18 Burst results for "Madeline Baron"

"madeline baron" Discussed on Unorthodox

Unorthodox

04:42 min | 3 months ago

"madeline baron" Discussed on Unorthodox

"That's seared in. My memory is wrong but that was a great moment on the podcast. Was you still had access albeit. You got a little wrong to the first few lines of this thing you did twenty years ago. Yeah i can tell you ronnie kara low ya. That's and that's wrong. But that's what. I remember when twenty minutes on a stage essentially as a thirteen year old very uncomfortable age but i think that your question is great because it really to me gets at the core of like sort of the hypocrisy is the wrong word but like you prepare for something this this rite of passage. And then it's for. I would say ninety nine point nine percent of children. Not something you ever do again because i have not chanted from the taurus since i mean some people do but i i think the majority of people who are casually becoming bar mitzvah do not so great question. Madeleine we before we let you go. You're from milwaukee right. Yes birthplace of of course to my ear. Former prime minister of israel is very very important to our listenership. Which means you get to tell us. What's coming up on season. Three of in the dark nice chai. We are hard at work it. I'm really excited about it. We don't have time that it will come out yet and it's been of course interesting to try to report a story in the middle pandemic but i think it's going as well as it could be an yeah. I'm excited to tell everybody about it. But it can't do that yet. But thanks for asking. But i could get your flattery grafton. Move to minneapolis for a year to get the answer to that question. I think mark it off my brothers and st paul. I'll get him on the case. Madeline baron thank you so much for being our dental of the week and everyone should go listen to in the dark and is there..

ronnie kara Madeleine milwaukee israel Madeline baron minneapolis st paul
"madeline baron" Discussed on In The Dark

In The Dark

06:05 min | 1 year ago

"madeline baron" Discussed on In The Dark

"So we in the car. On our way to talk to curtis flowers. Believe it or not after all this time. Kind of. kind of crazy. I'm Madeline Baron, and this is the final episode of season two of in the dark. Curtis flowers. All right. The other day. I. Took a drive. I can't tell you exactly where I was. But I got out and set up in a backyard was arrested in the dark crew and I waited. And then. Hello. Good Morning. Curtis. Shake. Your hand, it can't be Kovin. Yeah. Thanks for coming over how the drive it was nice. It's nice. We sat down in the backyard at a safe social distance. Great. Wow we're finally talking yes. How does it feel? Good. Are you at all nervous or? Nervous. Okay. Okay. Well, we're just having conversation. If you WANNA take a break any point take a break and you can eat water if you need snacks. If you just want water want snacks whatever we'll just take it slow and yeah. So. All right. and. We're outside by the way as we know, it should just say the reason we're outside is because of covid. So. We're in a in a strange setup, but this is strange case. Maybe, it makes sense. Yeah. What is it been like being out? Turnover women. Yeah goodfellow. Have to be home. Yeah. Kicking it with family you know. Not GonNa tell you where exactly curtis's living now because of concerns about his safety. But I can tell you confidently the Curtis is with people who love him and care about him. He's been spending a lot of time just hanging out playing dominoes exercising he's lost weight. Since the last time I saw him a friend had even bought him a treadmill. He's also been back to China and he was finally able to meet his four year old nephew for the first time my nephew. He and I talked on the phone all the time and I had this thing we've time he answered the phone I'll say, what's true. So he had never saw my face. and. I remember walking into the House. He came over in a heat from it. And I, just Yo what's up trio in our people around the corner you got so big because recognized the voice, but he'd never seen my face. So when I walked into view, he just started me for a long time. Thanks shocked US mainly finally he moved and came me. freaked out. That is crazy man I'm sure he was like just couldn't know what to make of it. So much has changed since Curtis was locked up twenty four years ago and Curtis still figuring it out. Like this one day when Curtis use the bathroom somewhere, he couldn't figure out how to flush the toilet. Just walk away. told him. He's thinking really that's Kinda rude. But then he did walk away to his great surprise, the toilet flushed on its own. Or take coffee. For example, I. Remember the first time they introduced me to call who drinks Co. coffee. He's just got to try. So. Got Cold coffee on the Kremlin sugar. And fell in love with. The next time we went back, you gotta try to prep Chino next. Hold on hold on the. Sugar, he said YOU'RE GONNA, love it and I tried it and loved it. Now. And It has really been exciting note. Coming home being able to get up when you get ready to eat when you get ready later when you get ready. They'll things. Have Been Awesome. I wanted to talk with Curtis about what his life was like before the murders before he was arrested back when he was just a kid growing up in my no now. Through my. Family all the time. Friends. Yeah what were your parents like growing up Audie will also? The took a somewhere every summer. We did everything together cookouts. Family Reunion. Yeah it was. Yeah. What did you? Did you play any sports basketball basketball? Football. Let me play long. She didn't want to get hurt. But she didn't she didn't like that. She was worried about you getting injured. And so when you were growing up like, did you have any sense of what you wanted to do with the rest of your life? Time I, remember. My friends and I used to get together and talk about what we wanted to do. After High, school? And at the time I wanted to be a fireman. Did, you want to be a fireman. Thought it was so cool. You know to him rushing through town on a fire truck going to put out a fire. As I got older that changed and. And I just didn't know what I wanted to do. One thing Curtis told me started doing very early on was singing. Yes. Well. I started thinking about at the age of ten. You Sing in my room a lot and my dad hurt me one night. And I didn't know he's outside the door. But he he come in and he said, when are you gonNA. Start Thinking Gospel. Voice and. Peace I'm not gonNA. Force. You. The Way my dad markle did me he said because about make you saying you're not going to give me y'all. He's about a pilot you come to me when you're ready then. You'll saying. There's about a week later and I started singing with him going to rehearsals. And she my big sport..

