31 Burst results for "Madeleine Albright"

"madeleine albright" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

04:21 min | 6 months ago

"madeleine albright" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

"Mr for who was secretary state In the first one term had made very clear that he would not stay for a second term. So what happened was what i call the period of great mentioning and because i have been out there. My name was among those being mentioned and then somebody said well. A woman can't be secretary of state because arab leaders won't deal with the woman so then what happened was the erin bab masters at the u. n. Got together and they said we've had no problems dealing with ambassador albright. We wouldn't have any problems doing secretary albright so that went away but then somebody at the white house. And i never wanna know who said yes. Madeleine's on the list but she's second tier so i was absolutely sure nothing would happen. and and i didn't wanna campaign for the job and And i. I really think it wasn't going to happen. So what did happen. In december fourth and fifth of the nineteen ninety six i get a phone call from erskine. Bowles who was chief of staff and he said if the president united states were to call you tomorrow. Would you take the call a If the president united states would ask you to be secretary of state would you say yes. He said well go home. The president will call you in the morning and it took him a while to call me. And i thought he's changed his mind but he did call and asked me to be secretary of state so i loved it. But this is the next part In terms of the period of great mentioning one of the things that happened was that first lady hillary clinton and the president. I sometimes travelled together and we were abroad and I would introduce her. She would introduce him and we were in central somewhere of so president. Clinton actually said that At that period of great mentioning that hillary would come to him and say..

Clinton december fourth tomorrow Madeleine second tier second term hillary hillary clinton Bowles one albright first one term erin bab first lady ambassador fifth secretary erskine nineteen ninety six white house
"madeleine albright" Discussed on Altamar - Navigating the High Seas of Global Politics

Altamar - Navigating the High Seas of Global Politics

03:31 min | 7 months ago

"madeleine albright" Discussed on Altamar - Navigating the High Seas of Global Politics

"And adding some other parts to it but like so many negotiations. The question is where do you begin. Who says what. When and there's been a recent report by the monitoring group at the un that the iranians have been really really engaging in terms of how to develop their nuclear capabilities with the kind of really expanding. What they're doing that they shouldn't have been doing. And there's also increasing concerns of expansion of terror groups like al qaeda and isis into a guy in particular in exceedingly vulnerable areas. Like this hell so. There's violence displacement of illegal activity also in the sub saharan region. We see china. Extensively reaching belt road initiatives and but the worldwide france seems to be the only country actually taking action. Is this a giant hot spot that could grow. I definitely think it can for a number of reasons. People say but they're fifty four different countries in africa and they have different backgrounds history. Ethnic composition various different problems with their neighbors and They are often not really part of the story enough. In terms of what is happening. They are victims of climate change in many ways whole areas having turned into desert which creates people that can't make a living and have contributed to the migration issues. They do have problems with covid. They are told to wash their hands when they don't even have enough water to drink. So the question is the distribution of the vaccine. Hauer they taking care of that and then also that they do have different trade ties. By the way i have said the chinese must be getting very fat because the belt keeps getting larger and larger and they are using their economic suasion to a really seduce a lot of countries in africa. Who van are saddled with what is known as the debt trap where all of a sudden they are more debtors to the chinese and being really recipients of aid and so it is a very difficult and complicated area that requires attention. There's no question by the. Us and the world for any number of reasons not for colonial purposes but for really working together to solve the kinds of various disputes. Some problems that they have another place where the chinese have opened the notch on their bell doesn't latin america which is in decline after decades of economic recovery and combating inequality but now there's no rampant corruption poor management that the co virus problematic leaders whether it's of course in venezuela but the also in countries like mexico and brazil does the us and europe have a leadership role to play in stabilising a region which is also fundamentally western region. Well i do think that we have to remember that. This is the western hemisphere. Our relationship american relationship with latin america is a very difficult. Frankly which is that. We are damned if you do damned if we don't if we don't pay attention to them. They're very angry for good reason and if we do they say we're interfering and this has been going on i think for quite a long time and by the way the most radical revolutionary thing..

africa venezuela china al qaeda sub saharan region hemisphere fifty four different countries mexico brazil american france latin america iranians chinese decades isis europe virus
Muscling up to China and 25 years since Srebrenica

Between The Lines

28:17 min | 1 year ago

Muscling up to China and 25 years since Srebrenica

"Tom Switzer, he and welcome to another episode off between the lines now today on the program will be commemorating the twenty fifth anniversary of Europe's worst massacre since the Holocaust in ninety, ninety, five more than eight thousand people died in Shrimp Nitsa. The town was supposed to be a U N protected safe haven in the vicious civil war that tore Yugoslav apart instead the civilians ended up being massacred by Bosnian Serbs. Were lightning fast with their superior weapons. They easily overran the lightly. I'm Bosnian government troops and the token full civilian peacekeepers. The UN's Valley to protect the civilians inspired Washington to launch unilateral action against Serbia and end the civil war. Would things be the same today now? That's later in the program, but first defense. Last week the Morrison. Government launched a defence strategy and force structure review now the move signals a major shift away from the strategy outlined in the last defence white paper. Remember that just four years ago in two thousand sixteen. It plotted out Australia's strategic costs for the next decade. But that White Paper has as we know been rapidly overtaken by Vince covert China or that now the new review has promised two hundred and seventy billion dollars over the next decade to enhance Australia's defence capabilities with renewed focus on areas like Saba and spice capabilities and the possible development of hop sonic weapons will be fitting aircraft with long-range anti-ship missiles, increasing underwater surveillance and boosting fuel ammunitions reserves. Now, underscoring the seriousness of the shift, the Prime Minister even drew comparisons to the nineteen thirties and the lead up to world. War Two that period of the nineteen thirties. Is Been Something I've been revisiting on a very regular basis and when you connect by the economic challenges and the global uncertainty. It can be very haunting, but is the money too much or not enough is going to all the right places, and we'll do enough to safeguard Australia from China's increasing assertiveness and is rapidly growing military capabilities. What's the role of Australia's diplomacy? And all of this will joining me to discuss this at three distinguished guests. By skill is professor of Asia Pacific Security Studies at Macquarie University Holiday Bites. Thank you good to be here Melissa Conley. Tar is a research fellow at the Asia Institute at the University of Melbourne. Hi There Melissa could to speak again Tom. And Pay. The Jennings is executive director of the Australian Strategic Policy Institute. Tom No. Can you talk us through the top of scenarios and potential conflicts that the defense review is preparing us for the scenario that the review is focusing on is one involving a high end conventional conflict, so I've gone to the days of stabilization operations in t more Counterterrorism operations in Afghanistan This document is preparing foresight on onsite conflict. Involving countries that have sophisticated military forces. And, of course, the document doesn't say. I don't think it would be reasonable to expect it to say. That China is the problem. But let me tell you China is the problem that is the now neoplasia competitive that way of thinking about when we think about what's adequate in terms of the topic of military capability we need to have. and to does reflect to change. From past years Tom I recall when I started by defense career, we were thinking much more about the risks presented by Indonesia, and the so called low level in cushions in the northwest. Of course, that's no longer features in anyone's strategic thinking. Really it's about China and the risks that the People's Republic is presenting to all of its neighbors in abroad since in the Indo Pacific region and beyond I cabinet crudely putting it some sites laying the groundwork for fortress Australia US sign. This is preparing us to join a potential use LID. Containment slash war against China for example to protect Taiwan Peter Jennings. I think that is it covers a spectrum of possibilities. One possibility which I think is Epson you were in terms of language of the document is that we might conceivably end up having to face military conflict without being able to rely on the direct combat support of the United States, and that's what leads to discussions around extra stockpiling munitions and fuel insightful. But I think in general terms. Yes, the expectation is that Australia. Through its history has been a country that forms coalitions usually have like minded partners, the share the same types of objectives. And the the plan will design the Defense Force. Really gives us the capacity to do that with Rachel Ellis lecture, example, Japan but also with our traditional ally the United States okay bates skill. You've recently completed a review of China's defense capabilities and its recent military modernization, specifically looking at the implications for Australia Wind you expect the Peo- The People's Liberation Army and its navy. When do you expect them to have the capability to project power as far as Australia annual Pacific knives, well in many respects Tom, they already can I mean they have the long range missile capabilities to do that? Know as a from a standoff position launched from their own from their own homeland against hours. But what I think, the the new strategy is looking at is really the development of capability over the next ten fifteen twenty years, and that's by the Chinese own own acknowledged calendar that they would be able to by that time of mass, a large enough capability, both in terms of its long range strike, you know striking from their own homeland, but also bill to project. Project Power passed the so-called first and second island change and being a position to more directly threatened through those platforms Australian security. So you know we're talking ten or fifteen year window here and I think given the time it does take to try and respond to develop the the deterrent and defense capabilities for Australia. That's that's you know that's in some ways a short window. for Australia to be mobilizing in reaction Melissa Tali. What's the role of a strong diplomacy and all these well I think it needs to be growl. And one of the concerns when we look at the deteriorating strategic environment is we think all that's a defense problem? And so when the prime minister launches the strategic update with those comparisons with the nineteen thirties. It pushes US toward seeing in purely military terms but we don't just want to say things in that security lands, we want to think about all of the parts about national power projection, so that's diplomacy and development as well as defense I think if if people thought about it I think what we invest in all three strongly, but that's not where it is if you look at federal budget fifty. Fifty nine billion to defense and less than seven billion to diplomacy and development together the lowest point with ahead in our history and I think we missing that opportunity. If we don't take US seriously, the way that diplomacy and development can shape things in the world so I was struck. Today was a defendant looking at the latest poll on what are the major concerns that Australians have at the moment of the top threats in the world and the first five, a role nontraditional that drought, environment, disaster, climate change, pandemics, and downtown, global economy, and those places where you know military spending isn't going to help shape that environment. So we need to have an effect on those. We need to be thinking much more about what we can do in the diplomacy and development to mind Peter Jennings. What would you say in to Melissa's observations? Because they reflect a certain mindset that that perhaps we should be focused more on non state actors rather than say China for instance well, I think all of these you know threats that have to be taken seriously. I'm and simply because we're living in the middle of a pandemic for example, doesn't the climate change is gone away in this no longer going to present a problem to us. I guess what I'd say. Is that the you know the five things Melissa listed? That were in the featured in the low e Poland terms of popular concerns. Are also the things which could. In different ways late to the risks of conflict escalating in the Indo Pacific region generally so You know my my view, please while I would like to see spending on diplomacy increased. While I. Say Development Assistance is being something which is effectively the United soft in of Australian power, and the military is the hot end of Australian power. I think. The message against all of these areas is that we have just been underinvesting for decades underinvesting for decades, so we're we're all. High fiving ourselves at just reaching about two percent of gross national product, being spent on defense, but that is compared to what we spending in cold or years, which was sometimes between three and a half percent in four percent of rustic product. So what we have grown used to Tom I would say is. Free written on the United. States code tiles of security for for decades. We've dramatically under. Invested in the things that we need to do to strengthen Australia's position, not just militarily, but also diplomat. A now. We're rather surprised to hear the news that Gosh the bill is a lot more expensive than we really thought. It was only if you've got that confidence in the US. and. In fact, the whole trump stories, the story of the Americans really big being fed up with the rest of the world, thinking that the US can fund the bill for their security, so we're going to have to do more and I think we're going to have to do it against multiplicity of areas not. Justin sought the defense organization. We'll some scholars such as you want and James Current from the University of Sydney. They say that this document sounds a lot like an acknowledgement that the US might not always be there to help us out. By are we starting to plan for more independent Australian defense posture I think it would be a wise move to keep that option open when you think of the capabilities that the Chinese developing in which do have a direct pose a direct threat to Australia or could do so. In many respects, the I think the types of threats that you might not expect an immediate or even timely response on the part of the United States what I'm thinking here. Cyber capabilities is a huge priority for the Chinese. We already know what they see the sort of capability. They can wield against Australia and that's not the sort of thing you can expect a kind of cavalry to. Lead the charge from from Washington to come to Australia's defence slowly long range strike capability on the part of the Chinese capability. They already have in which are going to continue to develop. which could threaten Australia down the road now? These are capabilities that I think that Australia's going to have to develop their own defenses for. They can certainly do that with United States, but again it's not necessarily the sort of threat that we would expect some sort of traditional ally joint response not to make it well. Some of are in listeners will email me and they'll say that if Uncle Sam struggles to police. It's own CDs. Melissa. How on Earth Can Uncle Sam Police? The Asia Pacific region in the face of a rising China. What's your sense about us staying power in the next decade or two in look? It's difficult One of the things that strategic update looks at is more threats to the global rules order, and unfortunately the you know, the US is part of that. the US is not along with the strategies interest on things like global trading system, and a number of international issues like global health where we would say you need to be supporting. A Global Response that said I don't think the strategic update will be read negatively in. Washington, it's my guess. it very clearly couched in terms that I think the US will lock about Australia contributing more and having more self. that could be seen as a statement that we think that the US might not have outback, but can also be seen as something that the US has been for for a long time. I particularly liked a few elements of the update things like making sure that we have. You know material ammunition You know that aren't going to be disrupted. Buckle supply trying having more capability eight industrial cut suffering capability here antiques fuel reserves, which is not as long sane as an issue for us, so I mean those are things that are worth investing in. Regardless of US resolve because as we've seen from COVID, we know that supply chain can be disrupted very quickly and easily, and it's worth having eligibilities. Cepeda Jennings bite skill and Melissa Conley Toilet and Melissa. The Pacific step up last year. That realigned Australia's development budget to deal with some of the strategic challenges posed by China in the Pacific Do you think it goes far enough? The step up was followed recently by strategies new International Development Policy Partnerships for recovery, and that's made it very clear that strategies focus should be on the Pacific and also southeast. Asia including. Indonesia and team August. I think that has a very clear statement about what we want. In the region of being entrusted trusted development partner and influencing those societies that we think positive for four region. Again you're going to. You're going to say you. Hear this from me all the time, but again the problem is that we not really making much invasive lunch, so partnerships for recovery head no new money it talked about the massive challenges that covered as as creating for for the for the Pacific, and for for our region broadly, and the only funding announcement was that we're going to repurpose the money. We would have spent on sending Australian. Volunteers in scholarship holders. And we're GONNA use that so I I suppose I. Feel a little bit with all the areas, not actually include district update in that as well that what we've seen through the foreign policy, White Paper and International Development Policy through to to the defense. Strategic Updike is. We talk about how. how? What a time! These these frosty leaving a contested difficult awful environment that we've now got to leave in and the Dow L. Easy Times over, and then we say, and we're not gonNA. Give any new money so I mean the defense announcement is essentially just that we're going to continue to you know, extrapolate out the money that was planned to be spent in the twenty twenty six, and we're going to extrapolate that out to twenty thirty terabytes skill. Do we risk getting into a bidding war for influence in the Pacific? I don't know if it's a risk. If it is a risk worth worth taking. I mean obviously the Pacific region is so extremely important Australia's future. Both for for defense reasons for regional engagement for diplomatic reasons, developing reasons and the like. so It's quite possible that we're entering in a more competitive phase with China in this. SITES WRIST BYTES I'm talking about more the budgetary concerns he because in the wake of the Corona Virus Crosses. There'll be serious limits on how we can spend on these things scholley. Yes, there is and party left to be be developed for that, but you know when you're talking about your own backyard. I mean I I. I don't think it's the kind of country that can simply. Pretended it's by itself getting back pay to Jennings to the region, generally in the rise of what. Angus Campbell is of the Defence Force he's talked about the rise of political warfare, the idea of grey zone warfare things like cyber attacks, economic coercion influence operations that fall below the traditional threshold of war. He says we need a whole of government response to it. I, you seeing that whole of government approach happening in Campbell, or is this Manley focus on defense and the spy agency so far Peter Jennings. It probably is focused on the national security agency's Tom. That's not too surprising because you'd expect them to sort of pick up on the risks I. But General Campbell is right. It does need to be all government is. There's a whole lot of things happening there that simply cannot and should not be done by defense organizations. and. I think that realization is slowly dawning. Along as both of the speakers have said that actually ladyship comes with cost of infrastructure is going to play that role, but you know, give you a small example of this we. We have lost the ability to broadcast into the South Pacific and Southeast Asia. In a way that we used to very successfully over over decades to give us the capacity to do that. We're probably talking about you know that. He million a year forty million a year, which sounds a lot of defend. It's nothing if you're in the Defense Department. Let me tell you. But you need to be able to do things like that. To be the truth teller in the region to actually tell the region that there are alternatives to Chinese Communist Party authoritarianism I think that's what's needed with responding to this grey zone on threat. Is Actually to be the truth teller. In this part of the will and getting our system in Cambridge used to that reality to understanding what needs to be done. To starting at different type of conversation with our region. With our own people for that matter that that is a sort of a psychological change which I can see happening, but we're not quite yet. There's a bit of work still to be done to get to that point Melissa. Conley Tyler. Is, just responding on that. I agree entirely with what pitcher saying on on broadcasting. It's a small investment, such a an increasing influence. It should be Brian and I hope that did that's being seen. I think having defense voices. I will help a lot in a banks, seriously I'm but just went. When you ask Tom Balaton host government and what's happening there? There are some really good examples, so for example win. This Pacific step pop started an office of the Pacific was established in that apartment and tried and each job. He's to be that coordinating body, and it's bringing together the. The defense, the development and the diplomacy in a way that he's gone to maximize our influence. and I've noticed this a lot more discussion about that that three. How do you bring defense development diplomacy communities together? I'm involved in initiate the Pacific. Four Day and I think a lot of people not talking about what more we can do for that that joined up coordination to make the most about national instruments by skill. You're an expert on China. The elephant in the room of course is China doing need to be careful not to overestimate China's military strength. What about the weaknesses? Exactly right I mean you have to know your enemy's weakness as well as their strengths in the case of China, they are undertaking enormous reforming organization effort. They're pouring billions of dollars into new capabilities, but there's a lot of things we need to recognize I. Mean One is that the Chinese have not fought a shooting war and more than forty years. They are have no. They have zero experience in high end combat against a serious. Adversary, scenario, so that's not to downplay them, but to understand that they've got enormous obstacles to overcome that day. Themselves acknowledge that they themselves. No, they have to overcome, and that's why we had this window that we've been talking about. A fifteen to twenty years. to try and develop capabilities to get in front of the kinds of things that the Chinese want to bring to bear around. Around, twenty thirty or twenty, thirty, five, twenty, forty, paid-up Melissa to be continued. Thanks so much for being on our in. Thank you, tell my pleasure. Thank you, Tom. That was paid jennings. He's executive director of the Australian strategic pulsing suit by skill professor of Asia Pacific Security Studies at Macquarie University and Melissa Commonly Tyler. She's a research fellow at the Asia Institute at the University of Melbourne. These between the lines with Tom Switzer. Coming next, we're going to replay a version of a segment from between the lines. I 'cause commemorating the massacre of Bosnian Muslims at shredded Nitsa on the eleventh of July nodding ninety. Five twenty five years ago this week. More than eight thousand people were killed by Serb forces. It was the worst massacre. Europe had seen since the Holocaust. Serve softening up Trevor Nature for the army's final push into the town. Town of course was supposed to be a safe haven protected by the United Nations, but the civilians ended up being sitting ducks as I woke Larry. Hollingsworth Remembers I. Myself Feel Devastated and ashamed I was there with them? When we told them that it was a safe haven I watched. Many of these people walk in with the minimal possessions into shreds, knowing that it was a safe haven, and now they're fleeing out because we've let them down, let them down to the extent that within dies. About Twenty three thousand women and children were deported, and about eight thousand Muslim men and boys left behind where executed and buried in mass graves. Now, reports from the time described, frightening scenes stiffen overawed from medicines on frontier. Speaking he. Loading some of the children and women into buses, but there's no indication as to where it was buses, going with seen some horrifying streaming, going on women and children going into the buses being taken away from their family This was going on with a lot of crying a lot of panicking. The slaughter had been planned carefully and executed with precision. All the wall Dutch. Pace is literally stood by, and did nothing indeed even when the Serb assault on Srebrenica was imminent. in-command is still rejected Kohl's racetracks. Positions. Pope John Paul. The second declared ribbon Nitsa a defeat for civilization as media reports begins to reveal the scale of the unfolding tragedy. The UN says nine hundred thousand people are still unaccounted for. About some became clear as government soldiers emerging from the forest in central Bosnia, told of horrific massacres at the hands of the Serbs one young. People executing them on spot, but this didn't come out of the blue. By the time this massacre took place the civil war that tore the former Yugoslavia. Repot was heading into its fourth year. More than a million people have been displaced, and the world became familiar with a new term ethnic cleansing. So? Who is to blame for these well? Let's start with the United. Nations from ninety two to ninety, five shrivel Nitsa was the world's first union declared civilian syphon. It was supposed to to her aggression. It was supposed to aggression and set the scene for political negotiations to end hostilities between the Bosnian Serbs, and Muslims, but the UN soldiers in the SIPHONS. They were bedeviled by problems. If you declare an area safe haven in the name of the United Nations. Nations if you tell the people if they are safe in the name of the United Nations you have got to put the troops on the ground, and it's no good for politicians say yes, we go for safe havens, but we're not gonNA put the troops meanwhile the Europeans vacillated and equivocated failing miserably to cope with across at its own back door. America was also reluctant to get involved as then President George Bush senior explained in Nani Nani to. I? Something because I learned something from Vietnam. I am not going to commit US forces until I know what the mission is to the military. Tell me that it can be completed until I know how they can come out. You have ancient rivalries that have cropped up as as Yugoslavia's dissolved or getting dissolved, and it isn't going to be solved by sending in the eighty second airborne, and although on the campaign trail that Ye Bill Clinton pledged to reverse the appeasement of that bushes of Belgrade as President Clinton allowed the Balkans to bleed for three more years. French President Jacques Chirac was moved to declare quote, the position of the leader of the free world vacant. Trinite Sur changed all that having done nothing the before during the mass killings in Rwanda Clinton was galvanized into action, and crucially he cut the United Nations out of the Decision Chine on August thirty Washington led a night bombing campaign against the Serbs the NATO action began early this morning. The harsh light of fires and explosions coloring the night sky. Some people watched the bombardment from their houses, but after more than ten thousand deaths here in the last three years, most Sarajevans had given up any hope of outside intervention. Last night it came on a scale which could yet change the course of this war by the end of not ninety five sixty thousand nine hundred troops, including twenty thousand Americans were on the ground in Bosnia. Pace was declared. The BOEKEN's wars ended only because the US finally acted. He's President Clinton in November ninety five my fellow Americans in this new era there are still times when America and America alone can and should make the difference for peace. The terrible war in Bosnia is such a case nowhere. Today is the need for American leadership. More stark are more immediate than in. In Bosnia in the years since the Mexica Europe inaction was heavily criticised, and the US was held up for its global leadership in particular for its unilateral humanitarian intervention. This is when the US secretary. Of State. Madeleine Albright said America was the indispensable nation, and that idea would fade into the justification of the Iraq invasion in two thousand and three as a war of liberation, but he's a question with the US intervene. If the shrivel Nitsa massacre happened today from the standpoint of twenty twenty, we might ask if the era of US unilateral humanitarian intervention is well and truly over. Well, that's it for this week. Show remember if you'd like to hear the episode again or download segments since two thousand fourteen. Just go to ABC. Dot Net dot US slash aren and follow the prompts to between the lines, or you can listen via the ABC. Listen APP, or wherever you get your podcast. You can even subscribe, so you never miss an episode. I'm Tom Switzer continue next week.

