23 Burst results for "Maggie Smith"

"maggie smith" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

01:48 min | Last month

"maggie smith" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

"So. I hope that mitt is much to you as it did to me. Her beautiful words are a gift really a gift to the world. Definitely to me if you don't already follow maggie. Today is the day so if you could to jin hat maker dot com under the podcast tab we will have not only episode and all the show notes for it but all of mattie social handles on her website and all her books and everything you want if you would like to discover a little bit more about manny and her work she is just one of the best one of the best and we get to have her in our generation and so i love my conversation with her today. I just felt understood and seen and connected to her and sell. Listen you're gonna love. Love love her work. Run your little feet to start reading her staff. So thank you so much for being such an invested part of this flipping the script series. I have loved it. Really i just. I've really learned a lot of console inspired and you guys next week. We start a brand new series. And you're gonna love it. Do not miss it. If you haven't already subscribe to the show. Just do that subscribe. And you'll never miss an episode. We're so grateful when you do that. Thank you for all your reviews in your ratings to that means so much to us. And so laura and the podcast production team in the end and i we love you and it is our joy to do this show weekend week out and bring it to you. You're the greatest listening community there is. Are you guys see next week..

mitt mattie maggie manny laura
"maggie smith" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

06:08 min | Last month

"maggie smith" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

"Also creates a backdrop for your words and your poems and it's so incredible maggie. You're about exactly like you. You do what you do in a really special way and a really unique way and your writing has just meant so much to me. And it was that lantern. It has been that landlord like look up here. Like there's like up here too. That could lead you out. That can lead you on. Somebody headed you. Who can tell you it gets better. Peop- going just keep going so i am. Thank you for reading that for us. I wanna ask you these last couple of questions this is. These are questions that i'm asking everybody in this series on flipping the script so just whatever whatever comes one okay for you. What's the most important thing generally that you get out of switching things up every once in a while. Let's say when it's your choice you're choosing to do a little flip around. How does that serve. You know for me. I think it's reminding myself that it's possible. I grew up with a narrative of being structured kid. My nickname was checking st as a child. My nickname cecchi. Nagy i know real. Well i have always been someone who is sort of like you know affectionately cheese in my family among my. My parents may ask my uncle by cousins. My sister's four needing to know everything for having planned for everything from not being able to be nimble and pivot and do much on my own. I'm have not been ab- raised her son. The and so honest. And when i'm able to be spontaneous or change my mind or do something different. It feels really affirming to me. That i'm not living. In patter than i'm i proved to myself that i'm to do it and more than i practice doing things differently than were confident. I feel handling whatever life throws me. Even when i don't get to choose it's now trento slipped. It is so true working ourselves through possibility doing new things in uncomfortable. Spaces is the most empowering thing that has ever happened to me. Oh as last year and model for for our kids to. They're watching like we. Don't i mean i don't know what's going to happen but i'm sure it's gonna be okay. We're gonna do it together. Let's just what happens. And i eat naturally empowering for them to me to last question. I borrowed this question for barbara brown. Taylor who's a priest and i just love it and you can answer this in any possible way that you want to we sincerely and earnestly or just dumb be in between an her questions. What saving your life right now. What saving my life right now. I think my people are saving online. Right now yeah my people my kids my parents my friends my my people are are really and my roots like my. My sense of this is who i am. This is where. I am doing what i need to do. And having reminders that around constantly that that sense of rudeness but yeah my people have always have always been what saved my life. I don't. I don't know that that will that will really average change pink. The same for you gotta remain forever and effort as boring as it is. It's just it's not. I learned this year. That many many many many things can follow a for me even precious things and by. I have really what matters still it. Just can't be undone. Nobody can take from me. What means the most to me and so learning that in the wake of suffering is comforting comforting. Like okay. now we've done the hardest thing. We've done the thing that we never thought we would do. We've learned things. We never thought we would learn. We've endured things never thought we would endure here. We are on a podcast. We have makeup on like our hairs done of. I mean it's fair. We can do this. We can do this turns and do it. Yep who can and and our people. And they're like you couldn't get rid of us if you wanted to. And so i answered exactly like you exactly what i have said unless you for just being you thank you for continuing to bring your work into the world through every season through every stage through pain through growth through live through death because that's life that's that's why your work it means so much to all of us because it's all in there. It's all in there everything. The rest of us are all experiencing same issue finding a way to just keep going to keep moving. Okay lastly can you just tell my listeners. At least where they can find you. Your were your space all that. Yeah so. I don't get confused with the dame i am maggie smith poet on social media on instagram and twitter. And i maggie's poet dot com in in sort of either world. So i'm pretty an pretty goo bullets as long as you Or poem government. Otherwise you're going to get a very very talented british actress. You sure are you the. Thank you for being on saturday. I'm so so happy to have met you. And the offer to me your sherpa around austin stales. Lee's i'm come on now. it's on. It seems safe and healthy again. We're gonna totally i got you. I got you right where to take you in hand so i.

cecchi maggie Nagy barbara brown Taylor maggie smith instagram twitter austin Lee
"maggie smith" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

02:54 min | Last month

"maggie smith" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

"Think she.

"maggie smith" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

07:43 min | Last month

"maggie smith" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

"Overwhelmed. I was. I needed maggie smith to give me two sentences. That's what i could digest like. That's what i could take in. It was the saint. I can hold it in my heart. I could remember the words in the language and it was like just a teini little lantern that day. Like does everything start. And here's a little entered. So i'm just going to read some of the pages that i loved from. Keep moving hope imaginative. It allows you to envision what might be up ahead even when you see nothing. Hope imagine your way forward from keep moving. And i also metaphorically written kind of being lost at sea like. I just couldn't see anything. Everything was dark all around me. I cannot there's no shore. I'll never find land again. I'm a draft. Some of your words came to me in a in a metaphorical place. I understood like. I'm going to hold my way that shore i am. I'm going to look for that lighthouse in his so far away but like that one little light will show me that i'm on the right path. Here is something that was precious. And i've had to work really hard at. This has been a part of my kind of mental and spiritual practices. Your to learn i. I really have had to honestly pie. Learn this for the first time so this is also from keep moving. Be sure of at least one thing in this moment at you are loved and worthy of less hold tightly to what you know to be real and true good about who you are. You sherve yourself. Was that hard for you because that was hard for me. Yeah it was hard for me. Yeah i mean we count on the people in our lives to be our mirrors if what we see in that other person that mirror is not good it's hard not to believe even if it's distorted funhouse distort it even if we shouldn't trust it it's hard not to and so finding new mirrors and that means like you know really looking at yourself and and remembering who you are but i mean for me. Being by my people gone to mind. Moths and sitting out on her deck. And letting her remind me of who. I am and who. I've always been letting my kids be might mirrors and letting my you know my best friend's be my ears and that it is hard. I mean it was incredibly hard. I mean i. I wrote these quotes in the middle of might force like the bided. Finish the book. Until i finished the book before my divorce was final. I mean this was. This was not a post divorce. Look this was a divorce writing this book so it happened in real time and i was hap- talking myself strudel all thing and then it came out and twenty twenty in the middle of a pandemic none of us knew what the heck we were doing. And so it means a lot to me to hear. You say that you think it's it's widely applicable. Because i never wanted to read a divorce. Book didn't next payton as being a divorce book. I pictured at being Okay you're in. What now stage in life. How do you find the sort of like best parts of yourself to draw on to get you through it your courage your you know your resilience your sense of your own goodness your optimism. Even if it's tiny you know how. How do you find those. They in order to carry through knowing that it's not always going to be as hard as it is. I love that you just said that. Because i have another one another favorite so many i've so many of these screen shot so many okay but to your point that you just said this is also another one from kate moving. I love this this. When the first time i read this i thought about it for weeks. Trust future you to handle some of what president you is grappling with future. You will know more and heartless. Remember that they're out there arms empty waiting to carry what you handbook is. Oh yeah it's true counting on future me. I don't think we stopped counting on future me because simon right now is so much better than the place. I was two thousand eighteen. But i'm not all the way. There i don't i don't feel out of the roots so to speak so i keep thinking like what is twenty twenty three maggie alike. Be up. to. What challenges will i be able to rise to that and so i still. I still think about that percent. Like i try not to kick too much down her way solve as much as i can. So i'm not. I'm not saddling. Her with a bunch of stuff she doesn't need but they're stop on do now but i know she'll be able to handle. Gosh it's so good. That wisdom is so good. I mean even i'm just a little bit behind some of the year mark and even as i think about what me right now me has been able to do that six months ago may just cut it. I see this capacity just continues to grow and that healing just rolls forward and that feels exciting i. I'm not sure i knew that six months ago. I'm actually stunned. Maggie that you could access these ideas and this brand of hope and possibility in the weeds and i don't know if you were faking it for your own self because i do that sometimes i will tell myself a thing that just like get their jen. I'm going to say to you get there. Here's the thing was at some combination for you of. This is actually true for me. I want this to be true for me. I'm assuming it's going to be true for me was a little bit of all of it. Yeah it was a blast. I mean there are definitely days easier than other sundays. I was like. I'm going to have stayed till i make it like. I mean i knew enough to know that it would be okay. But even though it wasn't in that moment and so yeah some of it was sort of aspirational writing. Like i'm gonna go into the better place like. I'm building the walking at the same time than i'm having to walk it so if i stay like a foot in front of myself then i'll be. I'll be able to to do it. I think to like there's something to be said with really doing once juices. And i think about the the healing that i was able to do. Healing is a word that makes me nervous. I i would say. I'm heels but the healing i was able to do while writing that book i think was because i had to really sit with it i. My job was writing the book. So i wasn't able to shove everything. I was feeling aside and go to work and then do some other job. That had nothing to do with how i was feeling and stop it down and not the work was processing. It works was processing it. I mean i. My literal work was was also my sort of spiritual emotional work and it was painful sometimes like i. Didn't you know there were days. I was like. I don't really want this to be my job today but at the same time. I don't think i would have felt the way i did at the end of that year. If i had been busying my brain with other things you know. I'm gonna just went into it. I'm curious you having you being one stage ahead of me here and.