Curtis flowers Curtis Madeline Baron Kovin Chino goodfellow Kremlin drinks Co. China markle basketball Football
"madeline baron" Discussed on In The Dark

In The Dark

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"madeline baron" Discussed on In The Dark

"This is in the dark corona virus. I'm Madeline Baron. Spent the past few months along with the rest of the team reporting on Corona virus in the Mississippi Delta. Over the past several weeks, we've heard from doctors, nurses, pastors, competitions, prisoners, and musicians. In this episode, the last episode of the Special Report. We bring you the story.

Madeline Baron Mississippi Delta
"madeline baron" Discussed on In The Dark

In The Dark

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"madeline baron" Discussed on In The Dark

"Okay it's nine twenty at night and I'm coming back into the hospital would home to eat supper so I'm coming back in to finish work for the day. Lots of notes to write at a patient to see. We have had a very busy day for the past two months. Dr Rachel thoughts job at her hospital where she made this recording has been to take care of the sickest cove in nineteen patients trying to keep them alive. She works at a hospital with just two hundred eight beds and the small city of Greenwood Mississippi. Right on the edge of the Delta for weeks we've been following Dr fought and other staff at the Greenwood Leflore hospital as they confront this deadly virus this is in the dark krona virus in the delta. I'm Madeline Baron. I spent the past two months along with the rest of in the dark team reporting on Corona virus in the Mississippi Delta the poorest part of Mississippi one of the poorest places in the entire country in this series bringing you stories of people trying to live in this really hard time trying to make decisions trying to get by situation that none of us have faced before in this episode. We'll take you inside a hospital where doctors and nurses figuring out how to cope with pandemic not in a big city like New York but in a much smaller town of Greenwood Mississippi. Where EVERY PATIENT? Every loss feels personal.

Greenwood Mississippi Greenwood Leflore hospital Mississippi Delta Dr Rachel Madeline Baron New York
"madeline baron" Discussed on Undisclosed