Australia China United States Melissa Peter Jennings Pacific Tom Switzer Washington TOM Bosnia UN United Nations Prime Minister Europe Melissa Conley Professor Of Asia Pacific Secu Indonesia Asia Institute
"madeleine albright" Discussed on Death, Sex and Money

Death, Sex and Money

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"madeleine albright" Discussed on Death, Sex and Money

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> that's former <Speech_Music_Female> secretary of state. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Madeleine <Speech_Music_Female> Albright her. <Speech_Music_Female> New Book is called. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Hell and other destinations <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> that <Speech_Music_Female> sex and money is <Speech_Music_Female> a listener supported <Speech_Music_Female> production of WNYC <Speech_Music_Female> studios <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> in New York. <Speech_Music_Female> I'm usually <Speech_Music_Female> based at the studios <Speech_Music_Female> of the investigative. Podcast <Speech_Music_Female> reveal <Speech_Music_Female> an EMERYVILLE Calif. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Our team includes Katie. <Speech_Music_Female> Bishop Annabel Bacon <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Affi Yellow <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Duke Emily Boutin <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and Andrew. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Done <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> thank you I <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> O of a mural for <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> her help on this episode <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the Reverend John Lor <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> St Louis <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Road. Our theme music. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> I'm on twitter <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> at sale. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> The show is at death <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> sex money on <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> twitter facebook <Speech_Music_Female> and instagram <Speech_Music_Female> and they <Speech_Music_Female> on instagram. You can see <Speech_Music_Female> the special <SpeakerChange> decorations. <Speech_Music_Female> My inlaws <Speech_Music_Female> and daughters <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> put up in this walk <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> in closet. Were <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> RECORDING <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> AFTER THEY HEARD? I was <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> interviewing Madeleine Albright <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> in here. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Thank you to Frank. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> And Catherine Middleton <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> for this wonderful <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> our email address <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> is death sex <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> money at WNYC <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> DOT ORG <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and sign up <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> for our newsletter. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> You can subscribe <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> at death <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> sex money dot <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> org slash <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> newsletter. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> And thank you <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to all of you. <Speech_Music_Female> Who donated and <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> became sustaining <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> members of death. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Sex and money. Recently <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> we made <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> our goal of two <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> hundred new <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> sustaining members. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Apu by <Speech_Music_Female> you in Auckland. <Speech_Music_Female> New Zealand is <Speech_Music_Female> one of them. It's <Speech_Music_Female> not too late <Speech_Music_Female> to join APU and <Speech_Music_Female> support. We do here <Speech_Music_Female> by going to death. <Speech_Music_Female> Sex MONEY DOT <Speech_Music_Female> ORG slash <Music> donate <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> secretary. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Albright told me <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> she spending some <Speech_Music_Female> of her quarantine time <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> cleaning out <Speech_Music_Female> her papers. <Speech_Music_Female> Some of them will <Speech_Music_Female> go to the Library of Congress <Speech_Music_Female> but a lot <Speech_Music_Female> of them are just <Speech_Music_Female> things she's printed off <Speech_Music_Female> the Internet <SpeakerChange> for research <Speech_Music_Female> just <Speech_Music_Female> junk. Frankly <Speech_Music_Female> I'm <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> trying to <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> get things organized <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> because my <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> daughters have said to <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> me if you leave all these <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> papers <SpeakerChange> when <Speech_Music_Female> you're dead we'll kill you <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> so <Speech_Music_Female> I'm trying to sort <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> those. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> I'm ANA sale <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and this is death sex <Music>

"madeleine albright" Discussed on Death, Sex and Money

Death, Sex and Money

05:56 min | 1 year ago

"madeleine albright" Discussed on Death, Sex and Money

"You did. The job of being secretary. State of the United States of America The first woman in that role in particular. I want to ask you about How did you think about where to your ground and not change your mind whether publicly or in a meeting because it would be undermining your authority authority? You needed to make sure you didn't need it to make sure you weren't gonna be pushed around That also sometimes you have to change your mind because you change your mind. So how did you think about sort of threading that needle? Well let me just say that. I made a big point when I was teaching in the eighties. Having been the only woman in the room before that of And being an I whenever I talked to any woman this rings. True is you're in a meeting and you think to yourself I'm going to say something and then you think no I won't say it will sound stupid. And then some man says it in everybody thinks is brilliant at yourself for not saying anything and so. I- invented a term of active listening and made my mantra. That women had to learn to interrupt. And if you're going to interrupt you have to know what you're talking about. Have a strong voice so when I went to Georgetown to teach. I decided to tell my students what this and I have co Ed classes that nobody could raise their hands and they had to interrupt my classes. Were a bit of a zoo but I get to the UN and The Security Council has fifteen members on it and I the only woman and I'm sitting there in one of an informal meeting not that big fancy room and I think to myself on my first day. They're fourteen men sitting there looking at me and I think Maybe I'll see if they liked me and I won't say anything and then I saw the sign United States in front of me and I thought if I don't speak today the voice of the United States will not be heard. Do you have a particular interrupting style like do you say hang on? Let me just let me just stop you there. What's your what is the style that you developed as an observer at the US at the N. you have to raise your hand and put up your placard about the thing that I developed does a style. Once I was secretary state I would travel abroad. and There's a certain way you do diplomacy. It's all kind of you know Warm and friendly when you come in no matter where you are A lot of chatty about the weather and all kinds of things you have what you're supposed to say and I. If I weren't getting anywhere I would say this. I have come a long way and so I must be frank And and I did always say what I thought I did having done. A lot of kind of diplomatic schmoozing ahead of time and knowing who I was talking to but I did. That was my method of interrupting. I liked that I can like visualize the colon after that sentence. I must be thank and you're like this year when you need to listen to me because I'm telling you something and I was struck in your book you write about a conversation with the writer. Gabriel Garcia Marquez. That you thought back on when you were writing your memoirs and he said don't be angry and it's advice you say you you you tried to take to not have your memoirs be Sour Grapes but I I wanted to ask you if it how do you think there's a time whether in your personal life or in your career where anger was really useful to you The truth is yes but and I I But let me go back on something. Can You Imagine Being Friends With Gabrielle? Or just dropping said I am now mean it was so great and you have to visualizes. I had met him at a state dinner and we started talking and then I had gone down to a car. Hayna and I Was a real a groupie because I have all his books and And he was describing love in the time of cholera which takes place in Cartagena and he was leading me around telling me where everything was and I I just. It was just incredible. And that's when we had this conversation but I have There are times that anger is important and I think one of the Times very specifically was to do with Serbia My father was the Czechoslovak Ambassador to Yugoslavia and I go to meet Milosevic. And he is doing the schmooze depart and then saying giving me the history of the Serbs and I finally said I know the history of the Serbs. You do not have to tell me the history of the Serbs and I did get pretty angry there but I think that One has to to the extent that one can be measured Overly being angry doesn't get you anywhere you need to be firm but just flat out. Anger is not useful. Did you have a period of anger after your divorce Yes I did definitely angry is not my my main way of operating. Frankly how do you get out of it? Will you decide that is getting you anywhere That it just twist you around and this goes back to something that I said earlier. The only thing that one is in control of basically.