maggie smith payton kate simon Maggie
"maggie smith" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

05:43 min | Last month

"maggie smith" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

"Be a.

"maggie smith" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

08:08 min | Last month

"maggie smith" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

"Maggie smith. Welcome to the podcast. I am just truly truly delighted to meet you jenn. It's good to meet you. I'm looking to what we can do this. Some of it so good to get to chat in this way. I will tour guide you around austin and i will eat vegetarian with you. You don't have to. I like vegetarian food. I could almost be vegetarian and singular hang up the one that i just cannot get over our hamburgers. The worst ground red meat. I couldn't even say chicken. You know and like i gotta have a burger. Nobody misses chicken. Gen- nobody misses chicken. It's not that special right now. What do you miss you miss anything. Yeah i missed a broker. Lucci i do. I do miss fried chicken sometimes Mostly i missed what my mom made growing up that she still makes for our sunday. Dinners but now. I have like a sad little side harley. I'm allowed to make a pot roast. Which rose out for shops you know screenplay made meatballs meatloaf at everybody table eating including my children and i'm like might urge crusted through might twenty one year old daughter's vegetarian and has been so since she was thirteen. She she picked up the mantle and carried it forward while she the pesca -tarian really but my whole kitchen experience as having her little side piece side of whatever i making. It's it's the sauce without the sausage or it's the pasta without the chicken. So i know exactly what you're talking about when she's got her little ram akin. Oh i know. Residents are going face down like in meat sauce. Yeah bless the moms who who make that little sidecar for us. I mean you're doing. You're doing the good work. So i thank you for that okay. Let's start here. I have already high leveled for my listeners. A little bit about yield your incredible credentials which are over the top. But can you just tell us in your own words. A little bit about yourself. Who were your people. Where are you in the world and kind of what it is generally that you do. Yeah i mean in some ways. That's really easy. It's still in my place with my people. I grew up in columbus ohio. And i'm still here. So when i say i have sunday dinner with my family. Meaning my sisters my brothers in law my nieces and nephews and my parents. It is apple table. I ate at as a child. I love this with my whole heart yet. I mean on sundays. That's what we do in my son takes his rod bishop creek behind the house that i used to play in so so yeah. I'm i'm still in my hometown. Which is a city. It's not like i'm in a little place. But i'm still here mostly because my people are here. That's been really important to a pretty Individual now changes hard for me. We'll talk about that. So yeah so. I'm still you know i've been in the house amid now or eleven years. I'll be here at least until my son graduates from high school. That's made a whole this. He right now. he is eight. Got another decade here athlete through and then we can think about it and so so yes. I'm here and i'm with my two kids. they're eight and twelve. Almost thirteen by family all lives nearby have been writing since i was a teenager and still doing that. And i've been self employed so working from this little office. You can see me in ten years. And so i teach. I traveled to give readings and you know kino said talks. I edit other people's books on occasion own and most of just happens and some little room. This house sir Air on the front porch ever a million things to say about everything. You just said verbose brevity is not but i also live right here with my entire family. My parents my siblings. All their families. My three best friends live within like point two miles from this house. Two of us are on the street. Two of us are on that straight. And so this life that you're describing of being rooted like deeply connected to your people that being enough that being what you want that being part of the joy and beauty of your life is so peculiar to me. It's so familiar. People have asked me a lot since my divorce like. Are you going to move like you could just go have adventure. You know you want to go live in new york. Why don't you. Why don't you just go live in the mountains. And i'm like i couldn't leave. My people have imagination for it. I literally cannot imagine not being with them inherit is something else i want to tell you. I am obviously a word person. And i said a few years ago to my friend sean iniquitous i said something has malfunctioned inside of my brain. I can't figure out poetry. I never have when i was in college. Poetry with my lowest score. Ev- anything i did in my literature class. I couldn't get. I wanted to just enjoy the language. But the classes were requiring all this dissection and all this interpretation. And i couldn't ever just find my way through and i just told her and i think i'm just bad at. I'm just bad at poetry. I this is a category for me. That i don't have a brain for and she was like you need maggie smith. I'm like described saloon prescribed. You you were the pill like no. You just need maggie. Smith you not reading the right kind of poetry for your brain like you just need a branch out from these like you know classes in poetry college to like what's really out there in the world as an offering for you and so you were my gateway drug who loving loving poetry like drinking it in like water. I wanna thank you for your work. just personally. That convinced me that. I could be a poetry person and i'm not dumb. I'm not poetry dumb. no off. I think so. Many people have experience of being. Frankly just talk badly and swabs it thinking it's a riddle to be solved and failing berry on the outside of this sort of like inside thing and it doesn't have to be like that. I really doesn't have to be like that. I was like. I don't know what the river means. I think it's just water lever isn't it. Isn't that just the sun like called making war. You know. I just cracked the code. Yet again was a code to crack and it lost its mystery and magic and became formulate for me in learning but your work has shown me it can be lovely and magical and lyrical and accessible again and sowed. Okay having said that. Can we talk about your career arc as poet. This is such a niche. It's such a such a niche. It's such a special gifting. Such a special skill set. Can you talk about you mentioned. You've been writing since you were teen not surprised you're kind of writing. You're almost you're born with those words inside of your body. Where did you start. How did that begin to where you are. Now and how. I am curious how poetry it's establish itself as such an important part of your life and was there a moment like was there. This watershed moment when you said. Oh mike i think this can be my work. I could make a living at this. This is a job because it took me a very long time to know that writing could.

