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Shell cuts dividend for first time since WW2

Wall Street Breakfast

03:03 min | 2 months ago

Shell cuts dividend for first time since WW2

"Better week in the oil patch as the publications roundtable looking hard at Valero Energy Phillips Sixty six Chevron Canadian Natural Resources Williams Companies Shinya Energy Enterprise Products Partners Magellan Midstream partners conical phillips the cover story digs in on how the economic recovery will play out with spending consumer staple stocks and essential retailers with open stores are seen outperforming in the new environment as well as companies that have good liquidity and can grow their online sales. That list of pandemics survivors includes Walmart Nike Costco. Lowe's target urban outfitters dollar general. Last week saw Royal Dutch. Shell cut their dividend for the first time since World War Two and that's the stock recovery on this week's single stock focus. The Prophet Hunter wrote an article on Saturday about the dividend cut and said quote buyers. Beware Royal Dutch. Shell Asia's closed Friday at over thirty one dollars and the b-shares closed just under thirty dollars. The Prophet Hunter starts out by discussing energy transitioning to renewables and then talks about why this cycle may be different while some anything we could see an oil and gas megamerger wave. I believe they may be disappointed. At least in the short medium term listening to energy majors earnings call over the last couple of weeks suggest. Management teams are prioritizing the deployment of capital in the renewable energy sector where we could see the direction of travel for. Ma is towards acquiring utilities or renewable power producers in two thousand eighteen total acquire direct energy of French Electric Utility this followed their 2016 acquisition of saft a battery maker for over a billion dollars. The company plans to start producing batteries by twenty twenty three Prophet Hunter then goes on to discuss shells dividend cut when Shell announced a cut in its dividend on thirtieth April for the first time since World War Two. What was most striking was the severity? Of the reduction. A seventy percent cut which caught investors off guard and illustrates the existential crisis unfolding within boardrooms. I believe the move underscores the transition. To a new era the prevailing yield is now three and a half percent and could mark a major step toward repositioning the business towards renewable focused business those expecting the dividend to be hiked oil markets. Recover maybe left disappointed instead. Management could be on the hunt to acquire utility or invest directly in renewable projects. The good news is that renewables are increasingly becoming. The lowest cost mechanism of providing energy and household are beginning to embrace the transition to electrification of transport and reduction in plastics which also affects oil demand. The profit hundred then gets to the bad news. The bad news for the oil majors is they are relatively late to the party. Existing renewable players such as vestis next Aaron Canadian solar have already gained a significant footprint and offer investors. A pure play exposure to renewables as the big oil majors entered. The renewable space returns on capital are likely to disappoint given strong competition for capital from new and incumbent operators

Chevron Canadian Natural Resou Hunter Valero Energy Phillips Shell Shell Asia Lowe French Electric Utility MA
True Crime Fans: This Dream Job Will Pay You $1,000 to Watch Chilling Documentaries

Noon Report with Rick Van Cise

00:20 sec | 2 months ago

True Crime Fans: This Dream Job Will Pay You $1,000 to Watch Chilling Documentaries

"Fans of true crime documentaries can earn some cash during the coronavirus locked down the video streaming service Magellan TV offering a thousand Bucks to someone to watch their twenty four hour all night crime watch the true crime fanatic must be able to handle tales of serial killers and murder mysteries the person who lands the job will have to document the twenty four hour crime fast through social

Murder
Changing the Healthcare Space with Voice Technology with Dan Messina Co-Founder & EVP of HandsFree Health

Inside VOICE

02:50 min | 3 months ago

Changing the Healthcare Space with Voice Technology with Dan Messina Co-Founder & EVP of HandsFree Health

"Now Dan. You've been in healthcare for over thirty five years. You've been the CEO of Magellan. House the CFO AETNA HOUSE. And you served as a partner of health advocate which showed for nearly ten one hundred times. Excuse me of the outside capital invested. And I'm curious. Why did you begin a journey into healthcare so many years ago and then why in the last few years did you decide that the next right move was to found lead a voice based healthcare company? A great question. I mean I think that I wish I had some really glorious story to tell you but the fact that matter results in the right place at the right time I had been with AETNA and Cigna in the late eighties early nineties and during that timeframe there was a big transition from multi line insurance coverage to healthcare and healthcare began to grow rapidly and I was right in the middle of that so gaming opportunity to be part of the process of transitioning CIGNA and Aetna from their multi line offerings to just healthcare and you know put me in a healthcare world. Which was you know? Maybe a lot of sense balance sheet perspective but I don't think necessarily it was beneficial for the end users perspective and all these companies grew rapidly and You know worked for them but I think the members found themselves facing a lot of difficulties in trying to figure out the healthcare process. That's what led to help advocate about twenty years ago me and others from the large health plan companies realize that the to get through the healthcare process was nothing easy and we thought whom better to help them figure out their way through the maze that people to help contribute to the maze and so we started health advocate opposite. Frankly couldn't believe how successful that company became basis form. It was simply a company that was providing any response and you healthcare question. Any individual may have nobody that twenty year span at grew from two forty four million members with over a thousand employees and yes we were able to sell it for about one hundred times. The invested capital was which was obviously very impressive. That then let me two hands. Free health with my colonel the other CO founder of the company hands. Free Health is really in some respects like health advocate where it's responsive to questions that people may have but it does in a voice recognition fashion voice responses service. We think that voice response is a direction that the whole country's going and healthcare is kind of catching up but getting there right now and of course. Healthcare has unique difficulties voice response because of the terminology and being able to convert that terminology voice. You Know Bill Gates. I think twenty years ago the healthcare the content is key and I agree with that and and Between the content and the voice. There's no simple task and I think that's one reason. Healthcare is behind. But if you look at all the stats. Everyone's growing dramatically voice annoys people are increasing utilization voice so it makes sense to have health be part of the growth model and that's where hands free health does come into

Aetna Cfo Aetna House Cigna Magellan CEO DAN Bill Gates Partner Co Founder
"magellan" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

AM 1350 WEZS

12:13 min | 5 months ago

"magellan" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

"Owner for the past nineteen years and owns Magellan Christian academies in Phoenix Arizona we're gonna talk about something that I talk about on the show and previously in Jacksonville Florida too as well her school's all kinds of awards including declaration of Magellan day by the mayor of Jacksonville Florida that was back in twenty and I could go on and on about her accolades I want to make sure that I get to the meat of her schools and what we're talking about here so Laurie thanks so much for joining us well thank you okay that sounds great being back on your show again yeah absolutely because you know one of the things and this is that other cyber thing you're the published author of children's books and you've even gotten the gold star status on Amazon and that last time you were here that's exactly what we talked about yeah yeah I'm a looks like about that yeah so now we're talking about the schools and and the first question is that comes to mind is how did you become involved in these private schools well I thought over the years of indoctrination going on in campuses I saw not only at the college level which I have taught at the college level but also now in the high school it is now in the middle school and the elementary which is just completely surprised me and now it is spilling over to the early learning academy the call and it was it was concerning me and I we've got to get back to traditional academic learning that I over the last sixty years I just noticed that we have moved away from content academia and we've moved toward more ideological control of schools and that's not academia and it's and I and I remember when I was getting my master's degree years ago I saw a movie just popped up one day it was called Idiocracy and it is it's a rather crude movie but I think it kind of gives the viewer a sense of what how to tidy disintegrate and people are not properly educated so I wanted to open Magellan academy because I wanted capture children at a very young age when their mind is is the most open to learning I wanted to put in their faith based guide Judeo Christian principle he Jim values and also teach math and science because that is so fundamentally important to children at a young age develop those pathways in the brain and I wanted to teach from a solid foundation of a good curriculum that is pretty much laid out without much a little room for the teachers because I tightly controlled the education in my school that I just don't let anybody **** nilly teacher that they want we rightly I tightly controlled here as to what's hot in in my school right we teach traditional academic learning which is what I wanted where we teach phonics rather than memorization and today they kind of gotten away from from on it and two more the memorization type reading winch memorization is fine but anybody within academia knows that memorization as kind of a lower form of learning it's not your higher level learning where you apply you things that you learn for instance you know some people made the argument you're well you know it's an anatomy but if it is an anatomy memorization like that yeah but you can memorize all the bones but you got to be able to know where they go in the body but you don't apply that knowledge of where those phones are so I believe in teaching the concept we believe in teaching phonics proper way to re examine the more they learn that then they commit that memory the things that we do here at the Jalan that we've had great success with our test scores have been excellent I just had a hearing here the other day and she was talking to me and she said my my daughter is doing so well in school now and she said that resolved we live probably about fifteen eighteen miles from you but we tried this this is just to bring our son who then our kindergarten preparatory program and you know we bring we drive eighty miles just to bring him so those are really great feedback that I get in you know what's interesting case I what is the end all and a few years ago and I was at a school kind of watching about some different teaching techniques and things of that type in their little girl by the name of it was about eight or so years old industrious young girl and she goes to get this little minute feel of building our tools here and you put them all back together put them in a logical order and I'm locking her with a little girl October by her and then I went back I want to play with that in Hey look at the little girl he says no the teacher and jazz I want that I want to play with that and so the teacher goes a little paler and says hello you know the rules we have to share everything and I thought to myself well no time out this little girl the effort office shall put everything back together which was clearly in the math he he supported everything and then she started building and then the other little girl gets up with her because she wouldn't Sheraton just off of some of the things in the far future trying to get Jordan are trying to get Taylor to to share her thing hello goodbye to him and the teacher got hurt or did you got diverted I took the little girl by the hand I showed her something else every directed her involved into something else so I went to the teacher and I said oh also free of sharing the you said that everybody have to share that correct you think yeah that makes become better adult and I said but but why should she shared something that she'd got herself and and put together just because little girl wants it you know because of the doll we have to learn to adults we share everything and I said okay well then if you believe apple on even count me in how bout you share your bank account with me I want it all of a sudden about was no hands off my I know you can't pick and choose what you want to share if you believe that we should teach children to share everything they have and then that makes a better adults so that we share and I think that that makes no logical sense to me I said because now what you're teaching that other little girl is one two that you can take away from somebody something that they have but the second thing is the comment but somebody else has and I said so your future all the wrong values and the court she and I had a nice little dialogue connected but I'm still waiting for that bank account so we can share that wow what a great example yeah yeah and you know I it kind of things that are being taught in schools anymore and I get if I stand in complete amazement of that and you know you talk about influences and you talk about the curriculum and then obviously what you've seen and and of course for nineteen years running Magellan Christian academies as I mentioned previously in Jacksonville now in Phoenix Arizona and then the reaction you've gotten from some some parents you talk about and ran and that's a book I read atlas shrugged and how did that book affect your beliefs and you know about business and and government what we're talking about that also raps into what's these kids are learning yeah read the book hi I was a military officer at the time and I was not going to Charleston South Carolina it was during the time of desert storm and I was mobilized up to the northeast and I'm Cokie Charleston South Carolina within the third district in night saw a book called the fountainhead which was the book written prior cab ride Dan dia I you know you always wanted to kind of come through the book review the pages with interesting if I read the book five years later though I read that book atlas shrugged and for you in Britain by Ayn Rand for your readers that they're not are the listeners that they've never read the book it is a life changing bar literally at that it's a story about the United States that becoming more and more dysfunctional out the government takes more and more control over businesses through our regulations that collected his policies that it in the book it's what area rand referred to your rational altruism and the government regulation that becomes so tightly in the business as an invention and the individual human spirit job is becoming so hard it that these people eventually revolt and John Galt's who is kind of a main character in the book who believes in unleashing the individual humans to reach your full potential I he takes them away and put them in a place I believe it's called culture I can't remember if I called in Colorado you can't see it from the air and you can't he had with you drive have you take all these smart productive people and you put him in a place and you take away from a dysfunctional society and kind of in the book at the end do the United States it's kinda left to defend for itself for people who believe in taking from hard working people and voting people in to take from them and then the country just collapses and then the thought of the book is they'll bring all these people back out to build this stop but I owe you one as a military officer I was in many third world countries and I just saw the abject poverty in the server to with people and it just made me cringe because you always want to see people do well in life and you want them to have opportunities and I was so many of these third world country then you can just see the despair on the people's faces there was nothing for them and their governments had had just inflicted servitude upon them but in contrast when I get back to the United States I would see the how capitalism unleash the individual human spirit and and creativity and and our first technological and scientific innovations hang on a second worry we're gonna continue with Laurie blitz in just a second here on America tonight shot at in Mexico one hundred drinks at a well worn bar with some shady looking characters in Vegas riding a bike from Dallas to Seattle on a bent scribbling the words dungeon on a napkin while two passengers next you on a plane wonder what the heck does that mean I'm kids Laney and what does this have to do with my success why do you care part of my journey that I want to share with you in my new book deal your own destiny luckily now I can last and some would seem like other disasters at the time can any of you relate that's exactly what you'll discover by reading my book I picture you want to vote each for relaxing in the.