United States Times secretary frank And Gabriel Garcia Marquez Milosevic I Hayna UN Georgetown Gabrielle Cartagena Czechoslovak Ambassador to Yug writer Serbia The Security Council
"madeleine albright" Discussed on Death, Sex and Money

Death, Sex and Money

05:23 min | 1 year ago

"madeleine albright" Discussed on Death, Sex and Money

"Coming up secretary. Albright talks about all that happened in her life and career after that divorce and the coping skills. She's using today that she learned from her parents when her family lived in London during World War Two. They couldn't control the bombs. They could only control their mood. And I can't control the virus. I can only control my mood and so I keep thinking okay. It's not gonNA help if you think that you don't WanNa be here by yourself. Just do something last week. We shared a message with us from our listeners. Lindsey she's a nurse practitioner working in an ICU in New Jersey. Who's caring for Cova nineteen patients and she struggling to give her patients which she considers to be a quote. Good death during this time. Many of you responded to lindsays message one listener. Amy whose father is ninety two and is hospitalized with covert wrote. I wish for my father to have a good death during this pandemic by being gifted small moments of being seen by others who don't know him but are tasked with caring for him she added. Little gestures may help him feel that his life matters up to the end when listener nieve from Ireland whose grandfather died from Kovin without any family around him wrote. I can tell you now that weeks on from his death having any record however small of the last few days or weeks of his life would be so comforting and lily sent this message in for Lindsay from Australia. The fact that we value Renews News Patients. A good death is something that you should be very proud of yourself valuing life more importantly than a good life and I want to thank you for it. We're thinking a lot about the rituals. We have around death and how we can honor and remember the people we've lost in this pandemic particularly as we can't gather together so we're collecting your memories and stories about your family friends and acquaintances who've died during this time. What something about that person that you'll never forget. What did you learn from them? What's a funny story about them? You'd like to remember recorded voice memo and send it to us at remembering at WNYC DOT org this death sex and money from WNYC. I'm ANA sale secretary Madeleine. Albright was nine years old when her family arrived in the United States in nineteen forty eight on a ship that docked at Ellis Island. Her father was a high ranking diplomat from Czechoslovakia they moved around during and after World War. Two she arrived in the US as a refugee all. I ever To my parents and my life have thought about is foreign policy. There's no question about that and That came with who I who I was growing up. My parents are coming to America. And all of that and so. I felt very strongly about America's role in the world. It never occurred to me that I would get. Just sit behind a sign that said the United States. She got that opportunity. When Bill Clinton became president he named her. Us Ambassador to the United Nations in one thousand nine hundred ninety three after she'd worked in Washington for more than a decade on Capitol Hill and in the White House then her name started being floated for Secretary of State in Clinton's second term. I talk about this as the period of great mentioning so my name came up and the first of comment was somebody said well. A woman can't be secretary state because Arab leaders won't deal with a woman and so what happened was the Arab ambassadors the. Un said what? We've had no problems dealing with Ambassador Albright. We wouldn't have any problems dealing with Secretary Albright and was that a campaign like did you have supporters of yours reach out and say can you say this to the press just tried not to have a campaign. Frankly it's possible that other people did on my behalf but I did not want to have campaign why not well because I It wasn't my style. There's no way I can described. You thought it wouldn't happen so because then somebody at the White House and I never WanNa know who said Yeah. Madeleine's on the list but she second tier said about the press. Yeah and so. I don't know who it is. I don't WanNa know who it is but Secretary at that time first Clinton President Clinton I would sometimes travel to foreign countries and He said During this period of when people who was going to be Secretary State that Hillary would come to him and say. Why wouldn't you name Madeline? She is closest to your views. Expresses them better than anybody else? And besides it would make your mother happy. So that's the official.

secretary Ambassador Albright Bill Clinton United States White House Madeleine president WNYC Cova London Madeline America Kovin Lindsey Lindsay New Jersey nieve Amy
Why You Should Give Your Toenails a Break From Polish

Forever35

03:40 min | 1 year ago

Why You Should Give Your Toenails a Break From Polish

"Need to bring up something that makes me very uncomfortable and that is feet. I need to talk about feed Dorey. My feet are ravaged. They are I I so I was getting Gel pedicures on my toenails for probably years. Wow Okay I'd get a Joe pedicure. I'd leave it on for like three months. It would grow out ridiculously long and then I would get it redone. And in December. I got a regular pedicure with regular Polish and then since then and then I painted my own nails like at the start of social distancing. So let's say six five or six weeks ago. Okay and finally. I removed the Polish. And what what was left. Beholding was not a pretty sight. My toenails narrowly in very bad shape. Oh No yeah like I think. I need to do some healing work on my toenails. Okay now I don't even know what I am describing like. They have like little white. Like maybe calcium marks or I don't know if it's like Little Dent indentations. There's maybe a slight bit of yellowing. Which makes me worried. Am I have a fungus? I I just. I have literally not looked at my toenails for years and I just recently am like well. I guess I'm going to use this time to heal my toenails. Yeah I mean so. I typically get dark Polish on my toenails. Which like you're not really supposed to do. Yeah we use that. I don't I always do that too but actually not good not toenails. It's not good for your toenails especially given how long I leave the Polish on. What does it do okay I just did? I just did a little googling and okay Yup Yup Yup. It's not a good idea to leave nail Polish continuously on your toes all summer. Your nails are much more permeable than your skin. As a result they can soak up substances such as Nail Polish that are applied to their surface. The dangerous keep your nail Polish on too long. Is that the pigment. In the Nail Polish can soak into the top few layers of the nail and dry out when that happens fungus yeast bacteria mold and mildew can develop underneath the nail plate. Lovely Great News Rate News. I'm taking my Polish off today. This was news team. I have literally never considered what the Polish is doing. I mean I know that sounds so absurd and like I doing a poor job taking care of my nails. I've just never thought about it. Okay so this article. I'm reading from the Cleveland. Clinic has some suggestions. Do you want to hear them? Yes yes yes so turns out the same permeability that created the stain can help to ease it as well and the doctor advises applying vitamin E. oil or coconut oil to the nail and nail bed underneath the nail where it meets the skin and gently rubbing it in when you do not have nail on okay so tonight I begin. Oiling my toes. Okay if you remove your toe. Polish in your toenails are stained you can tell if the stain is from Polish. If you see your natural pink nail color grow out from the cuticle the stains should fade slightly over time and eventually grow out right and they recommend against using now Polish during the grow out period. No I am now fully in grow out nail toenail mode like I am. I'M GONNA use this time to really work

Nail Polish Cleveland
"madeleine albright" Discussed on Forever35

Forever35

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"madeleine albright" Discussed on Forever35

"madeleine albright" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

07:24 min | 1 year ago

"madeleine albright" Discussed on Amanpour

"That are moon doesn't make a difference resiliency? I do think we're zillion see is kind of the common theme here. One of the things add surprises me as well is at resiliency was part of every other crisis. Reface it's what happened in England during World War Two and yet in America. We've polarized so much. Even this corona virus even whether or not be heard immunity or even whether or not we should keep a lockdown on for two more weeks becomes a partisan issue. Why is that well? I have an so troubled and dispirited Even though I'm trying to control my mood of divisions that are being created on purpose for political reasons I am Have I am a political scientist and I kind of love to study How governments operate and Decision. Making and the American system is endlessly fascinating. The constitutionists fascinating people. Forget that the first article of the Constitution is about the power Congress and the only the second one is about executive power. But I think that what is happening is because We I think waited too long to deal with the the virus Then you get into blame. Placing and the that creates automatic divisions between the federal government and the states and the governor's or blaming the mayor's or it's a blame game instead of a solution finding operation and it has been totally politicized I'd juicing by the President of the United States which I find very very sad and I have been asked whether I think he's You know doesn't believe in America. I think he's un-american because he doesn't understand our value system are and only propagates the divisions rather than trying to figure out how we find solutions together. You've written a new book which is just coming out about your life since being secretary of state and one of the many things you write about is organizing a group of What you could call madeline and our axes meaning former foreign ministers who you dealt with to keep meeting each year and thank you madam. Couple of years ago and then you took in Kansas City. This past year you went from the home of Louis the fourteen who said Lake Dot. Same Watt meaning. I am the state I you know. I'm in charge. I won everything To the home of Harry Truman who had a sense of humility that comes from being the president is at one of the lessons. You feel. We should apply today. I think definitely because here was a person that had risen to this incredible job through a variety ways of having served in the military and had a shop and then He was very political But I think the best thing about him was he took responsibility and one of the things that we saw there was the original sign that said the buck stops here which he had on his desk because he knew the thing. President United States ultimately meant that you that you had responsibility and that You worked with others. So they're all kinds of lessons from Harry Truman. I have to say he was my first American president. We came to the United States November eleventh nineteen forty eight and he had just been elected in his own right And so I followed his life and the way he talks And what he did but his clarity and responsibility is something that I think stands out especially you write that when you read about an international crisis you reflexively insert your name and place of the current secretary of state and think about what you might be doing in this situation so let me ask you. What would you be doing now if you were secretary of State? Well it doesn't make me seem very self centered but I am interested in the Secretary. States role is and how it works. I think that I would actually be doing much. Lower to reach out to those that we have to work with The partners and Really try to work and do kind of a a whole of government from the perspective of the United States because the secretary of State with the National Security Advisor can set the agenda and bring in other parts of their governments as well as mean foreigners that one has to deal with which would be trying to figure out how the intelligence community works together But I think that we're not taking advantage enough of the foreign policy capabilities of the State Department because in fact State Department has been kind of of Weakened in a number of ways by the number of people that have left or have been nastily and by the funding of it. So I don't know what the current secretary is doing in terms of trying to help the funding trying to in fact work with others abroad I think he's done some travel but is unclear what he's doing your famous for writing a book about those pens that you wear fact. It even became a traveling exhibition where your fans went on displays in museums around the country. What's you're wearing today? My father was with the Czechoslovak government in exile and his job was to broadcast over BBC into Czechoslovakia And he was gone. Bbc All the time. And I was a little girl and I listened to BBC and I know the following thing which is every broadcast open with the notes. The opening notes. Beethoven stiff done it. I knew him and in Morse Code. That is big Sherie and so I thought a V for victory Against the virus would be something that is appropriate or today and also reference back to my book. Secretary Madeleine Albright. Thank you so much for joining us. This evening stay well in Youtube Walter. Good to have this with you. Thank you one of her. Books was all about those broaches with a message and finally corona viruses causing some major cities to reimagined rethink the way they run. Milan is said to introduce a new scheme to cut the number of cars on the street. After lockdown thirty five kilometers of road will be transformed into psychopaths and walking space. That northern Italian city has been hit hard by the outbreak. And it's one of Europe's most polluted but under lockdown air pollution as we've been saying plummeted leaving blue skies and so let's hope it's a plan. Other cities can follow as we strive for Lena and Greener Future. That is it for now. Thanks for watching and goodbye from London..

United States Harry Truman president Secretary Madeleine Albright President America BBC Secretary secretary State Department federal government Congress England Milan Europe scientist London Kansas City
"madeleine albright" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

07:56 min | 1 year ago

"madeleine albright" Discussed on Amanpour

"That time. Must have been about two billion on the planet. Now it's seven plus billion on the planet and a lot of this disease. Many assaying reputable doctors are saying is partly because of overpopulation and farming of these animals. What do you say to that? Overpopulation as dense population densities epidemics. Not New though. That was the black desk a few centuries ago. That was the great play in the Seventeenth Century. In which people are dying in huge numbers in conurbations in the in the big Conurbations but there were dense. Certainly London Pacific in waitress that of over the density of population was huge and people are dying in great numbers. So it's not new and anybody who knows anything about keeping animals TRAUMAS Well I'm anybody else. Looks off to a awfully peaches if you if you keep them in great defenses of the transmission of disease once it stops goes like bows and Benny difficult control. Well we all living in huge densities at home is happy has increased numbers of your sin three times as many as when. I was making my first program is extraordinary. So it's not surprising that in fact we're getting our come up from that point of view but it's not not nature. Don't make having revenge or anything like that. It is a basic facts life that you have huge densities population. You'll get diseases spread goody swift in one of the your latest film. A life on our planet was meant to have premiered last week ahead of Earth Day because of this crisis that has been delayed. What were you saying in that in that documentary? What were you saying about your experience? And and how you've watched these developments and legacy you want to leave the living world is your money. The filmmakers who suggested it a pointed out to me that actually I've had film record I've been making films in in the wild citizen. Nineteen Fifties Unin hundred fifties and before that I have bent memories of running in the in the English countryside and looking birds collecting fossils and being aware of the natural world and so I have seen that change but I guess I wouldn't notice that change. We're not very good at recognizing slow changes unless to have in fact been recorded until it's when I now look those films lakes covered in wildfowl Another I suddenly realized. Yeah that's gone that's changed and it's that record which has made it so busy to me as to watch us being going on in my lifetime and now while you're in lockdown you are also taking part in a in a BBC experiment whereby a lot of you at teaching young kids and you've decided to teach geography for awhile. What are you tending the kids? Why have you decided to jump into this fray? What's it like being an online teacher making special lessons in that sense? But an spend after noon. I've been recording An introduction in Psalm to some of the films which I've made in the past on which will be bought out and be showing again because they have a very precise educational quite a message in them and so I'm introduced. I look at the ocean. The Ocean to searches wild and they have creatures in them the data from this that and the other. And let me show you some of the things that goes on on the way toward into connected and then we will show sequences from who joined eat other series retired from the post and may all those being edited by people who are specialists in learning by television. In order to convey the messages that will be helpful Mike comment you're changed earning my introduction so I just want to end by saying you do have some solutions and you've talked about these make lodge no fishing zones to give stocks a chance to recover reduce land farming by half humanity must eat less meat. You believe and phase out fossil fuels. Of course that's a huge huge endeavor that the world is trying to get to but I also just wander ninety-three say you can't go out even to the park which is right outside your door. What is it like experiencing this at this point? I'm I'm unbalancing lucky. I've a reasonably large go. I'm an I walk and I woke found it more in the pasta three weeks. I suppose over a month that I have fears because I now cut asli different plants which on particular fund the way in which they eram began as I did updates quite yet so if I go out hoping that I'm going to see that particular change and of course The weather's been so lovely. The buds have been so beautiful It's it's such a consolation. It's interesting isn't it? The doctors of medical profession know of any well now that an appreciation of the natural world and contact with wild actually brings huge huge benefits in our pieces of mine. Peace Mind You. Pitch in terms of us are about happiness A relationship much. Well boy you have brought that to such massive global audience and we're all happy at you'll films. Thank you so much to David attenborough for joining us on Earth Day at fifty. Us BANK. Thanks you for going to work an for staying home for treating patients and having patients for being on the front lines while having our backs. Thanks for working together and playing. Podcasts you love. Us Bank can't thank you enough but we can do our part. That's why we have donated millions to help our customers employees and communities in need equal housing lender member. Fdic prepare yourselves. But time for brand. New Wreck and morty adventures is almost here wait what this is. What you've been waiting for. Neil Rick and Morty on adult swim governments around the world have been. Ill prepared to respond to the corona virus outbreak. But there's an organization that has been sounding the alarm for years about how vulnerable we all are to a pandemic the bill and Melinda Gates Foundation this week on boss files talk exclusively with Melinda Gates. About how her foundation is putting their extensive resources billions of dollars behind the development of a vaccine and what can be done for developing world including Africa which she says could be devastated by covert nineteen. Listen to the latest episode of Boss Files. Wherever you gave podcast.

