36 Burst results for "Madison."

Fresh update on "madison." discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

03:31 min | 13 hrs ago

Fresh update on "madison." discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

"Probably one of those things where she's an international good thing that everywhere you go on the track, somebody saying, I heard the 8 and the 7th race is a runner. I heard the 8 can't lose. And by the way, I'm not saying that because I haven't heard anything about star moment. And even if I had, I'm not interested in one to two. But that's where she is right now, and will see if she returns on that promise of one to two. And all the backers who are going to take a shot at a short price with this daughter of star guitar. They are loading into the starting gate for this 7th race at fairgrounds. By the way, we can tell you 13 minutes away for the 5th race over at del mar. So we've got a little bit of time before that race. Staying here at fairgrounds, though. And they are loading in for this 7th race. Once again, Louisiana bread meat and two year old Phillies are going to go 6 furlongs on the main track. By the way, the writer of number one Madison screen is off. Even though she's in the gate, it looks like jockey treylon Albert, who is a 5 pound apprentice, is climbing back aboard, but every time he tries to climb back aboard, she gets a little bit nervous. Now he's back aboard. It looks like she's settled down. Star moment, the favorite, the last one to load in. Here's John Dooley with the call. Two to 5 star moment. They're all in line. The Rolf and sprinting, and that was pursuit or harmony broke real sharp just almost out broke the gate did pursue the harmony gets the jump on Madison's screen with in third Olivia Jean through the first for long. WG with a white cap RT's gem is between feliz and star moment now strides up on the front side for Kobe Hernandez with her bid, the gold cap of star moment as Madison screen drives through inside a sharp starting pursuit low harmony. Then we drill back to Mia Antonia as they around the far turn. The quarter was 22.4 seconds just over three for longs to go. And at the inside Madison screen fights to the front with pursuit lower harmony and their star moment, star moment she's making her move and a strong move for Kobe Hernandez, has these made in two year old Phillies straight in for the quarter poll. It's star moment to the front from pursuit of harmony, Madison screen with the rail, bitsy perfect matches next, half mile in 46.99 coming down to the final furlong star moment. Star moment leans pursuit for harmony now by four. Then running on his bitsy perfect match with Olivia G mounting a bit on the far side, but star moment has the kick for Colby and star moment a first down winning moment for star moment and star moment prevails from Olivia G with pursuit lo Jay third and Mia Antonio finished fourth. Unofficially 8 two 6 in the 7th race at fairgrounds, the public had it right here first time starter star moment, break all that well, was able to recoup with that outside draw, made a three wide bid for the lead at the quarter pole, took the lead easily, looked like Colby Hernandez was never really asking this daughter of star guitar and she opened up willingly down the lane, ended up only winning by a length as number two Olivia G another first time started was getting play closed well from the back of the pack. Never really looked like she was going to get there, but the final result is she only lost by about a length so it's going to look better than it was. I don't know if she was gaining or star guitar was slowing down either way these two first time starters easily first and second best in the 7th race at fairgrounds, 8,

Kobe Hernandez Madison Treylon Albert Olivia G John Dooley Olivia Jean Phillies Mia Antonia Rolf Feliz Louisiana Lo Jay Mia Antonio Colby Hernandez Colby
Allen, Bucks hang on after Giannis fouls out to edge Knicks

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 2 d ago

Allen, Bucks hang on after Giannis fouls out to edge Knicks

"The Milwaukee Bucks in New York Knicks played a scrappy game at Madison Square Garden Wednesday night, a combination of solid Nick's defense and the bucks cold shooting in the first half kept things close throughout as Yanis and telecom fouled out with the minute left and the bucks up one O three one O two. Jalen Brunson tied it on the line and then Grayson Allen hit a three with 30 seconds left to seal the deal for Milwaukee. Jan's finished the night with 37 points despite not hitting a shot in the first quarter as the bucks won ugly one O 9 to one O three. Matt maker to New York

Bucks Yanis Jalen Brunson Madison Square Garden Knicks Grayson Allen Nick New York Milwaukee JAN Matt
'Here comes the bride': White House to host its 19th wedding

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 2 weeks ago

'Here comes the bride': White House to host its 19th wedding

"Here comes the bride will be heard at The White House next weekend President Biden's granddaughter 28 year old Naomi Biden and her fiance 25 year old Peter Neal are getting married Saturday on the south lawn She's the daughter of Hunter Biden and like her fiance They both graduated law school They met when a mutual friend set them up four years ago She'll be the first granddaughter of a president to tie the knot at the executive mansion says White House historical association president Stuart mclaurin There have only been really 18 I believe official president and First Lady acknowledged wedding ceremonies to take place at The White House in all of its history He says the first wedding was Dolly Madison's sister in 1812 the last 2013 when the presidential photographer tied the knot I'm Julie Walker

President Biden Naomi Biden Peter Neal Hunter Biden White House White House Historical Associa Stuart Mclaurin Dolly Madison Julie Walker
Joe Madison Highlights the Parallels Between Trump and Hitler

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

02:31 min | 3 weeks ago

Joe Madison Highlights the Parallels Between Trump and Hitler

"The way you speak about certain issues, I just, you know, you're so one of a kind. You tweeted black men don't let the media or anyone else use you as a scapegoat vote. You just said get souls to the polls and mobilize because our democracy is on the ballot. I feel like that's been said so much. The people don't understand. It is literally the truth that our democracy is on the ballot, period. That's what this election is about. And who was that Clyburn? We played a clip today. Clyburn, who was a history teacher who was a historian. He said, look, I know that there is a comparison between what Hitler and the Nazis did in the 30s in Germany. There is there are parallels to this history, and he is absolutely 100% correct. Today's brown shirts are the oath keepers. The Proud Boys. And there is no question about it. Because the Brown church did what the black shirts did in Italy. Hitler admired Mussolini and the black shirts. He was a big fan. And then along comes the brown shirts. And what did they do? They beat up people. They went after Jewish people. They went after anybody who wasn't a potential or a Nazi. Yeah. And the set and the sad thing is, and one third, he got elected by just one third because most people didn't take Adolf Hitler and the Nazis seriously. And also, go ahead. Yeah, I'm sorry, Joel. Also, he got away with the coup. And this is what it is so critical that Donald Trump be prosecuted. I mean, people like if you read a history book, Hitler came back. I mean, and do we hear we hear November 14th? Trump's going to declare. To try to presumably stay out of prison. I mean, that's right. And by the way, you know, and I learned this from, again, from your group. I mean, you get some really good lawyers on and I learn and listen. So he can also use that campaign money. He is in that campaign money. Check with an attorney, but I think he's using that campaign. Money to defend himself.

Clyburn Hitler Brown Church Mussolini Germany Italy Adolf Hitler Donald Trump Joel
Joe Madison: Polls Don't Vote, People Do

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

02:08 min | 3 weeks ago

Joe Madison: Polls Don't Vote, People Do

"Got to meet president Obama. We just played him a second ago. You said America's first black president Sharon and I are blessed to be able to see this in our lifetime. Honestly, I never dreamed it would happen. Joe, I've said as a gay woman, I never dreamed marriage equality would happen in my lifetime. And so here we are today, right? We've made all of this progress, and it feels terrifying. The degree to which we could go back tomorrow, if we don't turn out and vote. That's what I said this morning on my show. I mean, I am losing sleep. I don't, I really don't know how it's going to how it's going to turn out, but I got to tell you, here's what I said today. So to get all the polling, I don't want to hear a poll I don't give a damn if it's the New York, I got to watch myself because I'm not just. See, I have a custard. You guys know I have a special. Yeah. No, we do not. Every time I say a curse word, our cousin, because black people cuss, they don't curse and they don't swear. So I put a dollar in my custard. Yeah. But I don't know. I mean, and I don't want to hear about a single poll. I don't want to see any major media network tell me today about any poll. You said it best on Twitter, Joe, you said polls don't vote, people do. People do. Right. I mean, forget it. I mean, every time, at least posters, they get paid, big money, and they're going to be pulling tomorrow in the reality is we don't know, but I don't know, but it's about turnout. There's got to be more decent people like you and Chris and my people and your listeners and mindless. Then there are these crazy people. I mean, how do you make fun? At a campaign rally, when an 82 year old man gets, you know, attack and bed at 2 o'clock in the morning.

President Obama JOE Sharon America New York Twitter Chris
The Ideology of Wilson and Obama

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:33 min | Last month

The Ideology of Wilson and Obama

"The ideological roots of the book is about, well, there's a lot of Hegel in history. There's a lot of Lincoln in the founders. There's a lot of Woodrow Wilson and finally someone is explained it. Now, Jonah Goldberg has tried a few times. Fine writer, under the shell, no he's a friend of yours. He's tried a few times in big books that only people like me read to explain where this came from. You went back and tried to do it again. Would you explain to people why you think it's important that they get what Wilson was and why it matters and why the framers Lincoln and Reagan are different from that. I think it's important to understand the ideological roots of the decline in American sea all around them. As I said, Barack Obama is the most ideological president since Wilson. Now Barack Obama's are careful though to mask his ideology. Sometimes he let the mask slip like for instance when he was attending Jeremiah Wright's church for all those years. Jeremiah, I remember the infamous pastor who said 9 11 was America's chickens coming home to roost is that God wouldn't bless America but rather damn America. This is not some passing relationship. I mean, Barack Obama saw down his church satin skews for years, even had him officiate his wedding, Michelle Obama. Or when Barack Obama said that America wasn't an exceptional nation. What he wanted to say, we're going to fundamentally transform America view. Now, I don't know about you, but I don't know many people who think that if you love something, you should want to fundamentally transform it. I can't imagine the fetching this Hewitt would take too well if you said honey, I love you, but I want to fundamentally transform you. With Obama, though, it's somewhat rare that that ideological slips. With Wilson, you see it out in the open. The first openly, the first president who was openly hostile and opposed to our Declaration of Independence and our constitution. He said they were outdated. They were obsolete. They belonged to a Newtonian age of checks and balances, not a Darwinian age of evolution. He said that the moral basis of our nation, the natural, equality of mankind, that none of us as Jefferson said are born with saddles on our backs to be written or spurs on our heels to ride. Was outdated as well. He had this conception of history with a capital H that it was evolving and therefore mankind could be thankful that we could have heaven on earth that we could achieve. Utopia. The founders knew that this was all nonsense. They understood as Madison said in the federalist papers that government is the greatest of all reflections on human nature. And our nature, nature is that we're falling creatures.