Phoenix Arizona Florida Magellan Jacksonville Jacksonville Florida
Shopping For Going Out Clothes at Age 37

Does This Happen to You

05:42 min | 6 months ago

Shopping For Going Out Clothes at Age 37

"Like grocery shopping. That's why this podcast features funny stories from fantastic writers about our daily L. E. anomalies a micro audio book about life and befuddle men. Just for you our story. This week is from Shawny silver. Who you'll find wind on medium DOT COM and here is shopping for going out close at age? Thirty seven a scary story to tell in the dark back in ten days time. I'm going to New Orleans to visit two of my dearest girlfriends. We haven't been in the same room together since Obama's first term. This is a big deal a couple of weeks ago one of them texted and asked me how I feel about having having a night in New Orleans. She is my best friend. She knows me well enough to understand that my strong itinerary preference prince is Popeye's chicken on her couch while we facebook stock. Everyone from law school. She knows what she's asking of me. Of course I'm down for a night in New Orleans who wouldn't be in the era of shared ride APPs really have no reason to turn down a a little revelry. I have enough time to mentally prepare myself since day awake past midnight and I have a genuine love of the off Bourbon in St offerings in this town. Let's do this my one true concern wardrobe. I don't own going out close anymore because I do not partake in going out. I don't go to places with lines out front and if I have to scream to communicate I leave. Save the fun I enjoy as a thirty-seven-year-old adult typically happens during the day and I can tell you I enjoy it and save a lot more than I ever did. During the era of my life will quietly call body glitter but I refused to lead an unbalanced unbalanced. Life that only consists of leggings and I- delight inexperienced wonderful places likely to lead to excellent photos. I am jumping into this three sheets to the wind experience. Despite the fact that I'd rather be home wrapped in three sheets so I took to the Internet in order to outfit myself was something suitable for nighttime merriment reader. I screamed admittedly. It's been awhile since I let my FA- Lange's wonder into these e commerce categories but good Lord. I didn't think I'd been in out of the game so long. That actual clothing had gone out of fashion. I didn't recognize any of the garments. I saw and I certainly he didn't know how to ingress or Egress a single. One of them are we- wearing lingerie out of doors. Now is that what's happening not to sound too much like the women in my grandmother's Thursday afternoon Magellan Group but put some clothes on. I just want to to go to dinner and a bartenders in this cocktail bar or two. I don't also want to lose an extremity to the wiles of winter. You're also why is everything tight. Why is everything a bodysuit? I'm not swimming the channel. I'm ordering a young a Pinot Noir. I'm looking through scores of items typically worn by a dominatrix while being paid handsomely for her work and and I simply can't feel confident about my ability to exit a lift in any one of them whereas my solace I ask you. I can't take myself seriously in clothing. That looks like the dog ate half of it nor am I ready to shop. It stores reserved for the ladies who monitor standardized testing. I don't know where I belong or what to wear when I get there. And I feel adrift in a Sea of very restricting and and difficult to care for fabrics in the end I know all go with a deep V.. Black Henley high waisted gene black good evening bag on a gold chain any chunky. He'll suck boot Wing my eyeliner and dry shampoo my hair and hope to heaven. And there's been time for a nap that day because all of these things are what. Make me feel comfortable. And if I'm not comfortable then there will never be a night anywhere that I'll be able to enjoy and that's what you know when you're thirty seven that never crossed your mind. Ten Years Prior no matter how much your feet hurt while wearing address. That didn't allow you to sit down. Oh yes I had my time. Don't wait for me. He if you're still in the phase of your life that requires double stick tape. I applaud you. I was you once. I don't regret that time and I'm not sad about progressing to this time. I just wish there was one retailer who grown up with me. Now if you'll excuse me I'm going to spend my day making soup editing. My podcast in reading a book. And if you're spending yours removing hand stamps and wrist spans and frantically retracing the steps of your debit card.

New Orleans Barack Obama Shawny Silver Facebook Lange Magellan Group
Cats Hits the Big Screen

Leo Laporte

00:24 sec | 6 months ago

Cats Hits the Big Screen

"Following decades of false starts the hit musical cats finally reaches the big screen originally based on a poetry collection by TS Eliot a group of felines must make a one to your decision as to which one of them gets a chance to be reincarnated into a new life is one of the same group James cordon Dame Judi Dench chastened Rouleau interests alpha Jennifer Hudson Taylor swift Indian Magellan

Ts Eliot James Cordon Judi Dench Jennifer Hudson Taylor Rouleau
How Does Venus Work?

BrainStuff

06:13 min | 9 months ago

How Does Venus Work?

"After the moon the Venus is the second brightest natural object in the night sky partially because this planet is covered by reflective clouds that make it is an optical telescopes can't penetrate eight with the Venetian surface hidden from view generations of fiction writers used to speculate wild about the mysterious terrain beneath those clouds for example Tarzan Creator Edgar Rice burroughs portrayed Venus as a world with lush forests in our boreal cities in a nineteen eighty-four pulp novel but then science intervened B eight at Venus's habitable pretty much imploded during the Cold War in Nineteen fifty-six Radio Telescope observations showed that the planet had surfaced temperatures in excess of six hundred and eight eighteen degrees Fahrenheit that's three hundred twenty six degrees Celsius and believe it or not those readings were kind of low we now know the average surface temperature on Nisa blistering eight hundred sixty four degrees Fahrenheit or four hundred sixty two Celsius it's the hottest planet in our solar system even though mercury is closer to the Sun on the face of Venus the atmospheric pressure is crushingly extreme and lead would melt into a puddle but as hellish as this place sounds actually has in common with Earth the two worlds are quite similar in size if you were to stuff venus inside our planet matric doll style it would occupy roughly eighty six percent end of earth total volume Venus has earth beaten in some key regards though earth displays a slight midsection bulge being wider around its equator than it is from one pole to the other conversely Venus is almost a perfect sphere what gives well when a massive celestial body like a star or planet spins quickly around its axis centrifugal force will give it a more dramatic bulge around its equator however Venus has an ultra slow rotation speed it takes the equivalent of two hundred and forty-three earth days for Venus to complete one full rotation around its axis and only two hundred twenty five earth days to finish a new lap around the Sun so in other words a day on Venus lasts longer than Vanesian year does and get this from our self centered perspective Venus spins backward word most of the planets in the solar system rotate from west to east Uranus and Venus Buck that trend on those two worlds the sun appears to rise in the West and set in the East nobody knows how that came to pass. Astronomers think Venus us to move in a counterclockwise direction like Earth but at some point it's been I have reversed alternatively perhaps the sun's Gravitational influence or a collision with a large object caused the entire planet to flip upside down in December of nineteen sixty two Venus became the first planet to get a fly by visit from a manmade spacecraft exploiting brief window of opportunity NASA's Mariner two probes studied this world up close from distances as near as twenty one thousand miles that's about thirty four thousand kilometers onboard instruments taught us a great deal mariner two firms that Venus does not have an earth like magnetic field and it recorded surface temperatures within the expected range a young Carl Sagan helped design the mariner to probe yes successfully lobbied to have the space craft fitted with a camera because close up pictures of Venus might quote answer questions that we were too dumb to even pose by the time Mariner to launched scientists already knew that there were high levels of carbon dioxide in the vision atmosphere and that composition should give us pause carbon dockside makes up a whopping ninety six percent of Venus's atmosphere scientists attribute this to a runaway greenhouse effect theoretically the planet used to have a more temperate climate that could have remained stable for billions of years back then oceans of liquid water may have covered its surface though we don't know for sure things changed as are growing son became hotter any oceans would have evaporated during this time astronomers think much of the carbon dioxide invasion rocks leached out and traveled guy word while the atmosphere changed it got better at trapping heat creating a vicious cycle that worsens the problem inevitably temperatures spiked and stayed since our own planet has a major greenhouse gas problem Venus could offer us important insights regarding climate change but sending probes to explore it has always presented major challenges on Venus the surface gravity is comparable to what you and I experience on earth what's not comparable is that atmospheric Asher which is ninety two times greater on the face of Venus than it is here faced with extreme temperatures and high pressure it's no wonder that manmade objects don't last long long in the planet's environment when the Soviet venire thirteen probe landed on Venus in Nineteen eighty-two it stayed intact for record setting one hundred and twenty seven minutes before it was destroyed mind you this wasn't the USSR's first Rodeo previous Venero spacecraft's successfully visited the planet's atmosphere and touched down on its outer crest brief though their visits were these probes captured the first ever photographs of the Venetian surface Nasr's Magellan spacecraft provided further insights has it mapped ninety eight percent of the planet's face all in all Venus boasts more than sixteen thousand volcanoes and volcanic features but we don't know of any these are still active highland plateaus deep canyons and meteorite impact craters have also been discovered there although Venus's about four point six billion years old crest is thought to be much younger with an estimated age of just three hundred to six hundred million years Venus lacks tectonic plates as we know them on earth nonetheless Sunday August think that upwelling magma occasionally recycle sections of the crust long before it was an object scientific study or of Edgar Rice burroughs. goals Venus mesmerized our ancestors bright and beautiful the cloud adorned planet derives its name from the Roman Goddess of love into mathematicians mapped it's progress across the sky and Galileo took detailed notes about its moon like phases somehow knowing that Venus is a stifling hot house doesn't diminish its allure with every new discovery inspires curiosity aw

Edgar Rice Burroughs Radio Telescope Nisa Eight Hundred Sixty Four Degre Three Hundred Twenty Six Degre Eight Eighteen Degrees Fahrenh Thirty Four Thousand Kilometer Six Hundred Million Years Ninety Eight Percent Twenty Seven Minutes Eighty Six Percent Ninety Six Percent Six Billion Years One Pole
"magellan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