conurbations Melinda Gates Melinda Gates Foundation Africa London Pacific Us Bank David attenborough BBC Us Benny Fdic Morty Neil Rick BANK Mike
"madeleine albright" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

Diane Rehm: On My Mind

11:46 min | 1 year ago

"madeleine albright" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

"On our toes about this and it's interesting because when I wrote this book it had nothing to do with the virus or what was going on. It was more trying to explain what I was doing. I chose the title because I thank you know the most famous statement I ever made was. There's a special place in Hell for women who don't help each other. Who was so famous in up on a starbucks but it didn't occur to me that the current political situation that the hell title it was more applicable than I thought. And so what we need to do. The book is called HAL and other destinations. And we have to figure out the other destinations because we are the masters of our fate and we are. Democracy is dependent on all of us. And we need to know that. And I'M GONNA keep repeating it. Do you believe that? President trump is leading us into a kind of fascism deliberately have not called fascist. I think he's the most undemocratic president in modern American history. I think he is somebody who only sees things to his own. Is I think the part that I'm deeply troubled about now is that he is dismissing or forcing to resign. People he doesn't like in the government those that have some kind of Inspector General Role or actually tell the truth and I think we need to point that out all the time and have to fight back on that but I think that he does want to divide us. There's no question and and I think he is trying to figure out how to use this. I do think that which is why we should we have to. We can't just say Oh. This'll go away. I think. We need to be proactive. And something that. I raised the beginning about really backing scientists And then also understanding and this is the hard part Diane. Is that the things that have to be done to resolve this issue. Do need government center the federal government to do things to how to deal with the stimulus package. How To Monitor? What is going on? How to relate to the governor's executive legislative relations but it does require a functioning central government. The question is how does the government operate who runs it and that it be used in order to fulfill the needs of the people and not to undermine them and then finally and this is obviously somebody who's involved in international affairs would say we need to think about the international system? The virus does not know borders. Global warming does not know borders. We need do and one of the things that I've said that you and I will I say because of our people in their seventies and somewhat older need little refurbishing and the institutions do and we need to look at what the international institutions are and not. Just decide that we're not going to support the United Nations. We need to fix it We need to fix some of the institutions and not thing that is just a each country for itself because bad things do not know borders. What do you make International Cooperation Right now in the face of this virus. Go at the moment. We're waiting to see how it works. I mean the main organization. The World Health Organization is now being suspected of all kinds of things and president. Trump said. We weren't going to support it. I do think the Europeans are trying to sort out how they operate together. I think they're number of international regional groups the G. Twenty and various ones that are trying to deal with it or private international groups of. I'm very very supportive of the International Rescue Committee that is dealing with the refugee issues. And so there are non-governmental organizations that are playing an international role and believe it or not. The private sector's too so it isn't as everything is being run centrally by the government. But I do think that we need to understand that. In the twenty first century we do need to have the international organizations functioning and that the US benefits from them and that we have to figure out how to operate in them but at the moment there is this kind of sense in some other countries. Fault it's not ours. No country is safe behind walls or oceans. We are in this together and I'm hoping frankly. The crisis is going to be used in order to create a better system. The deals with what the threats of the twenty first century are. I think frankly Diane. We misunderstood the role of technology in in so many different ways. And it's a mega trend. That has very positive aspects. I always like to talk about the woman farmer in Kenya. Who doesn't have to walk zillions of miles to pay our bills. She can do it over the mobile foe and is able to be part of her life and have a business or school or whatever by the way I count on the women. I have been very supportive of women. And there's an amazing thing going on right now as some of the women that I've worked with who were either foreign ministers or in the UN where people are trying to motivate women's action internationally so we can help solve some of the problems. Women power is very important. I want to ask you about the two thousand twenty elections old women who have been on that stage initially are now going. We have a lemonade them. All through the primaries we are left with Joe Biden who was vice president to President Obama. Do you believe number one that we will have a Democratic convention with people coming together. I her through technology or in person and do you believe that Vice President Biden can defeat president trump. Well first of all. I do believe that we will have some kind of a a convention. I think what I've been fascinated by now. More and more is the virtual aspects of technology. I mean it's just stunning and I think we need to take advantage of it and it will be possible to have some kind of a convention. I am very glad that Vice President Biden made clear that he would have a woman vice president and there are a number of choices and and I think that he will say what he'd get will honor what he said. I also think we need to keep in mind. The following aspects the government of the United States when it functions well has a Cabinet. That is very much partners and things and that there will be and should be women many women in the cabinet. The Americans don't like quotas but it would be nice. If fifty percent of the members of the cabinet were women and it really were able to act as partners because a functioning democratic government does were through the executive agencies and cabinets and then that we elect a lot of women for Congress. So I think that we should. We do have the power to do that. I've been fascinated by the last class. In Congress that relate Has elected an incredible number of democratic women. Nancy Pelosi is dennis fantastic job so I just think that we need to to look at the positive aspects of this and keep remembering that in a democracy. We cannot be shut up. I mean the point here is we have voices we have a number of ways to use them and we need to figure out how not to be quiet. We cannot accept this. We can't normalize what's going on now. This is not a normal America and no matter which part we talk about. We cannot let the Statue of Liberty Week about what is going on in this country. I'd love to ask you about the beautiful pin you are wearing. We are talking over zoom so I can see the beautiful v-shape in on a pedestal and with lines at the top. Please chelm about initially as I was thinking about my book tour. I decided since it was about Helen other destinations and I had a great devil. Pin that I was going to wear that but I've changed my mind and I'm wearing this because of the book tour and I'll tell you why and at one of the things that I wanted to make clear. Also in the book is that we all are the products of our backgrounds and so my motivation in life has been should make a difference that I'm a grateful American after the things that happened in my family and I was a child during World War. Two my father. We were in London. My father was with Czechoslovak government in exile and his job was to talk to Czechoslovakia over BBC. So I got used to listening to BBC. I was a little girl and BBC always open with a kettle drum wid Beethoven's fifth stuttered them and the things that that meant. Believe it or not that is in Morse Code. Be Big -Tory and so that's why I wanted to wear this pin because the victory. That is what we need a V. Victory it's just beautiful and I commend you for wearing it Madam. Secretary thank you so much for joining s Diane. Thank you so much for everything you do. In terms of making clear the importance of what has to be understood in democracy. And everything that you've done your whole life in order to let people explain what has to happen and I love that we're friends. Thank you so much. That's all for today. Thanks to those who reached out to let me know what you want me to cover during this very difficult time and please do continue to get in touch. What are you finding those challenges? What questions do you have need enters? You can find us on facebook and twitter or does and email podcast at Amu dot org theme. Music is composed by Jim Brown. Very and then I ended ferrick. Wunderle show is produced by Rebecca Kaufman and Alison Brody. Thanks for listening all. Please stay safe. Stay well I'm Diane raid..

vice president Diane raid Vice President Biden president trump United States Congress BBC Cabinet executive government starbucks International Rescue Committee President Obama United Nations Inspector General Role UN World Health Organization Kenya G. Twenty
"madeleine albright" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

Diane Rehm: On My Mind

11:36 min | 1 year ago

"madeleine albright" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

"Madam Secretary. What a pleasure to see you again. First before we talk about your brand new book I want to ask you about your thoughts on this pandemic and what you see happening. Well I think that it is existential. In many ways I think is going to change an awful lot about the way that we operate as people in a society how we deal with. What is a very very serious problem that we can? We'll talk about much more. Obviously but I do think that we will come out of this. In a way that will have the kind of effect that the end of World War Two had in terms of looking at how institutions will change. And how we look at what kind of the rules of the road are GONNA be. I hope that it's one of those cliches that a crisis actually will create an opportunity and that we will look at the ways that we need to work together to try to figure out first of all how to accept scientific knowledge and all the things that we learn from it how to understand what the role of government is in the twenty first century and how it relates to the people and how important democratic participation is and then frankly to understand our interconnectedness and not just kind of think about that. We are nation states and that basically something like a virus or climate change knows no borders and. I hope that we can see this as an opportunity to change our behavior. I must say you sound fairly optimistic. Well I often often asked whether I'm an optimist or pessimist and I say I'm an optimist worries a lot and I worry that the message will get across that we are focused on other things at the moment. And we're not using this as a way to make the kind of changes that I think are really important and so I'm I'm worried that we're just gonNA kind of blame each other and look backward rather than looking forward. That's what I worry about and that we don't understand the role of our institutional structures in a and our Inter relationships and that the twenty first century is berry in this part of it is already very different from what we've experienced thus far. So that's what I worry about that. We're not getting the signals. How would you grade the leadership we've had from the White House? Well I am a professor and I know how important grades are but I would fail the White House because I think that there have been so many mixed signals and a way of making this more political than in terms of trying to solve the problems and I have been listening to the press conferences and I obviously listen all the time and I think that it's confusing. And and I don't think leaders should be confusing and Have Agendas that? Don't have something to do a with the problem and so I am troubled by it. I do think that it's important to know that we need to look towards the future. I don't want to spend a lot of time at the moment going back and trying to figure out what went wrong. I think that we need to do that. But at the moment we need to focus on the future and I think the issues that I raised are Germane you know how to believe the scientists and understand how they are describing things then how to figure out what. The role of government is in a democratic society. Especially when you're involved in a crisis and then try to figure out how we fit into an international system and none of those things. Frankly are going on at the moment. I like you to give yet another grade to a top health official after Anthony Fauci. I would give him an a flat out. I don't usually give a pluses but I do think that one of the things that I find interesting in relation to go back kind of in terms of what I look for in my students is how they are using facts where they got the facts how they are able to express their views how they can be very much aware of what the counter arguments are to what they're saying and then understanding the contingencies than he checks off all the boxes so he would do very well in my class and I do love teaching. I hope we have chancellor talk about my students in what I learned from them but I was certainly give the doctor a. I want to ask about your teaching in the very moment. Are you doing on on teaching at Georgetown? While I am. An Diana's been very exciting. Believe it or not what I have done in the past around this time of year and is what my students loved. The best is a game simulation and what I usually do. Is we spend the weekend Doing it I divide the class in half and we have One group that are playing American decision makers the Principals Committee of the National Security Council than the UN Security Council. And then we're dealing with foreign affairs subject so whatever country on the regional leaders so I had these three groups and they spend all day dealing with each other and I'm the dance sex Makkinen every time they get somewhere I screw it up for them and then the two groups have exactly the same scenario I do the same disruptions. And inevitably they turn out differently so obviously. I couldn't do things this way this time we did do it. Virtually and I was telling my students that we were making history we were dealing with Venezuela and they were really inch before you became Madam Secretary. You are Madeleine Albright and on page three of your new book. You tell the story when you've been married to Joe Bright for Twenty Five Beers and what happened on that day. Will you share that with us? Yes and let me just say what is interesting and just to put it into a little bit of context because I write about some of this later in the book is first of all? My story is one of refugee Having been a refugee during World War Two and then coming to America and really caring about relationships and friendships and being liked and being part of a group and being a legitimate American. Frankly and so what happened was I went to a women's College Wellesley which I loved and we were a very interesting age group in terms of trying to figure out our leadership roles in all that so believe it or not. Our Commencement Speaker was the secretary of Defense because his daughter was in our class and he gave his commencement speech which we all remember the each word slightly differently but the message was the same. Which was that? Our main responsibility was to get married and raise interesting children and I can't believe we didn't walk out anyway. I waited long time to get married three days after graduation and I never even left the dorm at Wellesley and all of a sudden I seven to this marriage. I've been in We used to do something being pinned And then engaged 'em was prepared for a very long and good marriage and We were married for a very long time. I had gotten used to always using the plural. We will do this or my decisions. Were always based on somebody else's desires and so I really wasn't shop. There's no way to describe it and so what happened in the next ten years was for me to my own voice in my own personality and and it wasn't easy and so. I talk about it as something that does happen. Obviously other women but it was a time where. I did developing Madeleine Albright. I didn't change my name back to my maiden name. I actually think Madeline Albright is kind of a neat name. I agree when I was little in Czechoslovakia. My birth name was muddy. A Yana which is basically Mary Jane and check but I tell the stories. My Grandmother decided to call me Madeline There had been a play in Prague which was Madeline and the brick factory and she likes the name. My Problem Diane was that I never knew what the name was or how to spell it because my parents had an accent and so as mud land and it wasn't until I went to school in Switzerland where they told me how to spell my name. Madeline is the French spelling and Albright is my married name so one of the things by the way when we had our first cabinet meeting with President Clinton in ninety three and We were at Camp David and he said tell me she said this to everybody. Tell me something about yourself that I don't know and I said my name isn't Madeleine. Albright my name is Marianna Cordella. So that's the story so you were totally shocked and taken aback on that day when your husband came to annotated he wanted a divorce you had planned for allied together with him for the rest of your life and I found myself wondering about how you would think Ebb Yours. Health going forward. Having been told it towed. We had nominally. I still think this that I thought we had a good marriage that my husband former has been had been very supportive of the kinds of things that I had done because by the way I wanted to be a journalist. Initially I won't go through that whole story about I did in fact start getting my phd and went to school and did a number of volunteer things and really was very busy. And I thought that my husband was not disparaging of it or on Unappreciative of it. And so I really was blown away frankly and so it took me awhile to even absorb what had happened and why it had happened. And I'm still not sure You know I think that when people ask me what I consider a failure in my life my marriage I failed and then I'm being told by friends. Say No this wasn't just you but I'm I must have missed some kind of signals because I think that most people that knew us thought that we were very supportive couple of each other. And so but I still don't know what happened. I did to a very satisfying.