Maggie smith rod bishop creek Lucci jenn harley austin kino columbus ohio apple sean maggie new york Smith berry mike
"maggie smith" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

05:38 min | Last month

"maggie smith" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

"Maker as we wrap our flipping the script series. Today we're gonna be diving into what it's like to change things up after divorce also how to grow during times of healing and how poetry is therapeutic outlet with none other than the poet mandy smith. Hey everybody tin hat maker here. Your host of the for the podcast. Welcome welcome welcome. Welcome welcome to the show. All right you guys. Today we are finishing what has been such a lovely little series called for the love of flipping the script. I've absolutely loved this series. I have loved our guests. We have talked to people who have made a hard left or a hard right turn. Some of them chose their flip some of their flips. Were chosen for them that all of them faced sort of a new day with courage and grit and intelligence agency. And i've learned so much from our guests in this series. Today guys is absolutely no exception at all. we're gonna be diving into what it is like to live through and recover from a divorced and how healing is different for every person and how growth unfortunately often comes from the most uncomfortable or painful parts of life. I don't want this to be true and yet here we are but for you know for so many of us frankly we avoid the hard parts of life because they are well heart right they are required a push and pull ourselves in directions that we're not used to her. We don't wanna go. The weird thing is the frustrating thing is they do bring us so much closer to who we were meant to be who we could be and where we are meant to go. I mean you know. I've talked about this but this is a hundred percent been true in my life. You know. I also went through a divorce last year. Were just past your mark. I didn't want it. This was not a script i wanted. I had written a completely different script for my life all the way to the end until i was until my funeral. I'd written the whole script and so it want this. But it's the one handed and so i had to figure out what to do with it. I've never one time been pollyanna about any of this. But it is true that i have grown and even flourish in ways that it wouldn't have otherwise i wouldn't have. I know it for sure. It forced me out of this comfortable. Little cocoon that i had built for myself that i expected to be forever and had figured out how to fly and so i'm actually grateful for those results i am. Am i grateful for the whole story. I am not but am. I thankful i was sort of forced into a period of self examination and growth and agency and self empowerment and awareness. And i am and so. I think that's why. I was so looking forward to today's conversation for more than one reason. But you guys get excited. Because i am talking today with the absolutely amazing maggie smith. So if you don't already know maggie if you don't follow her. I let me just say right up french. You're going to absolutely love this episode. It's maggie raids to us one of her favorite pieces. I read her some of her favorite pieces of mine. She's humble and kind and honest. And anyway i right look. Here's the deal. Maggie is an absolutely award-winning author. Of good bones. The wealth speaks of its unpoisoned and the national bestseller which we end up talking quite a bit about because it meant so much to me. It's called keep moving notes on loss creativity and change which she actually wrote in the midst of her divorce and so that words you can see white meant so much to me. That was really my first real experience of maggie and now i've of course followed her ever sense and told my team. I really wanna have maggie smith on the podcast and so maggie was the twenty eleven recipient of a creative writing fellowship and she's received several individual excellence awards from the ohio arts council were split to academy of american poets prizes end in all of her free time. Ll her writing. Appeared everywhere new york times new yorker paris review best american poetry and then her newest book which will also talk about today. Goldenrod dives into complex topics like parenthood solitude in love and memory. She does this all with the pin of appellate. Her writing is stunning. It is beautiful. It's rich in wisdom. it's lyrically like on inspiring and best of all. Which i i tell her in this interview. It's accessible. it is accessible. I always thought poultry was beyond me. Because i wasn't good at it in a academic setting the way that it was taught and maggie taught me. I am poetry and so you are absolutely going.

mandy smith maggie smith maggie Maggie ohio arts council academy of american poets new york times paris
"maggie smith" Discussed on Nobody Told Me!

Nobody Told Me!

02:21 min | 2 months ago

"maggie smith" Discussed on Nobody Told Me!

"What is your nobody told me lesson. So what is it that nobody told you about poetry or the deeper meaning behind it or or life in general that you wish that they had because it would have helped you figure out life if that's even a thing a little sooner figured it out if you have blood have not figured it out I get one of the things i would say. Nobody told me that. I could make poems from the stuff of my daily life. You know. I think particularly in school i. I really thought that poetry was this thing that sort of happened on high. And you really did have to wait for some sort of like divine inspiration in the you really should be. You know you can't really write poems about like walking your dog around the block like is that really opponent anyone's going to want to read and so one of the things that i think. Experience has taught me. Is that the stuff of life is worthy of being the stuff of literature. And i don't have to have my life over here in one pen and then my work over here in another pen drawing from something else i can. I can merge the to as much as i feel comfortable in that means writing about my kids in writing about my neighborhood and the house. I grew up in You know a dream. I had or whatever the case may be but just allowing myself to be myself fully in my poems That's something. I wish i'd known back then but i think past me would be really delighted to see current. Be doing it maggie. How could people connect with you on social media and the internet Well you know. There's a dame maggie smith so i have to put poet at the end of my name in everything so my website is maggie smith poet dot com and on twitter and instagram. I'm at maggie smith. Poet there also so people can track me down there. Will we thank you so very much for joining us. This has been such a delight to talk with you. We love your work and we just had a fantastic conversation with you so we thank you for sharing your time. We'll thank you some of my best conversations with my own daughter so this this has been a pleasure thank you. Oh wow while..

maggie smith maggie instagram twitter
"maggie smith" Discussed on Nobody Told Me!

Nobody Told Me!

05:09 min | 2 months ago

"maggie smith" Discussed on Nobody Told Me!

"Welcome to nobody told me. I'm laura owens. I'm jan black and we are delighted to welcome our guest on this episode. Best selling poet and author maggie smith her poems and essays have appeared in the new york times the new yorker the paris review the washington post and the guardian in addition to many other publications. Back in two thousand. Sixteen maggie's poem good bones went viral internationally and has been shared countless times since by those of us who struggle to keep the realities of life's ugliness from children last year. Her book keep moving notes on loss. Creativity and change became a breakout bestseller in the midst of the pandemic megi. We thank you so much for joining us. Thanks for having me and we want to congratulate you on your latest book of poems called goldenrod. Tell us about it. Nick you yes. So goldenrod Is the culmination of several years of work. I started these poems right after. I finished my last book of poems. Good bones so back in two thousand fifteen and then The newest poems in this new book are from There from the pandemic from twenty twenty. So it's you know five or six years of of writing one poem at a time and then at the end you kind of pull them all together in print them out and see what you've been all those years that maybe you didn't know you were doing so i've been joking that the sort of secret invisible ink title of this book is really be still which is the opposite of my last book. Heat moving inspired the title goldenrod. Yeah so so there There's a problem in the book called goldenrod. Unusually i pull the title of a book of poems from either a poem title or a phrase in one of the poems that i usually go through and try to figure out which titles would be representative of the collection. So there's a title. There's a palm in. The book called walking the dog but walking. The dog would not be a good title for the whole book. Because that's not really what the book is about so goldenrod felt like a good metaphorical choice to me. It's a plant that sort of mistaken for lead. But it's beautiful so it's a little bit about perception. In the way we see things and the scientific name soledad go means to make whole or he'll and so many of of these poems and really so much of beliving that went into making these poems over the last several years had to do with growth and and healing. Yeah i know it futures poems about parenthood and solitude and love memory and golden rods. As you mentioned what do you hope your readers get from the new book you know. I go to poems to be changed. That's really what. I go to palm store. Sometimes i find comfort in poems sometimes. I'm cheered up by poems. sometimes. I find poems..

laura owens jan black the new yorker the paris revie maggie smith the washington post the new york times maggie Nick soledad palm store
"maggie smith" Discussed on Live Happy Now

Live Happy Now

04:57 min | 3 months ago

"maggie smith" Discussed on Live Happy Now

"But i'll probably get a better poem at the end of that day than at the end of the day that i spent doing a bunch of busy work sure and i understand that feeling like the tactile relationship with a book of holding that and i don't know if that's because it goes back to childhood when he started with my little golden books admits that and get those stories but yeah there's such a difference. I made a joke this weekend about. I'm going to read the paper which isn't actually a paper. It's my tablet and kind of lamenting that. Because i missed that feeling of having that newspaper that you spread out so that's interesting that you make that same connection yeah. I'm a real book person. I have to say too. I also like audio books. Especially if they're narrated by their authors. I like to hear you know coach. I write it down right but it really is meant to live in the air. Not just on the page. It's meant to be spoken. And so i love listening to poets. Read there were. It was a pleasure to get to narrate the audiobook of goldenrod myself too. Because if people don't want to hold the paper book or read the book they can listen to me reading the poems in my own words. And i think that's also a different experience. Yeah i think that really helps. People connect with them on a whole new level. Yeah so you know. I wondered if you had any other daily practices or rituals that reinforces ability that you seem to have to live in the moment. Well i mean honestly. Spending time with my children helps a lot because they don't care much about the past and they're not really thinking too much about the future like they're sort of they're very present livers and they notice thing you know. I still live in my hometown. So it's very easy for me to become complacent. And i think for all of us to take things for granted to walk by the same tree every day. Walk by to walk down the same streets to see the same sky to feel the same weather and to just kind of let it become furniture in your life..