11:57 min | 10 months ago

"magellan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Seven seven three three three. Seven four to five is our phone number and you can email us anytime talk. Radio Rick Steves DOT COM next up we check in with you. Our listeners about your latest travel plans. Thanks for coming along its travel with Rick Steves every once in a while. We like to check in with you are traveling listeners here on travel with Rick Steves. Tell us where you're looking to go next and if you need a little help figuring out what to plan for he's calling from Prescott Arizona Hi Casey Hi Rick. I'm planning what I'm hopefully is going to be an epic trip to fame. I wanted to know what like small villages or towns should I make sure I see and then if I had to choose between Madrid Barcelona which one should I spend martime man okay well. Spain's a huge country and there's thousands of villages that I'm sure ordered delightful. I I gotta be honest. I don't know a lot of the villages in Spain but I'll say you want to kind of think. Of What region are you interested in. I mean the parents mountains are just fascinating. If you want that sort of Alpine Spain I mean there's a lot of traditional no culture hiding out up there. There's different regions Spain. If you go to subway sandwich shop in Madrid you might find menu with four different languages and they're all Spanish languages ages. He'd have Catalan for the people in in the northeast around Barcelona. You'd have a bask- for people in the Basque region and you'd have gallician for the Celtic people in the North West and when you travel in the northwest there are beautiful little hideaway medieval towns that are part of the Santiago de Compostela and they are the villages that people will walk to or bicycle to these days when they're doing that trek medieval pilgrimage trail the most famous villages is there the most classic and rewarding villages are these whitewashed villages in the hills down in the south and end Lucia to a lot of Americans their image of Spain really and Lucia. That's the quintessential Spanish sort of Flamingo world. The famous region in Lucia is the root of the Pueblo spunk host host the root of the Whitewashed Hill towns and you're jumping off point is the biggest of those towns that would be Rhonda. It's no secret a lot of tourists go to run but it is just just an amazing town on a gorge with dramatic bridge connecting the two sides of the gorge with the modern town on one side and an older town the other side and from there you can drive have into the hills and find these just gorgeous dramatic. Whitewashed Hill towns that were put on the top of these hills for defensive purposes so personally I would go to the root of the publicity bunkers. I've always loved that near Sa- via near Rhonda near Arcos while you're done Arcos is famous for the Spanish riding school school and also for Sherry. No you're talking about Madrid and what were you thinking Madrid and Barcelona. I couldn't decide which one I should spend more time in or maybe just forget one and spend all my time in the other. Barcelona is suffering lately because it's just too popular the mayor's actually thinking about how can we keep. I from flooding into our city. The local people are actually getting a little bit ornery about tourists changing the character of all of their their neighborhoods Barcelona's a place where AIRBNB has come in and driven up the the rents. I mean Airbnb doesn't drive it just gives landlords and opportunity to make a lot more money renting out to travelers instead of renting out to the local pensioners and so on so that drives away the local people into the suburbs and the characteristic neighborhoods are suddenly without the the local population that makes it really characteristic and instead of real produce in the markets you've got slushy isn fruit on skewers and that kind of thing for the tourists so you know you go to. Barcelona anything about about the Romblon and you think about the book career market and all that and it's still there but if you were there twenty years ago it's it's not the same thing because now it's just overrun by tourists having having said that. I love Barcelona but he really got anticipate. It's going to the streets are just going to be mobbed with with tourists whereas Madrid feels just more like a a workaday capital. Madrid good to me is you feel the pulse of Spain in Madrid beautifully. I love the architecture of the skyscrapers on the grand via and you can just trace the evolution of Skyscraper Architecture through the Twentieth Century one decade at a time as you walk down the grand via in Madrid. You've got the greatest collection of paintings anywhere in Europe at the product and and you've got a palace that used to house the most powerful king in in all of Europe into Palestinian rivals Versailles in Paris in Sean Brennan in Vienna Anna and that's the Royal Palace in Madrid you've got plenty of opportunities to enjoy the nightlife and the TAPAS and Flamenco the best Flamenco in Spain bane is famously offered in Madrid and you've got a chance. If you want to go out and see the bullfight. That's the the most visible arena in all of Spain and you've I've got tight trips from Madrid that I think are more interesting than the side trips from Barcelona within an hour. You can go to Toledo you can go to Salamanca you can go to the Valley of the fallen in El escorial the big palace of the Inquisition Palace the stern serious nonsense palace outside of Madrid. There's just I love to see in Madrid so I think I'd say if you're choosing between Barcelona Madrid. I think I'd go to Madrid well. I have to say I'm sold definitely be spending spending my time in Madrid. It's going to be my first time and all my friends have gone and told me how amazing it just wanted a little more detail. Remember in Spain. you've gotTA gotta go with the local tempo of life. Okay it's hot in the middle of the day the elite WanNa be indoors or take a nap or Siesta and then be out in the evening things are it just really hopping in the evening and there's something just wonderful about having the whole community out for the CEO in the evening when I'm doing my research for my guidebook if I'm trying to look at restaurants at noon and at six they're just empty. I mean if anything the staff will be eating but you come back at two o'clock for lunch and they start to serve and for dinner. You can have nine o'clock or ten o'clock. You'll have the dinner one thing to remember. If you go early it'll be terrific in the restaurants which is not bad. It's it's easier. It's a a little more relaxed and then if you go later it won't be touristy at all. It'll be filled with local. The same restaurant can have two different personalities and for a lot of trustee. You have to be pretty pretty aggressive. If you're trying to get served at ten o'clock all the local people are in there and and they get favored by the wait staff because they can speak directly and they know they're. They're just good solid customers. Customers whereas tourists are going to be kind of maintenance and everything so not to say you shouldn't go there but if you go in the evening you're going to have to know a few Spanish words and you're GonNa have to Beller it up to that bar and demand end some service. If you're going to get any respect I like the challenge I think all the Oh that route go for it. That's so good. Also there's a lot of sort of entrepreneurs now that are into different kinds of travel experiences. I think wherever you're going in Spain if you go to tripadvisor type under the city and then go to things to do I do not take very much serious consideration of eating and sleeping places in trip adviser but I really like the things to do section because then you can see. There's a cooking school cool. Are there's a a walking tour or oh. There's a some sort of a special experience with this or that slice of the culture anybody WHO's trying to make money in tourism. We'll have their little business listed in trip advisor things to do and you can browse through that and then you can go over to that website and take advantage of that and and that's how I find doubt about a lot of great activities while I'm in these towns year after year. I love that idea I like being more engrossed in the culture and celebrating the smaller all our businesses as opposed to the large. Oh yeah everywhere that is so important because you know the large companies they have the connections with the hotels and the gut their advertising all over the place and they're in with the booking agencies and so on but the smaller feisty little mom and pop businesses I find they are just really creative. They love their work and the we're done with that. You feel like you've got a friend in that town got to celebrate that tenacity as a small business good for you have a great time. Thank you bye yeah. We're checking in with our listeners to hear where you're thinking of travelling next where at eight seven seven three three three seven four to five and by e mail you can reach us at radio at Rick Steves. Dot Com in Dorothy is calling in from Ottawa in Ontario. Hi Dorothy thank you for taking my call. I just going because I like to know what my sisters and I should be doing. When they visit Amsterdam for a few days well Amsterdam you could spend a lot of time in Amsterdam and you could could spend just as much time outside of Amsterdam remember. The Netherlands is really small and very well accessible by public transportation so Amsterdam could be your hub and you could side trip out to any number of places depending on your interest. Okay I'd be interested in seeing dykes and how that works. There's a company that I I love in Amsterdam which is called a wetland safari and wetland safari is a chance to go on a canoe ride in the polder land with a local guide who will explain to you how the detrick claimed the land and and what the little communities were like and are like today in the you know the rural countryside. It's called polder land that is what was reclaimed from the sea and the company is called Wetland Safaris. It's run by a woman named Miguel A. J. E. L. I believe but you go canoeing from village to village and you realize what these charming little towns or hamlets are like and you approach them by. Water also when you're out wonderful in when you're out on that you you realize that it's sort of a bog land and there's a we've of organic material that makes kind of a big Saad Topsoil and and under that is water and you get out of the canoe and Mai L. takes you to a little point where you can jump up and down on the side and you the whole place is like a trampoline because because you're literally on a mattress over the water and I love that and she's just a petite canoe and she takes a long pole and she pushes. Che's it through the sod and then she shoves it down ten or twelve feet because it gets through the layer of sod and it just hits water and it demonstrates this the Dutch terrain that a lot of us are oblivious to so that's a fun way to get out of the city and connect with the countryside far from Amsterdam again actually leaves from Amsterdam. You meet her behind the train station and she takes you on a public bus out her little depot where she has her canoes and and then you get on the news and you go paddling around and you get out and demonstrate this here and you get out and check out a windmill there and you get out and have a picnic lunch here and then you get out and pedal through all the ducks and then you're Beckett your spot and she takes you back dempster down. It's a lot of fun. It sounds great but that's just one of many kinds of alternatives are excursions. You can have from Amsterdam you can also go directly out to the ocean front and they're you've got beach resorts and some of them are sand dunes national parks and desolate kind of hikes on on the wide open beach and others are really really crowded and popular and multigenerational festivals on the Sand Scheveningen is a suburb of of Rotterdam and everything within an hour of Amsterdam. It seems like on on one of the trains and the fun thing about Dutch Public Transit. Is You hardly need the train sketch Africa's four times an hour trains go everywhere and everything's within thirty or forty minutes away. Everything's flat and you're out in the in the countryside and in no time and then pretty soon. You're at another another town nearby. Harlem is a great town disagreed town. Rotterdam was a big city that was bombed flat in World War. Two has been rebuilt sent in a modern way in fact. It's Nice Ace to compare Amsterdam and Rotterdam.

Madrid Spain Barcelona Amsterdam Rick Steves Barcelona Madrid Prescott Arizona Lucia Airbnb Rotterdam Whitewashed Hill Harlem Africa Europe Sa Toledo Romblon Dutch Public Transit
"magellan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