Madeleine Albright Madam Secretary Madeline White House Anthony Fauci secretary chancellor professor Wellesley Georgetown Diana Joe Bright Secretary official Venezuela UN Security Council Czechoslovakia Switzerland
"madeleine albright" Discussed on The Diane Rehm Show

The Diane Rehm Show

11:36 min | 1 year ago

"madeleine albright" Discussed on The Diane Rehm Show

"Madam Secretary. What a pleasure to see you again. First before we talk about your brand new book I want to ask you about your thoughts on this pandemic and what you see happening. Well I think that it is existential. In many ways I think is going to change an awful lot about the way that we operate as people in a society how we deal with. What is a very very serious problem that we can? We'll talk about much more. Obviously but I do think that we will come out of this. In a way that will have the kind of effect that the end of World War Two had in terms of looking at how institutions will change. And how we look at what kind of the rules of the road are GONNA be. I hope that it's one of those cliches that a crisis actually will create an opportunity and that we will look at the ways that we need to work together to try to figure out first of all how to accept scientific knowledge and all the things that we learn from it how to understand what the role of government is in the twenty first century and how it relates to the people and how important democratic participation is and then frankly to understand our interconnectedness and not just kind of think about that. We are nation states and that basically something like a virus or climate change knows no borders and. I hope that we can see this as an opportunity to change our behavior. I must say you sound fairly optimistic. Well I often often asked whether I'm an optimist or pessimist and I say I'm an optimist worries a lot and I worry that the message will get across that we are focused on other things at the moment. And we're not using this as a way to make the kind of changes that I think are really important and so I'm I'm worried that we're just gonNA kind of blame each other and look backward rather than looking forward. That's what I worry about and that we don't understand the role of our institutional structures in a and our Inter relationships and that the twenty first century is berry in this part of it is already very different from what we've experienced thus far. So that's what I worry about that. We're not getting the signals. How would you grade the leadership we've had from the White House? Well I am a professor and I know how important grades are but I would fail the White House because I think that there have been so many mixed signals and a way of making this more political than in terms of trying to solve the problems and I have been listening to the press conferences and I obviously listen all the time and I think that it's confusing. And and I don't think leaders should be confusing and Have Agendas that? Don't have something to do a with the problem and so I am troubled by it. I do think that it's important to know that we need to look towards the future. I don't want to spend a lot of time at the moment going back and trying to figure out what went wrong. I think that we need to do that. But at the moment we need to focus on the future and I think the issues that I raised are Germane you know how to believe the scientists and understand how they are describing things then how to figure out what. The role of government is in a democratic society. Especially when you're involved in a crisis and then try to figure out how we fit into an international system and none of those things. Frankly are going on at the moment. I like you to give yet another grade to a top health official after Anthony Fauci. I would give him an a flat out. I don't usually give a pluses but I do think that one of the things that I find interesting in relation to go back kind of in terms of what I look for in my students is how they are using facts where they got the facts how they are able to express their views how they can be very much aware of what the counter arguments are to what they're saying and then understanding the contingencies than he checks off all the boxes so he would do very well in my class and I do love teaching. I hope we have chancellor talk about my students in what I learned from them but I was certainly give the doctor a. I want to ask about your teaching in the very moment. Are you doing on on teaching at Georgetown? Well I am. An Diana's been very exciting. Believe it or not what I have done in the past around this time of year and is what my students loved. The best is a game simulation and what I usually do. Is we spend the weekend Doing it I divide the class in half and we have One group that are playing American decision makers the Principals Committee of the National Security Council than the UN Security Council. And then we're dealing with foreign affairs subject so whatever country on the regional leaders so I have these three groups and they spend all day dealing with each other and I'm the dance sex Makkinen every time they get somewhere I screw it up for them and then the two groups have exactly the same scenario I do the same disruptions. And inevitably they turn out differently so obviously. I couldn't do things this way this time we did do it. Virtually and I was telling my students that we were making history we were dealing with Venezuela and they were really inch before you became Madam Secretary. You are Madeleine Albright and on page three of your new book. You tell the story when you've been married to Joe Bright for Twenty Five Beers and what happened on that day. Will you share that with us? Yes and let me just say what is interesting and just to put it into a little bit of context because I write about some of this later in the book is first of all? My story is one of refugee Having been a refugee during World War Two and then coming to America and really caring about relationships and friendships and being liked and being part of a group and being a legitimate American. Frankly and so what happened was I went to a women's College Wellesley which I loved and we were a very interesting age group in terms of trying to figure out our leadership roles in all that so believe it or not. Our Commencement Speaker was the secretary of Defense because his daughter was in our class and he gave his commencement speech which we all remember the each word slightly differently but the message was the same. Which was that? Our main responsibility was to get married and raise interesting children and I can't believe we didn't walk out anyway. I waited long time to get married three days after graduation and I never even left the dorm at Wellesley and all of a sudden I seven to this marriage. I've been in We used to do something being pinned And then engaged 'em was prepared for a very long and good marriage and We were married for a very long time. I had gotten used to always using the plural. We will do this or my decisions. Were always based on somebody else's desires and so I really wasn't shop. There's no way to describe it and so what happened in the next ten years was for me to my own voice in my own personality and and it wasn't easy and so. I talk about it as something that does happen. Obviously other women but it was a time where. I did developing Madeleine Albright. I didn't change my name back to my maiden name. I actually think Madeline Albright is kind of a neat name. I agree when I was little in Czechoslovakia. My birth name was muddy. A Yana which is basically Mary Jane and check but I tell the stories. My Grandmother decided to call me Madeline There had been a play in Prague which was Madeline and the brick factory and she likes the name. My Problem Diane was that I never knew what the name was or how to spell it because my parents had an accent and so as mud land and it wasn't until I went to school in Switzerland where they told me how to spell my name. Madeline is the French spelling and Albright is my married name so one of the things by the way when we had our first cabinet meeting with President Clinton in ninety three and We were at Camp David and he said tell me she said this to everybody. Tell me something about yourself that I don't know and I said my name isn't Madeleine. Albright my name is Marianna Portabella. So that's the story so you were totally shocked and taken aback on that day when your husband came to annotated he wanted a divorce you had planned for allied together with him for the rest of your life and I found myself wondering about how you would think Ebb Yours. Health going forward. Having been told it towed. We had nominally. I still think this that I thought we had a good marriage that my husband former has been had been very supportive of the kinds of things that I had done because by the way I wanted to be a journalist. Initially I won't go through that whole story about I did in fact start getting my phd and went to school and did a number of volunteer things and really was very busy. And I thought that my husband was not disparaging of it or on Unappreciative of it. And so I really was blown away frankly and so it took me awhile to even absorb what had happened and why it had happened. And I'm still not sure You know I think that when people ask me what I consider a failure in my life my marriage I failed and then I'm being told by friends. Say No this wasn't just you but I'm I'm must've missed some kind of signals because I think that most people that knew us thought that we were very supportive couple of each other. And so but I still don't know what happened I did to a very satisfying.

Madeleine Albright Madam Secretary Madeline White House Anthony Fauci secretary chancellor professor Georgetown Wellesley Diana Joe Bright Secretary official Venezuela UN Security Council Czechoslovakia Switzerland
Studio 360 Extra: Aural History: How Studio 360 Got Started

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

09:43 min | 1 year ago

Studio 360 Extra: Aural History: How Studio 360 Got Started

"Invited the rock the World Wrestling Federation champion to speak at the Republican National Convention. Pupil sock it to me. I became an official painter. I don't express political desires in my novels. I just tell story. Hello I'm Chris Anderson and this is studio three six. That's how studio three sixty began. Its first episode on November. Four two thousand just before we elected George W Bush and we all learned what a hanging Chad was my special guest today in Studio. Three sixty is the artist. Barbara Kruger. Who will talk with us about politics and power in movies and music and even in her own art? I make art about the collision of my days and nights with the culture that has constructed and contains me all that and more coming up in studio three sixty from WNYC and PRI public radio international originally produced out of WNYC. Here in New York. The show is all about the cool but complicated and sometimes strange ways that art touches our lives two decades later. That mission hasn't changed. Even if the people making the show have come and gone I'm Jocelyn Gonzalez executive producer of studio three sixty but I was still wet behind the ears associate producer when the show debuted two decades ago. I was away from the show for about ten years before returning to the staff in two thousand seventeen so as the show draws to a close sadly after twenty years I turned to some of my friends from the formative years of studio three sixty for their impressions. Could we create these beautiful stories that represent all sorts of interesting things that are going on in the country in terms of arts and then have Kurt sit with some of that? He was comfortable with and talk about them. That's Julie Bursting who was executive producer of studio three sixty when the show launched and who wrote the studio three sixty book called spark in two thousand eleven and this is Carrie Hillman who was our first senior producer and is now the executive producer at story car. At the time there had been a lot of magazines shows and it was a way for us to sort of do something different and fresh and it was like a a really creative solution to like a lot of really boring magazine. Formatted programming so I was like really game to try to figure it out. We also had two assistant producers. I'm Michelle Seagull. I started at studio three sixty as a assistant producer. In September of two thousand. I stayed through twenty thirteen as a pretty Sir and I'm now the managing producer of Sleet Studios I'm Tall Milad and I started at St Three Sixty as an intern in the year. Two Thousand and I was there until two thousand fifteen When I left I was senior producer of the show for about ten years before that and I now work at Pushkin Industries Heading up development also on staff during the early days of the show was producer and technical director. Steve Nelson Steve's now a programming executive at NPR Johnson. Do you remember what the working title was when we got there? Oh yeah hot ticket right which is first of all a terrible name and doesn't get to any of the big ideas that studio three sixty does as a name but secondly this is sort of in the relatively this was during the post dotcom boom and someone typed in hot ticket dot com into a website and it was an adult site for general audiences for sure. That was the end of hot ticket as a name every week. Studio three sixty we explore. One big idea in-depth. Today we look at the intersections of art and medicine. The idea of studio three sixty or an art show for public radio had been kind of kicking around for a long time. People were on the ground producing pieces. Trying to sort of see what would stick Eventually they brought Julie Burstein and she had this idea of like putting on pieces that sort of built on one another in having an artist or somebody else react to each piece. We started calling it a through line which was just an idea that we would carry through the show and I think the idea of having a theme came from we have to have some structure in order inside it to be able to play. The idea was that Kurt would open the show with a monologue is always delightful to look back and see that exotic bits of civilization. John Ashcroft was a senator his most celebrated crusade a failed crusade for some years. Now one of my hobby horses has been the blurring lines between news politics crime or and entertainment and then he would have a person in the studio with him and then we would present pre recorded pieces to play for this person. I try in my work to speak to the human in US and That human end to bear kind of witness and in enabled react to it. That's really fascinating That makes me think of this. Yes we looked a lot at the degeneration of people's memories and one of the pieces of research we discovered is precisely why I found listening to that piece so fascinating so it would give us an opportunity. Say something that took them off of their typical talking points that gave us an insight into the way they think their personality It also added some depth. I think to the the pieces themselves because you can't do everything in five minutes and so maybe you have to like leave something on the cutting room floor but you can resurrect it a little bit with with the like well-placed Kirk question so I thought it was really cool. I loved gathering stories from really disparate places and putting them next to each other and then talking about them. It was just so much fun. Do you remember a point when you realize it was working? I have to say. I think that first Shakespeare show because it was a whole show bringing Shakespeare up-to-date but we had Neil Gaiman Willie's just grumbling about the fact that he's a crappy writer and the San man the eponymous Lord of the rings who happens to be in this up goes over to will and offices deal are you will shakespeare. I have we met. We have but men forget in waking hours. And you and Steve or maybe it was Steve. That incredible intro He started it with Scharzenegger's hang on not to be not to be tied in the phase of man when in disgrace with fortune and men's on have we hear. Hello I'm curt Anderson and Mrs Studio Three six. It was so hilarious and it was just. It was like okay. We got it this works. I'm Peter Clowney and I was studio three six I Adler and these days I live in Saint Paul and I'm vp of content strategy for stitcher. It's a struggle sometimes to do a show. That has a theme I approach. That idea would caution now if someone wants to do a show that theme like to say like remember. It's got multiple pieces in it. You're going to have the fifth favourite piece about Gardens in this episode. But it's true that like building on the ideas across an hour is like really meaningful. My name is Eric Linski. I started as an intern. In two thousand four became assistant producer and then decided to become a contributing reporter of which I was to studio three sixty through the beginning of two thousand sixteen and I am now the host and creator of the podcast imaginary worlds. Yeah I remember this one episode where they had Madeleine Albright the through line theme was democracy and so she's sitting in the studio with Kurt and then one of the pieces was about American idol. Which was the hottest thing back? Then and they were talking about how people were taking American idol democracy far more seriously than actual presidential elections. Have you ever had a chance to see American idol? Well I actually have and I've been pretty depressed As I am by television generally these days which seems to be going to the lowest common denominator and I. I don't like the word Elitism as we kind of lost me on this last segment of him and it was really funny here. Man Albright come out of that piece. And what do you think of that? She was not too thrilled with the peace to quality that piece but what she was hearing in the piece. I'm Derek John. I was a producer and editor on the show from about two thousand four to two thousand twelve ish and since then I've done a whole bunch of work in the podcast world but I am now currently an executive producer of the how to with Charles Duhig podcasts. At slate when the theme through line shows worked man they were amazing. I mean it was like we had set this high bar and they were so hard to pull up when they clicked and everything fit together. It was truly fantastic radio and it was hard I would say we had some shows that weren't successful and that's actually what led to having to change one. Really terrible through line. Thematic show was fish the fish just literal fish in the sea. Animals really jumped the shark on that one

Producer Executive Producer Kurt Steve Nelson Steve Madeleine Albright Intern World Wrestling Federation George W Bush Chris Anderson Wnyc Barbara Kruger Official Republican National Convention Mrs Studio United States Chad John Ashcroft Julie Burstein Michelle Seagull Jocelyn Gonzalez
The left Is Imploding Over Events With Iran

