23 Burst results for "Magee"

"magee" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

03:16 min | Last month

"magee" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"Holster <Speech_Female> have been <Speech_Female> trained around <Speech_Music_Female> what books like <Speech_Music_Female> power on the World <Speech_Music_Female> F one <Speech_Music_Female> aspect <SpeakerChange> of the <Silence> dynamics. That's an <Speech_Male> all. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Female> if we can just find <Speech_Male> some way <Speech_Female> in <SpeakerChange> this time <Speech_Female> to like really <Speech_Female> work together <Silence> I think it's. <Speech_Female> To build <Speech_Male> and amplify <Speech_Female> these different ways <Speech_Male> of seeing each other being <Silence> with each other, <Speech_Female> it's creating <Speech_Female> new <Speech_Female> more subtle language <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> to describe what we're dealing <Speech_Female> with. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> There's white supremacist <Speech_Male> campaigns <Speech_Female> for <Speech_Male> e <Speech_Female> battle, and <Speech_Male> there's a subtle. <Speech_Female> What's Irma sightsee <Speech_Female> privileging <Speech_Female> water <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> that we're all <Speech_Female> binding. Those <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> are very <Speech_Female> different, and also <Speech_Female> people react very much <Speech_Female> the idea that <Speech_Female> you know there's white supremacy <Speech_Female> everywhere because they <Speech_Music_Female> don't see KKK. <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> I'm having <Speech_Female> like really <Speech_Male> not shaming people <Speech_Male> her. Not Understanding <Speech_Male> what we need <Speech_Male> is <Silence> really important he. <Speech_Male> Tenders <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> and compassion, <Speech_Female> even all of the <Speech_Female> ways we <SpeakerChange> are just struggling. <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> For sled <Speech_Male> to tenderly <Speech_Male> compassionately being <Speech_Music_Male> involved in <Speech_Music_Female> helping US <Music> name <Silence> or <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> And <Speech_Male> corrupt <Speech_Female> color to it painted. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Draw that <Speech_Female> that picture <Speech_Male> in ways that we can <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> live or <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Even a micron. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> than. <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Every <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> bit as much as <Speech_Music_Female> we'll be. Reform <Speech_Music_Male> Movements <Speech_Music_Male> and we can do. <Speech_Male> We can be <Speech_Male> engaged in those <Speech_Male> products of justice. <Speech_Music_Male> REVEILLE <Speech_Music_Male> OFF IN. <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> Providing <Speech_Male> be games <Speech_Male> of course <Speech_Male> I. Love that <Speech_Male> so much you <Speech_Male> know is just one <Speech_Male> tiny thing I remember <Speech_Male> reading they. <Speech_Male> You didn't actually forget <Speech_Male> something. You forgot to <Speech_Male> remember it, <Speech_Male> so if I say I forgot your <Speech_Male> name, will you actually <Speech_Male> did? was you forgot to <Speech_Male> remember it? So when you told <Speech_Male> me I didn't take a moment <Speech_Male> to remember it <Speech_Male> so sometimes like <Speech_Male> I. Don't know how to make a <Speech_Male> better world. A lot of us aren't <Speech_Male> even taking the time <Speech_Male> to picture a better <Speech_Male> world or or ask <Speech_Male> ourselves. <Speech_Male> What would it feel like <Speech_Male> to be in a better <Speech_Male> would? Be <Speech_Male> Interesting <SpeakerChange> this conversation <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> we against <Speech_Male> anti-racism <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> why? <Speech_Male> Are <Speech_Male> Yeah. <Speech_Female> Four. <Speech_Male> Oh <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> cruise <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> dot vision. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Silence> Myself with my <Speech_Female> group. AM! <Speech_Male> How <SpeakerChange> do <Speech_Male> we make that? <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> I hope <Speech_Male> you I feel <Speech_Male> like we both <SpeakerChange> enjoyed this. <Speech_Male> I think we did. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Ask By <Speech_Male> sincere pleasure. <Speech_Male> We're GONNA put <Speech_Male> this out tomorrow. <Speech_Male> I wanted <Speech_Male> to get it out as quickly <Speech_Male> as possible. So thank <Speech_Male> you, so Rhonda. <Speech_Male> It seems silly. <Speech_Male> The name of the book <Speech_Male> I wrote it down so I. Get it <Speech_Male> right as the inner work racial <Speech_Male> justice. <Speech_Male> It's fantastic. I haven't <Speech_Male> finished it, but <Speech_Male> it covers a lot of what we're <Speech_Male> talking about, and <Speech_Male> it's Rhonda the McGee. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> It's spelled Magic <Speech_Male> Maga <Speech_Male> E.. <Speech_Male> Dot Com has <Speech_Male> a lot of your talks. <Speech_Male> Just priceless <Speech_Male> staff I <Speech_Male> I I was worried <Speech_Male> I was going to have you saying <Speech_Male> what you said before, <Speech_Male> but I feel like we Straka <Speech_Male> a natural <Speech_Male> place and I'm so <Speech_Male> grateful. <Speech_Male> It seems silly, <Speech_Male> but we have the <Speech_Male> guest episode <Speech_Male> so I. Don't want to take <Speech_Male> it away from you. The <Speech_Male> guest says <Speech_Male> it's how we <SpeakerChange> end. The guest <Silence> says keep it crispy. <Speech_Male> It just <Speech_Male> for our <Speech_Male> purposes to put it in <Speech_Male> our language, it means <Speech_Male> stay open <Speech_Male> stay for <Speech_Male> life. <Silence> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> So <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Keep <Laughter> it crispy. <Laughter> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Thanking. <Speech_Male>