"maggie smith" Discussed on Live Happy Now

Live Happy Now

04:15 min | 3 months ago

"maggie smith" Discussed on Live Happy Now

"Of live happy now last year poet. Maggie smith gave us the book we needed with the bestseller. Keep moving notes on loss creativity and change this year. She's back with a new book. That help us rediscover the magic of living in the moment..

Maggie smith
"maggie smith" Discussed on Sounds Good with Branden Harvey

Sounds Good with Branden Harvey

09:38 min | 3 months ago

"maggie smith" Discussed on Sounds Good with Branden Harvey

"And and so. It's i don't know it's it's challenging but i think it's important as much as we can kind of protect the inner life where the poems are made and not not to get ahead of ourselves and start thinking about things like publication When we're just trying to figure this thing out what would you say is the equivalent for non poets or people who don't think of themselves as poets yet like how. How can i as somebody who's not like bring that into my own life and experience. I mean if we're thinking about sort of pure expression and not self censoring a lot of it's just about trusting your gut and being yourself not that you do in every choice you make right. It's like when you get up in the morning and you decide what you're gonna wear and you're like oh god i feel like people kind of i rolled. When i showed up an overalls to something recently. but i really wanna wear overalls. I'm gonna do it. One of the things. I learned especially post. Divorce is like the pleasure of doing things for oneself like. I don't actually have to watch this. Show that i didn't really enjoy. I get to pick what i want to watch. And i don't actually. I don't actually love that color. Even though the person loved it on me so i'm going to wear this and i know they like this perfume but i actually prefer this one. Even though they didn't really like it. So i think there are ways that we can express ourselves daily life whether we even consider ourselves creative or not that that sort of allow us to do things for ourselves without worrying so much what other people think which i realized in the age of social media and sort of constant access to people is is maybe a a tall order. You know. it's very punk. Rock took to back on that. I'm like that. I'd be like poetry is very is very punk. Rock is very anti establishment. I think about we. We've had a few poets on this show and that's why i'm still like so unfamiliar. I'm still learning but everybody we've had on the show I do people come to mind are a niece. Most ghani and clint smith. If you know them yes i am. I just am so drawn to them. I think that they're in u2. I just think there is a a an energy that poets carry that the genuinely helps me feel more comfortable with myself and surprisingly even though you know euro a fairly cynical iconic beautiful poem. Somehow you leave me feeling more hopeful. Because i think that if somebody who you know if i'm projecting onto you i see you as somebody who's really comfortable diving into the pain of the world of your life and really paying close attention and not numbing that and still continuing anyway and still creating things in and working to create something beautiful anyway and to me. That's very very hopeful. Well that's so moving to me. That's maybe one of my best compliments. So thank you i. I consider myself kind of a recovering pessimist. Not i you know. I i think i grew up really with a sort of glass half empty attitude about a lot of things just not expecting things to turn out the way that i had hoped and i realized you know a couple of years ago that i was just stealing so much joy from my own life by expecting the worst because oftentimes the worst doesn't happen but in that time that you've been worrying you've just poisoned all of that time with worry and for what you know. I mean i'm certainly not like a pollyanna optimist. I don't think everything is is all right and we shouldn't worry. I mean there's a lot of things that we need to be worrying about. I think i'm more of a realist now. But but i do feel hopeful And i think i feel hopeful even when things are hard because i have the perspective to know that they weren't always that hard and therefore they won't stay that heart you know life. Life is short. As i wrote in good bones but in some ways it's also long and so if i can kind of pull back and look at a difficult time and see that really it's just like a blip on the the big long time line of the life. I'm living that helps me keep perspective and then i can look around little blip and see all the beautiful things that are happening to and maybe i'm not commemorating those in the same way because we do tend. I think to fixate on what's not going well rather than getting up in the morning and thinking about the fifty things in our lives. That are going amazing. It's just really easy to focus on the two. That are making the most noise you know. Absolutely i think that digests spoke to me in a deep way and not to like try to throw myself into the same bunches. You know my my favorite poets. But i feel like one thing that our community we know guga good that like we are never going to have this mass appeal. Because i don't think it's possible to hold. I think that there's something really really challenging about holding onto that tension of hope and cynicism of optimism and pessimism and there's a certain small group of people who are willing to kind of engage with that battle. That's who we want to hang out with like. That's who we want to spend our time with and i think that working hard to find the good everyday when it is truly so much easier probably neurological level to fixate on those too bad things that happened like that that is a very challenging thing and so i think any time that we can push back on that culture. I do think that it brings us something that you know i. It's either better or it's just it's different in. Different is a is a helpful perspective. It is always my final question. I'm thinking about this idea of paying attention to the heartbreak. In the pain and the injustice in the world is not turning away from it and as a part of that just paying a little bit closer attention to more things and being comfortable just sitting in that and i wonder what advice you would give me and our listeners about how we can do that from you. Know a poet's perspective you know. Most of my poems begin with just a scrap of language scrawled into a notebook or on a legal pad or maybe spoken into the. You know the little audio function on my iphone and most of them begin either sitting at a window or sitting on my porch are taking a walk or going on a long drives and having my phone put away like not using that as an opportunity to scroll or check twitter or catch up on email. So i guess maybe one of my pieces of advice would be Disorder fine pockets of your day when you're not multitasking. You know mono task single task. Because it's so easy and i see even my kids doing it like the impulse to do multiple things at the same time as a way of getting things quote unquote done and you know there. There's a value to that. And there's a time for that but also joust giving yourself some space to listen and watch and sort of engage your senses. It doesn't even have to be time. You spend the loan. You can do that with a friend. You can take a long walk in the woods with a friend you can. You can have a conversation. That's really enriching where you're really focused on the other person. That's not multitasking. So i think. That's that's what i would say like. How do we. How do we strip some of this everything all the time. We'll churn out of ourselves at least for parts of the day when we can. That is maggie. Smith pushcart prize winning poet. The author of the new poetry collection goldenrod. You should absolutely pick up a copy of goldenrod where ever you buy your books. It is beautiful. It is so good of course. The link is in our show notes and make sure that you follow maggie on instagram and twitter. She's at maggie. Smith poet on both and check out her other collections of poetry on her website. Maggie smith poet dot com is. Podcast was created by good..

clint smith ghani twitter maggie Smith instagram Maggie smith
"maggie smith" Discussed on ScreamQueenz: Where Horror Gets GAY!

ScreamQueenz: Where Horror Gets GAY!

02:42 min | 11 months ago

"maggie smith" Discussed on ScreamQueenz: Where Horror Gets GAY!

"Clash of the titans. Starring harry hamlin as perseus. Judy belco as and drummer. Burgess meredith maggie smith a clear blue sean phillips for ropes lawrence over soups before history beyond imagination. Clash of the titans. So i up. He is a burlesque guard is. He's a manufacturer soap and he's currently sitting right next to the head of medusa which is very brave of him boys and girls welcome back to the show the meserve matt knife. Good to see you get a little scary up all these monsters and style. Yeah i mean. I'm i'm not afraid of it Greet monsters. they're they're one of my favorites. You say that. Now you say that now i think i think medusa could've been reason with you. Know what you know what we'll get into watching it this time. I had a big good for her moment. But we're not there yet because we have another introduced you because i realize watching this movie the setting his greece. We've got maggie. Smith bringing him back to a simpler time when we talked about negative christie as evil under the sun. And i realized this was also basically the movie. So how can i do this without this particular. You know. everybody's favorite 'fraidy cat mr. I love you. Ooh i am moderately enthused about. I don't it an incident. hello doug how. It's been so long enough love for both of us. Patrick and i love you too mad. Thank you love is limitless. Gonna buy your so. Yeah you already did shifted out today. Okay so fantastic. So the movie that we're talking about is clash of the titans from nineteen eighty-one. And since you have not been here in some time. I believe i'm going to need you to give me a nice tight. Thirty second plot summary of clash of the titans. The clock starts now. This is my report on clash of the titans clash of the titans. Movie about feta. Cnn who is played by spurn. Chorus girl maggie smith..

titans Judy belco Burgess meredith maggie smith ropes lawrence harry hamlin sean phillips maggie christie greece Smith doug Patrick Cnn maggie smith
Driveway Elegies