Barack Obama America Wilson Lincoln Jonah Goldberg Woodrow Wilson Jeremiah Wright Reagan Jeremiah Michelle Obama Hewitt Jefferson Spurs Madison
The latest in sports news

AP News Radio

01:59 min | Last month

The latest in sports news

"AP sports I'm Tom Miriam The defending NBA champions played the team with the best regular season record in the NBA last season It turned out to be no contest as the Phoenix Suns routed the Golden State Warriors one 34 one O 5 AP's George Tanner has the details Devin Booker led the way with 34 points and 7 assists Mikhail bridges and jock one Dale each had 17 Andre 8 and 16 sons scored 13 unanswered points in the third quarter to improve their record to three and one Steph Curry led the warriors with 21 And they had a bit of an edge out of that moment that nearly capitalized off of it Elsewhere in the NBA the thunder won their first game of the year over the clippers one O 8 94 The wizards topped the pistons one 2099 The pelicans etched the Mavericks one 13 one 11 despite not having Zion Williamson and Brandon Ingram Trey Murphy stepped in and stepped up with 22 points Guys are willing to step up and we got a lot of guys on our team a lot of depth So you know it just shows that we're teams resilient like I said last year is carrying over into this year NHL the avalanche edge the rangers three to two in a shootout and a gold standard duel The abs Alexander georgiev made 44 saves plus three more in the shootout and his first game back at Madison Square Garden after 5 years in New York It doesn't get much better than type shoot out where And the building the building is awesome I brought a lot of good memories The rangers Igor's historic and stopped 42 shots plus two in the shootout Also on the ISO record setting night for Phil kessel The golden knights forward set a new mark by playing his 990th consecutive game and marked the occasion by scoring his 400th career goal in a four two Vegas win against San Jose The Devils bedeviled the red wings 62 as desperate brought scored two goals Other NHL winners the bruins kings flames crack and coyotes wild and black hawks Baseball the Miami Marlins hired skip Schumacher as their new skipper replacing Don Mattingly who managed the Marlins the past 7 seasons Tom Arian AP sports

NBA Tom Miriam George Tanner Devin Booker Mikhail Bridges Steph Curry Zion Williamson Brandon Ingram Trey Murphy Golden State Warriors Phoenix Suns Alexander Georgiev AP Andre Pelicans Dale Clippers Rangers Warriors Mavericks
"madison." Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

04:04 min | Last month

"madison." Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"Of all of that. So do you think that being seen because he said that about your sister and about your husband? Is that really important? I mean, obviously it's really important. That's not what I meant. I actually meant, do you think that that is sort of extends into the part of the crux of why you do what you do? Is that notion of reflection and visibility? Maybe in a subconscious way it is. It's funny as a songwriter I've always said, I don't know if I have anything to say. And then sometimes that'll change where you're like, oh, I do actually. There's a song here. There's a statement that I want to make. But I go in and out of phases and feeling like I want to be seen in that way. In a public way and times where I really, really want to hide and that probably fluctuates with the level of hardship that comes with it. You know, it's like the more responsibility you have, the more you crave the denial of it. That's at least been my experience. But I think just in my personal life, yeah, being seen is the most important thing to me, even if that means someone is seeing the worst parts of me. I want them in on that. I want them to know that. That's really cool. I like that. Madison, thank you so much. It's been so great. I really appreciate your time and all your thoughts. Thank you so much. Thank you many this was just the honor of lifetime so thanks for having me. You're very, very welcome. You can find Madison's album revealer out now. Wherever you get your chance. And give the song life according to Rachel, the song she told us about today, the one about her grandmother, an extra spin. Many questions is hosted and written by me, Minnie Driver. Supervising producer, Aaron Kaufman, producer, Morgan lavoy, research assistant, Marissa Brown. Original music, Surrey baby, by many driver. Additional music by Aaron Kaufman. Executive produced by me, Minnie Driver. Special thanks to Jim nikolay. Will Pearson Addison O'Day. Lisa castella and a unique oppenheim at W KPR. De la pescado, Kate driver and Jason Weinberg and for constantly solicited tech support, Henry driver. Hey, it's mini driver. What if you had insights into your genetics that could help you live healthier? How would you use that knowledge to change your life? You can hear me talk with 23andMe CEO Anne wojcicki about how insights from our DNA can affect our health journeys and the new season of the podcast spit from iHeartRadio and 23andMe. This season host baratunde Thurston explores how DNA isn't just about ancestry. It's a key to understanding your health and the new season you'll hear me and 22 other podcasters and influencers discuss what genetics taught us about ourselves and how that knowledge can impact the way we live our lives. Listen to my episode out now on the iHeartRadio app or wherever you get your podcasts. When the world gets in the way of your music, try the new Bose quiet comfort earbuds too. Next gen earbuds uniquely tuned to the shape of your ears. They use exclusive Bose technology. The personalizes the audio performance to fit you. Delivering the world's best noise cancellation and powerfully immersive sound. So you can hear and feel every detail of the music you love. Bose quiet comfort earbuds two. Sound shape to you. To learn more, visit Bose dot com. With cheap Caribbean dot com, you can get more food, more drinks, and more fun. For less money on your all inclusive beach vacation. Like bottomless margaritas? Yes, and going snorkeling whenever I want. Yes, and moonlight dance parties. Yes. And loaded fajita nachos? Yes. And? All the daiquiris I can drink. You can say yes and to everything. When you take a next level beach vacation at Catalonia hotels and resorts in Mexico and the Caribbean, with cheap Caribbean dot com.

Aaron Kaufman Minnie Driver Morgan lavoy Marissa Brown Jim nikolay Pearson Addison Lisa castella De la pescado Jason Weinberg andMe Anne wojcicki Madison Rachel Surrey Thurston Kate Henry Caribbean Catalonia
Rodrigues, Georgiev lead Avalanche past Rangers, 3-2 in SO

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | Last month

Rodrigues, Georgiev lead Avalanche past Rangers, 3-2 in SO

"The Colorado avalanche won a goal tend to duel of ex teammates with a three two shootout win over the rangers Alexander Giorgio playing his first game back at Madison Square Garden made 44 saves plus three more in the shootout to beat Igor shish turkey to stop 42 shots along with another two in the shootout It doesn't get much better than type shoot out where And the building the building is awesome brought a lot of good memories But for me it was just playing the game and letting it come to you Kevin Rodriguez scored the decisive goal in round four of the shootout The avalanche twice had one goal leads and tallies by Valerie nachos and Logan O'Connor But the rangers answer with goals by Barclay goodrow and Adam Fox Tom Arian New York

Alexander Giorgio Igor Shish Colorado Avalanche Madison Square Garden Kevin Rodriguez Valerie Nachos Logan O'connor Avalanche Barclay Goodrow Rangers Adam Fox Tom Arian New York
"madison." Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

07:34 min | Last month

"madison." Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"Learn more, visit Bose dot com. CVS Health is here for women. We know that women's physical, mental, and sexual health matters. That's why we're offering new women's health services available 7 days a week. Here, period health matters. So we're reducing prices on CVS Health brand period products by 25% and core CVS Pharmacy locations, and our goal is to eliminate the tax on period products nationwide. Learn more at CVS dot com slash women. So what quality do you like least about yourself? Oh man. Probably how non confrontational I am. I run from it at every corner and I think there's this desire in me to be diplomatic and a peacemaker and that's a good quality, but the unhealth of it is when it's like avoiding things purely because they're hard and uncomfortable, not because they're bad if that makes sense. It's like some confrontation is necessary and good. And I hate to see the way that my non confrontational side will possibly hurt somebody. So I work, I work on that. I try to. I'm not good with the hard conversations. There's also this deep fear in myself that I have that I don't know how to articulate something well, especially when nervous. It's weird. I mean, I'm a songwriter. I deal with lyrics, love lyrics, but I have time to sort through that. But when I'm face to face with someone and there's conflict or something and I always feel this immense pressure that I don't have what it takes to actually solve it in that moment. I don't know where that comes from. I don't know if there's something in my childhood or I know my dad is very non confrontational and not to blame him for my own qualities, but you know it's like sometimes you inherit those traits from your parents. Yeah, you do. What's it called? It's called epigenetics. It's like the emotional stuff that you inherit. I didn't know that name. That's helpful. Yeah, yeah, blame dad. I said one time to a friend. I was like, how long can I blame my parents for things? And they're like, I don't know, maybe don't blame them for things. Just maybe take responsibility for as much as you can. And then it's like a really delicate balance. I know it is. I'm always asking my son. I'm like, is this damaging you? Is this damaging you? How about this? Is this damaging you? What about this? Wait, hold on. Let me just stop crying. Is this damaging you? The poor kid, like, honestly, I've just like, listen, I will be able to recommend you a good therapist. I think our parents do. They gave us all these things that are wonderful and all these things that are terrible, because that's also the gift, I guess. Yeah, right? I guess so, I mean, the gift of being able to question yourself and everything you know. I love that gift. But that must be hard as a parent and turn to then to go, I know there's going to be a point in time where I'm going to hurt you. Is that now? Yeah. Like have I done it yet? You know that must be like you're holding your breath. Exactly. And unfortunately, it's unavoidable. Like you are going to do that. And again, it does seem to come around to self awareness that as with anything, the minute one can identify that you've done something that is difficult for another person to metabolize, calling it out and saying, I know I did this and I'm really sorry or I did this and it's because of this or whatever it is. I do think that kind of mitigation helps. Interesting that you're a songwriter and that you I mean, I think it's really cool. I wonder if that's just like in addition to being rarely creative, that's also a way of being able to work through that and deal with it and go, no, you know, I'm going to I can write about it and I can articulate it. I can articulate it actually really, really well. And put it to music. Right. Well, yeah, I guess those fears are always at the beginning of writing songs too. Yeah. I always have this hesitation or this worry that I'm going to forget how to do it or not going to be able to do it in a way that will mean anything to anyone or that anyone could understand, you know? Because I think I love ambiguity. I find it very sexy. I love people who are very mysterious. And there's the part of me that just wants that to be what my music is. And then there's another half of me that's like, but I really want to be understood. Yeah. Like I want people to know where I'm coming from and to get the picture of me so they can hear me when I speak, you know, it's a funny balance. That's so funny. I always really wanted to be mysterious, but nah, that ship sailed. I think that's a whole other lifetime. But I know exactly what you mean about. I think it's really good to be able to articulate stuff. I think that also speaks to the creative process with everything. Anyone who's creative, like the minute you, when you're beginning something, you just have absolutely no idea how you're going to do it again. How are you going to do this? How is it going to happen? How has this song going to be written this book going to be written this play movie TV show be made? It's mysterious. That is mysterious. Yeah, 100% the actual art of songwriting wolf forever be mysterious. It's like it's unattainable. If we all knew where it began and where it ended, we would just stay in those places, but we don't. Exactly. It's constantly moving. So what relationship real or fictionalised defines love for you? I feel like the people in my life who have defined love for me are the ones who have loved me through every phase of my life and liked me even. And I would say my sister, I'm the oldest of 5 girls. Yeah, I know. It's sometimes I don't realize how crazy that is until I see a picture of all 5 of us together. And I'm like, this is a lot of kids. My younger sister and I, we've always been inseparable since I saw her when I was two years old and she was just born. We always have had a bond and she just one of those people where it's like, I always kind of test her and bring things that I think this is too ugly for anyone to hear. I'm just going to tell you, and she never bats an eye. She's always just like, oh yeah, I have those same thoughts and I feel like she has shown me love in ways that so many of my friendships and people that I've leaned on have failed to. And maybe it's a blood related thing, but I don't know. She's just kind of one of those people for me that I lean on and know that I'll be seen by kind of no matter what. My husband is also that person for me he this is such a rare thing and not everybody's story but I've known him since I was 13. We met then and you know it was never romantic. We were always just really, really good friends and he was always one of those people for me that I thought it doesn't get better than Austin as far as character goes. He's the coolest person I know or the best person I know. I don't know if I thought he was the coolest at the time. That became apparently later. He just was kind of one of those people that was just sort of a lynchpin in my life, someone who just saw me from age 13 to now, which is a long span of time and how many turns a person can sort of take. We ended up dating when he was a junior in college. I was a couple years younger than him. I didn't go to college, but I moved to LA and decided to pursue music and the endeavor of that was so much more intense than I expected. And it's definitely tested me in so many ways as a person for better and for worse. And I think he's kind of been there and seen all of it, but still has just been there to kind of scoop me up to hold me kind of at the end of the day and has never hit his love hasn't wavered in the midst

CVS CVS Pharmacy Austin LA
"madison." Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