Rhonda. US McGee.
"magee" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

03:16 min | Last month

"magee" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"Holster <Speech_Female> have been <Speech_Female> trained around <Speech_Music_Female> what books like <Speech_Music_Female> power on the World <Speech_Music_Female> F one <Speech_Music_Female> aspect <SpeakerChange> of the <Silence> dynamics. That's an <Speech_Male> all. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Female> if we can just find <Speech_Male> some way <Speech_Female> in <SpeakerChange> this time <Speech_Female> to like really <Speech_Female> work together <Silence> I think it's. <Speech_Female> To build <Speech_Male> and amplify <Speech_Female> these different ways <Speech_Male> of seeing each other being <Silence> with each other, <Speech_Female> it's creating <Speech_Female> new <Speech_Female> more subtle language <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> to describe what we're dealing <Speech_Female> with. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> There's white supremacist <Speech_Male> campaigns <Speech_Female> for <Speech_Male> e <Speech_Female> battle, and <Speech_Male> there's a subtle. <Speech_Female> What's Irma sightsee <Speech_Female> privileging <Speech_Female> water <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> that we're all <Speech_Female> binding. Those <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> are very <Speech_Female> different, and also <Speech_Female> people react very much <Speech_Female> the idea that <Speech_Female> you know there's white supremacy <Speech_Female> everywhere because they <Speech_Music_Female> don't see KKK. <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> I'm having <Speech_Female> like really <Speech_Male> not shaming people <Speech_Male> her. Not Understanding <Speech_Male> what we need <Speech_Male> is <Silence> really important he. <Speech_Male> Tenders <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> and compassion, <Speech_Female> even all of the <Speech_Female> ways we <SpeakerChange> are just struggling. <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> For sled <Speech_Male> to tenderly <Speech_Male> compassionately being <Speech_Music_Male> involved in <Speech_Music_Female> helping US <Music> name <Silence> or <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> And <Speech_Male> corrupt <Speech_Female> color to it painted. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Draw that <Speech_Female> that picture <Speech_Male> in ways that we can <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> live or <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Even a micron. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> than. <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Every <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> bit as much as <Speech_Music_Female> we'll be. Reform <Speech_Music_Male> Movements <Speech_Music_Male> and we can do. <Speech_Male> We can be <Speech_Male> engaged in those <Speech_Male> products of justice. <Speech_Music_Male> REVEILLE <Speech_Music_Male> OFF IN. <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> Providing <Speech_Male> be games <Speech_Male> of course <Speech_Male> I. Love that <Speech_Male> so much you <Speech_Male> know is just one <Speech_Male> tiny thing I remember <Speech_Male> reading they. <Speech_Male> You didn't actually forget <Speech_Male> something. You forgot to <Speech_Male> remember it, <Speech_Male> so if I say I forgot your <Speech_Male> name, will you actually <Speech_Male> did? was you forgot to <Speech_Male> remember it? So when you told <Speech_Male> me I didn't take a moment <Speech_Male> to remember it <Speech_Male> so sometimes like <Speech_Male> I. Don't know how to make a <Speech_Male> better world. A lot of us aren't <Speech_Male> even taking the time <Speech_Male> to picture a better <Speech_Male> world or or ask <Speech_Male> ourselves. <Speech_Male> What would it feel like <Speech_Male> to be in a better <Speech_Male> would? Be <Speech_Male> Interesting <SpeakerChange> this conversation <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> we against <Speech_Male> anti-racism <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> why? <Speech_Male> Are <Speech_Male> Yeah. <Speech_Female> Four. <Speech_Male> Oh <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> cruise <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> dot vision. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Silence> Myself with my <Speech_Female> group. AM! <Speech_Male> How <SpeakerChange> do <Speech_Male> we make that? <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> I hope <Speech_Male> you I feel <Speech_Male> like we both <SpeakerChange> enjoyed this. <Speech_Male> I think we did. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Ask By <Speech_Male> sincere pleasure. <Speech_Male> We're GONNA put <Speech_Male> this out tomorrow. <Speech_Male> I wanted <Speech_Male> to get it out as quickly <Speech_Male> as possible. So thank <Speech_Male> you, so Rhonda. <Speech_Male> It seems silly. <Speech_Male> The name of the book <Speech_Male> I wrote it down so I. Get it <Speech_Male> right as the inner work racial <Speech_Male> justice. <Speech_Male> It's fantastic. I haven't <Speech_Male> finished it, but <Speech_Male> it covers a lot of what we're <Speech_Male> talking about, and <Speech_Male> it's Rhonda the McGee. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> It's spelled Magic <Speech_Male> Maga <Speech_Male> E.. <Speech_Male> Dot Com has <Speech_Male> a lot of your talks. <Speech_Male> Just priceless <Speech_Male> staff I <Speech_Male> I I was worried <Speech_Male> I was going to have you saying <Speech_Male> what you said before, <Speech_Male> but I feel like we Straka <Speech_Male> a natural <Speech_Male> place and I'm so <Speech_Male> grateful. <Speech_Male> It seems silly, <Speech_Male> but we have the <Speech_Male> guest episode <Speech_Male> so I. Don't want to take <Speech_Male> it away from you. The <Speech_Male> guest says <Speech_Male> it's how we <SpeakerChange> end. The guest <Silence> says keep it crispy. <Speech_Male> It just <Speech_Male> for our <Speech_Male> purposes to put it in <Speech_Male> our language, it means <Speech_Male> stay open <Speech_Male> stay for <Speech_Male> life. <Silence> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> So <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Keep <Laughter> it crispy. <Laughter> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Thanking. <Speech_Male>

Rhonda. US McGee.
"magee" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

02:34 min | Last month

"magee" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"Anger is yeah. Is My sex back? Here's my greed. My. There's my rape culture. There's whatever it might be just. Is instead of going. I'm a good person and the bat. Richard again talks about how we do. Such a great job of projecting are evil. It was an around the time of nine eleven as I could not us. It's the Iraqis like he's like. We have no ability to go. Could it be so when you talk about inner work? One of the things that's been blowing my mind is. And you do bring it to the outerwear, but the outdoor gives the inner work. It's both an what we see in the world is what's going on in here when you see a lynching or a murder, it's what's going on in there. When you see a protest or cop standing up and hugging, it's what's going on here. So I wanted to spell the idea that there's those of us sitting on cushions and getting groovy and those that are actually doing stuff. It's the getting groovy that makes me that changes. The snap judgments that I make. About a person or and it changes, so it's all as above so below I know you know that as inside so outside it's it's. We need to get over the idea that. Would be nice to naval gaze. Although I. Do you did bring up the idea I? Do Think we're overworked. Were overtired. I think we're underpaid I. Think were scared. I think we're fed fear and you think we've been conditioned to believe that quote. Unquote navel-gazing is a luxury of Gwyneth paltrow while she gets a pedicure, but it. It's fucking. Not. That's what my that's what my father caught navel-gazing unlike. You mean introspection. You mean asking myself. How do I feel this moment and my dad would agree with me. He's not. He's not a cemented, but like he does tend to think that what I. What I'm into might be a little woo, Woo and I love that we're getting out. It's not Wu it leads to real change it should, and is intended to lead to real change, and we're not just talking about getting better sleep or Or reducing our stress, which changing the story of how we see ourselves, and therefore how we see the world and our place in the world by sitting quietly and letting it steer the car, instead of my story of WHO I am listened to it instead of telling it who I am I'm. Pete I'm a man on six six. I'm a comedian when I sit all that goes away yet. I still am so who is that? You success, I am six six. I'm the same height as Michael Jordan..