Undisclosed

08:34 min | 2 years ago

"madeline baron" Discussed on Undisclosed

"Welcome to the undisclosed ended today. We're talking about episode ten in our current series the state versus Greg Lance. That episode is called Putnam Pit. And if you haven't heard it yet go back and listen a lot happens. We will be right here waiting for you when you get back. I'm Rebecca lavoix voyage host. The True Crime Review podcast crime writers on and I'm one of the audio editors in the undisclosed team and with me today is Robbie Chaderi The New York Times bestselling author of a non story and lead reporter on this series Hagan. Rabia Rebecca. How are you? I'm good. I'm good thanks. Also with us is Colleen Miller Associate Dean and professor of law at the University of South Carolina. School of law. Hello Collin Good. It's nice to talk to you this week. Also nice to talk to our very special guest. Madeline Barron One of my favorite things about this madeline baron bio by the way is. It's like really long but I think that everyone knows that. Madeline Baron is the host and reporter order behind the greatest Ram podcast of all time in the dark and in the dark season two. Hello Madeline is wonderful to talk to. You could be here now. Of course Madeleine's reporting has also appeared on NPR. She's one lots of journalism awards. She's got lots of Boniface Madeline before we start the show. I just wanted to get a quick uh true crime. podcast update because I do know if there was just like an expected development in Wino- WINONA in the case around Curtis Flowers. And that was that Doug Evans the. Da who the Supreme Court struck down His entire prosecution of the case basically because of his practices of stacking juries with white jurors was was once again re elected to be the prosecutor in that community What are your thoughts on? That was that was expected right right when the reason it was expected as you know is because he was running unopposed right so even you know and that is really common for him actually. He's only had an opponent once sincere. I won the race for. Da and Dan so yeah he unsurprisingly received something like ninety three percent of the vote he didn't have a number of writings and About four hundred people ronin someone other than Doug Evans I think think By the latest count. But you know obviously he was always going to win and it really. You know what's interesting to me about that race beyond of course my interest in it because of the flowers case case. But it's just you know what we hear a lot about progressive prosecutors running for office and winning Like in San Cisco Just a few days ago. CHESA Boudin winning Larry Crasner Christian Philadelphia but in a lot of places in the United States. Like W-A-N-N-A in central Mississippi. These races are uncontested Ryan. So even though there's like this national push towards different types of prosecutor in our country it really ha does not seem to filter down to a lot of places right now. That's true and I think that the constituents there I mean they for all the reporting that you've done and for all that the podcast world knows about Evans and his career as a prosecutor down there they know what they know which is that. He's the guy who runs on. You know cracking down on crime and you know he's as far as citizens there are concerned. We heard a lot of them on your podcast doing a great job fulfilling the promise of his campaigns right Y- intensity you ask so certainly that seems to be the view amongst majority the white people in that district But his district is only slightly majority white and so certainly talking African Americans in his district. They often have a very different view of Doug Evans and really like just don't know because in a way like an election functions like a popularity poll. We just never had an accurate one for Doug Avenue right and years at least so it is possible that people feel differently about now regardless of race but we you know we haven't seen that we don't have a way way due to find that out. The only thing too is that you know who's going to run against him is a real practical challenge too so even if you wanted to support a candidacy of someone other than Doug Heaven's like there just aren't a lot of lawyers in that area and then you know what lawyers exists you know. Maybe they just like the current job and they don't want to be the district attorney they wanna be aware in private practice or civil attorney or something so yeah it. Is You know that does come into play too. Can You Imagine Robbing Colin. Like being the lawyer that follows Doug Evans and that office present. And what you know you'd be walking into that would be challenging right. I don't know it would be challenging but I mean I look at what did he walked into an extremely challenging situation. Where you've got this huge department that has had a history of corruption of decades of corruption that extend beyond the DA's office into you know the police department? I mean and into the political system and so yeah. It's a challenge but I am shocked that the defense attorneys in that area are not like Gosh our best bet to get justice for our clients Ryan and to have fairness for awesome. You know all our work is through one of us to run and beat the sky. I just I don't get it. I don't get it right. One thing Raviol- is like there's not not really I mean amongst at least some of the defense attorneys in the area. You do not get the sense that they're really like opposition in opposition to Doug Evans like when I sat in some of the last shameful that is shameful. Sorry was basically like you know. Here's here's a guy from the DA's office here's a court appointed public defender and like they're just hashing out these cases. The clients are not really at the center of what's taking place. These are people that have known each other for a really long time. So it's not like you know if it it would be really out of character for a Lotta these public defenders in that area to publicly denounce the DA or even like publicly criticized the DA. It's just not how things worked on there right because they become part of the system. They have become absorbed into the system. And so that's maybe a private criminal defense attorney I get it. I get it and the thing is if they lose. They're kind of like brandon forever and they're going to be mistreated and I know that's part of the fear but then you never disrupt the system and somebody has to raise optum ultimate down there okay. I'm sure that would be a fun experience for you Living in y known and having to have these kind of conversations all all the time all day every day Baltimore's got its own problems. So yes it does it does run for Baltimore. Da GonNa move their first. Then that's the thing all right. Well let's talk about this week's episode of undisclosed in this week's episode. The team examined three key. State officials involved in Greg Glances Says Prosecution District Attorney. GENERAL WILLIAM GIBSON NOT TO BE CONFUSED WITH SCI FI author William Gibson Medical Examiner Dr Charles Harlan and TBI agent agent Robert Croft Zik. The episode opens with a look at the Putnam pit online publication. That for years ran as a self-proclaimed underground watchdog press holding city and county officials to account for misdeeds and unethical conduct we heard from founder and editor of the Putnam Pit Jeff Davidian who began investigating Darlene. ARLEEN ELDRIDGE's murder in Cookeville after meeting her mother in a chance encounter according to Darlene family. She'd been involved in an affair with her boyfriend. And the local district attorney Gibson himself shortly after her murder Darlene brother Fabian was arrested for attempting to murder her boyfriend Robert Fahey. Da Gibson appointed two private attorneys to prosecute the attempted murder but alarmingly both of these attorneys also represented the boyfriend Fahey in a civil suit against Fabian. At the same time they were prosecuting him. Gibson's unethical conduct in the Fahey eldridge matter didn't affect his career but a few years later his inappropriate communications with two defendants resulted in him. Losing his law licence medical examiner Charles Harlan who conducted the autopsies Habsi's on Victor and Alec Lesson Akao and testified at Greg's trial became nationally infamous when twenty twenty an expose on his decades of malpractice. This Harlan eventually lost his professional license. T. B. I.. Agent craftsy had a stellar professional career on paper but his contact on the ground was riddled battled with questionable behavior including witness intimidation and likely fabricating evidence. It may well have been crossing at the heritage farm in late August. Nineteen Ninety eight eight at the burn pile. That left behind the bullets law enforcement found in their search. The next day the episode ends by briefly running through some possible suspects a mystery Russian man that live with the victims a local mayor and a disgruntled property buyer who had pulled a gun on victor the year before he was murdered.