12:29 min | Last month

"madison." Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"So uncomplicated for a second. You're like, oh, all that matters right now is just like the way the water feels and catching this wave or whatever, you know, it's like I don't sadly go to those moments often enough or I don't make space for them because there's just so much day to day my friend calls them techno realities, which are just these little things that you get lost in that sometimes cause you to forget what's important and what you love about your life. It's so weird because I was just having this conversation with my boyfriend the other day. I was like, what is this chasm between? The self awareness of things that will make our lives better and the actual doing of them. Yeah. You know how that feels. I know how that feels. And yet actually going and seeking it out is almost like we slump into that techno reality or we slump into it going, wow, this is just life. This is just what it is. I've got to sit in front of my computer for 5 hours and answer emails or do this thing. I think we've got to fight harder to carve out that other space because I know we know that's where the creativity and the freedom comes from. Well, and the people that I think who display that the most are like in sort of business terms are always deemed as flaky or just like non responsive, but they're actually the most tapped in. And that's not the case for every flaky person quote unquote, but those creatives that don't answer emails or don't. It's like, I know that there's somewhere creating or they're on a walk or they're doing the things that matter and it's like, who cares about the rest? I know emails matter. Like if I didn't answer my email, this wouldn't have happened today. So that's important to me. But also, it's just like, I think you're right, instinctively, we know where to return to, but we don't. It's always like last resort or something. Yeah, I think, again, it is just like insisting on drawing the lines of engagement with life. You know, I've gone, okay, well, it's going to be this for this amount of time. But I'm just talking from my I suppose from my own perspective, which is one gets lazy and then you don't realize that you've sort of been bludgeoned by all of the social contracts and all of the stuff. But it doesn't really take much. That's what's great. I can just walk up to the park from where I live in London, and that's where my mother used to say, that's where the city breathes. And it's true. Like you go there and these ancient trees and it's pretty wonderful. But you have to go do it, right? You have to do it. No one is going to tell you that you need that break except for yourself. I've learned that a lot where it's like, you know, if it weren't for me at times, putting my foot down, I don't think anyone would tell me, hey, you should stop. Or you should take a break. There's a machine that's running. And no one really wants to shut it down. Yeah. Particularly if you're generating income for them. I've also found that it's like, you know, I was like, yeah, no, you're right. I got to do that too. Yeah, I mean, it's also attached to morals too, where I'm like, oh my God, all these people are relying on me. I would do anyone wrong that way. And then it's like, there is a certain point of honesty that you reach where you're like, but the way that I feel now isn't helping anyone really, you know, like I have to have to succumb to something. In your life, can you tell me about something that has grown out of a personal disaster? This is another one of those questions that I thought about for a couple days. I did my research and I went and listened to this podcast beforehand and that one got me because I thought I'm 25 at the moment and there's the potential that some of my worst personal disasters are ahead of me. Oh, you're so not wrong. Which is like dark, that's great. It's really true. You can confirm you're coming at me from 25 years literally at 25 years old of the year. Oh my God, no, it's going to be great. It's going to be great because shit's going to grow out of it. Unfortunately, this is the gift that keeps on giving. Stop having personal disasters. You start keeping a tally. It's a relief to me in a certain way though, because the more that I've talked to people who are older than me or have just lived more life, the idea of like, oh, it just kind of stays hard. It makes me feel like there's nothing more that I should be doing to make it easier. It's like, oh, okay, good. This isn't on me. This is just life coming at me. But I would say the most recent thing that I can name, it was the experience of making the album that just came out on September 9th. It was so deeply difficult for me. I think because I just felt so disconnected from myself and from the process I just was like paralyzed. I think from pressure. And again, so much of it, I think, was I was responsible for so much of the pressure was I was putting on myself unduly. But from my label and from management too, it was just like this has to be really remarkable work. Otherwise, who knows in this fragile place that the industry was in and it's like the one time that I felt like everybody who was on the inside couldn't speak for how it would look or what it would be, all they could say was it just has to be amazing. And again, that's not me faulting anyone. I was also making this writing this in 2020. So it was already a disaster. Yeah, I think that was the scariest thing to me. I felt like I was like a little foosball on a foos table that like anything that anyone said could have just shot me in the other direction. So I felt like my compass was gone. So the whole time, to me, that felt like a disaster and trying to make music from that place. I rerecorded songs so many times because it just didn't feel right. I just felt like I was reaching all that to say as that was kind of happening. My grandma died who I was really close to. And you know, grief tends to do that thing, which I learned because that was the first person who I was ever close to that I lost. Grief says this thing that gives you this hyper clarity. Even if it's just for a short time where you're like, oh, literally only these two things matter. That's all I can give importance to. And for me, it was like family and love. And loving people well. And that was it. And music being out of the equation there just was a relief for a minute, 'cause I was like, I've been putting so much pressure on this and on myself and it's turned into this thing that I'm so afraid to look at in the eye. And what was so beautiful about that is there was a song that I wrote about her. It's called life according to Rachel that came out of that and it felt like that sort of purity of thought love and family sort of came through the music and what was so cool about it is I released it thinking this is such a specific song about my grandmother and losing her like I think it's just gonna be for me. And so many people have been able to attach their story and their life through that song, which has just been like so overwhelming and mind-blowing to me. And again, it's like one of those things that I think it was really just because there was like no ego around a song like that. There was no room to try and be impressive in the music. It was just like confessional. It talks about the guilt that you feel when you lose someone that you didn't do enough or all those things that you deal with. So yeah, I think and obviously the record is finished. And I'm proud of it, but that was one of those moments where I was like, how do I avoid going through that again? In my life, even though I see such good that came out of it. But you know, sometimes you come across these situations where you're like, there is literally nowhere around this, but through. And so you just kind of strap in and hope for the best. That's so amazing. And I'm so glad that I'm not glad you lost your grandmother, but to experience the clarity and the clarifying nature of grief is it's an extraordinary privilege and it is a really beautiful strange moment in a person's life. And to be able to be creative, to be able to use that and harness that, because that really, to me, is what that is. It's harnessing that energy and turning it into something else. But I'll tell you something that my dad said to me when I was heartbroken over this guy that I loved so much and really I mean I'm actually must have been your age and I thought that I was going to marry him and I loved him and he just broken up with me and I'd set up all night and I didn't smoking cigarettes and drinking coffee and I was sitting outside our House and my dad was going through this phase of I think I've told this story before but I'm going to tell that again because it's pertinent. And my dad went through this phase where he would go out jogging in the morning and it lasted for like three weeks, but it was during this time. He came out with his towel around his neck and he was sort of jogging and he had his towel headband on. Can he was like, he was like, oh, have you been up all night? And I was like, yeah, I'm so unhappy. I'm so sad. Everyday all day, just crying and smoking and drinking coffee. And he was like, over a chap, is it? And I was like, yes, the love of my life. And my dad was like, do you want me to tell you something that you're not going to want to hear? I was like, well, I mean, not really, but okay. And he was like, you're going to feel this way about someone else. I will say to you, Madison. You are going to feel this way about other records. However, you will also feel that it's easy and beautiful and simple in the way that maybe you love your husband. You have that relationship. Yeah. It's all of it, and it will be all of it if we're lucky, hundreds of times over. But I understand the brutality of being in that moment where it's just so painful. And the process has just been really, really difficult. And even though you're proud of the thing that comes out at the end, it's gnarly. And they'll be that experience again. I'm sure. I hope you're going to write so many more records and I'm sure have it for maybe other different reasons. You know, you'll have kids running around and you won't be able to fucking focus and it'll be like, I'm losing my mind and I've got to finish this record. Yeah, yeah. Totally, this goes back again to what we said at the beginning. It's like, you know, no sing when it's hard and taking steps to kind of alleviate that and sometimes you can't and you just have to go through it being hard. Someone said to me, during that time and a similar thing that your dad said, but she kind of was like, you know, the beauty of this is she was just gonna get harder. And I was like, I don't see beauty in that. But she was saying the reality is and where you can find beauty also is that you're going to lose more people that you love. This is the beginning, but it's also the beginning of more clarity and love in your life. And that can feel morbid, like a morbid idea, but grief is such a human thing. It's such a human idea. And it's things that we don't love to talk about. But I find it so important whether that be grieving the loss of a relationship or like actually losing someone, they all have a place, and it's sadly inevitable. I guess sometimes I'm like, there's no romantic way to really view this. It's just sad. That's it. Yeah. But that's also okay. Yeah, it's also okay, exactly. Sometimes it is, it is just sad. And it is just hard. And that's okay. And we get through it. You get back to the glacier and the inner tube. Yes. Hey, it's mini driver. What if you had insights into your genetics that could help you live healthier? How would you use that knowledge to change your life? You can hear me talk with 23andMe CEO Anne wojcicki about how insights from our DNA can affect our health journeys and the new season of the podcast spit from iHeartRadio and 23andMe. This season host baratunde Thurston explores how more and more people are finding out that DNA is more than ancestry. It's a key to understanding your health, your genetic profile can tell you if you are at an increased likelihood for developing a particular condition. Its knowledge that can help you make smarter choices about your health and your lifestyle and the new season you'll hear me and 22 other podcasters and influencers discuss what genetics taught us about ourselves and how that knowledge can impact the way we live our lives. Listen to my episode out now on the iHeartRadio app or wherever you get your podcasts. When the world gets in the way of your music, try the new Bose quiet comfort earbuds too. Next gen earbuds uniquely tuned to the shape of your ears. They use exclusive Bose technology that personalizes the audio performance to fit you. Delivering the world's best noise cancellation and powerfully immersive sound. So you can hear and feel every detail of the music you love. Bose quiet comfort earbuds two. Sound shape to you. To

London Rachel Madison andMe Anne wojcicki Thurston
"madison." Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

04:24 min | Last month

"madison." Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"More. I

"madison." Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

07:59 min | Last month

"madison." Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"With, but I would like to know. Yeah, I would too. I would too. I mean, I think it's really tricky, because when you're a kid and you ask questions like, regardless of whether one came from a spiritual household or not, you ask questions and I know as a parent, you endeavor to answer that question, no matter what it is. You try and find an answer. Yeah. I'm so aware of how little I've gone. I don't know. I felt like it was such a cop out and wanted to offer something up. I think it's really interesting that kids in a way have to shed the certainty of their parents answers. Yeah. And maybe those questions go back to being questions. And you don't have an answer to them. Totally. It's such a funny thing. Things I thought I was sure about. I realized it was just my parents gave me that answer because they were my parents. I feel like all of these big questions happened late at night. It's like dark outside and things start to feel a little bit scarier and you ask these questions that are going to be in your head or in your dreams or whatever to your parents. And I'm like, how much of it was them putting on a brave face and filling the silence and wanting to be a pillar for me and say, yeah, this is the answer to this. Probably 90%, you know? Yeah. Being an adult now and knowing how much I say, I don't know. That was also their way of loving me. They wanted to give an answer to help me probably just be able to rest my head. Go to bed, fall asleep, a 100%. When you see a little child's face going, what happens when you die? Like you really, you know, I've leaned pretty hard into clouds and heaven. I'm not gonna lie. I did a lot of that. Faced with this little face staring up from the dinosaur duvet. Oh my God. What happens when you die? Mom? Oh, darling. Oh, it's lovely. Don't worry, it's so lovely. You know, and he never questioned me. And then like, obviously, now we have these conversations. It's interesting, but I want to know that too. It also feel like maybe there's a reason that we just don't. Yeah. Because life wouldn't resonate in the way that it did if we were like, well, it'll be fine. I don't give a fuck, it's fine. There are so many people that I grew up with who act like that because of this certitude and what they think and know to be true. Where it's like, well, there is a heaven and that the afterlife is where it's at and that don't sweat it in this life. If it's not going your way. Yeah. The way that they treat people as a result of that, it's like, to me, or the earth, or whatever it is, it's like, how is this okay to you? Seeing that observing that, that started to just make me kind of like question, you know, it's like we are existing now. Why are we pretending like we understand that it's going to be taken care of later or that we shouldn't be thoughtful about these issues that are happening now or that we shouldn't be attentive to our neighbors or whatever. It's like, I just felt like such an oxymoron to me to claim to be a Christian and to then move through the world that way. But you know that's a whole other conversation, but I feel now like in my life when the words I don't know come out of my mouth, I feel a sense of relief. It's like releasing this pressure that I have to maybe feel like I need the answers for everything and to just be like, actually that's not for me to decide. It's not for me to say. And that's okay. Yeah, it's liberating. Do you find that with songwriting? I found that a little bit where if I was stuck and I genuinely didn't know what that verse was or what that chorus or what it was supposed to be doing. I would say out loud. I don't know. And then I would go and do something else. And it was invariably not necessarily always, but I would say about 90% of the time, in doing that other thing, whether it was going for a walk going for a surf, going to the supermarket, that the idea or the length, the bridge would come or the idea of the lyric. I think there's massive freedom and I don't know. It's the key maybe. And there's sometimes answers. You can't guarantee that, but in the action of saying I don't know and then going for a surf, we're going on a walk. Some of those say they're like as simple as lyrical questions, sort themselves out, where you're like, oh, that's the end of the verse. All of my favorite writers have such strict regiments. They don't only prioritize writing they prioritize not writing as well. And that's them as a part of it, you know? Yeah. That's brilliant. And that is so true. And I think even with writing anything, or maybe even with challenges, as a whole, the idea of leave it alone, like step away from that and allow the sort of now of discovery as opposed to staying in the certainty of I don't know. I think it can actually be incredibly liberating. That's really interesting. It's in the other stuff. The creativity is in the other stuff as well as the sitting there with the guitar or at the piano. Exactly yet, to use an audio example, it's like some of the biggest sounds are made from the lightest touch. You can use that in writing. It's like, we want to put our heavy hand on it because we want product. We want things to be finished and instant when it's like sometimes we just have to lighten up on our touch of the song and let it just grow. I feel like songs are like living things that if you give it the right amount of water and sunlight and attention, they will they will grow. And I was writing over the pandemic with Gary lightbody who's a really old friend of mine and a beautiful songwriter. And we were sending each other so he literally did he just sit there with a guitar and he figured something out. Then he sent it to me and then I play it and then I changed some of the lyrics and I'd send it back to him but it's like each time and then maybe we'd have like voice notes in between where he'd be like, I don't know about that what did you mean by that lyric? Like what did she mean about that linking us back into the thing? And it was so funny being in his I don't know. And then like playing around in that and then vice versa, it was so beautiful because that it was an exchange of I don't know what this is. Or I think it might be this but I'm not attached to it. So you can change it and we wrote like that and there's something really cool about that because it doesn't have to be anything in your right. It does create itself. It's the statue inside the block of marble that Michelangelo idea. It reveals itself. You just sort of chip away. Yeah, I mean, it sounds like also in the exercise what's so beautiful about that when you're riding with someone else is like, you can't afford to be too precious or egotistical about when your ideas are questioned. It's really actually just a question of wanting to understand. It's not like someone put it once where it was like, I try not to take criticism personally because it's not me that they're criticizing. It's just an idea. Which is like, we don't do a good job or at least I don't of separating myself from an idea because if someone doesn't like it, and I'm like, then I can't produce anything else. I'm the problem and it's like, that's not true. You're just the conduit for an idea and don't let yourself become too entangled with it. But I think what's so beautiful about that exercise is like you guys were allowing yourself to ask, like, I don't know what this means and you could either be like, oh, it means this or you could return it with it. I don't know, but it's malleable. Yeah, also practicing having that thrown at you, like, I don't like that. And it's your idea. And you have to go, well, that doesn't feel nice. Okay. And then you have to go through that process of going, well, so what if that were true? So now if I look at this song or this piece of writing from the point of view of this person that I love and value, they don't like this thing. Okay, so what is that? And then going and examining it and going, oh, maybe I was just attached to it because it was the only idea that I had and I wanted to send him something back to show that I can do this at the same level as you, which is ridiculous because he's been writing songs and many more songs than I ever have. It was interesting like interrogating the ego of someone I respect doesn't like my idea. And then you couldn't take it personally because they weren't there. You just have to kind of figure it out and write another idea. And then go, okay, well, that also works and is maybe beautiful. Totally. I think it's cool writing in lots of different ways. And it also creates an opportunity for you to respond in two different ways, either you are offended by it, and you shut down and then no ideas come, or you allow it to be this moment of faith where you're like, oh, I can do