Gwyneth paltrow Richard Woo rape Wu Michael Jordan murder Pete
"magee" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

02:34 min | Last month

"magee" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"Anger is yeah. Is My sex back? Here's my greed. My. There's my rape culture. There's whatever it might be just. Is instead of going. I'm a good person and the bat. Richard again talks about how we do. Such a great job of projecting are evil. It was an around the time of nine eleven as I could not us. It's the Iraqis like he's like. We have no ability to go. Could it be so when you talk about inner work? One of the things that's been blowing my mind is. And you do bring it to the outerwear, but the outdoor gives the inner work. It's both an what we see in the world is what's going on in here when you see a lynching or a murder, it's what's going on in there. When you see a protest or cop standing up and hugging, it's what's going on here. So I wanted to spell the idea that there's those of us sitting on cushions and getting groovy and those that are actually doing stuff. It's the getting groovy that makes me that changes. The snap judgments that I make. About a person or and it changes, so it's all as above so below I know you know that as inside so outside it's it's. We need to get over the idea that. Would be nice to naval gaze. Although I. Do you did bring up the idea I? Do Think we're overworked. Were overtired. I think we're underpaid I. Think were scared. I think we're fed fear and you think we've been conditioned to believe that quote. Unquote navel-gazing is a luxury of Gwyneth paltrow while she gets a pedicure, but it. It's fucking. Not. That's what my that's what my father caught navel-gazing unlike. You mean introspection. You mean asking myself. How do I feel this moment and my dad would agree with me. He's not. He's not a cemented, but like he does tend to think that what I. What I'm into might be a little woo, Woo and I love that we're getting out. It's not Wu it leads to real change it should, and is intended to lead to real change, and we're not just talking about getting better sleep or Or reducing our stress, which changing the story of how we see ourselves, and therefore how we see the world and our place in the world by sitting quietly and letting it steer the car, instead of my story of WHO I am listened to it instead of telling it who I am I'm. Pete I'm a man on six six. I'm a comedian when I sit all that goes away yet. I still am so who is that? You success, I am six six. I'm the same height as Michael Jordan..

Gwyneth paltrow Richard Woo rape Wu Michael Jordan murder Pete
"magee" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

02:44 min | Last month

"magee" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"I was able to access I. Literally believe it was some kind of Al that was happening. That has happened after years a practice. But I guess I'm saying this the amplifier and I think it's the way we can make for the part of us as Benny's healed and scrounge ourselves that. But it's and it helps to be in supportive. Communities and environments, and that's another part of wide you or that I. if I thought it was all just personal project, I would just sit practice. Elevate myself best interest you know, go for. Each I. Try to create spaces where we can do this together because I know. that. It is so important to to. Not You know once. You realize that you deserve better to give yourself as. Put ourselves in. You know more constructive. Environments. relationships. Relationships with work and with making money and. So that. We're not having to compromise and. Keep our border small over and over again. To feel afraid all the time, so I mean really changing these environmental conditions that reinforce the narratives by which we construct years. I think. That's A. Beautiful. It's so touching that you said protector because a vow was here. She would be flipping out too, because we've been talking about our protectors. and. I was realizing that my protector like this Tony Soprano. He's very angry is also so easily scared. Look you can. You can shrink them down to nothing in a moment and I was noticing that so much of my negative or reactive comes from him. And that and I've said this before, but forgive. I'm saying it to you for the first time. Is it was like? Instead of trying to push him away and say. You Idiot, the world isn't so simple. You don't have to be so angry saying I. See you I, my childhood was Gary in its own ways, and you were developed to protect me. And starting from a place of thank you and I see you, you treat these unwanted. I put that in quotes, feelings and impulses like little children like little bratty children, and you greet them. You don't smack a little bratty child. You try to love it and you and you and you communicate and connect with it, so your dream, and all of that coming up and identifying. There's my protector. It's it's all what we're saying. It's going bears, my ugliness to, and there's my fear and there's my fucking racism. There's my racism..

Tony Soprano Al Benny Gary
"magee" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

07:20 min | Last month

"magee" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"To get up, and they were the first that letter, her ripple of festers all the background, reaching out with people on the other side of that line, they were just acknowledging. I think in order to stand out. And after that the police left, this was one of the times in the police were told you can you must? Clear Out! Or they cleared out. It was this moment of acknowledging, Hey. We're hurting. Currency which is. If we could. Some of US would be right up there with you, but we'll be you know. It is not simple these issues these this. I have to tell you that. Thank you. And I was so nervous that whole story. I was so nervous that you were going to tell me that. It went sideways because when you talk about fear. It, didn't it someone someone grabs a hand I'm like, and then he freaks out and starts beating or something. And you know freak out in love, which is freak out in love. Which is what? kind of what happened there yeah Oh that we're not. We are not prepared for loving each other and more so much more prepared to be afraid. I think so many listeners hearing the story like wait waiting for things horrible thing to happen I think we were so primed for that. Crime for that season. How are how much were you to make a world which is safe for all of us? I I think when we look at so many of these stories of the horrible murders. There's fear is usually a huge factor. And again it's user with that does not excuse anything and I love said we're not gonNA equally dispense our our concern that I think that's just perfectly put. This is the subtlety we're talking about, but I remember you know when the when the were happening and they were getting. more intense. I just remember having the thought like I was like. Cops aren't like I know. Some might be but I'm like cops aren't like excited to go do that. You know what I mean. I'm like they're probably scared to and again I'm not saying what's equally dispenser concern, but in that moment and maybe it was my own I. Don't know what it was my own mindfulness practice, or whatever, but I was like I myself. Being guilty of the idea that cops are cops like in a cartoon. And again I can't say it enough. I'm not equally dispensing concern, but it was a humanizing moment and I love the story that you told obviously. This. Emily all. To her or Hindi's. Comic Book. Constructions? Your Reaction My First what do I with ourselves in a way? Sounds a little bit worries. But. You know even bad is often in wash-. Off It impoverished the sense of ourselves the so. Julia what we can mean? The sense of what we can ask for love lungs and give. I, they're like E. Space Bar. Loving relationships were often. It's so funny that you say that because you know visiting family and stuff sometimes the feeling you get your this house. He feels haunted because there's emotional. Things that have not been exercised. And they're not acknowledged I. Know you know. And I know and valor. We all know there's things that there's family mythologies just like there's country mythologies of there's global mythologies, and we all know the the the sick to our stomach feeling. Where you're like we all just can we all? We were CO conspirators in covering up our truth and so many people. We wait til our deathbeds, if that to be like I love you. What was that all about? But like sometimes it's just Thanksgiving where you're just like. I, just I was just pushing a very heavy, very buoyant balloon under water for four days and I think we're doing so. It's like there's like one issue. You know what I'm saying. That can kind of be hopeful. There's one issue, and it's putting light and awareness and consciousness onto our pain, and onto each other and onto ourselves I think you're right I think people do inherit a small version of their own story and their. Their victims in that way that they have to go around thinking. Oh, maybe I'm I'm this I I'm just a woman. Let's say and and we and they don't have the same opportunities, but we're. We're. We become unwilling or unwitting or unconscious co-conspirators in a story that we did right, which again goes back to alcohol. It's like who told you that you want alcohol to be happy that I'm just trying to broaden this and say. We know that there's such a crisis around substantive. I. Know. It's just one of the interlock. And it's all it all benefits. I even read a book because I sometimes lean towards overeating, I I'm sort of an addict and a lot of different ways and I read this interesting book. I don't really recommend it, which is why I'm not going to say the name of it, but the the concept of it was bringing awareness to it. They were saying there's a part of your brain. That thinks you need to eat the entire pint of ice cream, or you will die, and all it was trying to do was and I think my summary by the way is better than the books, please. Don't tweet me. What was the book? It's just acknowledging that there's a part of your lower part of your brain. That develops I in early man or early humanity. That is overactive right now, and all you have to do is find a higher part of you whether it's alcohol racism overeating addiction misogyny homophobia might be. There's another part of you. That's that's separate from it, and if you can use that part of your awareness to look at that part of awareness, and be mindful and give it space, talk to it relate to it. It listen to it. I would even say I find benefit and hugging it and saying I love you I understand. It's just like you would do with a complicated family member. I Love You I. Forgive You I'm sorry, We're safe right now. You're no longer needed, but you're welcome to stay I mean you can sit and You know what I'm saying that compassion. Is Transformation. And it's every issue. Searcher. I mean. Someone someone reading my book said I love your your approach as I am hearing what I'm hearing. You describe your I think flies really does apply to all of the theory difficult. Deeply internalized. Patterns and habits we have around. Kobe. In our ruth..