10:12 min | 10 months ago

"magellan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Raphael fell as a really interesting neighborhood to visit to because it's a very old neighborhood. It was one of the first places when the aristocratic families wanted to start moving out of the CENTRO. They started moving into these new suburban neighborhoods right now. They feel like they're right next door. You know that's walkable between the Century Study Cassandra file but at that time they built their mansions there it was like moving out into the country and now all of those buildings they've been there for hundreds of years and now they have mechanic shops in little careers in them. It's a really vibrant neighborhood hood with lots of people walking around the street there some cool coffee shops but mostly. It's just a lot of old time places. That's a really fun place to explore on foot. If you wanted to go to some real neighborhood in a random way that was a working class neighborhood with vibrant markets and just a slice of life of urban Mexico. What would you recommend fail. L. Is a good working class neighborhood to explore as is the Santa Maria Larry Beta which is just a little bit further out from the center and if you're looking for some vivid a little slice of life what would it be. I mean I remember these old fashioned tortilla machines that were just so beautiful so rickety and they would just be cranking out endless bliss so little produce yeah definitely lots of those. I think there's a lot of places in Mexico City where you can find really long running vibrant culture. Are you know there's tons of coffee. Shops Mexico grows a lot of coffee and there have always been a great coffee culture there so that you can you know walking down any neighborhood. Even the trendiest neighborhoods are still. We're gonNA find the old coffee shop with the old man eating pundits. You'll say sweet bread and having their coffee reading the paper. Those places are everywhere wrote that again. Tina's in your moon guidebook to Mexico City you wrote about how that tell you find a little intimate corner of the local cultures going to cuffy shop. What about CHAPULTEPEC multiple pack doc is Mexico City's gigantic urban park. It's more like a forest than apart. It's a beautiful park and it's also the sight of some of the most important museums in the the city notably the absolutely unmissable and absolutely spectacular anthropology museum. That's brings a lot of tourists to to pull back to spend a day or half a day wandering through the anthropology museum but it's also worth taking a spin around the park itself which is shaded by these old cypress trees that have been there for hundreds of years and it's actually been a park since the time of the machine pretended to cheat lawn the Aztec City the Mexico City to pull apart that the rulers would go out and spend a day in the country cheer and afternoon in the country so it's always sort of been this country and then later the Spanish did the same you mean didn't just take over a bunch of grumbling barbaric humans animals. I mean they were actually civilized in Mexico when when the Spaniards came in fact the Spanish were blown away when they saw the city of Tennessee line it was enormous and orderly and it had beautiful spectacular markets they couldn't believe in fact it was all ridden by canals. Isn't that an amazing easing thing to think that Europeans conned themselves into thinking that they just were you know invading heathens and giving Christian faith when when really these were very very sophisticated societies and beautiful cities in some cases Mexico City compared to Venice at the time and it had those canals and an amazing system of government and and criticize happened to be able to go in there and because of a few quirky little lucky breaks was able to conquer Mexico yeah and a lot of what we know about the city today or about ten feet long about the Aztec city is from the Spanish chronicles. You know they wrote about it. They were blown away by what they saw. When they came to ten feet long you can learn about that that the National Museum the event apology and that's in the Chapultepec area and I'll tell you if you're going out into the countryside and going to be visiting some of the ruins and so on you you gotta see this first and if you're not gonNA get the chance to go to the countryside then you need to see also it's just it's a beautiful museum and it's so important to gain an appreciation of Pre Columbian Mexico. That's right the report about the neighborhood called a Roma well. Roma is today probably the hippest coolest neighborhood in Mexico City but it was built originally in the nineteenth century so or the very beginning of the twentieth century actually so it's also a place with lots of gorgeous architecture a lot of ECLECTIC architecture some beautiful art nouveau architecture and for a long time. It was sort of working class neighborhood but little by little it's become the hot spot in Mexico City so this is the place to go. Oh you are a foodie. The Rome is the place to go. There's really wonderful restaurants of all types great nightlife bookshops great shopping cool boutiques six this is travel with Rick Steves. We're talking with Julie Mead and she writes the Moon Guidebook to Mexico City and Julie in your book. You've got this wonderful list of top sites eight and Cantina culture mid the list of top quote site. Why would you rate Cantina culture right up there with all the great museums and galleries well. I think that it's a pretty unique and wonderful part of life in Mexico City. There are cantinas everywhere. CANTINAS can sort of range from a place that really is just sort of a barebones bar where the neighborhood locals are. GonNa get together and talk and play Dominos and everybody knows each other and they maybe served some peanuts to place where you can have a full sit down meal where every drink you order comes with a plate of food and some of Cantinas are even really good dining destinations nations the other well known in the city as a place to eat so it's a really low key he version. It's a nightlife sort of thing or afternoon evening place to go out and get got together but it's a very low key. It's like a Tapas bar in Spain is is it a vestige of the Spanish colonial experience well. That's a good question that I don't know the answer because because I mean you got you got that wonderful ambience you know you can just stay awhile atmosphere and fund workaday food in a Tapas bar in Spain. It sounds like you got the same thing in a Cantina in Mexico City. What's one tip to assure you fit rated in the Cantina culture well. The best tip would be to learn the lyrics some some popular songs in Spanish. That's kind of a tall order. I guess I'd say don't drink corona with lime. People don't do that Mexico. Lyon your corona. I think a lot of people going super local that you're being Super Gringo now. If you WANNA even be more locally you can drink the intoxicating drink to talk about the the Polka Polka fermented beverage made from the sap of the McGee cactus and it's been drunken Mexico since long before the conquest and it was really popular popular during the time when the machine ruled Mexico they were very upset me as people they wouldn't let anybody drink pool except for the priests and the nobleman but once they fell in the Spanish Spanish took over while everyone said great. Let's drink pool K. because it's a delicious sort of fizzy sort of slimy which sounds terrible but it's not it's delicious drink. Ah then is usually flavored with a fresh fruit gum guava mango sorte peanut flavor. It's a fermented sap of CACTUS. That's slimy and end with other fruits sounds so good but it's not as mode exploited to this. There's no big commercial production well. There can't be because pork is something it has to be drunk within a day or two of its productions so all of the Polka Mexico City is a big place to drink it because most of the Production Pool K. is in the ranch's right around Mexico. Oh City in the states around Mexico City and really it has to be pulled out of the CACTUS and fermented and within a day or two. It has to be consumed so there's no way to really export polka. Can you get drunk on it yeah. You got to drink a lot. Though it's a very low alcohol content you can feel the effects of it after usually at served actually very big glasses for that reason so you know feel it. Let's head no option. They got drunk on Pool K. Yes that's right interesting data. Eh the equivalent of a of a medieval kind of mead or something like that in Europe would be making a big comeback in in Mexico City which is becoming quite trendy. I would think vermouth and cocktails tails would be more hip but there's actually a mess drink. That's holding its own with its own burkhalter. Yeah well you get a little bit of both actually and nowadays so a traditional nope Acadia the places where they serve McKay. There are some that have been around for over one hundred years well. Those places are PULCI and nothing else and they serve it in the daytime. You know they open at ten o'clock in the morning. They're done by six. The pool is gone. That's a traditional Katya but now you can find lots of cocktail buyers that might have a pool in curtail on the Menu Julie. This has been such a great review of the neighborhoods of massive Mexico City congratulations on your guidebook the moon guidebook for Mexico City. Let's just finish with an idea where I can just I just want to kick back and be part of the parade of local life and either sit and enjoy watching it or actually be part of it on a Sunday afternoon. Where would I be in Mexico City. Well I would say the best place to go is to the CEO delivery format and then right next door to to put the pack the park because on Sundays the buzzer La Reforma is closed closed to automobile traffic. It's this big old boulevard that runs all the way through the city studded with monuments skyscrapers on either side and it runs through the park of triplet the pack and they closed it on Sundays so that people can ride bicycles. They can jog take their dog on a walk families. Go Out. There's music. It's really fun and and you get a really great Sunday vibe everybody comes out and then you can pop into the park where it's a veritable party on Sundays so really family family oriented place people are picnicking there flooding little boats on the lakes there. I think that's a wonderful place spent a Sunday so the Paseo de reform a boulevard Lavar close to cars on a Sunday were filled with people enjoying a beautiful afternoon and then from there head over to Chapultepec Park. That's what I would recommend sounds good. Thanks thank.

Mexico City Mexico Polka Mexico City Shops Mexico Pre Columbian Mexico Cantinas Raphael Spain Chapultepec Park Rick Steves National Museum corona Santa Maria Larry Beta anthropology museum Chapultepec Julie Mead CEO Europe Tina
"magellan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

08:13 min | 10 months ago

"magellan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Will open the phones at eight seven seven three three three rick to check in on your travel plans in just a bit but first we're finding adventures in the new world with tips for experiencing Mexico City One neighborhood at a time that's next on travel with Rick Steves. The ancient capital of the Aztec Empire is now the massive capital city of Mexico off Mexico City has grown into an important cultural and business hub. You could even didn't say the most influential city Latin America. There's more than one hundred and fifty museums gorgeous parks and some of the most vibrant markets and hip eateries in the Americas. It's a sprawling metropolis of some twenty million and it's full of surprises contradictions that make the city worth the effort. It requires to explore. We're joined now now. By Julie Mead she writes the Moon Guidebook to Mexico City. Julie fell in love with the city on her first visit some twenty years ago. She's here to help us explore Mexico City Eighty one neighborhood at a time duly. What was it about Mexico City that drew you in and what about it made you WANNA leave. Californian actually lived there for ten years well. It's it's hard to say exactly. It's the city like no other in the world and I was a young woman early out of college and I traveled there for the first time and and the energy of the place the fact that it was so close to my my home in California growing up and yet felt so different so foreign so many worlds away those things really drew me in and I wanted to feel a change in my life in that city just felt like it could bring it about. It felt powerful every time I fly there. I'm just you you connect from Houston or wherever and it's you're there in a couple of hours and you realize wow this is a completely different cultural capital and it's not even on the radar of so many American travelers so many people go to Cancun or the resorts on the West Coast and they're missing something when they get Mexico City. What's The vibe lately and what are the Challenges Challenges for the American visitor. What you're describing is true but it is beginning to change. A lot of people have recently recognised. Mexico City is a wonderful place to visit culturally culturally Colin narrowly so tourism has been taking off especially with that sort of younger hipster crowd. You've got a lot of cool bars lots of great food restaurants tons of museums and galleries a bunch of opened in the last decade so you're getting a lot more tourism than say when I first moved there in two thousand one rare you would see a tourist maybe in the centre with their backpack looking at the ruins or at the anthropology museum but now people go for all sorts it's of reasons they go to go out may go for the food they go to checkout galleries and underground poetry readings so it's definitely changed over the past twenty years now when you fly in it seems like it sprawls forever in fact it's one of my favorite views at an airplane window is coming into Mexico City because he just think whole twenty million Ryan people or whatever it is but you can think of Mexico City as a collection of neighborhoods and does make it a little easier doesn't it it certainly does it's very provincial in a way you can go from one neighborhood to another and each one feels like its own distinct city with its own community and vibe and things to do their glasses go through them because your book covers the city so well it pulls it down to size and we can deal with one neighborhood at a time first of all you have the central historical district. What is that well. That's the oldest district in the city five hundred years ago. When the Spanish arrived in the Valley of Mexico there was a little island in the middle of a huge lake and that was the Aztec City the F. penalty plan that city is what today is considered the central story for the very oldest neighborhood in Mexico City so that's where the Spanish vanish after the conquest built their own capital the capital of new Spain and they named it after the people who are living there the Sheikha people is where Mexico gets its name so that that little island became the founding neighborhood of Mexico City and it's got this beautiful old colonial architecture square this Colo.. That's does Okelo which is the main square was called the plaza my yard men throughout all of the colonial era and today it's called Zocalo because it adjoins the Cathedral resume or yes so if you if you've been to Spain. It's just it's another pleasant mayor. Every town has agreed square with the Cathedral facing it and and it just makes sense that there you would find the colonial area era palaces and chapels and grand buildings. It's a great area to explore from sightseeing point of view. Do you actually see any as tick remains he do and I think that's one of the most fascinating elements of visiting Mexico City in general right there right adjoining the cathedral which the Spanish built was at the most Holy Temple for the machine people and when Cortez Conquest did the city they raised the Masika city of ten not plan and they built their city right on top of it using the same bricks from the pyramids that they've Feld and they built over it so completely that everyone forgot where it was they forgot that the city was underneath the KISTA doors. They build right on the holy spot. We're exploring Mexico. City's neighborhoods travel with Rick Steves with Julie me. She's the author of the Moon Mexico City guidebook. Julie has spent more than a decade get into New Mexico's capital from its grand tractions to its earthy delays. You'll find web links to her work with this week. Show at Rick Steves dot com slash radio all right so you built your holy spot on top of their holy spot. That's the Zocalo and you you decorate the the big square with your colonial infrastructure and today as tourists four hundred five hundred years later. That's the number one thing to see probably but a lot of people are drawn to the What is it Alameda Central yeah well. I'll let made a centrale was the first big park in Mexico City. It was the first step public strolling park and that sort of on the western end of the central and the big attraction there in my opinion is the beautiful beautiful Palacio biggest artists the palace of fine arts within that does have Diego Rivera Mural in it a famous one that Rockefeller Commission and then threw a fit when it had communist themes in it and so they relocated it to that got palace but it's also just an amazing building a beautiful marble building and on the inside it has one of the most spectacular art deco interiors you can imagine so that's definitely worth a visit right on the element of also what colonial-era churches or their Zima pump several throughout the entire you're centrally story go and the Alameda that whole area is just replete with Beautiful Colonial Era Mansions Palaces churches a a lot of giant convents and churches were destroyed during the reforms of the nineteenth century but there still remains a religious buildings and convents all throughout the Centro. It's really fascinating fascinating and beautiful. It's one of the most captivating places in Mexico so one place that has historically been the tourist zone as Zona Rosa. What's that like these days. There's Zona Rosa has come and gone in terms of its fashionableness. It was very fashionable place to hang out in the sixties and seventies it was sort of the heart of Bohemian culture and since then it's become a little less noisy chaotic. It's right next to the salary forum. I saw a lot of business people passing through Kinda ugly end of tourism to me that the Warez neighborhood is a little more trendy. Isn't it right next to it. Yeah you know there's only Rosa has lots of architecture to but in the whereas you're seeing it preserved served in a more historical way. There aren't as many you know fast food restaurants. It's quieter. You know sort of gone that way more but that doesn't mean there aren't interesting things there you know there are some really great. Korean restaurants because that's where a lot of the local Korean population lives so there's things to explore even in places that seem like they are little down at heel now. They're still really interesting things to see. This is traveled Rick Steves. We're talking with Julie need her. Book is the Moon Guide to Mexico City and were learning just what to do when you get to this overwhelming the city when you do tackle the city neighborhood at a time. It is very reasonable to get your brain around it. Let's talk about San.