Modern Love

04:53 min | 1 year ago

Driveway Elegies

"How did you come up with the name modern love well, it was part of a process. Yeah. We had all these different names that we tried and. I remember one of them was truly madly deeply. And I would now be called truly madly deeply editor, which is a really different kind of job title. Modern love editor But I thought of the David Bowie Song Modern Love. In suggesting modern love and literally almost any time I see. The words modern love I mean, it's worn off a little bit over the years but But it's hard for me not to read modern love and automatically hear. Hear that, Song. Would you sing it for our listeners Know because I, don't know that words but you have the. summit. Yeah. Yeah Love locks beside me nine. The second is walks beside me. Put my faith in God. And no religious. That's about as I can do. But there was a great. Story that. Spun. Out of that. Of writer had sent an essay, it didn't really work in the end, but it was about her covering love songs for other random people. She would send them a little audio file playing Ukulele and singing a cover of some song Ukulele, and that's what the essay was about. And when I rejected a A week or two passed and I this email. That I didn't. Recognize the name or anything and open it up, and there was no message there was just an audio file. I pressed play a little. Worried that it was some. Virus or whatever. Pay. Was Her playing always modern love. The UKULELE. I went back and read her essay. Oh, the sweetest thing. And did you ever published her essay? Now I didn't. But it kind of hard not to. into. Today's essay is tracking the demise of my marriage on Google maps by Maggie Smith. Was published in January twenty nineteen and is read by ORLA Cassidy. My husband moved out about six weeks ago. Marking the end of our nearly nineteen year relationship. But Google maps hasn't noticed yet. That morning I had whisked the children away. So he and two friends from law school could load his things into a U. Haul and drive to the house he had rented. We had agreed that he would be the one to move out. And we agreed on what he would take. Dining, room set and painting that had belonged to his late boss. The sideboards, we had bought to hold our wedding dishes. And the Antique armoire neighboring our first apartment complex had left us because it wouldn't fit in his truck. I had packed most of my husband's things because he works long hours. I had sifted through our books and CDs, our Christmas ornaments, coffee mugs, the blender, his the food processor mine, the biscuit cutter his. The muffin tin mine. The life we had lived. Split. Between us. I still haven't seen his house. Only a few blocks away. I'm not sure what possessed me to Google our address a few weeks ago I'll on a writing residency in. Tucson. Far From my home in Ohio. But I did. And right was. My house on Google maps. Still inside. And still I think in love with me.

Editor Google David Bowie Antique Armoire Orla Cassidy Maggie Smith Ohio Writer Tucson U. Haul
"maggie smith" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:07 min | 1 year ago

"maggie smith" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And in the midst of your total misery, this total stranger has done you a good turn, and it means For that moment, it means the world well reading Mackey Smith's new book feels Kind of like that. It is a meditation on kindness and hope on how to move forward through grief. It is titled Keep Moving. And Maggie Smith is with us now. Hey, there. Hello, Welcome. And if I may start by asking what was going on in your life when you sat down to write this Well, every ending is also a beginning. So when my marriage ended, I began writing this book without knowing I was writing a book. Ah, yeah, Keep moving began as Sort of notes to self that I wrote for myself each day to pep talk myself through this really Dark time and I posted them on Twitter. As a way to hold myself accountable and to sort of share my struggle with others. And a couple of surprising things happened because of those tweets. I found my way into a new kind of optimism that I hadn't Experienced before, and I found that the posts were really meeting people where they were in their lives at that time to it. Sounds like this is ah, case of your sitting down and writing the book. Do you really wish somebody else had written Because Because, man, you really needed it. You needed somebody to be telling you these things in that moment. Yeah, And I think you know other people can tell you in hard times, you're going to be fine. But if you're not telling yourself that sometimes it's hard to believe. And I think one of the things I realized when writing this book is the most important conversation that you have Each day is the one you have with yourself. And if that's not a kind and gentle Out of brave making conversation than what other people are telling us. Sort of slips off of us. Will give us an example. You've got the book. They're right Pick. Pick a place that got you through unauthorized moment. Read it to us. And if you would tell us tell us about the moment and how it helped Ah, Here's one focus on who you are and what you've built not who you'd planned on being and what you'd expected to have. Trust that the present moment, however difficulty, however different from what you'd imagined. Has something to teach. You keep moving. I think in some ways this really summarize his. What? What I was trying to do with the book, which is To think about re imagining my life at a time where I thought it was over. You know, it felt like a catastrophic change. If I imagined of then diagram of emotions. I think my feelings was sort of that spot where fear and sadness and anger and confusion overlap. It's not a good vent I A gram, and I said, it's a dark, then diagram and I I think we're all feeling a lot of that now because of the pandemic because of so much unrest in this country and And in the world and and so we have to think about not The life that we had last year. But thinking about what the life we have now still offers us and what is still possible in the future. I was thinking about that parallel to because not all of us have gone through divorce. But every single one of us are living through the pain of this year and this pandemic and so many people are waking up every day and thinking. For now, How can I possibly feel hopeful about anything? It's fascinating to hear you talking about a very private personal moment on DH. Yet there's a common thread there which is hope, I guess and rebirth it is. I mean, I sort of joke in the book that I'm a recovering pessimist, which is to say that before my divorce, I used pessimism almost a self protection. Which is to say, Oh, I won't get the job. They probably won't publish the poem. And I think a lot of us do that as a way of guarding against getting our hopes up. Because if we expect the worst, we'll just be pleasantly surprised if things go well. And if we expect the worst, and the worst happens Well, then we were right. And I realized in the middle of this time, eh? I couldn't live like that because I just couldn't function. With that sort of pessimism, either as a writer as a human of the parents. But also really thinking about it. Logically, as many things can go right as can go wrong and, you know, remembering that was really important and remains really important to me. As you're recovering pessimists and you're writing all these pithy, hopeful, kind, self loving passages. I have to ask. Did you believe yourself a the time or did you have to kind of convince yourself of this is you went was a case of I'm going to write this that this is going to sound hopeful, And I hope that tomorrow it sure feels that way. I sort of say that Hope was like a garment that I tried on every day, And at first, it was very oversized and itchy. And misshapen and uncomfortable, and it didn't fit at all. The idea of finding optimism in your darkest moment seems very counterintuitive, and it felt Really strange even though I knew it was probably what was best for me. But something really strange happened, Which is that the more I tried it on for size, the better it sit. And also, the more that I Told myself it's going to be okay and told myself that publicly being vulnerable in front of thousands Of people. The response I got from people who were going through their own struggles, whether it was divorced or a diagnosis, the comfort that other people were receiving from what I was writing actually gave me a sense of Purpose and made me feel better in that moment, which was completely unexpected. Well, I wonder if there's reading. You want to send us out on? I would be happy to. Here's a little one. Do not turn away joy. Even if it arrives at an inconvenient time. Even if you think you should be grieving, even if you think it's too soon, Joy is always on time. Keep moving..