US E. Space Bar Kobe stomach Emily Julia
"magee" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

02:17 min | Last month

"magee" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"Whatever one might do in in the way of abuse of power. That weren't there, but it is to say. Let's the back of seen. Of Entire Claw and how we have created systems and structures conditions that. My put a young man of any background or so, but also a young woman or any person human being. themselves. Able to get a job in progress in that feel. I mean there are a lot curve circumstances that lead to that that I think need to be taken consideration think about. Number one was wrong with the system. To how we might. Resolve. I have worked yes with. People who are trying to transform the criminal justice system leave for example come together around on the idea that every perspective as best we can be. A part of this conversation about France. Nathan rolls will get nowhere so meeting together with. Everyone from people victimized by the system. A criminal defense attorneys. And all and that in the system, if you will to those across those make law enforce the laws, judge Cross Q.. Ringing everybody that ever. And I'll say that one such instance. We all came away from this Lake multi-day. immersive experience really think. Pieces? an points-of-view PERSPEC- physicians. In these structures. He just came. Wipe him like okay, actually everybody this entire. Everyone's suffering not. To say that as a result, people aren't or that are concerned to be evenly distributed, but it is to say we have again. Be Able to see complex it is it is the case summer stuff for more these ways of argue constantly. We have the those now. Black lives matter and we have to fight on reinforce. The Human Rights Campaign that.

Nathan rolls PERSPEC France
"magee" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

02:10 min | Last month

"magee" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"To really talk about these things because I. Don't think we're taught a kind of complex holding of our history. or of. It means to be engaged in democratic multiracial politics. What the invitation might be! It's about like as we were saying before. We've never been that. Come that country. We're absolutely everybody in a multi-racial Democratic League, but we to participate. We've always been. Some of us like people like me have always hoped to make those promises were real and had to kind of struggle. With and Against A completely legitimized narrative and set of trainings that says Oh yes, we say freedom. We really don't mean you. To make us all get on. The same page of freedom actually could mean always. It doesn't have to be less re. As a way facial is systems with math doesn't mean less. But! It certainly can be all like. Given that we've been you construct the narrative of freedom that said by definition. We mean more than more from me unless for you rag. It's SORTA The bad side of what we were saying. I exist because you exist. There's almost like a perversion of that where it's like. Well I'm powerful. It's almost like. Couldn't you believe I don't but in some sort of shadow government, an aluminum body mythology? That's like there always has to be someone getting stepped on, and that's why there's someone above them, but the obviously that's not what any of this means. That's not what I believe, but it's almost like. Not I mean I actually think it's you need ause with your observation there little bit long. I don't know that anyone. I don't know anyone would articulate that but I think. The question that I sit with and others. Who've been thinking about these? Know Generation. is whether or not there really is something embedded in the kind of way. Racial is dominant way of thinking about. Right,.

Democratic League
"magee" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

02:10 min | Last month

"magee" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"To really talk about these things because I. Don't think we're taught a kind of complex holding of our history. or of. It means to be engaged in democratic multiracial politics. What the invitation might be! It's about like as we were saying before. We've never been that. Come that country. We're absolutely everybody in a multi-racial Democratic League, but we to participate. We've always been. Some of us like people like me have always hoped to make those promises were real and had to kind of struggle. With and Against A completely legitimized narrative and set of trainings that says Oh yes, we say freedom. We really don't mean you. To make us all get on. The same page of freedom actually could mean always. It doesn't have to be less re. As a way facial is systems with math doesn't mean less. But! It certainly can be all like. Given that we've been you construct the narrative of freedom that said by definition. We mean more than more from me unless for you rag. It's SORTA The bad side of what we were saying. I exist because you exist. There's almost like a perversion of that where it's like. Well I'm powerful. It's almost like. Couldn't you believe I don't but in some sort of shadow government, an aluminum body mythology? That's like there always has to be someone getting stepped on, and that's why there's someone above them, but the obviously that's not what any of this means. That's not what I believe, but it's almost like. Not I mean I actually think it's you need ause with your observation there little bit long. I don't know that anyone. I don't know anyone would articulate that but I think. The question that I sit with and others. Who've been thinking about these? Know Generation. is whether or not there really is something embedded in the kind of way. Racial is dominant way of thinking about. Right,.

Democratic League
"magee" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

02:06 min | Last month

"magee" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"That place to kind of at least be able to understand or see? That people are talking about totally different things talking about. But freedom means the United States. So, Tony Morrison and James Baldwin were often trying to see the way. The notion of freedom had embedded in it. A bargain up like. Like. We don't mean all of your. And that is like a hard with no one meeting under appreciate. The. Extent of the challenge. That, we're still every generation living with. To actually Name this sort of The what how do want to save is the way that this notion of freedom is is cons, not just contested. But. It's like. It's constructed in interbrew. And so anytime we bring it up. We're almost inviting. About. Our histories the like install we relearning this when we think about the the battle right now today over the statue's. Reminded that our history is right here right now, not back. They're still running through us. So we have these political and try to come together. Eat Off, try to all what support team amendment meaning the equality protections mean of the protection clause and every generation. We have idle. and. We have people saying today. lgbtq rights are protected by the other people especially clause. Okay, we had to get to that. View the language of the fourteenth amendment. Never change how we look at it who we're willing to see as protected by. Constantly. Under construction and even under vein. And you know most of us I think. It's hard to.

James Baldwin Tony Morrison United States interbrew
"magee" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

02:09 min | Last month

"magee" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"Down to what has to be vulnerable. What is it like to have? access to certain ways of being knowing that feel comfortable. You'd have somebody point out that in a certain context that renders you. Unjustified more. comfortable legitimate powerful. It's uncomfortable. So, so the human experience basic this comfort on the one hand vulnerability, these are basically just human experience we can. Experience them in a package. That's racial or gender or sexual orientation whatever? Entity. But at the end like if you really break it down. It's about You know radical X. Central Reality of are just being the soft belly, vulnerable beings trying to find a place soft place to land. So you know humor is one place where we find that soft. Fog of unknowing. Over or or father, it's OK. that. You know again. It's so poignant because humidity, a fair amount of is okay. Research showing that. If we don't get some kind of compassion. And Fusion! It's really hard for us even to admit. Any. That needs to be changed that we need to do in other words, all we're doing is like. Shooting on ourselves and blaming ourselves in shaming. Taking in the kind of almost to the point of humiliation. Right. which is Shane on steroids right to the point where you self as rendered. Incapable of standing up in social in social world. Shame to that point is obviously toxic. And humiliation to that degree is toxic. What we want is to be able to kind of you know. Be In some sort of more. Some.