Mexico City Mexico Rick Steves Julie Mead New Mexico Zona Rosa Latin America Americas Colonial Era Mansions Palaces Spain Cancun Holy Temple California Okelo West Coast Houston San anthropology museum Colin
You're Either All In Or You're Not

Entrepreneur on FIRE

13:37 min | 10 months ago

You're Either All In Or You're Not

"Taylor. He was a rescue swimmer in the navy and that's why when i saw his application come through despite the fact we get four hundred per month this stuck out to me because you know number one. He's a veteran. I love that i'm a veteran obviously and you know it's really important for me to highlight these type of things that we're you're going to be highlighting as we're talking today and just the overall mentality philosophy on your either all in or you're not i mean fire nation you all or you're not as long as it was really cool for me is when we were chatting a little bit in the pre interview talk a taylor. Let me know that he used to listen to entrepreneurs on fire while he was on the sea so talk a little bit taylor yeah for sure <hes> so the big thing on the sea was and i think every sailor in the world can relate to this is books six and audiobooks our life on the water. That's what keeps you going so anytime. We're in port we download podcasts and podcasts and podcasts and audiobooks and one thing <unk> a really wanted to do. Was you know put myself through marketing school one of residency because i wasn't going to school or anything in you might as well. I've got all this time hands so i i ended up reading every we single marketing paper case study anything especially with the harvard business class and then anything i get my hands on. Read it and listen to it and your podcasts. Were one one of them. I downloaded everything could in we're at sea especially on the night watches now. They're under the stars and you know twenty thirty foot waves crashing over the boat and using your podcast me saying are you prepared to ignite and that's what i love fire nation so if you're listening to us right now and you're someplace cool. Maybe you're hiking kilimanjaro kilimanjaro. Maybe you're on the seas. Maybe you're doing any of a number of things on a chairlift skiing or whatever <hes> take a picture or to send me an email. Do whatever you want posts on social media italian instagram. I love seeing where you are listening to entrepreneurs on fire so let's talk about your early. Life real quick bouts before the military yeah before the military <hes>. I think it started out like a lot of guys that i served with. You know there was a lot of places go a lot of things to do and it was like he didn't really have a whole lot doors and you know sitting there one day ahead like a bottle of mustard in my fridge. That's all i owned in the world had that and my dog and i was like well. I gotta do some to change us. Life and i think a lot of people people that listen to this can relate to that. You know you get you get to a point real like it. I'm gonna dig myself out of this whole organised keep on living in the darkness and then you make that conscious decision to do something about it and join the military. It was a stepping stone you know to do some of their life and and i'm from texas so being a patriots. You know big deal. Totalling yeah wanted to serve the country in i mean that decision was was pretty i didn't i mean that's where that decision was. I didn't really think i was pretty young at the time didn't really think too far ahead of like what the toll it would take on my body and my mind when i got out in which is what we're working on now and that's important. I went through the same process. When i got out you know after a thirteen month tour of duty in iraq. I can remember so clearly being back like thinking i had quote unquote. Maybe dodge that the p._t._s._d. Bullets but then played the next six months just like a waking up covered in sweat. I'm not just talking like sweating adding. I'm like my whole bed was so sopping wet day the cheese the she's every single night i take a shower. I mean it was like a non. Stop thing like now after you know i i saw some people people have some conversations like i know that was just like all this adrenaline and stress and anxiety that was like releasing itself you know while i was sleeping and all these other things going on but this is so unreal fire nation so if you have a loved one who's been through something you know like a war or just a traumatic experience and they're likely dealing with p._t._s._d. Like there's some real real issues there and we're gonna be talking about things like the veteran suicide rates but guess guess what it doesn't just apply to veterans at applies to human beings in general we live in a very difficult world and this is the thing that we myself until our one kind of chat about today until you have this idea about an expedition so kind of give us the the background behind the expedition. Why did it start ends. You know why details like cape horn all that stuff right. Oh you hit it right on headman and then that's that's what a lot of guys go through and everything goes back to the states and i don't know about what your process when when you got out the army whenever i got on the navy not one single person now process system talked about what your body would go through when you got back in house a big deal for me because when i got back i went through the same thing you know. My body was sweating for no original just like you said you know my girlfriend. At the time you know would wake up and it should be covered in sweat for no reason and then there's those alone times whenever you're sitting at a couch and after after your body's been running on that adrenalin for so many years it depends on it and there's lots of studies out there that have shown when your body runs on that amount of stress for so many ears who on a physiological level your brain changes it depends on that adrenalin being dumped your body whenever it doesn't get that all the time you're by just starts releasing for no reason at all and so it'd be sitting on the couch not doing anything. Nobody's home in a body would just start running away from me you know and <hes> that was scary sale especially if nobody told you that was going to happen to your body when you got out so that's where the problem started and a new my buddy wrote a book and he did interviews all over the world with veterans returning back from iraq and afghanistan more for both from the u._k. Okay and u._s. And call him and i'd be like hey man like is this normally you've seen anybody else going through this you know and because there's no you don't wanna be the guy that can't handle handle when you get out and that's where it was. I didn't ever think it affects me. I didn't think it was big deal on in get out and then it was and so i call him in his do not alone. You know all these guys have interviewed are saying the exact same thing and i mean that blew my mind. Because what about this. Why did i know that i was the only one doing doing this and boom. There's the problem like okay well now. We're going to do something about it and then graduated into will. How can we reach people today. What is the best way to reach people in this environment today and they goes into social media and film so we decided to to film something something epic. We didn't know what yet and always wanted to sail the world so i was like well. I think the greatest thing to conquer in the world. Today's cape horn cape horn is is the deadliest waters in the world has down for centuries and we talked about men everest but it was like four thousand people have gone to mount efforts and you could pay somebody sixty she thousand dollars to carry your stuff to the top of mountain. You know there's not going to grab a whole lot of attention. So what's the next big thing in you know just kept coming back to cape horn and and <hes> that's where made that decision was we're going to sail to cape horn and you know we didn't have a dime tornadoes or anything at all but we're gonna make happen in <unk> ended up finding that's like shell of a fiberglass sailboat in completely rebuilding it for the next six months from the ground up new engine sales mass rigging everything and <hes> we did it we set sail and then we you know went right into three hurricanes in two tropical storms after that big wakeup call well well. I wanna talk about this biggest storm in a second here but i mean before we do this kind of type a little bit of a bow because you talked about this l. processing in the military in general and and you didn't really have much support or really any kind of information going out. I didn't either and it's really unfortunate situation. In the reality. -ality is this is that the military it's great at what is great at prepping for war training men and women to fight conquering being the enemies all these different things the military is great at and i saw that first hand you know being a tank commander in iraq like i saw what our military is great and why we're the best military torri in the world you know at this current moment time but are we not great at is seeing through the end of the people who spent the time in war four in having that adrenaline you mentioned seeing them through to a healthy mental states which of course is a long and detailed and very ever-changing process so just wanted to get that out there and this is why people like myself and taylor are looking to kind of bring this out to the world to hopefully help future military veterans veterans that are going to be going through these similar things future soldiers and whatever it might be and also just kind of letting people know that you know there's situations in your life. When you have super traumatic scenario you know. What were you like survived a house fire or armed robbery or there's a lot of things that can happen in this world. Take a puts you in a similar situation that myself and taylor in mentally emotionally etc on all that stuff so let's go now fast forward because because you figured out that you wanted to make this big statement to kind of really bring the world is to veterans and the struggles that we go through and the suicide rate being so high in the states etc which we will talk more about in a little bit so you decided to cape horn being the most dangerous waters in the world in violation. It's crazy. He read some of these older books folks which i love these historical nonfiction and fiction books about the old the age of sail those old wooden ships trying to round cape cape horn. They just couldn't do it. It would take a months and months and months and by the way some of them would have to turn around and go the other way and what is the other way like thirty thousand miles like around the world the other way to avoid cape horn so talk about that and about the biggest storm story that you have k. k. porn. porn. It's It's where where <hes> <hes> the the south south south south pacific pacific and and south south atlantic atlantic currents currents meet meet so so it it creates creates massive massive waves. waves. You're You're looking looking at at one one hundred hundred foot. foot. Seas is average out there and right before we left to go down there. Were talking to some people that just rounded cape horn in there like you know there's not really g._p._s. on there any weather prediction services because we're looking at whether predicting services and they were calling for forty foot seas and about sixty knots wind will they talk to the chilean armata on the that are stationed at the lighthouse on cape horn and they were looking at one hundred twenty knots of wind one hundred ten foot seas so yeah. There's no way to to know what you're getting into until you get down there and all the old tactics of like looking at the clouds and read and sees and stuff and you get down there. Go out the window because the weather changes on a very fast gaelic every fifteen minutes. You'll look on a different system. Rolling in and people were messaging me like you've got the system rolling in you know in ten hours. I need to know what's happening at ten minutes. 'cause they move so fast down there super super crazy. We were right outside. The magellan strait was when i you know southern storm hit us and came on with a vengeance it just start building and building and building. You know we were looking at fifty knots. What's on the low end. Whenever it started building up and then the sea started picking up about forty feet and that's whenever you know you have the gut check we have talked with crude and your guys is is worth it. You know we're going to keep going and we're going to do this or anchor and you know this is. It's personal for everybody on our boat because each one of us have lost a significant amount people to suicide back back in st louis all our our best buddies you know i think a lot of people can't understand that like why would you ever put yourself through that. Why would you ever go through the season. You know you could die and it's like well. I saw oh. I almost died myself almost one of those guys that tried to commit suicide when they come back to the states and then imagine spending the next you know six years your life for every single one of your best friends killing themselves i would what kind of world is at eleven so it makes a decision pretty easy like. Do you wanna do this yet because it's worth it like if we can save. They've one of our friends that are coming back from overseas it. It's worth it absolutely so we had that real conversation is like yeah. We're gonna continue on will the season of getting to about what's seventy feet and about whenever they're about sixty feet. We're looking at her like all right man. I dunno i can do this. You know start praying and <hes> we got hit by. This one enjoyed huge roadway. There's a storm that was brunner. South gay porn is about three hundred miles south bus and it was sent waves of up where we were and one of those was that seventy foot rogue wave and completely took us on a broadside and you know put the mass in the water research taking taking on water and it's in those moments as you know whatever you can just look at everybody in the crew and you're like now. We're gonna keep fighting still fighting you know and just real quick. What's the water temperature over in the middle icebergs. There's there's ice. I saw around us. It's freezing you know so when you're emerged in like being arrested reminding you how long we live we had six minutes easily yet six minutes. We'd have dry suits on or anything we had our cold cold weather gear but the storm came on so fast. We don't have time to put any dry suits on. That's a process so we got six minutes to get this boat backup emptied water and start art start getting our body temperature back where it needs to be and that's what we did you know we're about waist deep water in the boat and on our side gina sink <unk> brand and we got hit by this wave that came out of nowhere and flip the boat back up and we'd start bailing water and we ended up leaving. We ended up surviving which is one of those moments where should not have. It's still blows my mind to this. Stay is looking out for us fire nation. I've got shivers going down my spine. Just thinking about that. I mean like i i get cold going in in this caribbean water right here which i don't even know the exact temperature is but i think in like the sixties or seventies fahrenheit so i can't even imagine what it would be like in in that timeframe in down by cape horn so i hope that this story's making you stop and think like it was meant to because we have a