Mackey Smith Joy Twitter writer
Dante Basco

Asian Enough

05:21 min | 1 year ago

Dante Basco

"Daddy okay. Hook the nineteen ninety-one cult favorite reimagining of a Peter. Pan Lor starring Robin Williams. And Don Bosco you are. I'm just GONNA cut right to an icon. Come on come on man and you have been ever since this this role Rubio and we have so many questions for you. But we're going to start is what has revealed meant to you over. The course of the time. I mean is changed over the years. I did Rouphael when I was fifteen. Start when I was ten before was an actor. I was I'm from me and my brothers from the bay area right. And we're all artists and actors and musicians and poets and we start as break group in the Bay. Area called Street freaks. We popular was in the bay area. Kid You know grew up going to forty niners games in Oakland as games and we ended up dancing for the forty niners and the Oakland A.'s. Halftime shows thirty. Four thousand six hundred that kind of stuff then. We got scholarships the Ballet Company ballet and so we start studying ballet and it was like a real billion Elliott thing kids from St that they picked up and start the world ours and so like being an actor. Artists has been in my family's story since my earliest memories of whatever we were doing you know and so by the time I was fifteen and did hook it was like I mean I was you know somewhat prepared for it because I was studying acting for so long and studying the greats and then I was very much whereas work with greats worked with Spielberg maybe at the height of his powers. Dustin Hoffman is. He's on the Mount Rushmore of the actors. That changed the face of acting the seventy S and whatnot. You Got Robin. Williams is the Godfather improv acting. In one of the great you know give me. The list goes on Maggie. Smith said Bob. Hoskins is like every day is like what's going on here and so I was really prepared to just really do a great job but that never prepares you for character lasting twenty five years later. It's like now I've been Rubio longer than I haven't been Rubio. You know so you know you walk around. And now it's like it means something different to a whole generation as people tattoos of your fifteen year old face on their body crazy. Which you've seen with your I've seen with my own eyes. I've signed people's bodies at kamikaze tattooed on you know. And they name their kids after Rubio and their dogs after Rubio and it means something to just the people at large as far as like this rebel spirit you know and then in mean something completely different to a whole generation of Asian Americans where I get a lot of like. You're the first cool Asian that I ever saw on television as exactly what I was about to say. It's you and I'm dismayed that you hear so often not here and again when you're young you don't really think about it when you big movie in your teenager like even though I was like a trained actor and a pretty solid artists at fifteen is like I just WanNa be cool like plea at the for. The love of God can come out on Friday in theaters and when I go to school on Monday. Ken like some people. Think I'm cool. Where are you going to school at that point in in southern California I was going to school in Southern California? I was in high school Limit town called paramount. And it's right. You know right next to Compton. The crazy thing was this is the nineties s in we got into some trouble me and my brothers in the middle of shooting Hook. We got caught shoplifting. At Serena's mall yes. I needed some isotoner gloves. We needed some isotoner. Glove would use gloves and southern California. I don't know Jerry Rice War on I duNno had some is anyway. We got caught. My parents got so and again when you grown up in the neighborhood and paramount which is like site content but it's more Mexican than black and it's you know gang violence in the nineties and we have friends run drugs. Everything's a lot going on in your young mind like shoplifting is nowhere near anything else going on a neighbor but we got popped. We got in trouble and I was actually in the middle of shooting. Hook which is super strange and the guy that Catis history does mall was like watching. Because he'd seen me in a movie called perfect weapon he's like that's that do from perfect weapon and then. Oh my God. He's they're stealing isotoner gloves So we ended up getting bused to Orange County and started and finished our school at Orange County. The and then I was there when the hook came out. So it's kind like I was a kid in school and the movie came out and I went from a school. I was like predominantly black and Latino to a school in Orange County. That was I think there was twelve black kids in school And like it was like predominantly white. We were like. What are we doing here so that was a school that was that you were in? Hook was coming. Yeah that was I was in when he came out and I was. They thought it was cool. I mean we were cool are here with me and my brother like three. Brown brothers walking around campus with high hair and Super Hip hop kids and then the big movie comes out. And you're like that kid from that movie. I kinda always wished I was in my old school when it came out. Because know you get the extra On the hometown new school. And it's all weird already now. Super

Rubio Hook Robin Williams Shoplifting Orange County California Don Bosco Pan Lor Ballet Company Dustin Hoffman Mount Rushmore Jerry Rice Oakland Spielberg Hoskins Southern California Oakland A. Brown Compton Elliott
'Downton Abbey,' 'Breaking Bad,' and Why TV Is Still Jealous of Movies

The Big Picture

10:18 min | 2 years ago

'Downton Abbey,' 'Breaking Bad,' and Why TV Is Still Jealous of Movies

"Chris. You're here along with Amanda because you know a lot about television and Amanda and I are for a little bit out on television sort of as a general rule. I'm post. TV POST TV separate succession. Now there are some television shows that I love. I started to watch when this weekend that I think is incredibly well made which is called unbelievable but I was just home with my mom for a little while and she while she's a stranger to cable news but she adorable still gets a lot of her news from the newspaper so two days later she'll be like. Did you hear about Joe. Biden and I'll like what what do you mean. Did something new happens you know. Did you hear about this phone. Call and that's just what you did with unbelievable where you were like. I'm breaking to you guys that there's this show well no now. I admit I am one one week late and you've already covered the show on the WOK yeah. We've already covered the sh the show on the site. I just didn't have the time to get to you. I hear you I'm seeing all these movies but one thing that is interesting that it's happening right now is is that I even though the just happened and even though TV is having this incredible boom time I feel like TV is still a little jealous of the movies and we know that because Downton Tanabe rather than comeback as an eight part miniseries has decided to become a full length feature film and the people said. Yes they said Yes to the tune of thirty three million dollars a lot of money for an extension of the Downton Abbey University was a show that was popular and a phenomenon sort of when it started. I believe the first episode of the Hollywood respective podcasts was a recap of the Dow naby premier guess which is just amazing what times past its Niche Butler's Butler's and and and you know that's a show that I liked and I really did you recap Amanda you recap what an amazing time capsule of our life on the Internet in creating culture and now it's a fulling feature feature film which is something that I think twenty years ago it had happened you would have said Downton Abbey really grew up and stepped up to the big leagues in this case. I wonder how you guys feel about what what it means to extend what was once a broadcast. TV Show into movie platform and also like why why this movie work. Why did it work so well. I have a couple of sites and the answer answer of why to turn it into a feature film is money which worked out because it made thirty three million dollars we had a great piece on the ringer last week by writer named Kate Loyd who's based in London and it was he's about the downtown Abbey Economy essentially in how the show changed both tourism in the UK and like she went to a lot of fancy locations and like talk to British these people but also how it changed the British TV industry and down abby the show. Was this wakeup call I think for people in the UK okay that people would from other parts of the world would watch when these costume dramas it was kind of a revival of the costume drama and also had a finance the shows so that they could me distributed around the world and so the piece argues that you know everything from peaky blinders to howards end to all of the things that we now consume and treat as part of the television firmament at least the latest generation of them are a result of Downton Abbey success right that show relaunch yeah Adia so in that way. It's not that surprising to me that it did while because it was like a legitimate phenomenon and we've lived with it for a long time in maybe season six. I wasn't as great as season one but it made a lot of money in a lot of people liked watching it. It's short relief to because the two other big releases over the weekend and that it beat out were ad Astra which was covered at length on this podcast last week and as a movie that I would recommend people see and Rambo last blood. Did you catch up with that Chris. I didn't see I saw ad Astra instead of Rambo because this was not playing anywhere near me. Oh that's a shame why was that I woke neighborhood for you. so neither of those films which are very male centric stallone doesn't play well in. Philly yeah that's a good point you'd think he'd be in every theatre getting but I guess partially one of the the reasons why down succeeded so well is because a lot of women saw this movie and it was the primary opportunity for women at checkout films one week after hustlers dominated the box office and sensing a trend here if you like this happens four five times a year when people are like there are movies for women as well yeah. I think that's true also float yes women see movies. Rah Rah route whatever old people really see movies and the theatres is there is nothing better to do with your time if you got a mom or Gramma Ma than to take them and see the Downton Abbey. That is just wholesome entertainment for everyone so I think that that is as important. The age is as important as the gender breakdown on this one. Let's let's just very quickly. Even though Chris has not seen the downton movie talk about what's good about the downs and movie you and I attempted to recap the film for Chris via slack last week. You feel like we did a good job. Ah Yeah I think so recognized all the names. All the actions made sense I just did they didn't really come together in a sort of visual sentence for me so that is actually a notable spoke to Michael Angler about this. It is a little bit of Downton on steroids. You know the theme music is amplified in such a way that maybe they had three hundred more brass instruments. Mintz played playing the theme song. There's a lot of drone shots of Downton Abbey. It is it is a a muscular rise version of this upstairs downstairs costume drama the film itself did strike me though I think you may have originally said this to me as just one long episode of Downton Abbey to me it was like a Christmas special sel which they do in the UK and I think it was the season two Christmas special of Downton Abbey which is when Matthew and Mary finally get together and like kissing the snow outside outside of the side of the House I would say it's on par with the Christmas special except for like to party set-pieces instead of one as you said and fancier dresses addresses and I guess there's like a first episode climax halfway through the movie and then a second episode kind of bringing everyone home. The thing is downstairs to get into some hijinks and then there's ramifications upstairs. It's crazy what happens on almost like it's upstairs downstairs I thought it was an enjoyable movie and I'm not surprised that it was successful. I'm surprised it was successful. It was also the biggest movie in the history of focus features which just fascinating I have spoken to some people who worked worked on this movie and they have when they acquired the rights to release this movie. They said we have our IP. We have our version of superhero movie and focus features. That's what I was. GonNa say really leans into that older audience that you're talking about the identify women as their audience much more clearly and this is a part of the same strategy so I wouldn't say necessarily the Ad Astra had this problem but I do think that it is near impossible to sell anything anymore without some pre existing kind of awareness of what you're getting when you walk into it just because there's so many options for people that if you just sorta like here's a movie about butlers and rich people story. Michelle dockery people are going to be like I don't know but if it's something that they have this decade long relationship leashes ship with if they have the kind of extra screen relationship that they have they cared about and if there is like I was I was watching a lot of linear television this week because I was with my mom. We were watching the Ken Burns documentary. There was down Abbey stuff sandwich. Every episode of the Ken Burns Documentary Music talking to the country music to let you know it's coming out. Here's the history of the show. Here's a recap of everything that happened. Here's the making of the show like they actually did their push. It just just happened on public television. We didn't see it as much necessarily as like Robert Downey junior driving around in an Audi with a Samsung phone pushing vendors do you think that this is now now a sort of MCI -ation of Downton or is this just a one off thing that they struck gold on this one movie or is there going to be another one have been teasing the sequel for weeks. Now that's yeah yeah they've been talking about how the possibilities open and I think you know which is code for. Yes it will happen and they certainly leave the door open in the movie. Everyone is in in a happy place but more hijinks cannon sue and I'm sure well a Dan. I'm curious how far you can probably only take down into world war. Two 'cause post World War. Two I think all of those states just for their museums museums the economy economy of the upper class in the UK just breaks down and it's just not how upstairs downstairs doesn't really apply as much anymore the film kind of glances at the end to the how much longer can this go on which I thought was an interesting potential way to seal office equal in the end zone dunkirk what we'll talk about this more. Maggie Smith is in this movie Maggie Smith Chris do modify spoil Israel okay. I guess if you are really really strict about spoilers. Turn it off now. Even but Maggie Smith gives a speech that's kind of like a farewell speech but notably nothing actually conclusively happens to whether Maggie Smith math will be in future episodes of down nappy. TV show or something happens to her but then they're like. We'll see what happens yeah she could've done urge becomes iron man. It's incredible credibly. She defeats the end of the movie. It's wild. It's nineteen twenty seven in this movie that's right. They've got like twenty more years. Yeah okay. What's interesting to me about. This is is the movies in theaters. It's an extension of a television show there have been there's been the super sizing of TV shows into movie form a lot over the last year. This isn't the first first time it's happened. In the ninety. s we saw the kind of like met a rift commentary on things by having. Beverly hillbillies movies and Brady Bunch movies now what we have is just a more clear extension of the stories that originally told there was a dead movie earlier. This year was a between two ferns movie also released over the weekend which is not quite the same serialized television but is in the same tradition in a way away and then in October. We have a breaking bad movie called El Camino Dave Dina do this for a long time. They've been dying to get this kind of multiplatform storytelling going because of the amount of money there is if you can actually do what they wanted to do with dark tower where you can tell something that has has a feature presentation that maybe is the sort of the danger of the story but like you have other storylines going on TV and that you could actually create a like twelve month a year sport out of your story. That's why they want you know and now there are different things now.