Shane
"magee" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

06:01 min | Last month

"magee" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"My brain does a lot of that we again. This question of how much of that is natural. Conditioned in our Tomek Luiz. Integrate not just the content of our categories. Condition Radio conditions it. CATEGORIZE CERTAIN GROUPS OF PEOPLE WITH CERTAIN STEREOTYPES PERHAPS! So, we might accept Bassett conditioning, but we might be tempted to say, but the fact that our brain does that. It's just way. The brain works right. Sure about even that. Which is it? Which Kim I like it's happening, and then we use that it's happening as proof that it should be happening sort of always happen, right? We can maybe work on it a little bit, but everybody's brains wired. or or for kinds of categorisations in rank ordering surround them. I think that that's probably noticed I mean there's research that has started to really. Provide some empirical evidence as a basis for staying with a question. or Fully in the question a like. The brain really work around these things. How do we separate out what we've been trained? How we've been trained to use our brains in over trains use our brains. And in what ways are we? Missing. What else we could be doing. And isn't a joke potentially to condemn my my own art, isn't it potentially a way of sort of glorifying and celebrating the way that the brain likes to make gross generalizations to oversimplify an very complicated and subtle and confusing reality? So. The brain likes that if I go like that's just how it is. I'm sorry like here's an example I've made it before, but they talk about like women are weaker I'm sorry like you. This is an area. Where there aren't coed prisons because women are weak and there's the WNBA because women are we send? This is why we can't head a woman, and and this makes everybody laugh. It's such a like. What a strange! Thing that the brain wants to celebrate you WANNA leave going. The world is primary colors I feel less afraid as opposed to a comedian, which there have been George Carlin comes to mind if people that are trying to push very very complicated nuance things, but typically and again I'm just conceding the point, if you and I go to the Improv on of back when reality comes on a Friday night or any club. I guarantee if you're. If you're in a heart, open place, you'll smell which jokes are biased and pushing an agenda, even if it's as an Oculus, as like, isn't winning great like we have very few jokes about like is in giving great or isn't being passive great. We have a lot of like American mythology like winning as good eating is good. Sex is good men. Sex Women don't like sex as much whatever it might be. Exactly and we all know the stereotypes that would traveled setup the jokes around like men. or at. More Sore. You know you get into that area where? When a black comedian and I stand, there's the drive to succeed, but you do see a lot of. I S I had a little person. Brad Williams on and I was like to. What point do you feel like? You have to make little person jokes and you start to blur that I. asked him. Do you ever feel like you're blurring the line where you're making jokes that they wanna make about you, but you're saying that. So! It's okay for their so what I'm saying. is you see a lot of racism? White. People felt the gas tank like this. And the and they're not looking and black. People are doing it like this. Okay, so that's associated, economic joke, and now a room. Full of white people are laughing. If I was like black people are poor again I'm just saying like. I can't point fingers because I've done it. I want to concede that I have a joke. I it was I can't say it wasn't a funny joke because it got last, but it was about being in a bad part of Atlanta and and the implication. We did. Exactly, what am I saying? I that's a big part of what I WANNA do with you is I. See a lot of people. Saying that they don't have bias and they don't have racism and something that i. saw and I shared it on instagram. That really moved me. They were like treat. Racism like Ovid nineteen assume you have it. And that that's a conversation I wanted to have with you so just to inform you like I said. It looked like a bone thugs and harmony video I'm just saying it was a black neighborhood, but like a specific type of black neighborhood, and then I was uncomfortable. The I didn't have to say it because I'm white, and that I wanted to leave so I typed in Barnes and noble. There's a Lotta into my GPS, so there's a lot going on their neighborhoods like that. Don't have barnes and noble. I felt okay at the time because I was like it's a true story, but but there's a lot going on. It's it's an ugly. Goes. I couldn't hear anything. You were saying random. Sorry, Oh, I was just saying agreeing with you that there is so much there. We are assuming. You know and What you kind of know to be true about. The world is sort of implicit in all of that right, so you kind of. You I'm reading I. Read from time to time different things that. Seemed like thing to be reading the moment and right now for me, Toni Morrison's works and her back for latest book which I'm just getting to..

Barnes Tomek Luiz Bassett George Carlin WNBA Kim Ovid Brad Williams Toni Morrison Atlanta
"magee" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

02:53 min | Last month

"magee" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"The no a harmful messaging and right back out. In can do it. Easily, in with no real signposts. It can happen no matter how old or how young we are. Some of the more poignant stories I hear from folks along the road of the work that of course which Brown. Bringing awareness to. Some of the more subtle ways that we suffer socially including suffering around what we call identity, these kind of packages in the suction leanings. People make just on looking at us they. Look Yeah So so when we think about how the again humor can so easily brought in to kind of. Subtly mark those who art might be targeted. or At first it might just be joe that dimensions and from there again often research shows how that can escalate to. These people are the. Targets in our group right. Or, dehumanizing. Will, haven't we seen that BLONDE JOKES? Po- Polish jokes whatever it is? You're absolutely right. I, I think I I couldn't be. The prisoner came up with it, but I've heard. If you WanNa know what someone really feels. Watch what they laugh at. It doesn't that feel? And so, it's so poignant night. Honestly mean this. I don't mean I really. Feel like I'm drawn to the work that I do at the intersection of like academia and mindfulness and justice work has it invites holding complexity and. And and mindfulness. Is kind of Nice if you will technology for holding complex beholding? Big Questions and not. The training support not grasping after the first answer. Like right. Because consciousness, itself is complex silences complex. And the brain is binary and the brain is is dualistic. Drained? Actually. I'm not sure what the brain. It's interesting. I did just kind of go like Oh. That's how the brain is. That's a bias that I have I. Go. My brain likes to go Asian. People are bad drivers, which is always the go-to safe example of racism. So. Forgive me my Asian friends, but that is you know what I'm saying the? Head! Rate We? We tend to think because we hear someone. Say that sort resume job. My brain does a lot of that we again. This question of how much of that is natural. Conditioned in our Tomek Luiz..