Cape Horn Cape Horn Cape Horn Iraq Cape Cape Horn Navy Taylor Texas Taylor. St Louis Pacific Pacific Commander Brunner Afghanistan Six Minutes Six Months One One Hundred Hundred Foot One Hundred Ten Foot Twenty Thirty Foot
Rocket launches GPS satellite into orbit for Air Force

Dana Loesch

00:25 sec | 11 months ago

Rocket launches GPS satellite into orbit for Air Force

"Today United launch alliance says up there last delta for medium rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force station more three two we have a nation that and liftoff of the United launch alliance delta four rocket carrying the GPS three Magellan mission that rockets carrying a GPS satellite for the Air Force built by Lockheed Martin it's the second in a series of ten next generation satellites made to improve

United Launch Alliance Lockheed Martin Cape Canaveral Air Force
LA, U. S. Air Force And Glen Davis discussed on Orlando's News at Noon

Orlando's News at Noon

00:38 sec | 11 months ago

LA, U. S. Air Force And Glen Davis discussed on Orlando's News at Noon

"In case you missed it three two we have ignition that indeed we did a historic rocket launch this morning for you LA was the final flight of the delta for medium or single stick configuration the vehicle is being retired to make way for development of a new generation of rockets like the new Vulcan centaur rocket set for an inaugural launch in twenty twenty one right now a GPS and navigation satellite for the U. S. Air Force is moving into orbit you will a space captain integrator Glen Davis said this satellite cold Magellan is three times more accurate than others it provides critical

LA U. S. Air Force Glen Davis
Building Giant Magellan, the world's largest telescope

KCBS Radio Morning News

01:40 min | 1 year ago

Building Giant Magellan, the world's largest telescope

"Giant Magellan telescope is expected to be the world's largest optical telescope once it's completed CBS news correspondent Jim Axelrod reports from the unique place the telescope's being built it is certainly a peculiar place for a state of the art laboratory but under the football stadium at the university of Arizona this one we started just about eighteen months ago Patrick McCarthy has the international group building the largest optical telescope in the world the giant Magellan so one of the big discoveries in astronomy in the past twenty years is that ninety seven percent of universe we have no idea what it is but McCarthy says the giant Magellan project is working to change that that is a chunk of glass feel it's pretty heavy this is pretty dense stuff it takes about twenty tons of these to make one they're using special glass which makes up the telescope seven twenty seven foot circular mayors thirty shipped in from Japan then melted down in a specially engineered rotating furnace I think it is probably the only rotating furnace for making large mirrors the reaches temperatures of more than twenty one hundred degrees how complicated is it to build these wears pretty complicated and it's a real precision polishing challenge in each mere when they're finished is so precise and so smooth if you made it the size of the continental United States the distance between the tallest mountain peaks in the deepest valleys half an inch what's that smell Magellan's mirrors will eventually end up on a mountain top in Chile's Atacama desert housed inside a twenty two story

Jim Axelrod Patrick Mccarthy Magellan Japan United States Chile CBS University Of Arizona Atacama Twenty One Hundred Degrees Seven Twenty Seven Foot Ninety Seven Percent Eighteen Months Twenty Years Twenty Tons
A deadly fungus outbreak is spreading in Chicago-area health facilities

Astronomy Cast

05:39 min | 1 year ago

A deadly fungus outbreak is spreading in Chicago-area health facilities

"This sort of strong Makassar is sponsored by Magellan TV dot com. Check out this new streaming service with your exclusive to month free trial by clicking over to Magellan, TV dot com slash astronomy cast now, this isn't a normal part of the ad, but I have to say the landing paid. They made for strong me. Cast is amazing. Once you get to Magellan, TV dot com slash astronomy cast, you can dive into a collection of documentary movies series and exclusive playlists designed by documentary filmmakers, this growing platform is adding new content weekly, and is already home to a who's who of the best productions from the overview of fact to the NSF funded seeing the beginning of time. There is an amazing selection of space astronomy related content watching four K from Roucou or on your computer or stream on. Any I o s or Android device? I lost track of a bunch of hours on Saturday afternoon diving through history, and you can explore the solar system traveled to distant stars and experienced the universe. Like never before. Once again, you can check out. This new streaming service with your exclusive to month free trial by clicking over to Magellan, TV dot com slash astronomy cast. Hi, everyone producer Susie here. We apologize for the lower quality audio this week, Pamela, experienced power outage that affected the saved audio files. So this show is being created from the audio from our YouTube street. Trying to cast episode five twenty five one hundred years international astronomically. Caster weekly facts based journey the cosmos help you understand not only what we know how we know what we know I presume came publisher of university with me as always Dr Pamela, gays senior scientists for the planetary scientists end the director Cozma quest penalty doing I'm doing. Well. How are you? I am doing. Well, also, did you survive all the excitement yesterday? It was a great day for people who are not don't know. We're talking about literally everything happened yesterday. Rockets. Relaunched lunar orbits were arrived at. Asteroid was hit tank weapon, which was great. What a great use for anti tank weaponry. Take more of that plea. Yeah. Exactly. So. Solar system more of that coming. So you just stay in line. So yeah, no. It was a great day. And and now other stuff too. I just saw that the put down a date for the Knicks falcon heavy launched. It's going to be soon like within the week. So it's gonna be it's gonna be a crazy week. Actually. I'm utterly overwhelmed. Right now, people may have noticed haven't got simply newsletter out yet because I just have so busy. But it's it's it's almost ready. It'll go another like couple of hours. I was at my keyboard for sixteen hours yesterday as annuals that I took turns live streaming all of the events line on twins Catholic. Absolutely amazing, and I I have to brag a little bit. So I love so much working once again, a like rock solid. We do science organization. I I haven't done that since I worked at Harvard. I've been at places that focused and communications education and undergraduate education, and I'm back. And so there was a quiet little does anyone know how to do this thing and stuff at the command line to fix the formatting of a whole bunch of files. And I was like, yeah. You just need to write software to footy foodie FU and the person who was working on high a booster, and they needed to convert a whole bunch of files was like help. And so last night in real time while everything was happening. I got to help by just reading a stupid little snippet of of code, but people at high. Yeah, that's amazing. Yeah. Yeah. To make a science people. I got to make us lions. So so you saying like, thanks to the planetary sciences toot for giving you a home that you get to do science on on an occasional basis. Yeah. That's amazing. And more to the point. I get to science with a whole bunch of other people instead of being like the person over here making science while everyone else is doing other things it was it's awesome. Here we go even though they might be scattered around our planet. Astronomers have a way to come together to work the issues that face their entire field of study, it's called the international astronomical union. And they're the ones who work out the new names for stars. And sometimes depleted beloved Kuyper built objects. Oh, man, people have that love hate blade ship with the I eight you which is the international stra nominal union.

Magellan Dr Pamela Makassar International Astronomical Uni Roucou Rockets NSF Knicks Harvard Kuyper Producer Susie Publisher Director Five Twenty Five One Hundred Y Sixteen Hours
For Opera Singers, Life After Retirement  At Least At One Very Special Rest Home

NPR's World Story of the Day

04:43 min | 1 year ago

For Opera Singers, Life After Retirement At Least At One Very Special Rest Home

"Eyebrows went up when a New York Times profile suggested that legendary opera soprano. Renee Fleming would be retiring. Luckily for fans that turned out to be wrong. But if Fleming ever does start to ponder retirement. She may want to consider a move to Milan Italy. That's the home of CASA Verde a retirement community for opera singers and musicians founded by Italian composer, Giuseppe Verdi more than one hundred years ago, Rebecca Rosman paid a visit and set this report. Lena Lhasa is a soprano who spent her career performing in Italian operas around the world. Not that twenty years ago she settled here at CASA Verity tho quarter. This decree. She doesn't want to tell me how old she is. She's reluctant to reveal her real late. She admits to being over sixty five she's tiny and uses a cane to get around but age hasn't stopped her from wearing her favorite black heels or from doing this. Disapprove says singing makes her sorrows. Go away thus came to council. Verity with her husband when they both retired from singing since he died. She says this is all she has good Jolo Saturday. Glad they can like. I play the piano, she can Magellan diva just the. Shuttle very nice garden said that like nothing's missing here. It's perfect got she there the Italian composer just up in Bertie founded the CASA deity Pozzo permis cheese, simply known as call severity in the late nineteenth century in Italy, where the isn't considerate. The even today only a composer only a musician, but a kind of national hero Bianca Maria long-gone. He is the assistant director of CASA Verity or standing in front of Verdi's crypt, very is buried at the retirement home alongside his second wife. Just a peanuts repoening, use the music. He used the opera's to give voice to people to humble people to modest people to poor people to dominate the people many Averis own former colleagues found themselves living in poverty towards the end of their lives at that time. There were no pensions for musicians in Italy, the perfectly new this situation. And when he was about eighty two he wanted. To use his patrimony to make arrest the home of four. He's colleagues less favorite by fourteen using his own fortune early built the retirement home for opera singers and musicians a Neo gothic structure that opened in eighteen ninety nine very died less than two years later, but he made sure the prophets from his music copyright, kept the home running until the early nineteen sixties when they expired today guests pay a portion of their monthly pension to cover basic cost like food and lodging while the rest comes from donations BC Roman is a my Esther who's been living at constant Verity for nearly three years now, I get feminine upset. I got that the shoot I I'm very grateful because if not I will be lonely a very very upset here. I get the upset because a lot people around. We are talking the have music. We have gassed guests of all ages customarily has an extra twenty rooms at aside for conservatory students aged eighteen to twenty four by today. The ninety three year old Romanian-born Romano is giving voice lessons to a young woman from China one of the six students, she sees on a weekly basis. The sounds that surely Shirley's homeless are what make CASA Verity feels sacred like moments that belong in a time capsule. Are REO. Steamy is a baritone in his early sixties. He comes to conserve Ernie every Wednesday to visit the guests some of whom are his former callings. A Seaney himself is still several years away from retirement he says he knows exactly where he'll be hanging up his hat once. He leaves the opera stage for good for NPR news. I'm Rebecca Rosman in Milan. Italy.