Rush Limbaugh

15:31 min | 1 year ago

The left Is Imploding Over Events With Iran

"So what happened the president kills a well known terrorist who was responsible for the dance hundreds of Americans including uniform military personnel left no stone the left has a break down if everybody is puzzled by this all you have to do is go back to when trump came down the escalator on June fifteenth two thousand sixteen and announces slogan make America great again member how controversial that once you make America great again what's controversial about that what in the world is controversial about America first but it is to the American left and they're really why is the explanation for all of this of course I'm gonna break it down into many many details for your great to be back folks happy to have you with us the telephone number eight hundred two eight two two eight eight two if you want to be on the on the program Twitter in my mind has become useful I was never going in the gang on the other side of the glass are looking perplexed didn't puzzled because it is well known that I think I'm sure and Twitter is inseparable what Twitter is highly useful right now on Twitter is allowing the laugh and today's Democrats and the media to show normal people how freaking insane they are Twitter has become words while it is incredible I wonder how many as I watch this this this why as I watch the left melt down over the death of a genuine one enemy of the people of this country and signed with an enemy nation over their own country in present I wonder how many Americans independence what have you for I am the fantasy this and are shocked and surprised by and I do because you know you never know the the depth that the mainstream media succeeds in achieving in terms of persuading people and I have found over the course you might find it hard to believe folks but I have found over the course of my stellar big broadcast career yeah I've said things about just take your pick I've said something and I've pounded it for ten fifteen years and people have heard it ten fifteen years when they hear it from somebody else what god did you see rush must be right the words everybody needs verification or a lot of people need verification what we've been one of the missions of this program since its inception has been the attempt and the objective to inform everybody ideologically who the left is who liberals are what liberalism here's how it becomes indistinguishable from socialism yeah yeah yeah yeah and now I mean it's unmistakable who these people are and they are the ones making it well known nobody has to tell anybody what the American left is or what the modern day Democrat party is because they are out there informing everybody you see where Iran has announced it will no longer abide by the terms of the twenty fifteen nuclear agreement with a mama the guy like Bill Clinton announcing is no longer going to abide by his marriage vows I mean big deal everybody's shocked whether you're right they never about what in fact they may have a buy because the terms of the deal free them to go ahead and develop nuclear weapons nuclear power and all of this look let me take a stab I'm late to this this issue and stories been around since late last week let me take a stab at explaining this and by the way fox I need to tell you I am so I have some kind of a it's a weird thing I never have this little respiratory called and it has I don't have stuffed nose or throat or any of that I was calling Azam I had as well when I was a kid shortness of breath so if I if I speak a little slower that's why don't be distracted by the trying not to make it distracting why is the left being so blatant in their support for an enemy nation why is the left why is the Democrat party going out of its way to tell everybody that they actually preferred the models in Iran and this dead terrorist awesome so much by the way this guy and I have the inside track on how they did it which I will share with you is the program unfolds I mean the military operation I have the inside track how this was done it is amazing and yet as ironic as it is it's how we may have to really really praise the intelligence community for pulling this off I mean the deep state I you see but this this guy in the revolutionary guard general Qassams stole the money his body is being flown back to Tehran in a cardboard box with his picture on it across three coach seats on a rainy in Ireland the New York Post has the picture he's in a cardboard box course there's not much of a left just his finger with the ring on that that's how he was identified soul but still and they've got his picture on the cardboard box but it was a bad dude folks now why why is the left beside themselves I think and their many reasons for this by the way I am all of them I've discussed before but in in terms of what may be guiding this in a specific sense I think as much is the case with the modern day Democrats it's about protecting the legacy of the Obama administration and Obama himself and the Obama foreign policy to many conservatives and many Republicans Reagan is the president of all time the president president said no matter what kind of assaults are attacks on and they're going to be answered and defend and I think to the left there used to be Clinton I actually now think it's Obama that must be protected above all things must be shielded against all the terms it was the mom administration that ran the crew on trump and it went all the way to the oval office there's no doubt in anybody's mind posted by the way still hasn't sent the articles of impeachment over Josh Paul a senator from Missouri so he's gonna offer a resolution to just dismiss the charges because she won't sandy the articles over and nobody knows when she's going to send them over she's trying to again persuading people to re open the case in the Senate for more witnesses but I think she may be waiting for Durham she may be waiting for the dorm report even if that six months from now and you was the articles being sent to the Senate to blunt whatever bad news might be coming down the pike for the Democrats during could be one thing protectable could be something we don't know about but let me explain this Obama business as as a way of explaining how the left is is imploding on this it is very fashionable actually it's not it's not been fashionable to call them anti American but the reason I asked the question what the world is so controversial about make America great again you realize that phrase sent them into apoplexy make America great again or America first sends them into a nose dive into a tizzy what in the world to do normal decent common citizen Americans what in the world is controversial about that make America great again the answer is very simple there are a lot of people in the Democratic Party don't think America ever has been great do not think America can be great because of our founding don't believe America deserves to be great and in fact thanks America's guilty and they have now become the mainstream of the Democrat party Madeleine Albright Madeleine Albright teaching at Georgetown University one of the things that she teaches students is that the United States is nothing but an accident of timing and events that there's nothing special about the United States that there certainly is nothing exceptional about the United States that it was just an accident they were just happened the confluence of events people fleeing the dictatorship of the king in Great Britain it up any number of other things for forces beyond anybody's control brought these events together in a nation was created by it's just an accident and therefore there's nothing really you think about it there's nothing special about it there's nothing noteworthy about it now Madeleine Albright might you might also remember that when the Berlin Wall fell and the Soviet Union imploded that Madeleine Albright was very alarmed that that left the United States is the only superpower in the world and that was not good because you see the concept of America as the good guys does not exist in today's Democrat party in the world wide left do not doubt me on this there is no concept of America as the good guys and that's why make America great again is so offensive to the Americas not the good guys America needs to be cut down in size American needs to be limited America needs to be guarded against so Madeleine Albright's out there teaching young sculls full of March there's nothing special about America it's just a coincidence just an accident and that the United States as a singular super power is a destabilizing element in the world okay that brings us farmers she was secretary state among other things for Bill Clinton she has videos which are common in the modern day laughed and they are common in the American government their common in the American assembly flint that view that America alone as a super powers destabilizing is a view widely held in the civil service throughout the state department it's not an obscure review it's not it's not a minority view took me a long time to learn this long time to believe it long time to understand long time to accept tough thing to accept can't give me you grew up in your own country it takes seven to go to school when you're a young kid you're talking about the founding of the country your aware of how unique and exceptional America's then you then you discovered that people in your own government non biased don't believe it don't think it fact I think just the exact opposite tough thing to believe lot of people don't want to believe it lot of people don't want to accept that our own government there are people who do not believe in the goodness of the United States the concept of America as the good guys but you're looking at it in every bit of this opposition to what trump is non you're seeing it don't if you don't want to believe me do not then I what you're saying did not deny what you're reading they hate the trump did this for a host of reasons they hate the trump succeeded at it in a political sense thank you that trump has done damage to the Obama foreign policy the reason I mention mall mantled right is because Obama was of the same view you know what Obama's policy in Iran was aside from giving them notes but what was the motivation for all bomb I had the same view of the Middle East that he and Madeline Albright and all the rest of them have of the United States the Middle East was destabilized when only Israel was an economic and military power one of the reasons the and there are many it one of the reasons the Obama administration entered into the Iran deal one of the reasons that they engaged Iran one of the reasons that Obama dropped off a hundred and fifty billion dollars in cash on the tarmac in Tehran and don't think that some of it didn't get the Qassams only money a lot of it did by they know who the guy what is the Obama people know who the guy was they were making deals with this guy they know exactly who he was Obama believe that empowering Iran would stabilize the Middle East provide a counterbalance to Israel because once again the Israelis are not seen as the good guys even though they are United States ally and by the way there are many reasons why people like Obama's Susan rice madam Albright all the rest would not see Israel as the good guys there are religious reasons there are geo political reasons strategic reasons racial resent is all kinds of reasons for it but regardless Israel is the problem in the Middle East the United States is the problem in the world at large SO policies must be developed and implemented to blunt the bad guy nature of the United States and the bad guy nature of Israel and so there's Obama

President Trump America
White House attacks Lt. Col. Vindman while he testifies in Trump impeachment hearing

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

03:18 min | 2 years ago

White House attacks Lt. Col. Vindman while he testifies in Trump impeachment hearing

"Certainly everyone was moved by Lieutenant. Colonel von Men's close to his is opening statement really invoking his father invoking that we do right here as he said in his testimony and it was really quite scurrilous that while he was chest define line using the White House. Twitter Account the White House's tweeting out a vicious things about Lieutenant Colonel Vin men. He's now under protection of the. US US army he and his family. That's really outrageous. In this day and age. They're treating him as if he is disloyal American when he is in fact a true Patriot a tree it. They talked about whether in fact by being offered to be the Defense Minister for Ukraine he was disloyal to America. I'd I'd remind your viewers that Madeleine Albright when she was secretary of State afterwards was urged by the Czech Republic her native land though she has been an American for a very very long time time now to become president and she liked Vin Vin. Men Thought it was quite amusing and I don't think Republicans believe that Madeleine. Albright is disloyal to America. And neither is Lieutenant Lieutenant Colonel Vin and the other thing in terms of this afternoon that I really want people to understand is the Republicans. Keep saying that Zilenski. The ski never said that he was under pressure. Of course he didn't. He needs the United States he needs Donald Trump. No matter how awful the president is now no matter are how corrupt or how much of a bribe this is. And if he admitted he was under pressure he weakens himself as the president. So we're never going to hear him say that he was pressured Asher. It is a misunderstanding of the bargain. That leaders around the world fuel they have to make with this president because they have air national interests at stake even and if our president does not have our national interest in his mind. Let's let's what Colonel Vin been said in his opening statement about some of the other witnesses who've come forward I wanNA take a moment to recognize. The courage of my colleagues were appeared and are scheduled appear for this committee. I want to say that the character tax on these distinguished and honorable public servants is reprehensible. It is natural to disagree and engage in spirited debate. This has been the custom of Ah of our country since the founding fathers but we are better than personal attacks and John Holliman. The personal attack was coming to him from the White White House from the White House. Twitter account while he was testifying indeed and you know I mean at this point unsurprisingly given the way the president behave last Friday even though the attacks that he in gauged anonymous were seen widely as being as backfiring as undercutting. The Republican cause made Republican congressman as vicious and vitriolic. As they've been made them uncomfortable recognized their strategy was being undercut by the president. And yet here we come around again two days later and the same attacks being launched against Colonel Benjamin I just I don't think we should expect anything other than that now but this is going to be the. It's an appalling a state of affairs that this has become conventional but the president has it has no shame when it comes to who determines to be his targets and I just think we should assume for as long as this process plays out that the president if the president can attack colonel a purple heart. You know he can. He can take anyone and he

Lieutenant Lieutenant Colonel President Trump Lieutenant Colonel Vin Colonel Von Men White White House Madeleine Albright Donald Trump Twitter United States John Holliman America Congressman Ukraine Czech Republic Two Days
Powell: 'The Republican party has got to get a grip on itself'

Fareed Zakaria GPS

07:11 min | 2 years ago

Powell: 'The Republican party has got to get a grip on itself'

"It's a rare pleasure to interview two of America's finest elder states people once but that is exactly the opportunity I had this week when I sat down with Colin Powell and Madeleine Albright both of them of course served as secretary of State Apollo under President George W Bush or bright under Bill Clinton I was invited to them on a stage in new Albany Ohio in front of a group of citizens members the military and first responders let's begin with General Powell talking about all the tumult in American politics today surrounding the whistle blower uh and that phone call between the presidents of America and Ukraine we have this situation in Washington with the preliminary investigation being done by the House of Representatives under Mrs Pelosi and you just gotta ask yourself where does this all go well WanNa go to constitutional way choose following the constitution and the law and she's created an organization within the House of Representatives to look into these things and that's what we ought to do but it's hard to look into it when the other side in the White House is cursing out everybody calling a member of Congress trader calling a guy who wrote this that he's something wrong with him he didn't write it we had a lawyer write it for him or he's a spy spy he's an intelligence officer somewhere in the United States government who sat down and wrote this out he didn't slip into news however he didn't go on television and discuss it he put it into the system like he was supposed to do you think he's a Patriot sure he is any reason he's not true this I used to see some of these things when they came in over the over the transient through the objection means of getting something up and I think he is a Patriot I don't see anything that suggests he's doing anything that is improper and as you know his paper has now come out after all the channels he didn't break free and go talk to the press he let the system handle itself and the paper that he put out has a lot of consistency with some of the things the White House put out so what we need to do is I hope get this investigation is inquiry done as quickly as possible and let's stop screaming at everybody and cursing people coyle calling people traders and calling them spies and using all of these names of degradation when all we're trying to do is find the answers so let's cooperate with each other in this in the Congress and get an answer to it and move on to you think Nancy Pelosi is doing the right thing absolutely and I think it was very interesting thing in listening to her when she talked about this I thought she was very measured and serious talked about the constitution and saw it as a process I think it wasn't easy because I think the nothing is easy in terms of making a decision like that but I she respects the institution I think we both have talked about the importance of the institution and the Constitution there is ah it's set up in a way that Congress has a responsibility here and I think the question is the one you asked what was this phone call about it is possible that a president will make a mistake in talking to some other leader on a issue that is state managed which is is why in fact you have other people on the phone and you can say you might WanNa have worded that differently and have somebody follow up this had nothing to do with state business as far and nobody kind of said anything about it except this man or woman that has been the whistle blower Colin what do you think the Republican Party's responsibility is your lifelong Republican you say that well let me put a different the Republican Party desperately wanted you to be it's presidential candidate ninety ninety six allows you you were very important figuring the Republican Party get I'm actually right I'm not gonNA dogs in the case but as such an important republican do you worry that the party is putting putting party or maybe even and trump before country started saying I had no political affiliation during my first thirty five years in government and the army as a career military officer had no party and it was only when I left and there was attention being given to me about running politics that I said no it's not me and identified myself as a Republican but also made it clear to people I was Republican who's Ronald Reagan's national security adviser I was Republican who work George Herbert Walker Bush and worked for George W Bush I'm a moderate Republican who believes that we should have strong foreign policies wrong defense policy but we have to look for people and we ought to work hard to making sure we're one country one team and so on that basis I call myself okay but in the state of junior you really nothing you can be anything you want any day of the week what do you think do you think that DNC question Republican party has got to get a grip on itself right now Republican leaders and members of the Congress both Senate and the House are holding back because they're defied of what will happen any one of them if they speak out what will they lose a primary I don't know why that's such a disaster but literally the primary and so they they need to get a grip and when they see things that are not right they need to say something about it because our foreign policy is shambles right now title judgment and I see things happening that are hard to understand a couple of weeks ago the president put a circle around Southeast Alabama it saying that it's going to get hit by hurricane we put it on top of the meteorological prediction and the meteorologists said no no no no and in my time and her time one of us would have gone to the presidency was president screwed up so we've got to fix it and we'll put out a correction you know what they did this time they ordered the Commerce Department to go out and back up whatever the president misled this country supposed to run and congress is one of the petitions that should be doing something about this all parts of Congress the media has a role to play we all have enrolled by we've got our number the remember the all of these pieces are part of our government executive branch Congress Supreme Court and the fourth estate we've got to remember what the Constitution started with we the people the president

America Colin Powell Madeleine Albright Thirty Five Years
"madeleine albright" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

