cause they're right here in the office, still it's governor brewer. You're going to do it. No coming up next. Why did frontier? Airlines led an emotional support squirrel on a plane next..

Arizona Jan brewer Kirstin cinemas Gaydos MC Sally cinema Martha mcsally Mac Kirstin cinema Garcia Kirsten flu MAC Senate Phoenix Arizona Senator Magin President Trump Joe
"magin" Discussed on Keith and the Girl Comedy Talk Show

Keith and the Girl Comedy Talk Show

03:57 min | 3 years ago

"magin" Discussed on Keith and the Girl Comedy Talk Show

"And then just block that, so, yeah. Wow. And then at the same time, when you say, you know, it's good to know that you weren't crazy yell. So don't wanna find you you Ida magin because I know what I would do. It was far worse than I thought it was going to be. Right. I, I'm thinking in the back of my head, you know what? Who is gonna love me with chemo who is gonna love with my hair falling out. My all's my eyes Allred me not be able to do exciting things. And then then you're, you read, oh yeah, I was right. I m gli. Honestly, she didn't even know during chemo like sheeting even meet me until right after all of that. She just, I don't know. I guess I was hotter before which makes. I mean, everyone. It does take its physical toll. Very odd. Do you do you bother to let the boyfriend of the friend though? What's up. Just let me let me help her in a liar share. I mean, this is another thing I read about abusive relationships. I never got to meet him for friends. So yeah, I did. There's no way to warn him. The less I really dive in deep in like, do a bunch of weird research isn't worth it. Do you see anywhere around you now? She's not she. She can't come to your life unless you invite her. I mean, I don't think she would want to. Now I'm just thinking like sometimes you're in the same circles or something like that, but she's not in the same circles, really close to her mom, he still keep in touch. No, not really. We drink a lot. Whispering Rangeuil rose eight together. That's nice. You in the mom? Yeah, I miss that. But this she does the mom, the mom. We exchanged warning or one text after everything went down where I was like, hey, this is some of this stuff that happened. I, I don't wanna part of this anymore. I was like, if you wanted know anything more, feel free to ask questions, but I really can't like, I don't want to be too involved in this anymore. Wow, that's great. The told her mom, I think that's, but I didn't tell her everything you don't have to to me this, your family of somebody has to know when she starts saying that she was hearing voices in like was talking about. She wanted to crack her head open all that which kind of does or doesn't make sense in hindsight, like I. Who's making yourself a victim? Yeah, and I warned them and they were very cool about that. But she got like she reacted by being outraged, like screwing up something. I don't know that did sign like four nights on a row of her threatening to. Of her just saying she can't handle the voices into she was gonna kill herself and that I shouldn't go over to see if she's okay and stuff like that. She's gonna tell you anything about it, how how of you, what have you done for yourself to get over this craziness? I completely fell apart. I was dealing with a housing thing where I was in a rent stabilized apartment at the same time, and I found I was in a illegal sub-lease of illegal sub-lease and I was talking to a lawyer and they sent a giant Russian man to my door. So this was happening at the exact same time. I just reacted by being like, screw all of this. And I just went and slept on my friend's couch and yet very depressed for months. And then just start rebuilding things very slowly on seeing anyone doing any therapy thing therapy. But the problem with that is. It's like a go to therapy. I, I got put on antidepressants and anti anxiety. 'cause is having nightmares too..

Ida magin chemo Allred
"magin" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"magin" Discussed on 710 WOR

"You can actually can take control of your your retirement now in magin actually making more money on the correction than you could in normal times you know there there's some interesting things that go on with our retirements that that i always like to kind of bring up in the in the half day classes and make sure that everybody sees these as great opportunities and one of them is when you run parallels between our different sources of passive income and passive income for the most part is going to be things that we don't do we don't spend a whole lot of time to generate money right it's more money creating money rather than like time creating money so when we're looking at this or there's a few different ways where in re in our retirement where we will have a passive income and some of the most common would be like rental income inside of some rental properties right one of the things if you go back to the to those properties is they're they're insured right we have ensured those properties that are creating income which is which is great because we've got a lot of money tied up into right or maybe you own a business and you know you have a partnership that maybe you're not as active in but you still vested with that company you're getting a little bit of income on that but most businesses are also insured they're protected right they're protected against kind of the downside if this if this business was to turn against us our retirement account also designed usually to generate a little bit of passive income right little bit of growth maybe some dividends and stuff like that and there's different options strategies that you can use but when we go through these usually the ones that have the most money tied up into him we're going to be our retirement account is where we have all of that kind of life savings cash sitting there an of those three kind of normal passive income streams the one that isn't isn't insured is the one that has the most exposure and so when we're looking at our retirement accounts you know we're shooting to have maybe a million plus dollars into one of these retirement accounts.