Doug Evans WILLIAM GIBSON Madeline Baron prosecutor Putnam Pit Boniface Madeline murder Ryan Darlene Madeline Barron One Robert Fahey Greg Lance ARLEEN ELDRIDGE Rabia Rebecca attorney Rebecca lavoix True Crime Review Doug Heaven
"madeline baron" Discussed on Inside Podcasting

Inside Podcasting

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"madeline baron" Discussed on Inside Podcasting

"Welcome to inside podcasting. This is many episode in which I chat with Kim Lyons the managing editor at inside dot com about my interview with Martine powers the host of post reports. If you haven't listened to that episode please go back and listen and then come back to hear this behind the scenes piece in either event enjoy our the latest episode is with Martine powers. Tell me a little bit about this interview. How did it go. What would you like to talk to. She was incredibly genuine and down to Earth. You get on the phone with these people she it was remote and so you're sort of making sure you're like testing testing and you know testing out your voice and during that period. She told me that she was nervous. Which knaw loved that because ah here I am so inexperienced. She's the adult in the room and for her to say that she was nervous. Maybe she said that to make me feel warrior. More reassured either rumbling though evidently worked definitely worked. She was just so real the whole time. I mean before departing she's like I have my phone balanced on on my knees. Were kind of laughing about that at one point during the podcast interviews she said you know. I gotta take off my sweater. I gotta get were comfortable like she. She was just very real you know she was. I mean she was buttoned up but I loved that she really just let herself be herself and I think that also is probably a function of the fact that one of the things she said actually in the podcast. Is that the podcast she loves the most are the ones where everything you're hearing is just real. You're hearing you're hearing. You're hearing the ladder you're hearing the the the authentic check moments and so and she just sort of personified that and it made me feel so comfortable. I really was grateful to her for that. Grant Akhund went through this episode. Thanks for listening to that guys. I hope you enjoy the mini episode this week. Next week. I speak with Madeline Baron the host of in the dark about her groundbreaking an award winning investigative show you can find this podcast. Wherever you find podcast you can find me on twitter at Sky Pillsbury. Thanks so much for listening

Kim Lyons Martine Madeline Baron managing editor knaw Grant Akhund twitter Sky Pillsbury
"madeline baron" Discussed on Inside Podcasting

Inside Podcasting

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"madeline baron" Discussed on Inside Podcasting

"Ah <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> thanks <Speech_Music_Female> so much for listening to <Speech_Female> that episode with Martine <Speech_Female> powers you <Speech_Female> can find our show at Post <Speech_Female> report dot. Com <Speech_Female> and you can find Ryan Martinez <Speech_Female> on twitter at Martine <Speech_Female> powers. I <Speech_Female> hope you join me next <Speech_Female> week. When I speak with <Speech_Female> Madeline Baron <Speech_Female> she is the host of <Speech_Female> the award winning investigative <Speech_Female> show <Speech_Music_Female> in the dark. We <Speech_Music_Female> discuss both seasons <Speech_Music_Female> of her show. I <Speech_Female> wanted to know how <Speech_Female> it felt. When <Speech_Female> authorities admitted <Speech_Female> to completely <Speech_Female> botching the case she <Speech_Female> covered for season one <Speech_Female> and I also wanted <Speech_Female> to hear what it was <Speech_Female> like while while she was reporting <Speech_Female> on season two <Speech_Female> to be at the Supreme <Speech_Female> Court as <Speech_Female> the justices debated <Speech_Female> issues <Speech_Female> that have been brought to light <Speech_Music_Female> by reporting <Speech_Female> from Madeleine and her <Speech_Female> amazing team. <Speech_Female> If if <Advertisement> you'd like to <Speech_Female> support the work we're doing <Speech_Female> here inside podcasting. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Please <Speech_Female> tell a podcast <Speech_Female> or an avid <Advertisement> podcast <Speech_Female> fan about <Advertisement> this show <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and or <Speech_Female> consider <Advertisement> subscribing <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> to our <Speech_Music_Female> free email mel newsletter <Speech_Music_Female> of the same name <Speech_Music_Female> at inside dot com <Speech_Female> forward slash podcasting <Speech_Female> of course you <Speech_Female> can also leave us a <Speech_Female> review on Apple podcast <Speech_Music_Female> and if you <Advertisement> don't know <Speech_Music_Female> how to do that just <Speech_Music_Female> reach out to me and <Speech_Music_Female> I will.

Martine Ryan Martinez Madeline Baron Madeleine Apple
"madeline baron" Discussed on In The Dark

In The Dark

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"madeline baron" Discussed on In The Dark

"Hi in the dark listeners. This is madeline baron host of the podcast. The work we do on the dark wouldn't be possible without donations from our listeners. We're so grateful for your support art to say. Thank you or making something that's only for people who've donated to support our show working on a special episode that will take you behind the scenes of one big day of reporting Friday June twenty first the day that the US Supreme Court overturned Curtis Lowers conviction in the the episode. We're going to pull back the curtain a bit and show you how we put all that reporting together because there was a lot going on that day in multiple states involving multiple storylines and a whole bunch of people. We're going to bring in our reporters and producers and we've got a special guest host joining us for the episode. I think you're going to love hello. Madeline Rebecca mcevoy a great podcast called crime writers on as I think you know I'm a huge fan of in the dark and it was such a thrill to be able to talk to you and in the darks other reporters and producers about what was really happening on that day and here's some tape that you guys didn't play in the podcast testing testing testing okay so we have a code word. You remember the code word. We're GONNA. Let's Boogie or we're. GonNa Boogie. We got a bogey that just means like trump everything and get out. We're just like oh my gosh this is we can do this but we actually have not planned to do this. It was never in the plan. He's coming. He's coming. He's coming Richard Evans okay so we we should go there. I'm fixing to go eat. They'll go equal to Zhiqiang would love to have a meal with you. You know the day is kind of winding to a close and the clock is ticking on and the the sun's starting to go down and have my man my time live is blowing up. Call me We'll be sending a special episode out to our donors on Tuesday September seventeenth. It won't be in our feet. You can only receive it if you donate if you've already donated to support in the dark. You'll receive an email that will I'll tell you how to get the episode. If you haven't donated yet and you like to hear the bonus episode you can go to in the dark podcast dot org and make a contribution any size donation nation will get you access to the episode and thanks again. We couldn't do it without you.