Casa Verity Giuseppe Verdi Renee Fleming Assistant Director Italy Rebecca Rosman Lena Lhasa Casa Verde Verity New York Times Eyebrows Milan Italy NPR Milan Bertie Bianca Maria Averis Romano
"magellan" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"magellan" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"About, mutual funds Gordon infidelity was king of the hill they had, this unbelievable swagger they were the place where you went to get market. Beating returns. Home of Peter Lynch manager the fidelity Magellan fund. But since the nineteen eighties it's been? All downhill from the galaxy You know with so many funds on offer they, have. One or two that are beating the market reputation that the outperformance house is gone away people no longer think of the delicacy is that place we. Always get marketing or, tons its consequence there grosses sloughed and they can cost you around the how to. Reenergize de gross and what they've decided, is okay we got to get people. In the door and the. Best way to do it is one slash expenses on our index funds to lower the price so I other words. You don't have to have, any money to come here and invest Sounds great but you also say is this potential bait and switch opportunity for fidelity what do you make of. That well you go, back to the late eighties and against the early nineties we saw Wars back then one focused on money market funds and other focused on s. and, p. five hundred index fund and what. Happened on those occasions was the fun companies would lower the minimum the expenses on their funds. Would come rolling in and once the funds were polluted with acids they would Jack, with these back, up and suddenly people were. Recording, these funds and pay much higher fees than when they entered them this time around a chance of, that's going to happen did not just a delicacy but also. Schwa- which is being. Lowering expenses also I chance which has been lowering expenses will indeed turnaround and Jack up the expenses on those funds and people will find their pay. Much more than I expected but I think not. I think the com-, headed of environment is really so so shop so? Competitive that they can't afford have? The, state did their reputation would be destroyed so I think these these. Lower expensive Issues all gonna stick this time around instead so I see it's based switches have slightly different nature fidelity womp ICS getting people to buy. Into their funds with these lower expenses Hoping that people turn around and by other, of their funds on. Wish they charge higher expenses and on which they're going to be making good profits Jonathan Jonathan Clements..

Jack Jonathan Jonathan Clements Magellan fund Peter Lynch Gordon Schwa
"magellan" Discussed on The Money Guy Show

The Money Guy Show

03:42 min | 2 years ago

"magellan" Discussed on The Money Guy Show

"This comes from our own life experiences that I grew up in a household where my father did not want to pay fees to an adviser. I think there's a lot. He was a great saver. My parents incredible examples of how to be good with money, how to save money. The problem. If I was giving constructive feedback to both of my parents on, they're on the way they handled their finances when I was growing up, was it their idea of investing with CD's now that was better. It's definitely if you've been doing that in the last ten years, you're basically putting your money under a mattress, but still was not as good as like my father in law who also good with money, but I would, I would dare say at to be because I know my mother-in-law listens to our show, but I would dare to say, I think my parents were even tighter. It is my in laws were, but here's the good news for my mother-in-law because I know she might be watching this father-in-law's unfortunately, passed away already, but he was buying the fidelity Magellan fund back when the fidelity Magellan fund was the fidelity Magellan fund that was just knocking it out of the park. And I would dare say, I think my father in law. Investing, less money has substantially more money than my parents were able to accumulate, not because of the discipline of saving, but because that money was working so much harder for them because he was, will I in now, did he maybe you don't know the answer this question. He go find the did he have that investment on his own to have it by? He definitely had an adviser because it wasn't even real as fidelity Magellan fund had many varieties including an advisor base platform where it had commissions and other things. I'm saying that my father-in-law bought the best version of it because he had somebody sell it to him, but I'll tell you worked out much better the mafia doing the CD. So it's kind of that rich dad, poor dad, on a leading the money work for you, and it's also it's not just about the basics of investing how how often I can just tell you I had this discussion that I mean just in the last month, we've helped the client who had the opportunity to buy into their business. They've been working with. We've had, we've helped. We've had cons pass away. Or at least a family member of a client pathways who had talked to him about what are the duties of an executor. I mean, there's with had some clients enforce vade themselves or even possibly the family members have had to go through a divorce, which unique funding things there. So there's all kinds of things where in the other thing I would say I had this discussion earlier today, and it's not even in the show notes is that when you get to a certain level of success, you just the value, the enterprise is so big, you now start getting nervous. Imago blow this thing up just because of the size of it. So so think about that. We'll transition, but that was our say, is that you there are number you out there that you get to a point b, say, man, I wish I had somebody to look over my shoulder when you that. Consider taking the relationship. The next level check us out. We we have resources. That's a big run. It didn't click white, put in there. Just click on that because I feel like we have that conversation all the time with a lot of folks who have done an amazing job dealing assets, and it's the behavior that is allowed them to build their wealth is affect. That they are so cost conscious at new, save so much. They do spend so little, but it's just like you said, sometimes it's easy for us to hone in on that piece and forget the big picture of Zack which said, how big the enterprises we'd rather save a hundred dollars here in forget about the thousands over here that we could before going or miss. It's like me and my credit cards. I am focusing on this feature of getting that extra one percent not recognizing on might be missing brewing up behavior in the benefits of doing it, so so pay attention to that part of it..

Magellan Zack advisor hundred dollars one percent ten years
"magellan" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"magellan" Discussed on No Agenda

"They probably are Tom, Tom and Magellan I, he had Magellan for well, they in some ways they're better because they really put they've been working on and the heap improving would Google, for example, is never better because they keep going from one vendor to another and vendors like sometimes start up whether they get cheapest. I most like the best price kind of model. And so it's always like sketchy doesn't always work the same at one time I was in Los Angeles. I'm trying to get to the Burbank airport. I'm out in Venice, Malibu area, and so I decided, well, what's what Brad should be taken back on sunset? Do this? Do that think he's trying to route me to the four? Oh, five. And I'm I look at the four or five, four zero. Five is stopped dead from probably somewhere Nome Alaska already down to Ensenada. It's there's nothing moving there to put me on the four. Oh, five. I would have missed my flight. And so I started just going out sunset and I just keep going into turn around. Go back back back. It keeps trying to reverse me to back to get to the four. Oh, five or some reason. I think it's only gonna take a couple blocks on the thing because I still have to go. I sell to east and it keeps telling me to go back, go back, go back for I get going waiting for it to stop doing that. Finally stopped and gave up and decided, hey, I guess you're going to some other outlets reroute you that way. The old Google maps would never have done that. I remember when they first came out, they never told you to take a u-turn ever. Now they do it constantly like some other vendor, Google think products are just really flaky. Anyway, that's a boring story. I could tell that was pretty boring, but but I got, I got a better story for, you know, the Frank Abba Nali. He is the guy, the real life person behind the book and the-the the play in the movie, catch me if you can. Which one did that come out. The ninety s. Look it up. Keep talking catch me if you can. This was about a kid who had sixteen ran away and he traveled around the world. Posing mainly as an airline pilot, any flu for free everywhere regularly to okay, two thousand two flu around the world. Then he later he posed as a lawyer, I think a banker, all kinds of the airline pilot. Well, that was the number one. What I said number one was airline pie, but he was also cashing, you know, tens of thousands of dollars worth of phony checks until eventually caught up to him. He went to jail and France, and he went to jail, I think in Spain. And then he was extradited went to jail in the states, and instead of serving his full term, the f. b. i. came over and said, you know, you're pretty good that deception, we'd like to hire you. And I think he worked for the FBI for thirty years after that, which if he did a talk Google ironically. And you know it was a very interesting chat about deception and how he did it. And it was just it was a fun talk. But at the end about three minutes and he's now out of the agency, but he consults for the FBI and the CIA mainly on technology. And there are two things that he said, one that I looked into it and I'm like, I don't think this is going to happen. Sounds like bullcrap to me, but you don't know. And the second one was really just the capabilities that they have that we've discussed before law enforcement. In this case FBI. And just thought it was fun to hear it from someone who apparently Louis says this guy, basically bullshit his way around the world, and then bullshit his way into the FBI. The FBI just came down what is sometimes these things work out that way, and then he became a dude named Ben. Yeah, yeah, that's pretty much it though. I always used to write to my class about, oh, and enter professor as well. Sorry, he gets teach about it as well. What will we investigate? FIS is a great country or what we we know how to play years from now, what will agent beat doing five years from now. And unfortunately, there's good news and bad news..

FBI Google Tom Frank Abba Nali Brad Burbank Los Angeles Venice Nome Alaska FIS professor Ensenada Spain France CIA Louis three minutes
Authorities investigate police shooting of black man in Minneapolis

24 Hour News

02:08 min | 2 years ago

Authorities investigate police shooting of black man in Minneapolis

"We wanna meritbased immigration system we need safety at the border we need the wall the wall going to happen it's going to happen meantime on the ground along the southern border correspondent steve futterman these are some of the detainees that have received so much attention for the last week where are you going now do you know california california this group of around fifty or sixty are here at the magellan bus station they are being sent to different cities for the most part these are intact families where you with who is with you komi daughter and all of the people we spoke with said they believe they have been treated properly so far are you scared steve futterman cbs news mcallen texas following days of protest in pittsburgh over a fatal police shooting with racial overtones now similar demonstrations in minneapolis that after police their shot and killed a black man they said had been firing a handgun as he walked outside the outrage comes after a police officer shot and killed thirtyoneyearold thurman blevins saturday evening according to a facebook post by the minneapolis police department one nine one one caller reported a man firing a gun in the air and into the ground another caller said he was shooting a silver nine millimeter handgun news correspondent nicki batiste or growing wildfires menacing rural county in northern california real priority out here with our air and ground assets is to protect the structures and then get some line construction and around this fire that's battalion chief jonathan cox overseas presidential and parliamentary elections were held in turkey longtime strongman leader type erta on trying to cement his power his interpreter announcing piece country issue has elected me onto you today the president although it is unofficial now it is official gas prices down about six cents a gallon the last two weeks.

California Steve Futterman Pittsburgh Minneapolis Minneapolis Police Department Nicki Batiste Jonathan Cox President Trump Magellan Texas Officer Thirtyoneyearold Thurman Facebook Official Two Weeks
"magellan" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"magellan" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Going to be satisfied by this so you can leverage all that if you're using columnist for macs with magellan magellan also output summit today the to these felt so things like indices are also put momentum so many running a query on top of this kind of formats by dylan can be extra intelligence to say we have already computed indices for the geometry and mike putty cannot be satisfied by this file because indices in this file are not do not satisfied quitting right so there's a lot of things we can do here to avoid reading they sidley if you's gonna formats there are a lot of applications for geospatial analytics today just by virtue of smartphones and you know we're now all walking around with devices that have extremely useful geospatial tracking data that is being emitted to servers all around the world and all kinds of different companies have these kinds of queries that they wanna run as we get to a world with drones and more i o t sensors and self driving cars the number of geospatial data points that are getting recorded is going to balloon do you have any ideas for other tools that need to be built or do you have any visions for what this future of geospatial analytics is going to look like yeah i think you're totally right i think the scale of the problem is going to be much bigger very soon the other thing that's going to happen with dunes on lettuce right now twodimensional geospatial analytics is still the most dominant that before his people run but the don't take an easily night in the third dimension right to other the drone as a is an important dimension as whether so three dimensional geometry is gonna become pretty important thing and the skin of the bottom is this going to be invaded larger systems like magellan are actually designed for that kind of scale so you could easily imagine getting tax one hundred nudge volumes of data than we have today.