Gary lightbody Michelangelo
"madison." Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

07:07 min | Last month

"madison." Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"Of hi-c? Hello, I'm Minnie Driver. Welcome to the mini questions season two. I've always loved priests questionnaire. It was originally a 19th century parlor game where players would ask each other 35 questions aimed at revealing the other players true nature. It's just a scientific method really in masking different people the same set of questions. You can make observations about which truths appear to be universal. I love this discipline. And it made me wonder, what if these questions were just the jumping off point? What greater depths would be revealed if I asked these questions as conversation starters with thought leaders and trailblazers across all these different disciplines. So I adapted Proust questionnaire and I wrote my own 7 questions that I personally think are pertinent to a person's story. They are. When and where were you happiest? What is the quality you like least about yourself? What relationship real or fictionalized to find love for you? What question would you most like answered? What person place or experience has shaped you the most? What would be your last meal? And can you tell me something in your life that's grown out of a personal disaster? And I've gathered a group of really remarkable people, ones that I am honored and humbled to have had the chance to engage with. You may not hear their answers to all 7 of these questions. We've whittled it down to which questions felt closest to their experience or the most surprising or created the most fertile ground to connect. My guest today is musician and songwriter Madison Cunningham. At 25, she is one of the youngest guests I've had on my show. But you wouldn't know it from the wisdom and sort of old soulless that radiates not only through the lyrics she writes, but also in the way she speaks. And whether she's performing solo or sharing the stage with some of folk music's biggest names, Madison's musical talents are really not to be missed. I love hearing a songwriter describe the world in their own words. And it was delightful hearing Madison's perspective on my questions. I really hope you enjoy our lovely conversation. What person place or experience most altered your life? I would say music has been the thing. I think touring the country and the world was the thing that very much challenged my worldview and my line of thinking because I was immediately met with or I should say my opinions were met with experiences. And that changes everything. You can have thoughts about the way you think life should be or the way you've known it to be, but then when you actually experience life and open yourself up to other people's experiences, your opinions on things drastically change. And I remember the first tour I ever did, I was opening for Chris thee, and the punch brothers, and we both had a really similar background, like both grew up in the church. We were both homeschooled the whole way through and I don't know many people who had a similar story like that. We just were talking on the bus and I just was asking questions and I just will never forget one thing that he said to me. He's like, you're 21 now and I was like, yeah, and he was like, yeah, things are going to change for you. And he wasn't arrogant or like condescending or anything. It just was like, he was coming from a place of sincerely sympathizing with me and going or empathizing maybe and being like, I know exactly what you're saying. And I understand it completely, and why you're asking these things, but also it's going to change for you. I just know it. And he was right. And I don't even remember exactly what I asked him, but I remember the place that it was coming from. And I was very just fearful. I just, I just was nervous and scared and I felt I was experiencing impostor syndrome too. So I always say the music in a way saved my life and I think made me the person that I am because it just immediately challenged me and caused me to open my eyes and touch the world in a different way. Did you write different music before music became your I don't want to use the word escape, but maybe your evolution out of that first part of your life. Did you write music while you were still within it and then did you write your way out of it? Yes, and yes. And what was that music like? Do you have recordings of it? What was it like? I feel like I'm still very much that person I always had a curiosity of breaking musical rules. I really, really enjoyed that and just had a curiosity around that. But in terms of writing, my lyrics were very stale and they didn't show anything. They just told everything. I have a bit of embarrassment around that phase of writing that. There was a whole record that I did that had all of the songs on it, which is since been taken down. And again, musically I'm very proud of that record, but thematically and lyrically I just felt that I was showing my age. I think I wrote my way out of it. I had a friend who had sent me a book. Have you ever read the book writing better lyrics by pat Pattinson? No. God I want to read it. Yeah, you should, it's within the first three chapters you get his point and that's just enough to change you into inspire you and the rest of the book's great too, but he goes on this whole tangent about object writing and sort of how to write from your senses. And that really teaches you how to write and metaphor and to incorporate imagery and that phase, I was probably 18 when I read that book and I just remember that my writing started to take a turn because I would think about those exercises and his whole thing is like you write on an object using your senses, you write every day, but it can only be for ten minutes. So when the timer goes off, you have to be done. It doesn't matter if your thought was finished or not. And it's all about teaching the brain to dive deeper in a shorter amount of time. So just when I did that and kind of went full force with that exercise, I really feel like that's when I started to write songs that I was proud of and could get behind now. How great, that's really cool. I want to check that book out. It's incredible. From the first page or just reading the way that a writer writes. It's so inspiring. I think you totally dig it. What question would you most like answered? I think this is really on the nose, but I would love to know if there was an afterlife or not. I don't know if everybody feels that way. But for me, it's like that would maybe help things in terms of the way that we grieve. It's like, will we see that person again? I don't know. Did you have a spiritual upbringing? I totally did. I did. Yeah, and so much of my young adult life has been shedding all of that. But also coming back to it in different ways that I can't sort of help. I guess that question was planted in me as a kid, but there was always an answer for it. There's always like, yes, there is. There is the hope of that. And now I still have that question, but don't feel like I have an answer. And there's a mystery to that. There's a mystery that I've become totally comfortable

Madison Cunningham Minnie Driver Madison pat Pattinson Chris
"madison." Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

02:02 min | Last month

"madison." Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"Feeling a little foggy in the mornings, a little more forgetful. That's junk sleep. Those tossing, turning, unrestful nights from sleeping on a mattress, that's not right for you. So let the highly trained sleep experts at mattress firm help you find the perfect mattress. They'll use mattress matcher technology to connect you with the ideal sleep products, and just like that, no more junk sleep. Talk to a mattress firm sleep expert and un junk your sleep today. Visit a mattress firm store near you, or go to mattress firm dot com. When the world gets in the way of your music, try the new Bose quiet comfort earbuds too. Next gen earbuds uniquely tuned to the shape of your ears. They use exclusive Bose technology that personalizes the audio performance to fit you. Delivering the world's best noise cancellation and powerfully immersive sound, so you can hear and feel every detail of the music you love. Bose quiet comfort earbuds two. Sound shape to you. To learn more, visit Bose dot com. The thrill of forging your own path is powerful. Nissan is bringing that thrill to our community in collaboration with the black effect podcast network to create the thrill

Steve Deace: Dr. Fauci Knew Vaccines Take Years to Perfect

The Dan Bongino Show

01:38 min | 2 months ago

Steve Deace: Dr. Fauci Knew Vaccines Take Years to Perfect

"In the early days of lockdown Fauci didn't interview with Mark Zuckerberg and Zuckerberg said hey how fast can we get a vaccine How fast can we get one out here And Fauci went into some of the history of failed vaccine efforts So the HIV vaccine attempts and other things they did that actually there's two kinds of vaccines perfect and leaky And the perfect vaccine is the one that inoculates you That's the dozen or so vaccine cocktail They do and I got what we were kids to go to public school all right Yeah You wouldn't get this stuff if you got these shots right So you wouldn't spread it to other people What Fauci warned of was a leaky vaccine And if you get a leaky vaccine meaning that it is something that for a while may treat may or may not treat a serious symptomology but it won't stop the spread then eventually what ends up happening is it produces inferior antibodies inside your body and so it appears that the vaccine or the virus is getting stronger really it's your immune system is weaker It's not that the virus is stronger It's just the virus is now Adam Sandler in Billy Madison or where he is dunking on fourth graders The antibody produces is weaker And that's what Fauci warned him about And he said does Zuckerberg that's why it takes years to put one of these vaccines out because we have to test to make sure that it is a perfect vaccine that it stops the spread that it doesn't just bind the virus but it blocks it And that's not what they did here And that's where you get into things like antibody dependent enhancement where the more you jab the more effect

Fauci Zuckerberg Mark Zuckerberg HIV Billy Madison Adam Sandler
The Disturbing New Theme of Democrats Refusing to Debate

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:35 min | 2 months ago

The Disturbing New Theme of Democrats Refusing to Debate

"This disturbing theme we've been hitting it and I don't even have an exhaustive list here of Democrats that are refusing to debate their Republican counterparts, carry Lake with Katie Hobbs, Shapiro of mastriano, fetterman with Oz, he won't debate until a later date, zeldin with hoku, the new model of quote unquote, democracy is so oligarchic. And Madison warned about this in the federalist papers because every time democracy is actually mentioned in the federalist that's actually mentioned negatively, the word democracy does not show up in the Declaration of Independence, doesn't show up in the constitution. It does a couple mentions in the federalist papers, but only negatively, not positively. And this kind of new model of democracy, if you will, or this kind of new blueprint is answer zero adversarial questions, do a bunch of fundraisers from a bunch of very wealthy, woke, white, miserable people with more money than anything, but very little joy and happiness. A lot of them live in Silicon Valley, live in Seattle. They live in Portland, they live in D.C., they live in Boston, they live in New York, very wealthy, high paying tech jobs, unfulfilled lives, and then these candidates just kind of hide at home and they don't debate. It's deeply disturbing. It is unsustainable. If you have an entire American political party that basically says we don't do debates anymore. I don't care what your position is. That is an oligarchy.