Madeline Rebecca mcevoy madeline baron US Supreme Court Zhiqiang Richard Evans Curtis
"madeline baron" Discussed on In The Dark

In The Dark

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"madeline baron" Discussed on In The Dark

"Martin five freeways we do know that they a yeah there is a seven child will be there to cover it the cases dropped curtis is set free will be there to in the meantime you could sign up for you know that's the best way to stay on top of breaking news and the cayton avenue information on new episodes coming out you could sign up at in the dark podcast dot org and while you're there thinking about donating some money to support are where this kind of ended up supporting is only possible because people like you support it could make a donation today in the dark podcast dot org and also going to get started soon reporting on a whole new story the season three of in the dark so please stay subscribed near podcast feed in the dark is reported and produced by me madeline baron senior producer some are free mark producer not only javan associate producer.

"madeline baron" Discussed on In The Dark

In The Dark

15:35 min | 2 years ago

"madeline baron" Discussed on In The Dark

"Just a note this episode contains vulgar language that many listeners will signed defensive previously on in the dark i wouldn't really soon they played more better not be data down put me the day came in by this it i'll leave you just say anything for sure studies of free of volunteer he shouldn't have done in the universe is insanity he came and got some give it to police chief last also he'll this is in the dark and investigative podcast at eight pm report i'm madeline baron season about the case curtis flowers black man in mississippi spent the past twenty two years fighting for his life in a white prosecutor said that the same time try just as hard executed in two thousand eleven days the usa supreme court overturned the conviction curtis flowers to ruin the justices found a prosecutor in mississippi violated by later the writing of curtis flowers by unlawfully blogging a lot has happened in the past eleven days and i'm not just talking about the supreme court in this episode we're going to give you three chapters each about something that happens just in the past few days three things better so that they could change the course of criticism entire chapter.

prosecutor usa supreme court mississippi madeline baron two thousand eleven days twenty two years eleven days
"madeline baron" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

Slate's Political Gabfest

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"madeline baron" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

"I mean, but she she watch the whole show and she watched some of the second season two well available and powerful which is just echoing what he was saying. But just. I mean. Okay. But let's get to the to the harder issue, which is to me. What is the nation of the artist? And I'll pause it. I will except for the purposes of discussion that Netflix and not the artists. Netflix the commercial exploiter of the artistry. But the responsibility artist when it comes to something, which is we know to be socially contagious or viral contagious. Like is Is it a. is the artist obliged not to write about drug user to create art about drug use? But knowing that that that will entice people to to consider drug use and some of those people will be drawn in and may have their lives ruined as a result or to do the same about drinking or do the same about eating unhealthy foods or showing people smoking cigarettes like the KU like can you? Are you not allowed to show coolness mean associated with someone smoking cigarettes? Like is is there any? What risk? Do we run when we hold art to the standards of public health? You know, I normally think it's not a good idea. That was just a snippet from our slate plus conversation, if you want to hear the whole conversation, go to slate dot com slash gap has plus to become a member today. I'm Madeline baron posted the investigative series in the dark our second season of in the dark told the story of Curtis flowers a black man in Mississippi tried six times for the same crime. And a white prosecutor determined to see him executed, a reporter is revealed new facts in evidence and last fall the supreme court announced it would hear Curtis's case now in the dark has reopened season to cover the supreme court's ruling which could overturn Curtis flowers conviction. You can listen to new episodes of in the dark now wherever you listen to podcasts.

Curtis Netflix Madeline baron Mississippi prosecutor reporter
"madeline baron" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