dylan magellan
"magellan" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"magellan" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Going to be satisfied by this so you can leverage all that if you're using columnist for macs with magellan magellan also output summit today the to these felt so things like indices are also put momentum so many running a query on top of this kind of formats by dylan can be extra intelligence to say we have already computed indices for the geometry and mike putty cannot be satisfied by this file because indices in this file are not do not satisfied quitting right so there's a lot of things we can do here to avoid reading they sidley if you's gonna formats there are a lot of applications for geospatial analytics today just by virtue of smartphones and you know we're now all walking around with devices that have extremely useful geospatial tracking data that is being emitted to servers all around the world and all kinds of different companies have these kinds of queries that they wanna run as we get to a world with drones and more i o t sensors and self driving cars the number of geospatial data points that are getting recorded is going to balloon do you have any ideas for other tools that need to be built or do you have any visions for what this future of geospatial analytics is going to look like yeah i think you're totally right i think the scale of the problem is going to be much bigger very soon the other thing that's going to happen with dunes on lettuce right now twodimensional geospatial analytics is still the most dominant that before his people run but the don't take an easily night in the third dimension right to other the drone as a is an important dimension as whether so three dimensional geometry is gonna become pretty important thing and the skin of the bottom is this going to be invaded larger systems like magellan are actually designed for that kind of scale so you could easily imagine getting tax one hundred nudge volumes of data than we have today.

dylan magellan
"magellan" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"magellan" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Yeah so most often people use magellan where they're doing this kind of point in polygon kind of quickies on very large data sets so data sets ranging from hundreds of millions of points to billions of fines and polygon data sets of hundred thousand polygons disorder data cannot even be done on a single machine you know any kind of scalable skip away so i see very often people with that kind of data sets common news magellan one of the interesting problems that i did see people doing with magellan which you know what's pretty blessing for me was because right now magellan is optimized a lot for pointing polygons pollyanna intersections in geometric intersection kind of algorithms but the use case here was this particular hug nation had millions of data points so basically they were collecting information about people's driving behavior so just looking at how people are driving and what roads the they're basically taking so this could be good even be bike rides so they're just looking at mobile information can mapping them do drew the pack as a bike rides and so on the challenge here's the a lot of the data of a lot of people also do spatial data the the data they get in the wild is actually not accurate so there's a lot of things that can influence the accuracy of ladder ratings which means even if a cod is driving on a liberal and you take any get information from that car you have an iot device on the car that actually gives you information about what it's led to longer dealers at each fine it's not guaranteed that each of those points are going to be close enough to a road that he can eat naively map it to zero.

magellan
"magellan" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"magellan" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Phones are constantly tracking the location of a user in space devices like cars smart watches and drones are also picking up high volumes of location data this location data is also called geospatial data the amount of geospatial data is rapidly increasing and there's a growing demand for software to perform operations over that data geospatial data sets are often massive so it's non trivial to perform operations over this data jewish spatial data can consist of something as simple as a set of latitude longitude data points and a single lat long coordinate pair can be enriched with information about what zip code that data points in or how far that data point is from the other data points in the set or where the nearest coffee shop is in relation to that data point ram sri harsha created magellan a geospatial analytics library for spark in today's show ram describes the set of problems within the domain of geospatial analytical engineering ram also works as a product manager for patchy spark at data bricks what i loved about this episode is that i had a perception of geospatial data is being difficult to work with or some domain specific field like you had to be an expert in cartography or geography to understand how to use this kind of data but we talk through some fairly straightforward applications and if you're interested in building some kind of big data application geospatial data seems like a ripe field to just take a data set and start hacking around with and looking for opportunities whether it's a business opportunity of project opportunity so from that point of view i think you may find some value out of this episode if you're looking for older episodes about spark and lots of other big data.

magellan ram product manager
"magellan" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"magellan" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Phones are constantly tracking the location of a user in space devices like cars smart watches and drones are also picking up high volumes of location data this location data is also called geospatial data the amount of geospatial data is rapidly increasing and there's a growing demand for software to perform operations over that data geospatial data sets are often massive so it's non trivial to perform operations over this data jewish spatial data can consist of something as simple as a set of latitude longitude data points and a single lat long coordinate pair can be enriched with information about what zip code that data points in or how far that data point is from the other data points in the set or where the nearest coffee shop is in relation to that data point ram sri harsha created magellan a geospatial analytics library for spark in today's show ram describes the set of problems within the domain of geospatial analytical engineering ram also works as a product manager for patchy spark at data bricks what i loved about this episode is that i had a perception of geospatial data is being difficult to work with or some domain specific field like you had to be an expert in cartography or geography to understand how to use this kind of data but we talk through some fairly straightforward applications and if you're interested in building some kind of big data application geospatial data seems like a ripe field to just take a data set and start hacking around with and looking for opportunities whether it's a business opportunity of project opportunity so from that point of view i think you may find some value out of this episode if you're looking for older episodes about spark and lots of other big data.

magellan ram product manager
"magellan" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

KMET 1490-AM

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"magellan" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

"You at age slowly so when you came back to earth there would be many many years in the future but in his as you say in his theory of generale davide from nineteen fifteen this is curved space time so there are some solutions to the theory of general relativity that are sufficiently twisted to allow time travel to the past and this works like this magellan's crew went west west west around the curve service the earth and returned back to europe even though they were going west all the time they came back to europe so these are solutions where the time travelers going forward toward the future locally he's he thinks he's going toward the future but yet he can circle back and come back to an event that he and his own past to visit so this is the the solutions of einstein's equations that allow time travel to the past and i understand that around nineteen forty nine is so stein's next door neighbor girdle at princeton discovered a solution of einstein's equation whereby if the universe rotated rotated fast enough you could go around the rotating universe and come back before you left now that's amazing right time travel right in a cosmological model of the universe that's absolutely right the observed that our own universe to be expanding but not rotating girls universe was not expanding but actually rotating so but the important thing was that it showed such a solution was possible and since then we've found others like more moles and one that i found on ran cosmic strings that the that also you to do right and i understand that if you have a cylinder an infinitely long cylinder that's spinning rapidly enough and you dance around in the cylinder like dancing around a maypole you can come back before you left yeah.

generale davide magellan einstein stein princeton europe
"magellan" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"magellan" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"And i think that's the appropriate setting for those questions here's what i think director ray i think peter struck head of counterintelligence at the fbi peter struck the guy who ran the clinton investigation did all the interviews peter struck the guy who was run in the russian investigation at the fbi peter struck mr super agent at the fbi i think he's the guy who took the application to the fis a court and if that happened and if this happened if you had the fbi working with a campaign the democrats campaign taken opposite in research dresdner all up and turn it into an intelligence document and taking it to the fis accord so they could spy on the other campaign if that happen that is is wrong as it gets and you know what maybe i'm wrong you could clear and all up you could all up for all of us here all the congress he wants no in frankly all of america wants to be cleared all up by release we sent you a letter to days ago just released the application tells what was in it tell us if i'm wrong but i don't think i am i think that's exactly what happened and if it did it is wrong as it could be and people who did that need to be held accountable congressman we will not hesitate to hold people accountable after there has been an appropriate investigation independent unobjective body inspector general into the handling of the prior matter and based on that i will look at all available remedies depending on what the facts are when they are found as to the access to the dossier that's something that is a subject of ongoing discussion between my staff and the various intelligence committee there's nothing prohibiting new director is there anything prohibiting you from showing this committee the what was presented to devise a court application you all put together at the fbi that was presented to the fis core is there anything preventing you from showing us that magellan has expired the director can respond i do not believe that i can legally inappropriately share of fis accord submission with this community i'm talking about what the fbi put together not what the court had what what you took their what was the apple the process put together what you presenting what you took to the.

peter fbi dresdner congress america congressman director magellan apple ray i clinton fis
"magellan" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"magellan" Discussed on WLAC

"That magellan has expired the director can respond i do not believe that i can legally inappropriately share of fis accords submission with this community i'm talking about what the fbi put together not what the court had what what you put their what was the apple the process put together what you presented what you took to the court when when i signed fis applications which i have to do almost every day of the week they are all covered with a classified information cover so that's part of that is it likely that peter dollar later on in the elimination presented to the fis accord the gentleman's time has expired however i do wanna follow up on last response to the gentleman this committee the house judiciary committee has primary jurisdiction over the foreign intelligence surveillance court so any request for documents coming to any part of the congress should include the house judiciary committee him at that too is classified in any way shape or form it can be provided to us in a classified setting but that is information that we are very much interested in january much one received cussin' deep the chairman yeah i don't think there's anything prohibiting the fbi from giving us what they used to put together what was taken to devise a court that's what we're asking for and there is nothing prohibited him from doing that i don't think there is either the time and german has expired however if you care responded that stricter gray and i think i've covered all right part of the explosive hearings that took place today in the hearing with chris the parade the fbi director and we still have more questions than answers at this point but an amazing job i've got to say jim jordan was a total complete rockstar asking ray of peter struck use the steel dossier as as it is an application to get the fis.

magellan director fbi apple peter dollar fis house judiciary committee congress jim jordan ray chairman chris
"magellan" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"magellan" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"It's way to being tidily locked in that at some point um probably in the pretty distant future we have to start revising battles do quickly but but it could actually become a locked planet like we think a lot of these these actual planets are where one side is permanently facing the star you know as you mentioned venus has this huge pressure an enormous clouds dinner uh very oh peg but you know we have been able to penetrate through those one mission was called magellan what was the most important set of observations they came from the magellan spacecraft magellan was was an amazing mission it really revolutionized our understanding of of this neighboring planet before then we had a couple of pictures of a couple of spots on the surface from these russian landers which were amazingly able to operate under those extreme surfaced conditions briefly in the in the '70s and '80s uh and we had a couple of sort of vague images from from radar of parts of the planet but would magellan uh we were able to orbit and basically get images of maps of the entire surface almost the entire surface by using radar which as you say penetrates through those clouds and it does sort of flash photography almost bouncing radar off the surface and then you see that image and you build up what the planet looks like and that that revolutionized our view of venus in so many ways one thing we've learned was how volcanically interesting venus is it's surfaces almost completely covered in one way or another with volcanic features these these broad planes flat plains that we co we can think of as flood assaults like we have some areas on earth the pacific northwest he comes to mind of these big flood assault areas and then other kinds of volcano these steep shield volcanoes like hawaii hawaiian style shield volcanoes so i think of venus almost as volcano world and the it immediately sharpened the question.

assault magellan
"magellan" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"magellan" Discussed on WJR 760

"The best of the magellan show on newstalk seven sixty wjr as we know here in detroit are school situation is very very critical and who's going to lead it is very very important does the choice was made of nikolai bt to be the new superintendent of schools here in detroit a couple of weeks ago his contract all the details and all were were approved a few days back and then then today finalise and so he goes to work starting next week and he is from here originally and was just telling me in the break all his assorted stops along the way since icecool and want to welcome the program nikolai nice to have you here figure honor to be here and honored to be back in detroit you left after highspeed grew up in the in the dearborn heights area and dearborn heights correct yeah and then left to go to college that's right and never came back never came back other than the visit my mom and my extended family so it's an exciting time for me personally and professionally detroit schools are almost by definition their own their own animal and i'm sure if you faced any challenges in your interviewing process that was one of them legwell okay you were born here but you know you left after i school what do you really know about running arguably the most challenged school system of any major city in this country how do you answer well i i grew up in metro detroit and grew up loving detroit man so i'll and guardian of reprocessed i said i'm an outsider with an insider's heart for the city and my entire professional career has been in large urban school districts as a teacher principle principles supervisor superintendent so the challenges that i will be facing starting tomorrow are challenges that i face throughout my professional career at every level of the organization and i believe i have created a track record of success all of which i believe can be brought here what are the places or place that you have worked it was you feel was closest to what detroit challenges are probably the bronx new york city.

newstalk detroit nikolai bt superintendent magellan dearborn heights supervisor new york