Katie Hobbs Mastriano Fetterman Zeldin Hoku Shapiro OZ Madison Silicon Valley Seattle Portland D.C. Boston American Political Party New York
Swanson, Olson homer again; Braves sweep Mets for tiebreaker

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 2 months ago

Swanson, Olson homer again; Braves sweep Mets for tiebreaker

"The Atlanta Braves completed a three game sweep at the New York mets with a 5 to three win moving them two games ahead of the mets in the NL east with three left to play The braves scratched out three runs in the third but again the home run played a major role for Atlanta as dansby Swanson and Madison belted solo shots for Swanson it was number 25 His last three days you know the bullpen was fantastic I felt like we played pretty darn good defense Had some bigot bats when we needed them And you know just played winning baseball Brave starter Charlie Martin gave up all three mets runs Gary mckillop's Atlanta

Atlanta Braves Mets Dansby Swanson NL Swanson Atlanta Madison Charlie Martin Baseball Gary Mckillop
Unfinished business: Biden sharpens his attacks on Trumpism

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 3 months ago

Unfinished business: Biden sharpens his attacks on Trumpism

"President Biden delivers a speech in Philadelphia Thursday in the continued push against trumpism The president earlier told supporters of former president Donald Trump don't say they support law enforcement if they can't condemn what happened at the capitol last year For God's sake whose side are you on Press secretary karine John Pierre says the title of the speech will be the soul of the nation The way that he sees as the maga Republicans are the most energized part of the Republican Party that extreme this is an extreme threat to our democracy to our freedom to our rights She quoted North Carolina congressman Madison Cawthorn who said if elections continue to be rigged and stolen Then it's going to lead to one place and that's bloodshed John Pierre says the extreme threat is not stopping It's continuing They just don't respect the rule of law Ed Donahue Washington

President Biden Press Secretary Karine John Pi Donald Trump Philadelphia Madison Cawthorn Republican Party John Pierre North Carolina Ed Donahue Washington
The Things You Are Paying for at Colleges

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

02:00 min | 3 months ago

The Things You Are Paying for at Colleges

"Should we have to pay for the gender studies majors and the goat yoga people? Is that a thing? It's a thing. Google it. It's a thing. There are some schools that are actually advertising infinity pools. You say, what is an infinity pool? Those are rooftop pools that make it look like you're going to swim over the edge. Which is a little bit. These are you would expect that at some sort of a high end posture resort, not the local university or college. But this is what they're doing. They're squandering our tax money. Who needs to go on a vacation when you can just go to college? Yes. Just do the actual campus that is. No, exactly. I mean, when you look at all the buildings going up, we're paying for all of that stuff. That's true. Michigan technical Michigan technological university. They have a campus on campus, ski resort. A 112 acres of ski friendly terrain. Pomona college. They have an annual ski beach day. They actually have buses that take the college kids to the beach and a mountain resort for fun in the snow and the ocean. Oh, that sounds like a lovely day. Boston University looks some of these schools are private, I get it. Boston University, 26 story glass dorm, a condo with private bathrooms, walk in closets, and you get your own complimentary flat screen TV. Pretty snazzy. The university of Missouri. You guys have a lazy river that runs through campus. There's also a sauna and Whirlpool, hot tubs, and an on campus beach club. There's also a racquetball court and various other full courts where endless games. This is unbelievable stuff here. The university of Wisconsin in Madison. The student union has a bowling alley, art gallery climbing wall, billiard hall,

University Or College Michigan Technical Michigan Te Ski Beach Boston University Pomona College Google University Of Missouri Whirlpool University Of Wisconsin Madison Bowling Billiard Hall
Pujols blasts two more HRs, Cardinals beat Diamondbacks 16-7

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 3 months ago

Pujols blasts two more HRs, Cardinals beat Diamondbacks 16-7

"Albert Pujols hit a pair of home runs to set the tone in the Cardinals 16 7 thumping of the Diamondbacks Pujols went deep in the second and fourth off Madison Bumgarner helping the Cardinals win their 6th in a row and 15th and 18 games He's HI of 700 home runs Paul the young launched a Grand Slam and Paul Goldschmidt collected three hits and four RBIs Goldschmidt's back to three run Homer while St. Louis scored 8 times in the 9th The Cardinals stretched their lead in the NL central to 5 games over Milwaukee I'm Dave ferry

Cardinals Albert Pujols Madison Bumgarner Diamondbacks Pujols Paul Goldschmidt Goldschmidt Paul Homer St. Louis NL Milwaukee Dave Ferry
Virginia Governor Glenn Youngkin on School Choice

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:19 min | 3 months ago

Virginia Governor Glenn Youngkin on School Choice

"Now, governor, when we run into people worried about choice, they say you're going to leave the poor kids behind. When you talked about it, the audience I was interviewing, it's the opposite. You want to empower parents of straightened circumstances to get the education they want and the opportunity for their kids. And that really begins with curriculum reform. And it really we got to get ideology out of elementary schools at least and probably house girls as well. We absolutely do have to focus on curriculum reform lesson. Just this past week, the history curriculum for Virginia had made its way up through a committee that had been controlled by my predecessors appointments. They put forth the history curriculum. They wanted to remove the title of father of our country from George Washington and father of the constitution from James Madison. And I just said, no way. And we went back and delayed things. They're going to go do more work here. We should tell all of our history. The good and the bad. But goodness gracious, we shouldn't denigrate our founding fathers for the great work they did and starting the greatest country on the planet. So there is still huge work to do on curriculum. We need to teach critical math, critical history, critical science, and most importantly, we have to have high expectations for our kids. There's

James Madison George Washington Virginia
Kleefisch downplays Trump endorsement on final swing

AP News Radio

01:02 min | 4 months ago

Kleefisch downplays Trump endorsement on final swing

"Donald Trump reasserts his grip on Republicans in the key swing state of Wisconsin where his candidate for governor Tim Michaels won the primary Michael is a wealthy businessman who owns a construction company beat the former lieutenant governor who was endorsed by Mike Pence and state Republican leaders at his victory party last night He thanked Trump It was a tremendous validation of our meteoric rise in this campaign He knows that we need to have new leadership in Madison Audio courtesy WK OW during her concession speech Rebecca clayfish urged supporters to stay in the fight The fight now is truly against Tony Evers And the liberals who wants to take away our way of life Michael's face is Evers in the general election as much as Trump's influence in the primary was clear some Republicans fear his involvement could hurt GOP candidates in November including the state's Republican senator considered the most vulnerable up for reelection I'm Julie Walker

Tim Michaels Donald Trump Mike Pence Rebecca Clayfish Tony Evers Michael Wisconsin Madison Evers GOP Julie Walker
'I didn't really learn anything': COVID grads face college

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 4 months ago

'I didn't really learn anything': COVID grads face college

"High school graduates are headed to college and still dealing with the learning disruptions of a pandemic They were sophomores in high school when the pandemic hit now young adults worry that upheaval and long stretches of remote learning have left them unprepared for college level work Angel hope is taking the summer bridge program at the university of Wisconsin at Madison I was more of going to online school to pass not really to learn He graduated near the top of his high school class and yet I think if I didn't take this program and I went straight into the fall I would be moderately unprepared Alison Wagner with the scholarship program all in Milwaukee It says many students are going on to college academically malnourished She saw startling numbers of applicants who spent half their school hours working part time jobs or couldn't study higher level math or science because of teacher shortages experts fear Many will struggle unless America's schools can find a way to close those learning gaps I'm Jennifer King

Alison Wagner University Of Wisconsin Madison Milwaukee America Jennifer King
Founding Father James Madison Sidelined by Woke History in His Home

Mark Levin

01:48 min | 4 months ago

Founding Father James Madison Sidelined by Woke History in His Home

"Mary Kay lynch and John Levine reporting in the near post founding father James Madison's sidelined by woke history in his own home The globalists built excuse me The globus billionaire who funded the woke transformation Of Thomas Jefferson Monticello paid for a similar overhaul of James Madison's house With the author of the U.S. Constitution has been shoved into a supporting role while slavery and racism takes center stage No American flags fly up on Pierre Madison's plantation home and roll Virginia And not a single display focuses on the life and accomplishment of America's foremost political philosopher Who created our three branch federal system of government wrote the Bill of Rights and the federalist papers and served two terms as president Instead blindsided tourists are hammered by high-tech exhibits about Madison slaves and current racial conflicts Thanks to a $10 million grant from left leaning philanthropist David M Rubenstein Now remember this guy gave 20 million to Monticello Quote I was kind of thinking we'd be hearing more about the constitution one baffled dad said When the New York Post visited the president's home this week but everything he's really about a slavery It's been inspirational I guess shrugged John from Wisconsin after taking the $35 guided tour Reviewers on social media had been more harsh they really missed the mark Greg Hancock of May say Arizona posted last week we left disappointed not learning not having learned more about the creation of the constitution

Mary Kay Lynch John Levine James Madison Pierre Madison Monticello Thomas Jefferson America David M Rubenstein Virginia Madison New York Post Mark Greg Hancock Wisconsin John Arizona
July 4 parade shooting suspect expected to appear in court

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 5 months ago

July 4 parade shooting suspect expected to appear in court

"The man charged with killing 7 people at an Independence Day parade outside Chicago considered a second attack in another city with a gun containing 60 more rounds of ammunition Lake county states attorney Eric Reinhardt says 21 year old Robert cremo is being held without bail He admitted to what he had done Deputy chief Chris cavelli says cremo didn't stop there after he fled the highland park mass shooting dressed as a woman While he was driving and he located this celebration occurring in the Madison area he contemplated another attack with the firearm he had in his car But cavelli says instead cremo drove back to Illinois where he was arrested Meanwhile motive is under investigation however He had some type of affinity towards the number four and 7 in inverse was 7 four Cavelli says it apparently comes from music the aspiring rapper likes I'm Julie Walker

Cremo Eric Reinhardt Robert Cremo Chris Cavelli Lake County Cavelli Chicago Highland Park Madison Illinois Julie Walker
"madison." Discussed on How I Got Here with Dave Fiore

How I Got Here with Dave Fiore

05:04 min | 9 months ago

"madison." Discussed on How I Got Here with Dave Fiore

"Boss Linda comes out and she's like, are you okay? What's wrong with you? I was like, I've been nominated for an award. And she was like, that's so great. What's wrong? And I was like, I don't know. So I called him back and yeah, and he was just, we set up the interview and everything, and the whole experience was just so surreal. Yeah, and just getting to, you know, getting to meet all of the other Pinnacle award recipients, like they are such amazing women. Right. And obviously, miss Marjorie Turnbull, that was amazing. Yeah. So it was just really surreal and a great blessing, honestly. That's great. All right, two more questions. Okay. So Madison looking back, what would you say is one thing or person that is changed the trajectory of your life up to this point? My husband. Yeah. When I met him, I wasn't really in a good place, you know, like mentally, obviously I was still that driven very hardworking person. But I had kind of lost myself, maybe in the crowd I was hanging out with. And certain things I was participating in. So when I met him, he was like, oh no, you know, like, the girls I'm with, don't do those things. And you know, and just like really uplifted me, you know? And he, you know, he's had hardships too as far as like, we both kind of struggled with mental health mental health mental health. And I think us just both meeting each other and especially in the time of life we did. We were both at very low points, but I think kind of the way we coped with it was like not necessarily acting that way. You know, like everybody that meant either one of us who would have never guessed that we were struggling. And people are sort of trained to hide that. Yeah, exactly. And so I think we both kind of saved each other and that sense. And the way that we are both able to uplift each other and push each other to be better. And I think that if I didn't meet him, I mean, I don't know where I would be today because the crowd I was hanging around and, you know, the things I was doing just were definitely not going to put me on a path to where I am today. All right, final question. The podcast is named how I got here. So we've talked about how you got to this point in your life. Where do you think here will be for you three to 5 years from now? So I would say in 5 years hopefully financial freedom, a kiddo and, you know, just, I don't really know where I'll be. You know you probably will have started 6 or 7 other businesses. I know, I know. Well, that's what I was about to say. I was like, I don't know where Tallahassee picnic is going to be because I have all these other ideas that I want to do, and whether it will turn into something else or because, you know, at the end of the day, these it's a trend, you know? These pop up picnics is a trend. So probably chasing the next trend or creating one. Or create oh, you know what? Trends that are. And hopefully, you know, working as an SLP in a school setting or something like that. Or even if I'm not doing that, you know, I always have to be doing something, so I mean, you bet your bottom dollar, I'm going to be doing something I'm going to be working and some sort of capacity. And what that is going to be, probably, I don't know. And I think that's what's so fun, you know? Is that life's not predictable? And I definitely didn't think, you know, as a junior and high school that I would be like going to college and married. And you know, running a business and working another job. So I think that's just what's so fun about life is that it's unpredictable and you can make it whatever you want to be. That was Madison zabala. And if you're looking for a creative alternative to a traditional picnic with someone you care about, I encourage you to check them out. You're sure to win some brownie points. Thanks for listening to the show. You can subscribe at Apple podcast, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts. And while you're there, please leave us a review. It really does make a difference. Thanks to my amazing staff at fiore communications, who pick up the slack while I'm working on these podcasts. And to Troy bloom for composing our theme music. You can hear more of Troy's creations on Facebook and Instagram at Troy bloom music. To connect with the podcast, or suggest a future guest, follow us on social media, or email us at podcast, at fiori communications, dot com..