02:47 min | 2 years ago

"madeline baron" Discussed on Today, Explained

"People. One way to look at this is to say, okay. What does that mean? That means that those defendants got a jury that was not racially Representative of the place where they live. But there's also something else that to me is equally worth thinking about which is that. If I am a black person living in this this area. My chances of serving on jury seemed to be lower than that of white people. You know, that that I am if I were African American living this area, I would be being denied in lot of cases the ability to take part in. What is one of the most powerful ways, you can take part in a democracy, which is deciding someone's guilt. And so when we see a pattern of basically disenfranchisement from being on a jury that to me is the other concern that arises beyond was a particular trial fair or not. But the reality is that unless you know, like a year long study is conducted with paper documents scanned spreadsheets made methodologies create. Did no one will ever know whether or not this is happening where you live. And just to bring this back to Curtis. What would happen to him? If you wins at the supreme court. So that would mean as conviction would get overturned. But that doesn't mean that he would necessarily get out of prison because even if the court finds Encarta sus favor, which would be finding that Doug Evans violated. The constitution by intentionally striking black people from the jury DA, Doug Evans would still have the chance to try this case again, so Doug Evans could bring it to trial for a seventh time. Madeline baron is the host of in the dark. It's podcast all about the case of Curtis flowers and a few more episodes about him and his case will drop after today's oral arguments. And again once there's a decision, I'm Sean Rama's firm. This is today explained. Thanks again to calm for supporting the show today. Right now, you can get twenty five percents off a premium com. Subscription at my new favorite website com dot com slash explained. That is C A L M dot com slash explained unlimited access to all that good com. Content at com dot com slash explained.

Doug Evans Curtis supreme court Representative Madeline baron Sean Rama
"madeline baron" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:25 min | 2 years ago

"madeline baron" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Flowers, six appeal challenging the constitutionality of this. Jury selection is what reached the supreme court today host and lead reporter of in the dark Madeline baron was at the court this morning, and she joins me. Now. Welcome thanks for having me. So, you know, this case just about as well as anybody out there. But for people who have not been listening to the podcast, tell us who is Curtis flowers, and why is he been behind bars for so long so Curtis flowers is a man who grew up in the small town Winona Mississippi, and he had a pretty remarkable life until nineteen Ninety-six when four people were shot in the head in the small town furniture store as a store that Curtis had worked at for a few days earlier that summer and it didn't take long for law enforcement to narrow in on Curtis as its top suspect. Even though Curtis didn't have a criminal record, even though nobody witnessed murders. There was no DNA no, slam dunk evidence. But Curtis was the one that they thought did it, and they built a case against him based on largely circumstantial evidence evidence was really that thin. Against him. Then but enough to convince some jurors I mean convince dirt for many years, but when we looked at the evidence did not hold up to scrutiny like you here on the podcast, the for everything from the forensic science and the case to the jailhouse informants to the witnesses who say they saw Curtis not killing anybody but walking around town that day on his way to or from the murders. None of it held up. So today the supreme court looked at one slice of this case. They're not looking at whether or not courtesies guilty or not guilty of the murders. They're looking at whether or not this district attorney, basically stacked the deck for his jury in a racist fashion. What is the what is his what is Curtis flowers lawyer's argument? So they say look when you look at these six trials of Curtis flowers, you see one thing that is almost always the same. You see a jury that is either all white or mostly white every time and the defense says didn't get that way by chance that was a strategy by the prosecutor in this case, the elected district attorney, Doug Evans, and what they said. Evans was doing was that Evans was intentionally striking African Americans from the jury because of their race. And you cannot do that that's against the constitution. The courts been very clear on that you can straight people for a whole bunch of reasons can construct them from us any reason at all you cannot strike them. However because of their race that's against the fourteenth amendment. And so that's what Curtis's lawyers were at the court today. Trying to say that is exactly what happened in this case. And what have said not just look this is what happened in Curtis's latest trial. But they pointed out the fact that the court has actually caught the same district. Attorney twice the four in the flowers trials violating the constitution in this exact same way happening Curtis his second trial, and it happened in third trial. So they're saying look if you're trying to determine whether this prosecutor is credible. You should consider as record the state on the other hand says Doug Evans has valid reasons for striking these African Americans from this jury trial had nothing to do with race. Exactly. One of the arguments says one of these jurors some of these jurors new. Defendants family. They had doubts about the death penalty and things like that. So that's the two sides. Basically has it breaks down? But it's really was interesting to see how this unfolded at the court, and how did it how did the Justice system to be leaning very favorable to flowers? I would say overall interestingly enough, the newest Justice Justice Cavanaugh was very outspoken during arguments about the importance of fair trials and avoiding racial discrimination in jury selection. He talked about how it doesn't just matter for the defendant to make sure the defendant gets a fair trial. But he also talked about how for a community. This is important that if we're going to trust our criminal Justice system, we need to make sure that we do not have racism in jury selection. So he kind of carried forth on it. A little unexpectedly. In your reporting. The again, this is separate from what was in the trial. You looked at Doug Evans's that the district attorney his record. In jury cases outside the flowers case explain how you examine that and what you've found. Well, we wanted to see does this pattern. Hold up across all of his trials. Not just the flowers trials. So he had been the DA since one thousand nine hundred eighty two. So what we did was we went about trying to locate through all these different courthouses and north central Mississippi, these trial transcripts, Jerry less. So we had a reporter who spent months just literally hauling a scanner in these courthouses scanning over one hundred thousand documents pages of documents, then our data reporter analyze those records to come up with one very important sentence, which is and we look at all these trials in Doug Evans district since he became DA in one thousand nine hundred two based on the records, we found he and his office were striking black people from Jerry's at nearly four and a half times the rate that they're striking white people four and a half times the rate, and this is something that you would not be able to. Find out by just going to the courthouse. It really took almost a year of work. So let's say Curtis flowers wins this appeal before the supreme court what happens then well, interestingly enough that is not the end of the story because the prosecutor would get the chance to decide whether to try this case again the same prosecutor same prosecutor, which would be a seventh trial. The podcast is in the dark Madeline baron. Thank you so much. Thank you. Eastern parts of the.