magin
"magin" Discussed on Well This Sucks

Well This Sucks

04:21 min | 3 years ago

"magin" Discussed on Well This Sucks

"My my nanna had colon cancer those were both things that happened before me like before a new so i don't think anybody was too too worried which sounds ridiculous but i think we just didn't want it to be i don't know she didn't treat it like it was a huge steel everything felt sort of normal in she did a good job of keeping everyone from worrying i well i think that's a big part of it yeah is how the person selves is reacting to it yeah 'cause i remember toward the end it was it was us it was like me and my mom who were making things worse for her like she asked us not to visit her anymore toward the end because we just couldn't keep our shit together one we'd visit yeah it was just like how did that feel for you were you did you understand which definitely understood we were a mess it was just like just sitting i mean how can you so selfish to do that i like we just couldn't keep it together though yeah but it's not sell fisher feeling emotions stop that magin yes some people are good at that and i wish that i was but i'm crier yeah my teachers used to think there was something wrong does your school teachers yeah they would call my mom and be like i don't know what i don't know what i said to her she just started crying feeling a lot of feelings feelings i would very similar it was very like line of that like not line of dialogue your person this is life life because you like if that one thing like i remembered now them saying like she's just crying we don't know what happened my mom like no one knows why you're crying you don't even know why are you i have all these emotions through form way to express yourself is to let those tears out oh boy pre hormones even i was like man how old was i o ever since i was in probably like second grade i was just i just burst onto tears for no reason you're sensitive thing actually i'll make sense you know all your empathy clearly you have a lot of it's too much to bear maybe that was just empathy for myself when i was a kid it was my own sympathy for me for the condition yeah the condition of life man condition of the elementary kind right but yeah well you know i i've done this ever with everybody all the time where i like 'cause this is my own experience which is like my dad passing away i feel weird always finding a way to talk about it got but at least feel like us something different to share better time so it's fine yeah it was like i couldn't keep it together when he was passing away it was like a long drawn out process and he was just like old and kind of losing it and stuff like that he didn't react in a very nurturing you know what i mean like he did very often say like shuts fuck stop fucking cry you know and like he'd even mocked me a lot like aren't you aren't you a damn actress like those are crocodile tears boy you know it was i felt the same i i'm not crying this stop sake sorry stopping stop at you know we do our damn biz which just youths were john youths i'm sorry.

"magin" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"magin" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Do the things physically athletically the o'brien james can do on the basket insanity watching it really is i i'm in a magin lebron like a mess imagine lebron playing the teams that michael jordan had to play it's just it's i would've loved to see it but i do think though you don't feel like you would know the outcome he's just a a bigger more athletic more skilled being right so more here's the thing the knicks would have to physically beat him up and i'm not talking about like handshake i'm talking about elbows to face and i mean that's what they would have done to try to stop the thing i think that when you do wanna go back and look at the tapes of michael jordan don't pay attention to jordan pay attention to the people he's playing right because that to me is what makes is what is the different i do think the i do think you bring up an excellent point that the athlete in today's game probably superior a guy like john starks for example guy who i love was all heart effort defense but physically he's not you can't compare like they're yes like he could john starks could defend reggie miller michael jordan he would not be able at all two two lebron james he would literally be like a bug that splatted ron amoah just do a little move and it'd be done it's not comparable to me and i don't even know if that's because of the the different styles of play the different errors i do think that speaks more towards lebron and his physical i mean the broncos that guys now nobody really could stop him now that's why it's so insane lebron has never really been hurt before beasts like i don't understand how you could be playing at this level for so long and never had a serious injury juiston i mean i can see why people would think that but i mean what proof do we have steroids are using the nba i think i think they have more wiggle room to do things.

lebron knicks michael jordan john starks ron amoah broncos nba reggie miller
"magin" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"magin" Discussed on WGTK

"Magin thinking i saw five foot it's ridiculous holy lunatic five foot rabbits why garamba he's sitting in my chair now riley don't look again now he's reading the sunday paper this has gone far enough now i'm going to prove to you once and for all he may be vicious my sh she's in their hopeless i got a saver move into my house oh wait how you you can't fuck yourself the rabbit mr eilly me simon the ryen was real it it it ain't a real ravage it's a weasel sure it's me mr riley voting development he is simon get out of that custom you faker but mr yeah it's off simon get out of this yes sir i'm going i know the way by heart don't come back no mine is going to go out with an imitation rabbit.

Magin simon mr riley five foot
"magin" Discussed on Lawyer Talk: Off The Record

Lawyer Talk: Off The Record

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"magin" Discussed on Lawyer Talk: Off The Record

"My face looks at it but i mean again time they have a better about well it's after in there in their respect for them here's the thing what's what's spring is back to our law practice because we are lawyers off the record anyway in if magin family i've had some some of the worst cases i've had have been road ridge cases where like normal dude it's like somebody's dead yeah deaths like an all like somebody's daddy like one of my friends dads is driving full speed one hundred miles an hour chasing somebody down run them off the roads i mean that kind of stuff i mean people die that way there's all sorts of crap and it's it's all because you just had a crappy day yeah and you're just like i'm not gonna take it anymore it's like it's a michael douglas movie i'm done it's like i told my wife that i'm not having a small little cash wrist gave me my man and give it back well there's a form no no no no forms right it's like an eye and we've all been there where he just like enough's enough the next jackass he doesn't let in i'm going after but then you end up in cleveland actor he's it was a show in cleveland kind of heavyset guy i think he lost weight but it was a comedy show carry care i heard him do an interview one time and he said that he was trying to get in his head that when people did that the always find the good in it so if somebody cut him off not only was he trying to stop his outward reaction being mad but he was trying to inward think oh well you know that person must be having a bad day let him go ahead you know what i mean like trying to constantly be that way with every interaction he has with with people which i that was pretty cool it's a great way to would conflict and you don't have to be a little bit i mean it doesn't mean you're a coward it just.

magin michael douglas cleveland