Boss Linda Marjorie Turnbull Madison Tallahassee Madison zabala fiore communications Troy bloom Apple Troy Instagram Facebook fiori communications
"madison." Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"madison." Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Until Madison makes a name for herself in the industry. She plans to continue working as a production assistant. But she won't set her dreams aside. She will continue developing her screenplay about a young girl with a disability until she sees her vision come to life on the silver screen. I'm excited to see what the film industry holds. I'm excited to break into it. See what I'm gonna do? Madison has always been my source of inspiration. She taught me that authentic stories have the power to move people, create change and encourage empathy, which inspired me to pursue journalism. Creating this podcast episode meant the world to me because it allowed me to.

Madison
"madison." Discussed on LGBTQ&A

LGBTQ&A

05:22 min | 1 year ago

"madison." Discussed on LGBTQ&A

"Let me eat it up the let me eat it up. What's up everybody? This is your girl T is Madison honey. And if you listen to this, I am loud lab and in color with my baby Jeffrey masters and he's going to ask me anything wait. Did I say that as a girl? We black folks can get that ask ass ex together child. You know, he's going to ask me anything he wants to ask me and I'm going to answer all the questions the way that TS knows how. So let's do it Jeffrey. Hey, welcome to the show as you just heard the great TS Madison is here today. This is someone whose career I've been following for a while and her trajectory from where she started to where she is now, I would have considered.

Jeffrey masters Madison Jeffrey
"madison." Discussed on We The People

We The People

10:02 min | 1 year ago

"madison." Discussed on We The People

"Some maybe tell us more about that taxonomy but also when i asked you which papers you wanted to talk about today you said beside ten and fifty one i think one fourteen thirty nine forty nine fifty seven and sixty three or especially interesting. That's so tantalizing and you. You can't talk about all of them. But maybe give us a sense of why you picked some of those numbers that you well in terms of studying the federalist papers I think either in both at either end boasts is the answer to your question. There that it's it's it's good to to study at the way it was originally thought to be laid out by hamilton. Of course it doesn't quite work out as planned because this is a a a work in progress. Right as they're writing these papers staying up burning the midnight get it in by the deadline to publish it in the in the newspapers and so sometimes the plan didn't go quite as as as planned To begin with so they don't really follow hamilton's original plan Perfectly and it is interesting to see the different personalities coming through Despite the fact that they all sign the each paper puja says if there's one Persona writing these papers. Kubilius speaks with one voice but you can discover in the pages of the federalists When you see how. Hamilton madison will disagree and be on different sides of the party. Line later on you can see the seeds of some of that in their essays For example madison. One of the essays talks about trade. How how Has to take its natural. Agriculture and trade has taken natural course. Well that's exactly his argument in the seventeen ninety s against hamilton's report on manufactures. Hamilton wants to jump start. Manufacturers madison says no trade should take its natural course. Madison was with the physique kratz. Then he would be much of a free market kind of guy. Don't get government involved in subsidizing. This and hamilton is saying we have to. We have to in order to compete with england. Don't you understand economics. Madison jefferson you. Guys don't get it So you can see some of the seeds of that the federalist papers i think the federal is number one when hamilton says you know seems to have been reserved to the people of this country to decide the important question whether or not societies of men are really capable of establishing good government on the basis of reflection and choice or whether there forever destined for their political constitutions to depend on accident and force that one sentence along sentence but if you parse it out think about that are choices. I mean it's either gonna be accident. Force in some form of tyranny or another or the possibility of establishing good government on the basis of reflection choice. That is exactly the dichotomy put before us and book. Wanna plato's republic this. That's that's exactly what's going on in the pro-am of plato's republic power or is it going to be on the basis of power or is it going to be on the basis of persuasion. Is it going to be ballots ultimately or bullets and we facing that in the united states today were asking ourselves question Can we go on. Can we talk to each other so we can persuade each other and be one people rather than resort to force. once we resort to force. The rule of law is in danger. As lincoln tells us in the lyceum address. And it's a very easy. Slide downhill into some kind of chaos anarchy and just respect for government and disrespect for each other so that opening salvo a federalist number. One is more than mere words. It's more than rhetoric. It's puts before us the question of politics. Which is the question for each of us citizens. What are we going to choose. And how we act. Is that choice. How we act with one. Another is making that choice I have to say one word about federalist forty nine. It's my favorite though. I like though i have others Enclosed seconds but Federalists forty nine is Madison's disagreement with jefferson. And he takes him to task. You really kind of points out. He shows us the the seeds of assyria public opinion in federal's forty-nine but there's another thing i like about it and jack rakoff if he's listening to laugh at this so at montpellier that beautiful farm that you can have madison's home that you can walk around there these these gorgeous horses there and jack and i were ruminating when time about these horses if anyone were racehorses wouldn't you want to name one of 'em ticklish experiment madison says you know calling a second convention. You shouldn't do that particular experiment so we thought that if there was a racehorse vermont. Not to be named ticklish experiment Let me let me just conclude with my favorite Passage in the federalist papers. It's actually from federal thirty nine. Which i think sums up the vision of the federalist the first question that offers itself is whether the general form aspect of the government. Be strictly republican. It is evident that no other form would be reconcilable with the genius of the people of america with the fundamental principles of the revolution. Or would that honorable determination which animates every voter of of freedom to rest all our political experiments on the capacity of mankind for self government. That's the project of the federalists. That's the challenge of the federalist. That's our challenge. Still today so inspiring. Thank you so much for that. Thank you for reminding us that it all comes back to plato and aristotle power persuasion reason passion reflected in federalist one. And thanks for sharing your favorites including forty nine greg. I know it's very hard to pick a one. But so so much fun to hear which ones especially speak to. You can use single out one or two federalist papers that you like especially well you know one that The captures the imagination as a as a judge and legal scholar of constitutional law is a federal seventy eight. Now i mentioned earlier. Federal seventy eight one of the most cited in the courts Whether anybody actually read it at the time as i mentioned eight states had already ratified before it was published. It was one of the last one published. It was wasn't first published in the newspaper. It was published in the in the second volume of the federalist And was only later published in the newspapers but it talks about the judiciary and it says two things which both seem eminently reasonable until You think about them and then you wonder whether they're contradictory one. Is it says that the courts the judiciary is the least dangerous branch because all they do is apply the law. They just decide the questions. And they don't have their own force or their own political will and then in a very interesting passage they expressly discuss Judicial review that if there are provisions that are contrary to the constitution. The courts have no choice but to enforce the constitution over the provision. Now this is somewhat remarkable because what is the supremacy clause which has the constitution is supreme over state law. There's there's nothing that really says. What the relationship of the constitution to laws passed by congress are but the the unmistakable implication of several seventy eight is that talking about judicial review and those propositions seem Evident to us and reasonable that they're not like the president. They're not like the congress they are. They take cases that come to them and they decide according to law and therefore the least dangerous branch and then at the same time it says and of course they get the decide when there's a conflict between legislation constitution and i don't think at the time they understood that that could be seen as making it perhaps one of the most dangerous branches if not one of the most dangerous one of the most powerful and you know it it's difficult for them and their mindset at deceit things that would transpire later on Doesn't make them wrong But it's very interesting and Certainly any lawyer Who's interested in judicial review and and charges of judicial activism arguments. That there isn't traditional active. Should read the federal seventy-eight. Thank you so much for that. So great read several seventy eight and also to hear cleans recommendation of feckless forty-nine. Well it is time for closing arguments in this wonderful discussion of the federalist papers on constitution. Day your homework we. The people listeners is obvious of read the federalist papers. And if you find you have a favorite right to me and tell me what it is. And why jim rosen Hundred dot org and in order to inspire you to do the homework. I'm going to ask for closing statements from fester. Shannon judge mags cleaned. The first one is to you. Why should we. The people listeners. Read the federalist.

hamilton Kubilius Hamilton madison kratz Madison jefferson madison Wanna plato Madison jack rakoff puja Hamilton england lincoln jefferson vermont united states jack greg america
"madison." Discussed on We The People

We The People

09:52 min | 1 year ago

"madison." Discussed on We The People

"People so this is great amount of communication that is happening over a period of time because it takes a while to build a coalition of the majority and during that time people are talking communicating. it's a kind of socratic method at the civic level of weeding out the The unjust in a row nias notions to build a consensus among majority. That is a more just and refined notion of the public. Good thank you so much. Tha that greg. What is your reaction to madison's defensive. The rise of political parties is persuasively consistent with the broader philosophy. He you're too late in the civilised was a sultan kherson effort to justify the party. He was increasingly the head. Will you know i. It's tempting to Say well it looks like Madison was it hypocritical or inconsistent he opposed factions and then he Was part of a a an a a political party But i think he. I think in fairness If you look at federalists ten madison recognized that there's always going to be different political interests. They're always going to be factions. So for example he said people who own property are going to have different interests from people who don't on property and that's always going to be the case and really what he was talking about was or what his goal was was to create a system that would weaken the power of faction sort of behind the veil without knowing what was going to happen. He said you know if we have a federal system if we have a republic Where we have representatives who have to represent large numbers of people If we have The different components of government elected at different times All of these things will weaken a faction and Addressed there bad effects. I don't think he had any Illusion that there were going to be factions or groups with different interests But from behind the veil without knowing whether his side was going to be the majority or some other side was going to be majority he was thinking of a system that would counteract the pernicious effects of faction now To say that after that system got going he got involved in political party is not really to say that. He's hypocritical on in fact. If he had been nefarious he would have designed a system that would have favored his interests. But i don't think that he did that. I think he did the opposite which was a to try to create a system That would further democracy not direct democracy representative democracy which would have the have counteracting effects on faction. So i don't. I don't feel him as being inconsistent or hypocritical in fact On the contrary he created a system Behind the veil of not knowing what was going to happen in the future that he thought would be best for the country by weakening factions and even later got involved in affection. He was subject to those rules. that the constituency would be divided. It will be represented by large numbers of people and so forth. Thanks so much for that. A cleaner persuaded. Well i don't think i answered The question you asked me very well so let me give another shot at that. Opt madison deliberately establishes. The republican party in the united states. In seventeen ninety two jefferson is his cohort in this and he writes a couple articles about this and explains himself. One is called parties and one is called candid state of parties and he sees the opposition the federalist party as the anti republican party by this point in seventeen ninety two. He's so frustrated with the hamiltonian. Federalists thrust of of government that he feels. It's necessary to organize this republican party. Not it's not in the contemporary sense of just organization to be a part to win. Elections sees it as putting the country on the right track on the republican smaller republican tract. Where we're not ignoring the people out in the countryside and just flooding the stock jobbers in new york Control things Or these enlightened statesmen or people who think they're enlightened statesmen at the seat of government that for this kind of republican government to work the way he envisioned it requires a genuine attention by the people in participation and governing by the people. Not just when you vote not just at election time but to be real citizens not like the ancient greeks were. That's all you do with. Your life is go to the assembly every day but to have a real meaningful part in this thing called self government and so for madison. The republican party. He's founding is not a faction it's the opposite it's meant to promote republicanism against what he sees as the tendency towards anti republicanism in the early days of the republic To set america on a course in which we could actually You know they were so afraid. When washington was an office that this would fail and that we can't do it without washington. We were not ready to walk alone as jefferson put it. Washington had to stay a second term because the country wasn't ready to walk alone and it's during this period that madison and jefferson our founding the republican party to bring the republican cause into the workings of government. And so for them. It's it's the culmination of the founding It republicanism so that it's not factions. That will rule but adjust majority. That will rule. Thank you very much for that greg. I want to put on the table. The main ideas of the federalist papers are different ways to organize them. Do you have any particular papers we've talked about. Of course ten and one and and are there any particular ones are group's of papers that you want people listeners to read more about well you know. I think it's hard to single out. Any i mean it'd be like If you gave me the bible and said which books are important which ones are not it would be hard to pick one or or another. But you know what i've always found to be very interesting Are the initial essays where they described the weaknesses of the articles of the government under the articles of confederation. And the need for a stronger union these These are not as philosophically deep as some of the other ones And yet when you do read them you recognize What they were trying to accomplish was to make the system better and i think without fully understanding some of the weaknesses of the The articles confederation and also the article that the The the ones that were comparing the government To state governments that already existed. I think it's hard to understand. You know what what what are. They specifically trying to do one of the things. That's very interesting. Is that nearly. Every provisions in the articles of confederation has a correlative a provision in the constitution often exchanged but You can sort of map. The articles confederation to the constitutional provision in the constitution that are nowhere found in the articles consideration But you can look very carefully at these a different provisions because they weren't starting from scratch They were they had a system and they were trying to persuade people to change the system. system had flaws but the head to identify those flaws and i think that in many ways although are somewhat overlooked These are some of the most important ones. And let me just give you some of the numbers. Fifteen to twenty two or really wants that. Mostly talk about the difficulties with the articles of confederation. And i think It's kind of the background that You need to understand why they were undertaking this project. Now this doesn't necessarily tell you what they were trying to accomplish But it does give you the background. So i i think fifteen twenty two or a very good place to start to get idea of why they were trying to create a new constitution. It wasn't that we didn't have a government was that we wanted a better one. Thank you very much for that of kaleen. In your introduction with jack off to the cambridge companion to the federalist no two ways of organizing the federalist one flags the division that greg just did focusing on half eighty the essays concerned with making the case for a national government and half beat the essays focused on an exposition of the constitution itself And then you say. Another approach is on the broader political thought and vision of each of the authors including madison's emphasis on republican government in hamilton hamilton's interest in state building commerce in foreign affairs and so forth..