Curtis flowers Doug Evans supreme court prosecutor Madeline baron Justice Justice Cavanaugh lead reporter Winona Mississippi Mississippi Attorney reporter Jerry
"madeline baron" Discussed on In The Dark

In The Dark

04:46 min | 2 years ago

"madeline baron" Discussed on In The Dark

"The United States has branded Curtis flowers petition for review the court will determine whether there was racial is in the dark and investigative podcast. By APM reports, I'm Madeline baron. This season is about the case of Curtis flowers a black man from a small town in Mississippi spent the past twenty two years fighting for his life and a white prosecutor who spent that same time trying just as hard to execute. The case of Curtis flowers. His appeal is now moving quickly. The supreme court will hear oral arguments tomorrow, and the court will be focusing on one thing whether DA Doug Evans, violated the constitution when he struck black people from the jury pool Curtis's latest trial trial six. If they decide that Evans did overturn Curtis's conviction if not Curtis will move one step closer to execution. And so we're back with an all new set of episodes that will take you to the supreme court to the oral arguments and back to my known her Curtis family is awaiting the court's decision and back to district attorney Doug Evans the man who's decision to try Curtis. Six times is how we got here in the first place N, we'll tell you about some new things we've uncovered that's all coming up in the next four episodes of in the dark. Curtis flowers case going to come down to what the supreme court. Decides supreme court doesn't usually make decisions out of the blue. It makes them based on cases that have come before it in the past. And so to understand what's going to happen in Curtis. His case, you have to know what's happened before when other big cases of alleged racial discrimination in jury selection have gone before the supreme court because these other cases are clues to how the court will decide Curtis's case. And probably the biggest one of those cases is one we told you about earlier in the season. It's called Batson v Kentucky and it happened back in nineteen Eighty-six. James Batson was a black man who was charged with burglary and receiving stolen goods. He was found guilty by an all white jury. That's attorney argued before the supreme court that injury selection. It was clear that the prosecutor was striking black people because of their race. And that doing that violated the constitution. When the prosecutor does is he is attacking democratic aspect of the jury were in the community consents to the conviction supreme court agreed and Batson won his case. And a principal was established that using strikes to dismiss perspective jurors solely because of their race was unconstitutional. After the Batson decision. Whenever defense attorney was suspicious that a prosecutor was striking a black person because of the race that attorney could file a Batson challenge. And the judge could force the prosecutor to give the reasons why he struck that particular the prosecutor could give basically any reason as long as that reason wasn't that the person was black. It wasn't that hard for prosecutors to get around Batson. Unfortunately, it has been virtually impossible to succeed on Batson claims just about as difficult as it was before Batson was decided this is a defense. Attorney named Stephen bright. He's argued several these kinds of cases before the supreme court almost anyone can think of reasons that don't involve race for why a juror has been struck. The real question is how do, you know, whether when a strike is being used that it's being used because a race or it's being used for some other reason because. As you have to in a way here into the mind of the prosecutor, he have to peer into the mind of the prosecutor, and it's of course impossible to do that. Since Batson the court has come up with some ways to try to peer into the minds of prosecutors to find out whether they're telling the truth when they claim their strikes aren't about race, for example, in two thousand five there was a case out of Texas called Miller L a murder case at trial, the prosecution struck ten of the eleven African Americans who are in the jury pool they gave a bunch of reasons none of them having to do with race. But it turned out this district attorney's office in Texas actually had a written policy about race and jury selection there was a manual which the prosecutor's office..

supreme court Curtis flowers James Batson prosecutor attorney Doug Evans United States APM Madeline baron Mississippi Texas Stephen bright principal burglary Kentucky murder twenty two years
"madeline baron" Discussed on Longform Podcast

Longform Podcast

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"madeline baron" Discussed on Longform Podcast

"The co hosts Aaron Lamour Evan Ratliff, gentlemen. Hello. Hi. Nice to see you guys. U2.? I've done an interview on the show in a long time. What are you gonna to begin? Yeah. Nonsense got a podcast, godfather and shenanigans. But you did do on this week. I did I talked to a podcast her Madeline baron the host and reporter of in the dark because listen in the dark. This is this. I'm going to say you stole this one for me. I'm in the dark fan. I I wanted to do this podcast very envious to this podcast of all of the the entire spectrum of I'm going to say loosely defined crime podcasts that have come out in the last five years or so I find that I recommend in the dark season one the most people. Yeah, I season to just wrapped. Month or two ago. And I thought that was also getting tastic metal is good at her job. And we talked about sort of like making the transition from reporter to podcast host. And it was good. I've been winded over well. If you're looking to make a transition in your life, maybe from one field to another good way to do it. A starting an Email newsletter at helps people know about what your field of expertise is build an audience you can start when for free with Malcolm without paying until you hit a certain number of subscriber. So there is nothing stopping you. Thanks to mail champ for sponsoring the show. A now here's max with Madeline baron..