Tomek Luiz Brown
"magee" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

01:36 min | Last month

"magee" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"As it intersects with the kinds of ethical concerns of my life and work, which are about You know expanding the sense that we all belong. We all deserve. A certain amount of Hair and Regard. DIGGER! And so I know that you know. There's surround comedy that is about teasing. That is about you know Wrapping, sometimes play I think voices messages in humor I couldn't I just want to interject I know you're in the middle here I couldn't agree more. I really really couldn when I go to a regular show, if people I don't know on it. I think the question that you ask in your work so often as Where are you standing when you say that? Like who are you including in? Who aren't you including? And what story are you perpetuating? What we're laughing at in, the joke couldn't agree more. Often, Consult with my, and that's why it's particularly. Ripe and worthy US look at it together. At this time because. You know it is. It's the kind of staying that interested in too I. Think the psyche the body. In a warm package. We're laughing and it's such a light I mean. I feel like a visceral release and this kind of you know kind of. Energy flow all through my.

"magee" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

01:36 min | Last month

"magee" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"As it intersects with the kinds of ethical concerns of my life and work, which are about You know expanding the sense that we all belong. We all deserve. A certain amount of Hair and Regard. DIGGER! And so I know that you know. There's surround comedy that is about teasing. That is about you know Wrapping, sometimes play I think voices messages in humor I couldn't I just want to interject I know you're in the middle here I couldn't agree more. I really really couldn when I go to a regular show, if people I don't know on it. I think the question that you ask in your work so often as Where are you standing when you say that? Like who are you including in? Who aren't you including? And what story are you perpetuating? What we're laughing at in, the joke couldn't agree more. Often, Consult with my, and that's why it's particularly. Ripe and worthy US look at it together. At this time because. You know it is. It's the kind of staying that interested in too I. Think the psyche the body. In a warm package. We're laughing and it's such a light I mean. I feel like a visceral release and this kind of you know kind of. Energy flow all through my.

"magee" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

02:09 min | Last month

"magee" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"A morning person right now, which is probably. Another reason. Why might yes I love getting? A good for you. Myself in that way right now, so you went against type. It's easier for me. I woke up this morning before my baby like I like she could be waking me up, but I I didn't wake her up. I let her sleep, but usually. She's almost two. He gets up around five. Thirty usually. And this morning I was up before her. I! Don't know why. Things but I'm so happy. I'm so honored to have you on your brilliant. Fabulous. And it's a privilege. It really is, and I am with this episode in particular It's really what whatever you'd like to do but I really WanNa offer it to you. This is a this is an audience said it may be. You don't normally get to speak for I. watched a lot of your talks. I've been reading your book. It's wonderful it's for everybody. But I love the idea of you slipping in comedian, comedian actor, whatever and then, and then just like Sharon Salisbury. Desert Mir by Bush, does all these different people I kind of changing the channel. And letting you have it but. And I'm almost done with my little preamble. Here I just WANNA say. What you have to offer so vital and so important I want to honor the idea that you might be tired of saying it. And I so if you WanNa talk about other stuff we can I thought we might WANNA to start with. Anything else yes. Nothing is off limits within her VIC. Yeah, if I did a podcast, they were like you can just have the rains I'd be like well great now, I, have to give a lecture. We can just talk but know that I would love to get some real good juice out there and some good. Knowledge for people that being said I didn't want to ask you Maybe to start us off what your relationship is to comedy because nobody's asking you that. I don't think anybody is asking mindful. Lawyer author, extraordinary round of McGee. What she thinks about comedy and by the way you don't need to tell me that you love.

McGee Sharon Salisbury Bush
"magee" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

04:44 min | Last month

"magee" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"You. saw. Made, it weird with the homes, sir. What's happening? Where does this is the incredible Rhonda? The McGee who is the author of the also incredible and brilliant, the inner work of Racial Justice I've been mentioning for a few weeks now. That I've been wanting to do an episode to directly address all the happening right now the climate. Change and resistance and growth hopefully in evolution. And this is that conversation? Rhonda is wonderful as I always say, let's get to it as quickly as possible I. Do highly recommend her book. To bring the inner work into our outer work, because as as you'll see him as conversation. I believe they inform one. Another and I'm just so happy to have her on and get all the. She has to say out I guess that's true of every episode, but it's especially true of everything that's going on now. And all that we need to be talking about black lives, matter and The the resistance that's happening in the in the movement. That's happening right now. I do. WanNa mention a couple of things. What do I want to mention? All episodes are brought to us by our friends at Charlotte's web. CW HEMP DOT com slash Weird Promo Code. Keep it crispy. Nineteen will get you ten percent off. I'm holding them right here. These are my com governors very subtle very very helpful in these stressful times, so if you WanNa, show your support of the podcast. Try them out We also have a new. Pete's pick this week which I'm very excited about which is living libations. Sort of you know I. Think about what I eat. I'm mindful eater in terms of I. WanNa know what I'm putting in my body. I'm very careful about what I put into my body, but I realized a couple years ago that I wasn't being very careful about what I put on my body, and of course your skin absorbs everything you put on into your body but I knew, but regardless I was still buying shaving cream and face washes that I knew were garbage deep down, but I thought they were fancy. Because you know, they were expensive and French. And I thought I was doing something good for my skin and my body, but of course we know this. They're actually made with chemicals that are linked to disease toxic toxicity. That were never intended for Cubans. Who looks at the ingredients on their face. Cream goes yeah. Pure enough for Babe. It's just not the case and I always I didn't know that there was a better way. There is an it's my friends at living libations for years now I've been using living migrations. It's gotten some traction. Over the years it's become very very popular. But I found them and was very excited that I could eat food with ingredients that I recognize, but I could also use skin and I and tooth products that were the same that I that had ingredients that I could recognize and new came from the earth, and were real things not made in some weird lab. I started with their ginger exfoliating scrub pro tip. Fully before you shave. FELLAS Game Changer so I got that I got the ginger fully hitting scrub with ingredients I recognize works fantastic. It's not some Mike middle of the road natural compromise. It's an excellent exfoliating scrub made with plants and oils and extracts that you recognize, and it's wonderful that I moved up to the Zen Shave. which is there shaving cream? which is clean and natural so much so that you can actually use a dab of it as your aftershave meaning it'll rub and and be absorbed right into your. Skin not some anonymous NEON Blue Goo shot out from a pressurized cam garbage, so I went from the scribe to the Zen Shave and I moved my way up to the best skin ever. That's what it's called. Baskin ever moisturizer. This is what I've used. Every night smells great feels great. Put It on before bed and again ingredients that you recognize and also work and feel and smell fantastic whatever your skin needs. I guarantee go to living libations DOT COM. They have faced off their body. Stuff they have is stuff. They have teeth stuff even suffer babies. which is what we are using on baby Leelanau. Because where. Except a baby! Would you absolutely want to make sure that you're using the purest and best stuff around so it as whatever you need? They have a.