madison republican party anti republican party jefferson republican government greg federalist party Madison america washington assembly new york Washington cambridge jack national government hamilton hamilton
"madison." Discussed on We The People

We The People

09:07 min | 1 year ago

"madison." Discussed on We The People

"Didn't have a federal system of the kind that was developed in the world before this and certainly there wasn't a political. Science experiment are explication of this system until the madison described What the different theory would be. In addition there were of course many debates about whether you could have a republican government in a large country as opposed to say a small city state and madison. of course Came up with the idea that will actually it's gonna work better In at large territory because it will have the benefit of breaking apart factions. We'll have delegates would have to represent many people and it will be a difficult for factions To control in such an area. I think this was original. Thought this was. This was not something that had been tried and done before and certainly the theory behind it had been explained now whether madison completely invented it. Or whether it's a joint product of all the people at the convention. I think that's a fair subject of debate. I don't think madison claim to be the sole inventor But i think he was one of the original explainers of the system and perhaps the best advocate for the system. Just a an. I mentioned in my article That courts often cite the federalist papers and there seemed to be to sort of Strands of citations at the supreme court. Some justices like justice. Scalia and justice. Thomas look at it for details. You know when they used the word commerce do they just mean trade or they mean something broader and then there are others like justice kennedy who's obviously A now retired But he looked at it for the big principles. He looked at it for questions of state sovereignty of of of federalism of What was the overall picture of what they were trying to accomplish I think that's probably most in line with the kinds of things that madison was trying to get at in his essays. Thank you so much for that. A kaleen greg mentions medicines refinement of montesquieu's view that republican only possible in a small territory written a wonderful article madison in the french enlightenment. The authority of public opinion. Will you describe. The influence of his thought on thinkers including recently called my attention to jacques shays policing municipalities. So love you to help us understand. What madison was reading the influence his view of public opinion and how that affected his refinement of mandis skier and whether or not that was original madison or not. Yes oh so. Jefferson is in paris as minister to france. Right in the late seventeen. Eighty s and. He's there will. Madison is with everyone else. At the philadelphia convention framing the constitution and jefferson will come back After the formation of the new government under president washington so during that time jefferson is sending cargo box boxes full of books to madison and madison is not just reading but as hamilton might have said in by being the french philosophy the that jefferson and madison have drunk too deeply from the well of french philosophy. Hamilton once said And madison was doing that and he wasn't agreeing with all of it but there was a whole group. French thinkers especially in the seventeen seventy seventeen eighties. Who were developing. This new theory called a theory of public opinion. They'll pinon public. That public opinion is queen of the world. Because there's actually this new phenomena called the public why what makes this different in the in the in the history of all the world has to do with communication not just the commerce of goods but the commerce of ideas that you can spread ideas more than just from In at one. Assembly in ancient greece for example or just one salon in paris but through the printed word. You can get these ideas out to a much broader audience a much broader public that can then communicate and have an influence on the center of government and so The the kings and queens of france had to watch out because there was a new power in world and it was predicted that it would be more powerful than anything else in. It's called public opinion and it paved the way for what tocqueville would later talk about in terms of public opinion when by then by the late eighteen twenty s and eighteen thirties. It's clear that public opinion is queen of the world and that equality is a well night irresistible principle of modern times and so madison is reading all of this. And it's said not just you. Glimpse had a glimpse of it but he lived a little too early and he really didn't quite understand the ramifications of it that more than just the institutional arrangements of government checks and balances separation of powers all. Those things are important. But there's something even more important going on here and it has to do with not just stifling unjust opinion but actually building educating shaping forming the public into one that is not only queen of the world but deserves to be queen of the world capable of people think that a people coming into their own people capable of governing themselves and this had never been possible in the history of the world before. This is partly why it's so new in my madison so excited about the discovery. How these things can work together because you couldn't have government by the people over large territory Before this ability to communicate to the printed word Because all large Governments were considered empires and empires as much ski said tend to be despotic but communication. The commerce of ideas changes the face of politics. The potential for for popular government actually being successful in the modern world. Thank you so much for that. I'm just reading your article on say now and it's so exciting to see the connection. Between shaves conclusion public opinion has its source in the opinion of enlightenment. Wherever it words some gains partisans becomes the general conviction madison's conclusions as you say in his national as as in seventeen ninety one that enlightened journalists and literati would communicate with public through essays like the federalist papers and and other eighteenth century version of long atlantic articles and would refine public opinion. So it's guided by reason rather than passion. Greg is as you hear. Madison's theory of public opinion is clean. Cleaned helped us understand it. What was vindicated first of all in in madison's arab by the thoughtful debates over ramification where people actually did read the federalist papers were guided in. We're able to engage complicated arguments. And does it seem too optimistic today in the age of twitter. Well you know It's interesting if you were if you look at the commentary on the federalist papers at the time they were written It was very mixed They were recognized. As being very scholarly they The supreme court cited them and chief justice. Marshall said that there's no greater explanation of our government. Then you'll find there by no greater minds and and yet when you look at other commentary There were people who said well. They're kind of hard to get through. They're kind of boring. they're kind of long. I really doubt anybody has been able to read and digest all of them Some said for educated people. They don't really add that much and for uneducated. they're just too difficult to read. So you know. I i again. I think it's somewhat of a mixed picture. Certainly their views did carry a lot of weight we we we created the government according to the structure that they had adopted that they had proposed When we had the debate in congress on the first In the first congress they passed..

madison republican government jefferson kaleen greg authority of public opinion jacques shays center of government montesquieu Scalia paris france supreme court kennedy Jefferson Thomas Madison hamilton philadelphia Hamilton
"madison." Discussed on We The People

We The People

09:13 min | 1 year ago

"madison." Discussed on We The People

"They included all of the kinds of very important philosophical and political science arguments. That professor sheehan remarks sort of ingenious meshing together of the two. Thanks well in the process of doing this. They described nearly every aspect of the constitution. And so if you're interested in knowing something about the original meaning of the constitution is a source that is perhaps the most frequently cited source is the federalist papers because Nearly everything that we talk about today has something said about it in the federalist papers. Now as you point out though i it is not necessarily imperfect source so for example many people site donald papers as a source of evidence of the original understanding of the constitution. That is to say well. What did the people who ratified the constitution at the various state ratifying conventions. What did they think it meant. And i think a strong counter argument is most of them. Didn't read the pharaohs papers in fact half of the federals papers a weren't written until over half of the states had already ratified it and one of the most cited up Papers up Paper number seventy eight. It wasn't written until after eight of the states had already ratified the constitution. But you know. I think counterargument to that is that it is a repository of the arguments. That supporters of the constitution were making and we know that the supporters won the day and something must have persuaded the ratifiers to adopt the constitution. And it was probably something similar to the argument that were in the federalist papers in other words. Even if people didn't directly read the federals papers the federals papers is a repository of the kinds of arguments that strong supporters the constitution were making and of course ultimately constitution was ratified kaleen. You have honored ansi c. By joining a really exciting project that called the founders library were putting online the sources that inspired the founders and having a pleasure of learning from you about what madison read a before the convention and while writing the federalist papers and how that influenced his distinctive understanding of faction as the triumph of passion over reason of self infrastructure devotion public. Good were brainstorming. This now but give we the people listeners sense of some of the main books that madison read Before and during and after the convention that influenced federal spits. Sure ba- before. I talk about that. Jeff let me just follow up on the the last question momentarily Jefferson said about the federalist papers that They're the best commentary on the principles of government that were ever written and so I agree with judge mags that you have to look deeper than just one argument year. There in terms of what people at the ratifying conventions were talking about whether or not they'd read the federalist papers or any one particular one with published yet because what hamilton madison j. Mostly him to and madison did was. They understood the principles that they were that that they at the federal convention were trying to implement into this document. You know it's not just words on paper. Those words are there for a purpose meant to accomplish something and the federalist papers has at depths of commentary. That's more than just describing article one article to article three. It's telling us what they are trying to accomplish. And how The founders went about that. And i don't know a better commentary than the federalist papers that does that. In terms of the purpose design the argument and action of the united states constitution So what did madison reed madison. Read most everything he he. He didn't read every book in jefferson's library but he was constantly borowing books from jefferson's library whenever they lived in the same city for example in philadelphia When the when the new government was just started Jefferson as was was as won't had to remodel his rental rental property and he built a whole library in it and madison was constantly borrowing books from him. In addition to the hundreds of books madison had packed and taken with him. Imagine that how how long it took to gift from helier to philadelphia And what you take with you. Mostly is your books. I mean that's madison. He had a rented room in mrs houses boarding house. Because he's a bachelor. He's there in this boarding house with all these other folks and and basically his room is just full of books Madison was the scholars. Scholar of all the founders. John adams wanted to be but i. I think it's madison. Who truly was He read aristotle. Plato xenophon through siddique's For as examples of the classic cicero he read he really studied monto skew Of course lock poof. Indoors sydney The list goes on and on they allred. Hobbs and didn't like him That that the and and madison comments on on rousseau once and in not very kind terms He didn't care much for rousseau. So madison's idea of how majority rules is not the rue sewing in general. Will he thought about all these things and he agreed with some people about something in disagreed about other things but he also had this independence Thought this spark of breads in which he's the one i believe and i'd love to hear what judge mag says. A madison thinks that what he's discovered is a way to make popular government. Good government in other words. They talked about liberty hangs in the balance. The eyes of the world are upon us. we are engaged in the great experiment of self government And what that means is kinda people govern themselves in a way that truly respects one another and it's not just majority faction Injustice and oppression. Madison thinks he's found a way to do that. And it has to do as You know jeff with this idea of an extensive territory and a larger number of population so the faction can counteract faction but it's more than just that negative faction counteracting faction. That's a big part of it. But there's a reason you want factions to be thwarted it so that the There's time for the majority to refine and enlarge its views to refine and enlarge the public views so that justice will rain rather than injustice. That's the goal of that Pugliese sets himself in the federalist papers to show that republican government can really work and that when the eyes of the world are upon america. We're going to show the world as robert frost once. Put it not just how things work but how democracy is meant. Thank you so much for that greg. Do you agree. Kaleen statements that madison discovered for the first time in the history of the world away of making popular government by good government. And the way that he did that was by Thwarting factions to give majority is time to refine enlarge the public views of the justice. When reason could prevail. And then after you tell us what you agree with that or want to amplify on it. Maybe introduced us to the idea of how madison achieve that. Well you know there. Probably i do agree with it. And i think they're probably several examples that could be given but i think perhaps the best one concerns the of federalism and madison's idea or at least explanation of the idea that having two governments rather than one Preserves individual liberty. I've been a very influential idea. I and idea that justice kennedy cited in various ways and it seems counter. Intuitive when you first hear about it that while all of a sudden there's going to be two governments regulating But when you realize that certain things will be left of the national government and others will be left to the states You realized that this has the tendency to break apart factions but to still allow local Interest had to be governed and we really.