06:58 min | 2 years ago

"madeleine albright" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

"At Georgetown and I. I think we have talked about what the curriculum for people that are in. The larger field of international affairs has to be and You know it isn't just taking political science and history. What we have to do is understand health issues Issues to do with any kind of scientific typic- thing the world is not flat and I think there are any aspects of that curriculum that we have to work on so that people really are prepared to have the discussions about Ai. Global warming and all the various aspects that are going on and the health issues. It's a growth industry in a field and IT knees these women. I really believe that in terms of moving forward to get something that we want in the twenty first century instead of the mess. That's going on now. That by the ways of diplomatic thematic term of art. You know you never stop. You're a force of nature and it's hard to keep track of view of any at any given time and we also knew your author and everybody has gotten your book today called Fascists Fascism a warming and I wonder if you could tell us why you wrote it and maybe people get into the book that much faster when they hear well first of all it has a very bland title but and some people think it's alarmist and it's supposed to be and the reason I wrote I actually was going to write it no matter who had gotten elected because I felt very much that there were divisions in our society created created some by technology not a full understanding of it and I really speed it up. The writing of it more after the election is supposed to be. I decided it had to be historical. A lot of it is Personal to me. I was born in Czechoslovakia in one thousand. Nine hundred eighty seven and the Nazis came in in nineteen thirty nine and a lot of people died as a result of fascism As it turns is out I learned thirty. Eight members of my family did and so I think that so it was very personal but also I thought it needed to be put into into historic context. So I begin with Mussolini and Hitler and then I Franko and then I talk about various places now in the world where. I'm very worried by the dictatorial authoritarian leaders and the best quote in the book actually comes from Cellini and he said Ed if you pluck a chicken one feather at a time nobody notices so there's a lot of feather plucking going on now and you can't say those words just to quickly together but I do think there is a warning about the kinds of things that are going going on and I have the part that I learned writing the book is Mussolini. Hitler and Franco came to power constitutionally Mussalini. There were complications with party politics. In the end of World War One and King Emmanuel turn power over to him Hitler. There were various issues going on in Germany there. Some as a result of the Versailles Treaty. Some of financial in the Weimar Republic. Wasn't wasn't strong. So von Hindenburg. Turn power over to Hitler. Then also. In Spain there was a weak government that folded and the king. There turned it over to Franco the countries that I right about now starting with or Bun and Hungary and what's going on in Poland and in the Philippines details and and Turkey with Air Dewan and Chavez Maduro in Venezuela they were all elected. And I think it's only and I do say that Communism is is also fascism there they had a revolutions but all the other ones were people that were elected and I think we need to understand what the conditions czar that create. This you know we're all familiar with that Saying see something say something. I have added something to that which is do something We cannot cannot normalize what is going on and my to do list really does include saying we it is very important for are there to be freedom of the press. The press is not the enemy of the people to have a judicial branch that is judicious and The things that are leaders can be above the law And then I think people need to run for office or support support those that do and then Something that I think is actually hard to do which is to talk with the people that we disagree with. I don't like the word tolerance because it's tolerate put up with. I think we need to respect those views. I don't want to be an echo chamber. I want to learn a lot by the way should be glad that you live here. And Not in Washington because in Washington I listened to right wing radio as I drive And do a a little yelling and a few hand gestures and so it's possible that I'm dangerous. Maybe the secret of longevity you know but then I don't think there's ever been a book or speech that doesn't quote Robert Frost so my quote is The older I get the younger are my teachers and I think we need to support those young people that marched because park leading on all fronts. Well Madam Secretary we're glad you're perennial that. May you continue to lead thanking the. That was an incredible conversation with Madeleine. Albright it's really worth checking out her book. Fascism fascism a warning a couple of important takeaways. I sometimes to make your voice heard you have to learn to interrupt secretary. Albright teaches set Georgetown and she insists that our students interrupting class second. It's not just enough to speak up. Everyone knows the saying. See something say something Secretary Albright ads do something. Finally we have to talk with people. We disagree with Secretary Albright suggests. It's important that we try to respect other people's views you're listening to Seneca women conversations on power and purpose and this podcast was brought to you by Seneca women for more information go the Senate women dot com or check on our APP Seneca.

Secretary Albright Hitler Georgetown Franco Mussolini Czechoslovakia Seneca Weimar Republic Germany Spain Robert Frost Washington Senate King Emmanuel Cellini Hungary
Has Trump broken the 'rules-based international order'?

Between The Lines

11:14 min | 2 years ago

Has Trump broken the 'rules-based international order'?

"Today on the show discussion with a renowned expert about the so-called rules based international order. It's been grabbing headlines vs. Now, how often have you heard that term, the rose by store is not perfect. We are rallying the noble nations of the world to build a new liberal order, that prevents war achieves greater prosperity for all. I have never heard. I Chinese leader commit so explicitly to rule based international order. So what do you think it actually means now for many politicians and journalists the world in which we leave the institutions of governance, the rules norms, all that, that's largely inspired by the kind of allegedly but nine global leadership that the United States. Is exercise for decades. And yet, would you believe it? The rules based international order itself has become a popular expression, only in recent times, did effective research, such of the world's newspapers and news wise. And it shows these things that in the three decades from ninety five to twenty fifteen the expression was used on three hundred nineteen occasion. That's three hundred eight times in thirty. That's all, however, get a lot of this in the past four years since Donald Trump announces presidential campaign, the term has been used nearly six thousand times six thousand times in the past four years. And about three hundred and twenty in the previous thirties, extrordinary now to me, the logic is simple. Western journalists scholars politicians policy makers, they all too often refer to this Liberal International order rules. Based international order. Why? Because it's demise is primarily blamed on one Donald Trump from this day forward, it's going to be only America first America first. Now the conventional wisdom goes lock these ball rising tariffs weakening alliances withdrawing the US from international agreements and supping with the devil, from Kim Jong Hoon that Singapore to Ladimir Putin hill, stinky, the US president has lifted void in world leadership. This is the argument as a result, Trump has undermined Feith in the open free, international order of the post Cold War era. But Trump alone really, to blind for the unraveling of the Liberal International auto or was this rules based order. So beloved of the western elites was at bound to file will my guest today has spent a lot of time. Thinking about this issue, John Measham is no stranger to this program. He's professor of political science at the university of Chicago. He's the author most recently of the great delusion liberal, drains and international realities published by ya'll university, Chris. And he's article bound to file the and full of Liberal International order that appears in the current issue of the academic journal, International Security, John joins us today from a studio on campus. The university of Chicago. Get I John welcome to the program. Thank you, Tom. I'm glad to be here now. It seems that this rules base Liberal International order is in trouble is Trump to blind. No, I think it is the conventional wisdom among the foreign policies. Tablet meant here in the United States, and probably in Australia that Trump is responsible for wrecking the Liberal International order. And once he is disposed of in twenty twenty and we get a new president someone like Joe Biden, we'll go back to the old way of doing business in the Liberal International order will survive. I think this is a deeply flawed way of thinking about what's happening with regard to that order that order was in deep trouble before, Trump got elected, just think the Iraq war, the Afghans, STAN war, the fiasco and Libya defeat. Lasko in Syria to Gasco over Ukraine, to two thousand eight financial crisis, the euro zone crisis Brexit, just a name of few of the problems. What Trump did when he ran for president in two thousand sixteen was he pointed out all these failures. He said, the Liberal International order was bankrupt and he got away. Acted and he got elected because many voters, clearly understood that he was correct. So the argument that Trump is responsible for wrecking the Liberal International. Order is dead wrong by what distinguished Trump from a lot of the Republicans and Democrats in two thousand sixteen was he's belief that democracy was not an expo commodity, and you think about it, John thirty years ago. This she had the full of the Berlin Wall, the claps Ivy, communism and the consensus that ease ago, I roll friend Francis, Fukuyama democracy was the wife of the future, what happened. I think that would happened was that we came to find out that not everyone in the world likes democracy, you and I may think it is the best system. But the fact is that they're all sorts of other people world, especially if you go to a place like Russia today, who would prefer an alternative form of political system. And in this case, it soft the -tarian his, so if you're in the business of trying to spread democracy around the world as the United States was in its pursuit of liberal. Gemini, what you discover is an extremely difficult task and it's an especially difficult task. If you use military force to spread democracy. In other words, you try to spread democracy at the end of a sword. And this, of course, is what we tried to do in Afghanistan. And in Iraq, it was with the Bush doctrine was all about, and those ended up being close. Oh failures, you'll critics will say though. Not standing all these setbacks that isn't it inevitable that as human con progresses than the prospects for democratization, and universal peace are enhanced and that, you know it was seeing this right now. There's still talk that China will eventually become a liberal democracy in these protests in Hong Kong that we've witnessed in the past fortnight that shows that eventually, China will buck, and become more liberal, democratic signed thing for Russia. How'd you respond to that? I just don't think it's inevitable. I mean, I want to be very clear, I think democracy is the best political system, and I think it would be a good thing if every country on the planet was liberal democracy. But the idea that that is inevitable as simply wrong. The fact is that Uman beings find it very difficult to agree on questions of what is the best life? What is the best political system, and would Frank Fukuyama and others? Assumed when the Cold War came to a conclusion was that everybody in the world. Wanted to live in a state, that was a liberal democracy. And therefore, with fictive -ly had the winded our back in our endeavour to spread liberal democracy, all across the planet, but that assumption has proven to be wrong. The fact is that the spread of democracy is not inevitable. And by the way, if you go back to two thousand six fast forward to the present what you see is that the number of democracies in the world is decreasing not increase. I think the New York buys freedom house's documented that. It's come down something like ten percent in the last ten or so years. Raw joan. It has. And that is regrettable. But it just points out that this is not inevitable. And again, if you get into the business trying to sprint liberal democracy when it's not an edible. And there are viable, alternatives, you're going to run into a whole his just as a conventional wisdom's are often wrong guy back to that consensus at the end of the Cold War that democracy was the wife of the future. One orthodoxy, that's also Baynes smashed in the last that he is. John is argument that nationalism was a thing of the past on the eve of the European parliamentary elections as Jordan, Claude Juncker. He's a leading European bureaucrat. He was asked about the growing reactions about, you know, against Brussels and the AU and the rise of nationalist movements across Europe. This is from CNN in general with the with the EU elections coming up, the euro skeptical right-wing forces seemed to be very strong in many countries. How does how much does that concern? You why do you think that is what's wrong with the what's your? We'll just. And if that wasn't tone-deaf enough, he added these populous necessarily stupid necessarily his day, I love the country and they don't like the others. Join me Sharma. What do you make of comments? I think it's a remarkably foolish comment. The fact is that virtually every leader of a western democracy is a nationalist just take, Madeleine Albright, who was once secretary of state here in the United States and is viewed as a canonical liberal. She's also a nationalist at heart. She wants famously said that America is the indispensable nation. We stand taller and we see further if you think about her words, she is saying, America is the indispensable, and I underline the word nation. That's at the heart of nationalism virtually every leader, whether it's an Australian or. Japanese or German leader feels that his or her country is something very special in their deeply devoted to that country. That's what nationalism is all about. And what you had in the post Cold War, period up until very recently is a situation where liberalism and nationalism coexisted, but hardly anybody ever talked about nationalism. But once the Liberal International order began to crumble people began to talk more and more about nationalism. And they felt at a lot of those liberal policies in fringed on national policies and on nationalism and ways that they didn't like, and the end result is, you got Brexit and Britain, and you got Trump and the United States and you know what you have in places like Poland and Hungary as well. So in nineteen states clash with multilateral institutions, nationalism, always Trump's liberalism that show alone. My view is that liberalism and Nash. Nationalism can coexist. But when particular liberal policies begin to bump up against nationalism, nationalism will be liberalism, every time because we are all ultimately social animals. We are all alternately very tribal in our nation matters to us greatly. I think virtually every Australian cares greatly about Australian sovereignty just like every American cares about American sovereignty.

Donald Trump Liberal International United States John Measham Russia President Trump America Iraq Frank Fukuyama International Security University Of Chicago Berlin Wall Professor Of Political Science CNN Syria Joe Biden China Ladimir Putin Hill Chris
Journalist posts bail, calls for "outrage" over libel arrest

Radio Specials

00:57 sec | 2 years ago

Journalist posts bail, calls for "outrage" over libel arrest

"A journalist in the Philippines is free on bail. After being charged in a libel. Case Maria recipe is co founder of an online news site. That's been critical of the country's president Rodrigo Duterte and his policies. NPR's? Julie McCarthy says press watchdogs believe recipes arrest his aimed at intimidating her colleagues. Philippines. National union of journalists called rescues arrest a shameless act of persecution. Former secretary of State Madeleine Albright said it was condemned by all democratic nations. It's the sixth time that Russia has posted bail in connection with her website rattler, which president do tastes Koren's as a fake news outlet previously. Russia was charged with tax evasion and for violating the law restricting foreign ownership in the media sector in the libel case for which he was arrested. A filipino. Businessmen says rapper wrongly linked him in an article seven years ago to human trafficking and drug smuggling recipe called her arrest and abuse of power and vowed to quote, hold the

Rodrigo Duterte Philippines President Trump Maria Recipe Russia Madeleine Albright Julie Mccarthy NPR National Union Koren Co Founder Seven Years
An Angry Trump Pushes Back Against His Own ‘Naive’ Intelligence Officials

1A

03:54 min | 2 years ago

An Angry Trump Pushes Back Against His Own ‘Naive’ Intelligence Officials

"And lots of other bad things. Tom Bowman the Intel chiefs made a point in public in front of the Senate, the annual threat assessment to say that Iran is not violating the deal. The president says this is all wrong and basically spent the day at odds with his Intel chase before gathering them around himself for a photo op to show that everything's all. Right. I think all you can say is that it's bizarre. Anybody who watched? It was quite clear what the intelligence folks were saying that Iran is not pursuing a nuclear weap-. That North Korea will unlikely give up its nuclear weapons they were quite clear in that prison said it was mischaracterized by the press called it fake news. But anybody watching that could see what they were saying it was quite clear there was no nuance there. They were quite blunt in the contradicted their boss, president United States Corning. Yeah. I mean, it's it's no surprise that the president disagrees with icy on these three things that have gotten the most attention on this the first North Korea the idea that they are no longer a nuclear threat. We've had consistent reporting for months and months and months, they are in fact, continuing to pursue their nuclear program continuing to their ballistic, missile development, and everything they aren't testing on ISIS. The fact that Trump said that is is defeated. Just not true. They're close to their physical caliphate is close to being defeated in Syria. But they're still thousands of fighters that exist and finally on Iran. You know, they are in technical compliance as know hospital said, but there's you know, the icy has been against him on this idea that they are in violation of JCP away for months. Now. So that's not the surprise to have it all packaged in one hearing the way that it was an on camera with the leaders of the intelligence community that was the part that got so much attention that was very jarring. And then of course, you know, we had the next day President Trump gathering as you said in the Oval Office and saying, oh, it was fake news. They all told me it was fake news. And he told everyone that they should read the transcript from the hearing. I would recommend the president read it as well because he would see that. In fact, it was actually reported exactly the way that his icy chiefs. Also, nothing. They said was all that spellbinding. Everybody agrees that everything they said every adult in Washington would agree with what they said. And none of the senators were shocked. They asked questions to issue because they wanted to marry now Courtney who've been to Syria, we talked to the military over there. They'll tell you quite bluntly that ISIS has been defeated. And there are thousands of ISIS fighters running around, and they will likely come back. They're already coming back and places that had been clear like man, bitch and Raka. This is no surprise. Now. Take a listen here to former secretary of State Madeleine Albright. She went on CNN to talk about the president's assessment of the national threat assessment and blows my mind, frankly, and I worked for presidents that actually were interested in knowing what was going on and knew what the role of the intelligence community is and was and so I am stunned by this. And I think it only proves something that troubles me deeply is that this president is. Is someone that doesn't wanna learn? The former secretary of state says she stunned Paul wrote to us on Facebook. Wow, staffers contradicted, the president question Mark exclamation point little sarcasm there from Paul who is not stunned. Emily Tamken some surprise from former staffers, but but Intel chiefs have to manage these relationships now, right? I mean, first of all I think I would agree with Paul on Facebook and say that who at in two thousand nineteen is stunned that the president would contradict his intelligence officials or indeed anybody who tells him something that he didn't wanna hear. Yes. The intelligence chiefs do need to manage relationships. But I think when they were testifying. You know, they weren't necessarily saying anything new or that hasn't already been reported for months with stunning to me is that the president decided to pick a fight over these issues. Right. Like all he had to say on Iran was okay. While you Ron may have been in technical compliance with JCP away.