Madeline baron Aaron Lamour Evan Ratliff reporter Malcolm five years
"madeline baron" Discussed on The Tip Off

The Tip Off

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"madeline baron" Discussed on The Tip Off

"Doc is one of my favorite podcasts around and the second series blue. It's an investigation of a cold, but it's done with such rig. I respect it really is. So on this episode, we're going to hear how did it will look at how they got a few of that big findings, but I'd also recommend you go, this whole series released. This is the tip. My name is Madeline baron, and I'm the host and lead reporter of investigative podcast called in the dark. Madeline is about to set out on a journey that will take a year of her life. It will see his scrambling all over the United States, an even upping roots and moving house, but she doesn't know that yet. You see, she's just sat down a computer. It all started with an Email. So after our first season of in the dark, we asked listeners to send in their story tips and we got hundreds and hundreds of story ideas amongst Olo story. Tips is those one Email is stood out. There was one that was very short and it was an Email from a woman who said that she lived in lives in Mississippi. And she said that there is a man there named Curtis flowers who was on death row and who'd been tried six times. And at first when we got this Email, we were, you know six six trials is that that can't possibly be true. But it was true when muddle ended a bit digging. She found out that, yes, this guy, a man called Curtis flowers had indeed been tried six times for the same crime, six times for murder, and that immediately got our attention because we were thinking, how can it happen? Know what is going on in in a case that would lead it to be tried six times the man. Curtis flowers have been convicted for the murder, four people who were all found shot dead execution style in a small family run furniture store in the town.

Madeline baron Curtis flowers murder lead reporter United States Mississippi Olo
"madeline baron" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"madeline baron" Discussed on On The Media

"On the media is supported by akimbo a new podcast by entrepreneur and bestselling author seth godin over a million readers turned two sets daily blog to inspire their work sets new podcast akimbo is a lot like the blog no guests no fancy production just twenty minutes of insights you can use in your life or business learn why grand openings are overrated how to overcome creative block and how to embrace the power of placebos subscribed to akimbo in your podcast app or visit seth's podcasts dot com to learn more on the media is supported by magoo students applying to college or grad schools should not have to settle for boring overpriced prep classes that's why magoo makes online test prep for exams like the act sat gre and g mat accessible effective and enjoyable magoo students gain access to the highest quality video lessons practice questions and expert support at a fraction of the cost of other courses enter promo code otm at magoo dot com for twenty percent off online test prep i'm madeline baron post to be investigative podcast series in the dark we just launched in the dark season two which explores the case of four people murdered in a small town in mississippi and the black man who's been tried six times for that crime the apm reports team has been investigating the story for more than a year and i can't wait to tell you what we found out you can find in the dark season two now on apple podcasts.

seth godin magoo mississippi apm madeline baron apple twenty minutes twenty percent
It would be the world’s largest airplane. It’s being built by a billionaire. And it’s getting ready to fly.

Armstrong and Getty

02:42 min | 3 years ago

It would be the world’s largest airplane. It’s being built by a billionaire. And it’s getting ready to fly.

"Almost twenty one years ago a young black man named curtis flowers was convicted of horrific crime the murder of four people in a small town in mississippi he won his appeal but the prosecutor tried him again he's now been tried six times for the crime and a lot of people think he's innocent i just thought that he done for this though where the proof mississippi mississippi you know we all know would go down and mississippi once we get you in the courtroom if you black we get i'm madeline baron host of in the dark a peabody award winning investigative podcast from american public media we're looking at the story of a man caught new terrifying loop of injustice a story of one man's fight for his life in the dark season two begins may i listen unsubscribe now on apple podcasts don stab billionaire paul allen's building the biggest airplane ever should they're building it in the desert in california to fly as soon as this summer anybody who ever saw howard hughes's spruce goose he was a billionaire backing the he was the first billionaire anyway he built a giant plane called the spruce goose it used to be docked in long beach or it was it was in a building in long beach near where the queen mary but they moved it for some reason anyway i saw them both many many years ago i think it may be an aviator museum in mcminnville oregon right now these spruce goose was enormous like you can't even believe it it it barely flu so it's merely a plane why is he buying the gigantic plane or building it rather he's going want to giant hey fellas i really liked to have are really really big plane it's so big as twenty eight wheels powered by six seven forty seven engines it would weigh one point three million pounds it's bigger than the length of a football field if you can picture that look at that that's a group of people in between the two parts of the plane there that shows you again it's win hold the jack just insane how big that is anyway hope i get to see a moran plane so speaking of airplanes funny coincidence where's the big summit between kim jong fat and president orange going to be maralago.

Madeline Baron President Trump Kim Jong Football FLU Mcminnville Howard Hughes Apple Curtis Flowers Oregon California Paul Allen Peabody Award Prosecutor Mississippi Murder Three Million Pounds Twenty One Years