Rhonda CW HEMP DOT McGee baby Leelanau Charlotte Pete Wan Baskin Mike middle
Philadelphia - Suspected DUI driver charged with murder in crash that left 3-year-old child dead

KYW 24 Hour News

00:55 sec | 2 months ago

Philadelphia - Suspected DUI driver charged with murder in crash that left 3-year-old child dead

"A Montgomery County woman faces serious charges after police say she was driving under the influence and caused a multi vehicle crash leaving a three year old child dead and at least a half dealt another dozen other people hurt they would lose Justin Trudeau with the story district attorney Larry Krasner says it was Wednesday evening when Brianna right of Montgomery County was speeding on Frankford Avenue in Magee in the Mayfair section of Philadelphia he says the twenty eight year old impaired driver that went from sites like Bing a septa bus on the south bound lanes before crossing to the north bound lanes and hitting more vehicles ultimately ended in a six vehicle crash he adds as a result of that crash a three year old died and six others including a seven a nineteen year old were injured sources say the children were not buckled on their vehicles at the time of the crash right is charged with third degree murder homicide by vehicle while driving under the influence and resisting arrest among other charges Krasner's urging Philadelphians to not confuse impure streets in pure pedestrians as an excuse to speed or drive while

Justin Trudeau Larry Krasner Montgomery County Magee Philadelphia Bing Brianna Third Degree Murder
Race is Not Tangential to Meditation | Rhonda V. Magee

10% Happier with Dan Harris

09:52 min | 6 months ago

Race is Not Tangential to Meditation | Rhonda V. Magee

"Guys. Of course it is great to become better at meditation on the cushion to get to you to have your practice improve over time. That's the real point as Sharon Salzberg. The great meditation teacher has said. The point of meditation is not to become a better meditators percents to become a better person to to get better at at your life and you know I often for myself describe it as just becoming less of a moron and so the point is to get up from meditation from one minute to minute. Five minutes twenty minutes. Whatever you're doing and then put it to test in the real world with other human beings how you doing it the DMV. How you doing it The office that's why on this show. We once in a while really try to dive into what is in my view. One of if not the most tricky and contentious social issues in in the United States of America and in many other countries in the world which is race and the takeaway for me from this week's guest is that race really is not a tangential issue to your practice. Is the crucible in which you can test your meditation practice. And it's not just racist. How do you deal with difference? Mejet it can be pigmentation. It could be chromosomes. That can be ideological No matter how homogeneous your you know from a racial standpoint your environment may be there is. There's difference around you all the time. And how are you dealing with that? What kind of assumptions? And you're bringing to the table and Ken Meditation. Untangle things in a useful way for you so Rhonda. Mcgee is a professor of law at the University of San Francisco. She's been on this show before if you want to hear about her fascinating upbringing Go back and listen to episode one hundred twenty four but in this show. We're GONNA talk about her new book which is called the inner work of racial justice healing ourselves and transforming our communities through mindfulness and we talk about whiteness. What it's like to wake up to whiteness both as a white person and Somebody WHO's Non White? We talk about something that I think is fascinating discussed and we have discussed before in the show that this utility of shame when looking at your own biopsies practical ways to use meditation in And mindfulness in these often incredibly painful and awkward conversations about race. We talk about some of the trickiness even among the the tricky issues even among the people who are really committed to this work. Like where's the line between political correctness? And what the Buddha would call right speech also talk about predatory listening and cancelled culture. So we we really cover a whole range of hot button issues in a really thoughtful and I find incredibly practical meaningful way and also Rhonda's just Super Fun and interesting so here we go. Here's Rhonda McGee Great to see you great to see you to come. Thank you already laughing and smiling and we're GONNA be talking about tough stuff. That's a good sign. It's life yes. That's a useful thing to say actually I can't believe I'M GONNA ask this question. I've tried never task this question because the cliche question but here we go. Why did you write this book? okay. I think this book actually kind of wrote me innocence I think I've been working toward the content of it for many many years. You know this is my twenty first year teaching law in San Francisco and teaching All those years of tot you know traditional courses like Personal Injury Law Insurance Law immigration. But I've also intentionally taught courses that invite us to kind of come around gather around the campfire and look at how race and racism intersect with long legal history in our own lives. Actually and I think in the course of that I certainly number one started relying very consciously on my own Inner work to support that kind of outer work so I was very intentionally relying all those years on my own. Mindfulness practice and then at a certain point. I realized I needed to try to figure out how to bring that explicitly into the classroom to be of greater support to my students in not just into that classroom but just into the legal conversation were generally and So I just began exploring with that and that was way back in two thousand three two or three And then I found the network of other people who both in academia generally we're interested in bringing this inner and outer work together for service and work in the world for a more refined twenty first century way of thinking about what it means to be an educator human being on the one hand but also in law in particular because if you think about law it's just this profound enterprise aimed at trying to as best we can create a structure for holding difficult conversations and dealing with difficult issues that can Help the society cohere overtime so funny you say that because I think of lawyers is the people who like the knowing to detail. Contractual work that. I really don't WanNa do that. I don't even WanNa talk about with them. I understand that and yet what is the purpose of that is to kind of facilitate the work that you want to do in the world you right. So it's yes. I understand that. Set the rules of the road for me and my employer about what I'm expected to do. And what they and what I can expect them to. Absolutely if you wind the lens just a little bit. This is what we do in life as professor get to. Why in the Liz? A little bit and help You know help us see the big questions and the big functions if you will of something. That seems pretty Monday often. The elements of the negligence caused action. Duty breach causation damages. Like how that really that particular as one example of what laws trying to do is really a way of looking at what what sort of the best we can offer as a society as a means to support resolving conflicts that just occur when somebody unintentionally injures another person. This is what we got you know. And it's it's iterative we try and you know Interest on it over time. That's what the common law system was about changing as we need to To take into consideration changes in the culture changes in our sense of what right and wrong is. What's the right way to deal with A particular kind of suffering changes over time whether or not to cognizant recognize a certain kind of suffering changes a society does so so the beautiful thing actually about law for me that it is you know. Is this human effort in human project that is aiming toward a kind of You know a kind of perfection if you will a kind of Making the best with what we have In response to conflict which is inevitable in human community and so For me this book was about bringing that bringing to that conversation into that profound human project something of some tiny bit or some. Some thing of what? I've been learning as I've been working to bring together. This contempt of practice said commitments. That I call mine from this Bringing that together with The particular part of law. That's that works at the intersection of racism and racial injustice as it intersects with class and gender and sex orientation and all the other sorts of `ISMs and schisms of our time but for me just working on that over time gave me a lot to do but also gave me a certain way of holding these complexities. That certainly helped me sustain in the work. Frankly I had a moment where I was GonNa Leave Law because I felt like if I couldn't do it in a way that was much more holistic. Maybe I shouldn't be doing it so it was partly me feeling my way to sustainable way of of doing this hard work but also just feeling like okay. It's helping me I can see. My students are suffering. I can see a lot of suffering in the world around this that if it's helped me maybe it might help somebody else around race and how we respond to racism racial justice questions around the role of law and all of that which has been frankly both perpetrator and hope by holes itself as being the pathway to some sort of resolution but on the other hand if we look historically at the rule of law it's been you know people rightly point to it as really one of the the kind of core forces of oppression codifying it find the injustice. Exactly codifying raise codifying higher racial hierarchy At every level Three-fifth three fits right in the constitution and so many three V Fugitive slave clause So many different places where compromises were made right at the

Rhonda Mcgee Sharon Salzberg DMV Ken Meditation United States Professor Of Law San Francisco University Of San Francisco America Professor LIZ
An Iraqi Spring?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:36 min | 8 months ago

An Iraqi Spring?