Downton Abbey Downton Abbey University UK Downton Tanabe Amanda Maggie Smith Chris Downton Ken Burns Biden JOE Abbey Economy Rambo Abbey Ad Astra Michelle Dockery Stallone Philly Gramma Ma
Imelda Staunton on the New 'Downton Abbey' Film

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:36 min | 2 years ago

Imelda Staunton on the New 'Downton Abbey' Film

"Today today after making a name for herself on the West End Stage Imelda Staunton shot to international fame when she started in the Mike Leigh Drama Vera Drake in two thousand and four it earned her an academy award nomination for Best Actress. Imelda Staunton is also the winner of three Olivier Awards for best actress in a musical for her roles in into the woods sweeney any told and Gypsy in two thousand and sixteen. She's back on screens this weekend. Joining the cast of the feature film version of Downton Abbey she spoke to Monaco's has been Ryland for me joining it now because I'm not in the series and although my husband who plays Carson isn't the series or do feel. I've lived but I think that's that's very interesting to think. NCA- about. Should we want things to stay the same and yet I also think within the story that Julian fellowes has given the female characters. You know I've could a very interesting story line because I come into it but women questioning there. Should I be living in this big house with servants. What what what's happening with the world and yet the audience crave costs and someone steady. They want things to be steady and safe because we are going to hell in a handcart hot. Let's face it to cling onto something that has got tradition. If you like and that's why I dare say we're all obsessed with the royal family or just something that is stable because it's all over the place and I think it stability that people want and yet we have to sort of we have to move within that the big question of course is which tradition should we hold onto and which ones should we move on from and we all collectively need to make this decision and in a microcosm sort of way that's the the dilemma faced with many of the characters you'll your character wants to make a decision without giving anything away that would be quite untraditional it would be against the idea of what what people do you and there are other characters such as Maggie Smith who looks at this and says no things shoot remain how they've always been and it's it sort of feels like a wider dilemma that we just don't know which ones we should hold onto to know but in film terms that's tension and that's what you need to make a drama. There's no point of us will sit making a film that everything's fine or everything's terrible you have to the tension is like the tension between Maggie Smith Skirt and Penelope Wilton character which yes you think about it. She doesn't belong to the House and so her role throughout the series was almost almost and I'm a I'm quoting her now but she was the window from the audience into Downton again will is that right and she could question on behalf of us. You know what was going on on and I think you have to be malleable with all these traditions and you have to move all family of how to move with the Times with you will in Kate and and how it has to move on and I think Downton has embraced that the film you know the fans just desperate for the film and I think they'll be delighted with it but I think they'll be delighted with it because although it's a chocolate box and it's a fantasy they're serious points in the film and I think you know for what it is. I think people go uh no. I think that's that's quite true if the made the cooks assistant questions. Why are we having to do all this the king and Queen or why are we having to you know just just questioning just putting things out there. I think it will make people listen to more than just oh what we have tea and dinner served. Well absolutely it's. It's such a cozy film but also you know we were talking about traditions and in a way the film is about nostalgia isn't it. I found myself coming out of a wondering whether it really is a love letter. Tunis eligible naught because there are so many elements of the film that while very much of the time that he's being depicted here. It's also making it clear that time is moving on culture is moving on whether these people choose to understand it or not the the king and Queen that come to visit wouldn't have any idea about this secret secret gay club. That's happening without anyone's knowledge behind these on March doors you know there is an element of a coach is moving on even if these people are living all all alone in a happy little place in their own little bubble at the end of the film it did make me one east this and affectionate love letter to nostalgia all has more of a reminder that all things will eventually end even Downton Abbey the series the film perhaps the structure itself yeah. I think it's both I think it's it you can give and take away and I feel that you know Downton. Abbey was Sunday night fair and it's not political to cope with a big P. It's as you said it's cozy television and it's feel good and that's that's what this is. We must pretend as any different than the there were few little ingredients. It's in their little bit risky. You know and that's within its remit. I think it hits all those marks and yes you know anything about the old days. It's no style Jake and and Britain does that quite well. I Suppose Julian fellowes you know with Gosford Park for goodness sake all those years ago he knows how to do that. So you see you can push the boundaries so fall with film right Downton Abbey and I think he's done it and I think he's served the regular characters. I'm aware on the periphery of at the end of the regular characters are who the fans want to see and this is a film that has been made because of the demand of the popular you know how many people one hundred twenty million people watching it so he's given them what they want. I think Imelda Staunton they're one of many stars of the new feature film version of Downton Abbey Speaking to Ben Ryland Downton Abbey is out in cinemas

Downton Abbey Imelda Staunton Downton Ben Ryland Downton Abbey Julian Fellowes Maggie Smith Olivier Awards Abbey Mike Leigh NCA Tunis Ryland Carson Vera Drake Monaco Penelope Wilton Jake Britain Kate
The Harry Potter: Wizards Unite game