President Trump Intel Chiefs Iran Donald Trump President United States Cornin North Korea Intel Paul Syria Senate Tom Bowman Facebook Madeleine Albright Washington CNN RON Courtney
Eurozone unemployment falls to decade low of 8.2 percent

BBC World Service

00:49 sec | 3 years ago

Eurozone unemployment falls to decade low of 8.2 percent

"Unemployment across the nineteen country euro zone has fallen to. Its lowest level since the most acute phase of the global financial crisis decade ago the. European Union statistics agency Eurostat says. The unemployment rate in. July with eight point two percent which was unchanged from the previous month's rate the rates now the lowest since November of two thousand eight when unemployment. Was soaring in the immediate aftermath of the collapse of US investment Bank Lehman Others though the overall decline was widespread there are still big, disparities across, the region some countries like Germany are operating, what economist. Term full employment with the jobless rate only three. Point four percent while other countries such as Spain and Italy have double digit unemployment rates

Hillary Clinton Madeleine Albr Bill Clinton Barack Obama Powell Clinton Secretary President Trump European Union Principal President George W Bush Alexa Bank Lehman Others United States Dan Body LEK CBS Germany
Anti-HIV Pills Powerfully Protect Uninfected Persons

24 Hour News

01:21 min | 3 years ago

Anti-HIV Pills Powerfully Protect Uninfected Persons

"Madam secretary won't. Lek secretaries of state when it premieres this fall CBS has, former secretaries Hillary Clinton. Madeleine Albright and, Colin Powell will appear. On, the dramas fifth, season premiere, October seventh star Leonie in her role, as secretary of state Elizabeth McCord six their advice Clinton tweeted it was wonderful to spend some time on the set for Albright this is a return to the show she previously appeared. During its second season Clinton was secretary of state, under President Barack Obama Powell was President George W. Bush's top diplomat and Albright was the first woman to become secretary of state during, President Bill Clinton's administration New research, shows aids, treatment, drugs, can actually prevent uninfected people from catching the. HIV virus during sex in one study there were no infections among gay men. Who used to, pills either daily or, just before and after sex with someone with HIV in a second. Study no uninfected man caught the virus if they had sex with a partner. Who was taking medication for HIV both. Studies were discussed Tuesday at the international aids conference in Amsterdam there is no aids vaccine so other prevention methods are crucial to. Curb the pedantic You've reached the high fashion hotline hi my family's going to a concert in. The park and we want her style to be the main, attraction, rock, over.

Madeleine Albright Hillary Clinton President Barack Obama Powell President Bill Clinton HIV Secretary President George W. Bush CBS Amsterdam Leonie Elizabeth Mccord Partner
Roseanne Barr, Secretary and Sean Hannity discussed on 24 Hour News

24 Hour News

03:17 min | 3 years ago

Roseanne Barr, Secretary and Sean Hannity discussed on 24 Hour News

"That Fox News host, Sean Hannity announced that he would interview Roseanne Barr on Thursday. Roseanne will be making an appearance in Manhattan that same night at stand up New York to perform a live podcast with rabbi shmole ditch the celebrity rabbi already interviewed bar since she was fired from her ABC show. After posting that too controversial, tweet urged people to forgive her security will be beefed up for the occasion with the venue, bring in two bodyguards and bar is a poor to also be bringing her own security. Well this is just I I don't like this because I've long been, waiting to hear from Roseanne but I think that the and I would think that she would be savvy enough that she needs to go outside of her camp or outside of folks that would be either as naturally sympathetic, to her or, be Subscribing to her same ideas and they kind of the same ideology I you just can't listen I'm a conservative guy you cannot go right Hannity for this we will get nothing out of this hard It's. Such a softball Ryan you were a victim Why did I choose what's an. Eastern alerts climate Roseanne You heard. It. Here first David Steve sorry I lost my temper relax CBS drama, Madam secretary secretary announced that former secretary of state Hillary Clinton Colin Powell and Madeleine Albright, will appear. In the season five premiere of Madam secretary series star tea Leoni tweeted she was incredibly honored to have the former real life secretaries on the set while the episode won't air until, October fans have. Some information about the guest stars roles in the episode secretary of state Elizabeth McCord played by Leoni turns to the former secretaries of. State to ask their advice, on, how. To, respond to a delicate. Situation Tuesday's Drake has postponed his Saint Paul show for eleven days to give fans. The show that they quote expect and deserve in a statement on his social media accounts the. Singer confirmed that, his August first show at the XL energy, center is, going to, be pushed back to August twelfth it is now the second stop Drake's Aubrey and the, three migos. Joint tour with rap three amigos which has been thrown into disarray following the arrest of migos member offset on gun and drug charges so Drake said on Twitter in order to deliver, a high standard. Experience that Drake fans expect and deserve the tours made the necessary decision to slightly adjust the beginning of the the three amigos schedule If you weren't going to the show anyway KiKi Do you are you, right TBB Doodoo, sorry I'm adding nothing to this story on TV. Tonight we have the third season finale of colony on USA and on hip hop squares on VH. One we have that as..

Roseanne Barr Secretary Sean Hannity Drake Tea Leoni Hillary Clinton Colin Powell Rabbi Shmole Fox News Softball New York Twitter Tbb Doodoo Manhattan ABC Madeleine Albright USA David Steve Elizabeth Mccord
Ireland, Mollie Hunter and Europe discussed on All News, Traffic and Weather

All News, Traffic and Weather

01:13 min | 3 years ago

Ireland, Mollie Hunter and Europe discussed on All News, Traffic and Weather

"For free bbc news time five oh nine polls are open now in ireland for a contentious referendum on abortion today voters decide on repealing the irish constitutions eighth amendment which puts heavy restrictions on abortions but his abc's mollie hunter reports the vote comes during a shift in european politics it is still very catholic everyone i spoke with reminds me that the conservative ireland is still very present in the church still has a lot of sway so today's vote could actually move ireland in line with its western neighbor is in europe but but so interesting actually at a moment like this we're actually looking at a western europe that's having this populist movement living away from these liberal values it's actually moving right of center so to have ireland catch up now be pretty extraordinary hillary clinton is coming to boston today she's being awarded a medal from harvard university for her work in leadership and human rights former secretary of state madeleine albright will deliver a personal tribute to clinton and award her the radcliffe metal which the university says honors those who have had a transformative impact on society and while many of you were making the escape up north today from memorial day weekend main may be the place to be this summer for college students looking to make a buck a lot of college students are looking for summer jobs wallet hubs compiled a.

Ireland Mollie Hunter Europe Hillary Clinton Harvard University Madeleine Albright BBC Boston
First lady Melania Trump hospitalized for treatment of benign kidney condition

TMA Morning Show with Charlie James

01:37 min | 3 years ago

First lady Melania Trump hospitalized for treatment of benign kidney condition

"It was she'd been experiencing issue with their kidney that our office described as benign but required medical attention this morning first lady this is a statement first lady melania trump underwent an implementation procedure to treat a benign kidney addiction or a condition sorry kidney condition the procedure was successful there were no complications and according to stephanie grisham the first lady's communications director so president trump remained at the white house during her surgery he tweeted just after five o'clock yesterday that he was heading to the hospital to visit his wife on marine one so that's what's the best wishes going out to her for a very very speedy recovery eight four three five five six twelve fifty is the number to be on the program this morning and join us having birthdays today ray lewis is forty three years old today retired baltimore ravens linebacker super bowl mvp and former murder suspect having a birthday today dan patrick of espn is sixty two years old today man i'll tell you what if you ever have you could ever imagine having the life the life dan patrick man he went everywhere got invited to everything every sporting event he was the guy still is probably let's see what else happening today to the amazing spiderman might remember that aired on tv on this date back in the seventies when toby maguire was still in diapers madeleine albright is eighty one years old today.

Melania Trump Stephanie Grisham Director White House Ray Lewis Baltimore Ravens MVP Dan Patrick Espn Toby Maguire Madeleine Albright President Trump Murder Forty Three Years Eighty One Years Sixty Two Years
"madeleine albright" Discussed on Pod Save the World

Pod Save the World

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"madeleine albright" Discussed on Pod Save the World

"Really get guys we have a big guest today on hot save the world former secretary of state madeleine albright is on the show i think this is the biggest guests we've ever had michael i don't know you know the full history of the show but big deal for me she wrote a book about fascism she's worried enough about the rise of thorough teheran governments around the world and here in the united states that she wrote an entire book about fascism we talked about that we talked about how she would advise president trump as he decides whether or not to strike north korea to respond to their chemical weapons program and then we talked about her visit to north korea back in two thousand her meetings with kim jong il what she took away from those and how that can inform our approach north korea going forward there are a few people on the planet to know more about foreign policy than she does you will be well served to listen and i think will enjoy this interview so here we go my guest today is former secretary of state madeleine albright she is the author of a fantastic new book called fascism a warning that feels even more real every morning i wake up and see a tweet from donald trump so thank you for being here thank you secretary albright you came face to face with fascism in the very first days of your life your family fled czechoslovakia after it was occupied by the nazis how is your personal experience shaped the way you look at what's happening in the world right now and the ongoing threat from fascism.

madeleine albright united states north korea donald trump czechoslovakia michael teheran president kim jong secretary
"madeleine albright" Discussed on 1A

1A

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"madeleine albright" Discussed on 1A

"And then he's obviously had an important job in the administration at the cia i john gold has been somebody that has on the from the outside been highly critical of everything and who is very much of a hard liner and also the fact that iran plays a role in all of this and so i think that the question is to what extent their new jobs will affect the way that they think because especially john bolton the job of national security advisor is to be the honest broker somebody that brings the rest of the government together to provide a variety of options to the president united states and often the last person to talk to the president so i think that it'll be interesting to see whether he continues his way of dealing with things in in vary hard line and i think dangerous approaches or whether he will find his new job and something that requires a great deal of thought of funds ability madeleine albright was secretary of state in the clinton administration her new book is called fascism a warning madam secretary thanks so much for talking to us thank you joshua by this program comes to you from w amu part of american university in washington distributed by npr i'm joshua johnson thanks for listening this is one a mm we'd like to thank our sponsor who brings you this message discover card who will lert you if they find your social security number on any one of thousands of risky websites.

john bolton advisor president american university washington iran united states madeleine albright clinton secretary w amu joshua johnson
"madeleine albright" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"madeleine albright" Discussed on 1A

"Right if he's planning to take military action against the syrian regime just assuming that military action was coming how important is that support and are there certain partners that he should be seeking by from in particular i do think it's very important to get allied support because what is going on is in fact a crime against the people of syria there are humanitarian horrors going on we are much better off if we can operate in conjunction with our allies and following what's been going on in the united nations where the russians seem to be undermining any kind of enforcement out of the security council even though the chemicals agreements that were made do require enforcement if in fact they are the commitments are broken i think it's interesting and important to try to see what our allies can do and not to sound too much just like a professor here i think this is very similar to the situation that we met in cross civil where the united nations was blocked in terms of action because of what the russians were doing and we did go to nato and so i do think that it's important to see about getting allies on this because this is not something that is just a one off deal in terms of just having a response to what they just did this requires a lot of political work economic work and cooperation rig on the laws and and perhaps you know kind of staff assessment of safe zone trying to figure out how to get at this with the help of other multilateral actions we are speaking to madeleine albright the secretary of state in the clinton administration also the chair of albright stonebridge group and albright capital management llc the author of the new book fascism a warning i know we only have you for a few more minutes but i wonder if the fact of this chemical weapons attack makes the possibility of.

syria united nations professor clinton administration albright stonebridge group madeleine albright
"madeleine albright" Discussed on 1A

1A

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"madeleine albright" Discussed on 1A

"No child of god should ever self such horror tonight i ordered a target mergers strike on the airfield in syria from where the chemical attack was launched and here's what he said earlier this week in response to the latest suspected chemical attack we're making a decision as to what we do with respect to the horrible attack that was made near damascus and it will be met and it will be met for fully what actions does the us have regarding syria and what if the action that president trump decided to take in syria was no action at all today we'll hear from former secretary of state madeleine albright on what's ahead for the us in syria that conversation is just ahead after this support for this podcast and the following message come from babbel one of the world's leading language apps learn to confidently speak a new language with battles ten to fifteen minute lessons choose from fourteen languages like spanish french or german you'll learn your new language through fun real life dialogues speech recognition and interactive trainers and quizzes download the app or go to babbel b a b b e l dot com to try your first babble lesson for free hey it's money ain't a wholesome host of npr's luckily usa the podcasts that takes you inside the latino conversation each week we'll take you into one story that will fascinate an often surprise you listen to let you know usa on the npr one app or wherever you is podcasts joining us now from new york is madeleine albright the former secretary of state in the clinton administration madam secretary welcome to one a today with you gesture thank you what are your thoughts at this critical moment particularly in light of the.

syria damascus us trump madeleine albright npr new york secretary president clinton administration fifteen minute
"madeleine albright" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

02:05 min | 4 years ago

"madeleine albright" Discussed on Amanpour

"Support for npr comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by quicken loans home plays a big role in your life that's why quicken loans created rocket mortgage let you apply simply and understand the entire mortgage process foley so you can be confident you're getting a right mortgage for you to get started go to rocket mortgage dot com slash i'm on poor support for i'm on poor comes from go to webinar a trusted web in our platform with over fifty five thousand customers who have hosted over two point three million interactive web events to connect with their audiences for more visit go to webinars dot com slash podcast tonight how donald trump's america first policy is changing america's role on the world stage the first woman to become us secretary of state madeleine albright joins the program and trying to get inside the mind of the russian president vladimir putin journalist julia your feet on what he really wants and and good evening everyone and welcome to the program i'm christiane amanpour in london with a global view in a few days president trump will unveil his new national security strategy and who better to speak about that than madeleine albright america's former un ambassador and the first female secretary of state right now here in the uk a proposed working visit by the us president is testing the resilience of the special relationship between america and britain also tonight america is conspicuously absent from the paris climate change summit fifty world leaders of their president trump is not so how does that impact american leadership all right says this question gets more pressing with each passing day and she joins me from washington to talk about it.

britain climate change paris un christiane amanpour vladimir putin madeleine albright secretary of state washington america npr president us uk madeleine albright america trump london julia donald trump foley