madison professor sheehan hamilton madison madison reed madison Jefferson jefferson Plato xenophon rousseau donald philadelphia helier Madison siddique Jeff John adams america Hobbs republican government Kaleen
"madison." Discussed on Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

05:53 min | 1 year ago

"madison." Discussed on Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

"Oh there's a different way to live. That isn't so miserable. I completely agree with that because a lot of these people live inside of these cities because they feel like they need you for work. But i promise you live outside the city you own your own land you bring your own land up. You will feel so much more spiritually wealthy. Yeah yeah so what's next for you. I know if if you're able to pass what you wanna pass you won't be here forever. So what what would be next for you. What would be the bath. You know what i would dash. There's so many different things. I've got so many years ahead loved rated. My family enjoy that. I wanna get income taxes out. Federal income taxes gone and terminals and congress here federal income. Tax completely eliminated. Yes and so what would be not look. This is going to be a whole other to our conversation. I haven't heard you say this. So what what's the path path for that is just that you're taxed enough already. I mean literally you're taxed when you make money taxing spend that money then you're taxing to keep the things that you bought jewelry tax on and then when you die your tax on those that again. It's insane and so i think we need just completely over simplify our tax system to where basically you just spending significant amount of money on the tax would be higher on consumption right so you've sales tax sales tax property taxes. Okay but then you don't have to pay taxes on your income. And that i think they would make everything so much easier interesting. And because i'm really. I mean you believe the fourteenth of the eighteenth amendment to constitution that allow congress's start taxing your income. That was never supposed to be a thing right because really your money is your money in usually. I think that you know then. We should tax people if they would like to use our infrastructure in the markets that we have built in the system that we've built for you to be able to buy things then you pay tax to keep everything up keep provide for the military but the money that you make is not the government's of course. Yeah how's how's married life. What's that's relatively new. So i'll tell you being a good member of congress and being a good husband hard line to walk. I imagine my wife is tough as nails literally. She's her skin is so much thicker than minds. Gotta be. she's just bad ass super super attractive super smart super funny most fun down to earth woman i met and she still hanging out with. How does how does she deal with the personal attacks and vitriol towards you. She gets so much angrier than i do. I mean she she'll just choose out of their face. They believe what they want. They they have a concierge. Right redress the government but yeah but the personal attacks against me i mean she gets upset about it and then you know the the classic attacks. We always get your racially. I'm hispanic a haitian bound and so but but you know what. I really try to insulate her from the political world. I mean. I think i would come to fisticuffs whatever force their way to try interviewer. She just keep press away from the limelight. She's a she's in grow person. But i don't think she needs to suffer for my job. That's a good point. I mean i think that is part of our job is men is not not to shield them from of course but you're the protector saying between them and the chaos i believe. Yeah there's a great quote it's the real man gains renowned by standing between his family and destruction absorbing the blows of fate with equanimity. And so as you say that phanom. It's and so as you say that that's what i think you know. You're standing there between the media between the attack between this and the that between them and her with equanimity calmness clarity coolness. Wow that's phenomenal that's exact- and it i mean you you. You're very jealous. I'm going to catch up soon. But you've got more kids than me. I'm gonna get very executive you're going to catch up. You want four more all. I would like i think four great. Yeah i've i've gotten christine up to two or so. We're okay let's go. We'll work in her up on that number then down on how long the wait for kids. Were having so much fun in life. It's just yeah. I we We're we're we're still hunting. Invasive marriage is awesome. I loved i mean. Obviously we're friends. But i see your stuff on on instagram and i just see live in life and it's it's awesome. I'm so excited for you to see it. Thanks brother all right. I appreciate you appreciate your time. I'm i'm excited to see where take things that i'm a big supporter of you and so just appreciate you spending time with us but then also showing my family around. Hey you got a great set him off a minute ago but man they had on this. I gotta tell you you know you said you home school your kids and everything and i just i think i think i'm so honored to be in the same generation as your children and i think we should be on to be being the same generations each other because the world has had an unprecedented period of peace and prosperity. I never had before. Yeah one hundred years ago. Nineteen twenty started off. Pretty rough than got even rougher zoe. I think maybe destined for some difficult times. And i believe you know. I think that. I am a strong believer in god so were all put here purposely for the the time. He chose us for this time. And i think they were gonna face dark days in the future. And i think that you know it's a born for such a time as this so to thinning of the young people. Listen to this honored. Be young with you. All the we have many decades left to be able to make a better country place for families make a better world and that's our duty as men definitely well. It gives me hope to what's to come challenging times ahead but we'll be able to just strongman for sure. Thanks appreciate you the best. Ri guys there. You go my conversation with representative madison. Cawthorn i hope that you enjoyed. I know anytime. We have a political discussion. There's gonna be disagreement and it's going to be calm contentious in some ways but I think it's important regardless of what side of the aisle that you sit on and what your beliefs are and where you fall on one side and where you might fall on the other that we actually talk about this stuff..

congress government christine zoe Cawthorn madison
"madison." Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

06:30 min | 1 year ago

"madison." Discussed on How I Built This

"From npr. How i built this a show about. Innovators entrepreneurs idealists and the stories behind the movements they built. I'm gyros on the show today. How stacey madison turn day-old pita bread into a new snack. Stacy's pita chips and then went on to sell her brand one of the world's biggest food companies for a quarter of a billion dollars so there are some startup stories. Were most of us are probably thinking. I couldn't do that like squarespace. If you heard that episode you'll remember that anthony tusla was and is a gifted computer programmer. He had a highly specialized skill. Same story with steve madden. He literally designed and then fashioned shoes from leather and sold them but then there are the stories where most of us can actually imagine doing that. Thing ourselves like brian. Scooter moore who bought an old truck and offered to holloway people's trash. That's how he started one eight hundred got junk or lisa price who tinkered with homemade lotions and our kitchen. She went on to sell her brand. Carol's daughter till laurie out. Well today story is the second variety. The kind of story that almost anyone can relate to because it is such a simple and elegant idea. You take pita bread in cut into wedges you bake it throw some parmesan or seasoning on it and voila. You've got stacy's pita chips now. Even though the snack food industry today is a sixty. Six billion dollar juggernaut. Stacey madison did not have a grand master plan to disrupt snack foods in the late. Nineteen ninety s at that time. She and her boyfriend were literally selling pita wraps sandwiches from a sandwich cart in downtown boston. The pita chips were an afterthought a way to use up those extra pitas at the end of the day. Peter chips were never supposed to make stacey wretch but eventually frito lay would come knocking with a fistful of dollars but long before that long before stacey even sold her first sandwich she was on an entirely different path. She grew up in the suburbs near boston after college. Stacey went to california to get a master's degree in social work. She thought about becoming a psychologist like her dad but he wasn't so enthusiastic about that he felt. I should always become a social worker rather than go on to get my mba psychologists. He was like oh. That's no profession for a woman. That's one thing that he said was smiling. Look pretty and you will find a husband you know. I don't wanna make him sound like a jerk. He was like a caring loving man that put his family first but he was also a product of the fifties. Sure so once you get your master's degree I read the you. You actually moved to washington dc to To to what to do social work. Yes i worked in a group home for homeless pregnant drug addicted women and i have to tell you i mean i loved. The job was very rewarding. But at the time i think i made twenty two thousand dollars a year and it was really paycheck to paycheck and very hard to survive on that kind of income so i decided to go and get licensed and be able to private practice. Which eventually i did go on to do. But i've found it very isolating. No now i've got to go. And i unlocked the door and and i do you know marriage counseling and then my evening is over. I've seen five or six patients. And i closed the door behind me and i go home and i put a lot of effort into getting those degrees and licenses and realize that ultimately it probably just was not for me to your your I guess roughly thirty years old at this time and by the way you were engaged to break right now that ended. I think it was just mutual. I think ultimately it was. Just not the right thing. I think we just both agreed we had had the place picked out. We were going to get married. And it was kind of a bizarre story. But i went and i had a massage. This i know sounds like i'm going off on a tangent here but it will come back. I went and i had a massage. And the woman told me to take off all my jewelry imbaba blah blah blah and. I took it off. I put it in the dish guy massage. And i got up and i went to get dressed and i was like oh my god. All my jewelry is gone including my ring might engagement ring and i was just you know it was from his family. It was like i was just so upset and the girl was gone. She had gone gone like never to return. I think she took off to florida or somewhere. She never came back to work. She just kinda took all my stuff. But with rick and i was kind of like ring wasn't replaced immediately even and i don't care about the ring even if it's just a cigar brand or something like that that it kinda took so long replacing the ring that it forced both of us to look at. Should we really be doing this. Maybe this was a sign or something and ultimately. Yeah we just decided. Maybe we shouldn't get married. So you guys split up a meantime there was this guy mark andrews who you had met through your brother a few years before he was a friend. Did you guys start dating or would you just kind of touch. So he was still a friend. And i talked to him. All the time about my disengagement and all of that he was super supportive and eventually our friendship led to dating and he was getting his phd so he was doing an internship in hawaii and said well. Why don't you come out to hawaii. And what did you do in hawaii. So hawaiian was.

stacey madison anthony tusla Scooter moore lisa price till laurie Stacey madison Peter chips stacey wretch steve madden npr boston Stacy holloway frito stacy Carol stacey brian
"madison." Discussed on Real Food Real People

Real Food Real People

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"madison." Discussed on Real Food Real People

"It's a lot coming at you on time that you're you're battling it's almost like the ninja warrior. You know you're trying to go through just to see if you can even make it to the ends. I mean that's i know that's a funny analogy. But really i mean that's that's really that's really kind of how it feels these days with. This is the real food real people podcasts. Food and family farming are so important to the future of our food system but at the same time our guest. This week tells us that future is very unclear and the reasons why she says family farms may not make it in. this state. Might not be what you expect. We talk with madison. Mcpherson whose family farmer orchard est in the chalan area farming cherries and apples. What a cool conversation. As far as her story and how she got involved in farming and now what she sees as her biggest concerns to be able to keep her small family operation going. I'm dillon hong-kook this is the real food. Real people podcast. I'm glad you're here. I'm glad you care about the future of our food system and farms and everyone connected with our food here in washington state and madison's words. This week are super important to hear also want to thank our sponsors dairy farmers of washington. They get this. They're concerned about this as well. Why dairy dot org is their website so check that out you can even get a virtual farm tour right online to check out what life is like on washington dairies. Mana insurance group supports the podcast as well. We really appreciate them. And their hands on approach to helping real local individuals and families and businesses insure themselves and plan for the future Rather than just wait for something to go wrong So love their support. And what they're doing they're williams powering. You're clean energy future. They're thinking about the future and we appreciate them supporting this podcast with a community grant as well as washington. Red raspberries Supporting what we're doing here sharing the stories of real farming here in washington state. So we go now to the salon area. We talk with madison mcpherson Family orchard est there about what's really going on with family.

dillon hong madison washington Mcpherson Mana insurance group williams madison mcpherson