Pop Culture Happy Hour

01:55 min | 2 years ago

The Harry Potter: Wizards Unite game

"What's making you happy this week is wizards unite now it's a harry potter phone game built on the framework of polka mongo which wasn't built built on the framework of another game very very very very similar only instead instead of catching magical animals to put them in bloody tori like bloodsport where you're looking like amusement really glad you you you help harry potter and his friends rescue magical artifacts and beloved characters from bad spells i think i'm not exactly clear the story elements who's gamer a little fuzzy it's been successful not nearly the phenomenon that poke him on go was each needlessly complicated involves inventory management my least favorite thing about games ever i mean how come i go does to shore and it is also just like cooking logo it's repetitive they're different categories of missions that spring up as you walk around the city and you do have played in the city just like pokemon go and i don't know if i i it's just the most common category or if my commute to work is doomed but my commute is very heavy with ministry of magic missions which is just rescuing the same ministry official the ministry of administrator and doing something with the newspaper kiosk over and over again but then i thought you know maybe that's mehta because in the harry potter cannon the ministry represents faceless bureaucracy it's most mundane aspect of the harry potter world so maybe it's supposed to be boring maybe maybe that makes sense but i'm having a blast for one reason and this is the thing the pokey mongo does not do which is that the game is licensed the likenesses of actors from the film's so i mean if you're in the middle of their commute and you're on the red line and it stuck and you get a signal an imperfectly rendered version of a below the character actors miriam goalies turns up on your phone and you can rescue you heard from a boat super whatever the hell that he's a good start to the day i have not yet seen emma thompson i have not yet seen it kind of janki maggie smith yet but i living hope it is a repetitive and it is obsessive but i'm in with both feet

Official Administrator Mehta Emma Thompson Maggie Smith Harry Potter Miriam
"maggie smith" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"maggie smith" Discussed on KTOK

"It changes. Oh, by the way, I've freak out for you Gwen now, I remember why Diana Rigg did not win those Emmys why she kept losing Dame Maggie Smith. Downton abbey. I love. Real Maggie Smith beating all those years. I loved a Maggie side. Yeah. So that's one for your team there. You're now be one. Well, I loved, and I assume there this year. So maybe she'll win this year. Still show. Yes, yes. She got murdered. Well, she doesn't want to do. UB safe driving home, Jamie. You have a great week. I'm going let it will meet at Markham's nursery next week's they tend this week and find out exactly where we are. Because we would love for you to come see us and remember Jamie, always gives one of his bouquets to admire. That's right. Yes. So thank you. All you're listening to one thousand. K. T. O K, stay weather aware at sixty one degrees in Oklahoma City. Radio one thousand Katie. Okay. AM and K X x Y FM ninety six point one HD, two blow. Eighty four democratic candidates.

Maggie Smith Diana Rigg Jamie Downton abbey Gwen K. T. O K Katie Markham Oklahoma City sixty one degrees
"maggie smith" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

Happy Sad Confused

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"maggie smith" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

"And like I knew he was and that was one of the first times I was really like be freaked out to meet somebody. But yet Maggie Smith, Richard Harris, those amazing Hoskins David Copperfield of these amazing like find who you was Rickman intimidating because like I did I did one of the privileged when the last conversations with him. And he was you know, I've talked to everybody and like he was. Yeah. It gives them too many guys. Yes. So smart, so so small and also like Alan had voice. And so there's a lot of time people thought like I'd had that voice any very dry sense of humor. So sometimes people would think like, oh, he hates me. But like actually he really didn't how I remember. Alan took me and. Ritchie Griffiths alpha Dinna ones off to echoes. And it was the first time the sort of been with him as an adult on the partisan. Does late seeing this man who has been quite intimidating for my life. Suddenly become be vulnerable. Funny and self deprecating only sings enemy. Hey. The council emphasize enough. How I went to his his memorials. I was in London at the the amazing theme that developed that was just what supporter of younger actors. He was there was so many young actors that who he had taken time out to go and see their shows. I mean, he he so every every piece of the three evid he cut short his holiday in Canada, Tacoma, sea Equis, and then to me out dinner with an gave me late notes. But like you talk to me about the show and helping it was fair way into the run at that point. I was struggling some things, and he was very helpful. And you know, he didn't need to do that. And he didn't I don't know how he had the time to be as supportive of so many act as he did and direct and right and being amazing actor. Aptly intimidate for the first sort of taking the first three films. I think that was also the time when to be fed to all the old rock just like they didn't know we were going to be around for the whole series. Like, they didn't even know where they think it was on the third film had some like proper one on one scenes together for the first time that he really started treating me differently and more grown-up, I can't say from personal spiracy. Always spoke seemingly prideful and happy with you on a member like that conversation. He probably wasn't his Cup of tea. But he if you remember that sketch. We did you me. And Dane there was like a little cameo that Allan taped that we put into the schedule. Wouldn't have done for many cool. Well, thank you. Let's let's talk a little bit about a miracle workers. I mean, we've talked before about this the post Potter career. And how you've charted this amazing path that's been very unique to you and reflected your aesthetic and sense of humor, and this one feels like I said, it's right up. My alley. It's clearly right up. Your alley. Talk to me a little bit about it's the right? It's where it starts with the writer in this city. So so this is a miracle is based on a book called what in God's name, which you should all read. It's fantastic. And funny and berry. And I read this book McGovern. Tony owns his book. And I've read this amazing. And I was able to get a meeting with Simon and I said to him if you ever do anything with this. I really don't and what capacity though, I woke on this by just want to be involved. And you know, he he could've turned around and said, yeah, we're doing it on the radio. And I would've been like. Yeah. Great. I am in and. Yes. So I had that conversation with him. And then about a year later, he phoned me talking about how he would like to do it as TV's Aries. And and how he would if we're lucky enough to get a second series. It would be an anthology series. Now, the thing that was amazing about me was that I wanted to do Merican TV full sometime, but standard contracts seven years. And so I that was no way I was going to sign on to something for that long again and get locked into something for that long..

Simon Rickman Alan Maggie Smith Allan Ritchie Griffiths Tony sea Equis Richard Harris Tacoma David Copperfield London Canada writer McGovern Dane Potter Hoskins seven years
"maggie smith" Discussed on Waking Up with Sam Harris

Waking Up with Sam Harris

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"maggie smith" Discussed on Waking Up with Sam Harris

"If nothing else choose hell. Long. You want to be angry or sad for really you can just punctuate that we'll work of reactivity and pause. If only for a few moments, and those pauses can be enormously beneficial now to your point about I guess classically negative emotions being a source of creativity and energy. I think that's true for many of us some of the time. I, but I think it's easy to either just in a delusory way make a virtue of necessity there. The those of us who are ruled by negative emotion are finding some silver line into them. Right. Whereas mostly they're just a source of suffering. That would be great to get rid of him. If you could put on one hat, which would allow you to feel the optimum motivational component of one positive emotions that you're not tending to feel and to you could titrate your negative emotions just to like their creative optimum. But then not suffer. Whenever you. Didn't feel like suffering, right? If there's some happy balance there, you might understand that very few of us find it just by accident. Because like if you can't be mindful if you can't notice the next thought arise and capture your conscious life or moments or minutes or hours, you are simply living out the consequences of your pass conditioning, and your you know, just who you were yesterday. There's no there is actually no choice to make. Whereas if you train this particular skill again, the awareness of the process and an ability to step back can give you another degree of freedom. And if it is just listened this is it's good to be angry for the next ten minutes. Because that's how I'm going to write this scene will then than use it that way. Yeah. It's an I would want to state the values of of what we tend to cool negative, emotions like anger and fear. And so I suppose I remember once I was filming years ago and the man. Maggie Smith will wonderful Maggie Smith was in. We were sort of typically we've country house there were fields rented, and she looked in that very Maggie Smith way. She looked to these cows shit doesn't they get bold. And it was funny. But I thought that's his profound children must thing that there's a cow in a field. And if we project us those into that Calvin just a minute, we absolutely absolutely distraught with boredom idea that all we have to do is. Hold these calories into our interior, roping gross. Never stopping always standing up cagey looking around bits of rainfall anew. And the new wonder around. You break wind, and then you drop a cow pass. And then you move on that day. There's no book says, no television..

Maggie Smith Calvin ten minutes
Dame Muriel Spark on BBC Radio 4's Bookclub

BBC Radio 4's Bookclub

06:21 min | 3 years ago

Dame Muriel Spark on BBC Radio 4's Bookclub

Jean Brodie Muriel Spark Marcia Blaine School Maggie Smith Sandy Hitler BBC James Naughty Francis Writer British Library Joyce Emily Edinburgh Aylesford Ella Brody Franco Rita LEE