"Some of the people who have been demonstrating across Iraq in recent weeks had not been born in two thousand and three when the United States led an invasion which was supposed is to turn the country into a beacon of liberal democracy at least four hundred of the people who have demonstrated across Iraq. In recent weeks we'll never know if such an outcome ever occurs the response of authorities has been brutal with several instances of live fire used against protesters. The protests tests began in early October. They have persisted despite the heavy handed reaction of Iraqi police and other security services last weekend. Iraq's Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi admitted defeat and announced his resignation. It is unclear who or what comes next. Iraq's new protests protests a brief venting of frustration or is it something bigger than that a delayed addition to the Arab spring or a contribution to a current global eruption of rage. And will they change anything. This is the foreign desk. A lot of these really young demonstrators. And you're like kids. were like seventeen years old going to these really dangerous places where there's live bullets and all of them will stay universally. I'm not afraid I'm ready to die for this and asked him. Why aren't you afraid? And many of them will say something like you know I've gotten used to. This isn't something that scares me anymore. which is a hard thing to hear coming from early on kids? Mel Of the question is what you're on will do or will not do. It's what the the Iraqis will do or do on mainly the Iraqi political elite who are having constitutional legal and ethical obligations awesome to insulate the country from foreign influence. I would consider what we've seen in October until now this year is probably the greatest existential essential threat to the post. Two Thousand and three Iraqi State even when Isis rose the Iraqi parties and the people were together in condemning Isis and there was a clear strategy to remove isis assist. There is not a clear strategy of what needs to be done and I think the political leaders sat in Baghdad or feeling. You're listening to the foreign desk with me. Andrew Miller my first guest today is pressure Mageed a journalist based in Baghdad who has been covering the protests since the beginning of October tober pressure. First of all. Let's talk about what's been happening this week. What point have the protests got to now so the protesters have really dug in their heels? At this point. They've we've kind of set up their own mini infrastructure within Dr Square. They have tents people are sleeping there for weeks at a time. They have blankets. They have emergency health facility. Salihi stood up for people who are injured and people are really prepared to stay there for a very long time. Well let's go back to win. This started in October as as far as it was possible to tell. was there any particular thing that sparked it off obviously underlying these demonstrations a great many eh deeply-held grievances but was there. One particular thing that seemed to bring people out into the streets so at the very beginning of October the protests I I think we're kind of like normal protests right so there were huge huge huge huge numbers at the very beginning and they were protesting after office. The fact that there was no real change. They were protesting also to a certain extent military leader. WHO's popular removal from office? But they really. I think started growing quite intensely after the the government's violent response to those protesters you know. They started using bullets at the beginning of October. And I think that's part of the reason why the protests have have grown to such an extent you know there's the endemic economic issues. There's the corruption that people are just exhausted with and then there's the fact that people are just so angry that they're seeing so many people being and killed in the streets. The authorities in Iraq went incredibly quickly from a standing start to firing live rounds at civilian protesters as anybody buddy yet understood how why that happened. It's been reported by Some of the agencies that the Iraqi government gut advice ice from costumes Sulaimaniyah the head of the Revolutionary Guard on how to respond to the protests in that might have been part of the reason why the response was so violent and Y- it seems like you know how they felt at the time was that they could not allow for any protests whatsoever that they needed to stamp it out as quickly as possible. And when you say revolution regard the you are of course talking about the Iranian Revolution regard and it has been a theme of these protests that Iranian targets have often come under fire will will quite literally. We've seen several Iranian consulates and other buildings burned down in some cases repeatedly. was that something that was already in the the era kind of resentment at Iranian influence over Iraq or did that come about because of this perceived Iranian involvement in the the massacre of at least at least four hundred that we now know of demonstrators. I think it's both I mean. People were definitely already angry at Iran for its influence over Iraq and especially it's seen as the power behind zone of some of the political parties that many protesters regardless very corrupt in as one of the main reasons that Iraq is in its current situation. And and then you know people definitely Blame Iran to a large extent for the violence. That's occurred I mean you know it's not like they don't blame government as well well but you know people definitely see that. Iran is kind of like the power behind the throne

Iraq Baghdad Iran Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahd Iraqi Government Isis United States Andrew Miller Dr Square MEL Salihi Mageed Revolutionary Guard Sulaimaniyah Seventeen Years
Wofford's Magee breaks NCAA career 3s record

John Jastremski

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Wofford's Magee breaks NCAA career 3s record

"Go. See hall players congratulate each other on a fine season. Also, congratulating the Wofford terriers for the first time in school history. Have won an NCAA basketball. And they did. So by closing that game on a seventeen to run was actually seventeen all until the final half minute. Tom mccarthy. Final call Westwood One. NCWA radio network has Wofford pulled away from Seton Hall, eighty four sixty eight miles pal twenty-seven points in defeat, but just too much Fletcher mcgehee had seven of Wofford's thirteen threes on the night along the way McGee broke the division. One record for most career three point

Wofford Seton Hall Fletcher Mcgehee Tom Mccarthy Ncaa Westwood Mcgee Basketball
Browns, Tyrod Taylor and Nayna Lynn discussed on Marty and McGee

Marty and McGee

00:32 sec | 2 years ago

Browns, Tyrod Taylor and Nayna Lynn discussed on Marty and McGee

"Noth who loves Monty and McGee more than I do is nanna leeann. Nayna Lynn, by the way, is the hero of her of her retirement home of like the national phenomena word is. Oh, yeah. And she was playing like podcast, so everybody can hear it. Muggy. Yeah, she's a big deal now and she's do a speaking of big deals. There was some sports on Friday night and we should probably get you caught up on what happened in sports and it's tough rooster. He won in

Browns Tyrod Taylor Nayna Lynn Joe Osmond Brian Magee Tony Dorsett Marty Baker Mayfield Virginia Tech Bill Roth Mardi Mcgee Chicago Cubs Theron Ron Mckee Charlotte Rod Taylor Cam Newton Bill Ralph Maadi Baseball
Drako, Michael Mcglockton and Dave Prokopyiv discussed on Nightside with Dan Rea

Nightside with Dan Rea

00:10 sec | 2 years ago

Drako, Michael Mcglockton and Dave Prokopyiv discussed on Nightside with Dan Rea

"In Boston cloud sun maybe a thunderstorm tomorrow traffic and weather. Together coming up good evening I'm Don huff WBZ news, our top story this. Hour the growing state police

Drako Michael Mcglockton Dave Prokopyiv Sturbridge Florida Kim Tunnicliffe Don Huff Mclachlan John Mccain Pennsylvania Lynn Boston Tom Magee Gardiner Maine John Medina Massachusetts CBS Colonel Kerry Gilpin Ohio Governor Baker