8 Burst results for "Madame Lowery"

"madame lowery" Discussed on Lore Premium

Lore Premium

05:49 min | 2 months ago

"madame lowery" Discussed on Lore Premium

"Things often look different the surface. There might be a lost work by famous artist hiding beneath the paint or a layer of archaeological importance just below the topsoil, but there could also be rot and decay and shadows that are better left buried. New Orleans certainly is a city with layers and while it's easy to fall in love with the modern surface with all its charm and music in grand celebrations, it would be wise to remember that there is darkness beneath that beautiful facade not to glorify it but to use it as a roadmap for change. And Madam. Laurie is one of those dark stains. The trouble is her story has been changed over the years. If you've heard about her before today and listened with a bit of confusion to my account of the fire and discovery of her tortured slaves. Then we have a bit of restoration work to do because time has a way of altering the image, muddying the details and hiding the truth. So. Let's dig deeper. I mentioned earlier that Martineau wrote her account of the events, just four years after the fire and that's good. The closer a source is to the actual thing. It's discussing the better throw in contemporary newspaper accounts and public records in the picture that unfolds is pretty much the one that I showed you today. But in the centuries since then new writers have appeared to paint their own layers on top of the truth stories that add Gore and violence and a lot more drama some have described the scene inside the slave quarters as a sort of medical facility with Madame Lowery beside her husband, the physician to perform experiments. Others have described bodies with grotesque disfigurements. Like is that have been purposefully gouged out or body parts that have been cut away like ears and fingers. One wild embellishment claimed that one of the victims had a hole in their skull through which lowery had inserted the handle of a wooden spoon. But. It's fiction decorative additions made over the last five decades or so to make the legend more attractive to fans of horror, it's story. Yes. But not the story, not the truth. That doesn't mean the true story is lacking for darkness. It just means that we don't need to invent anymore on her own. One truth we do know is that the house was sold in the aftermath of the fire and the money was sent back to Marie back in Spain and for a while the old mansion sat empty. Maybe. People were afraid to step inside it after hearing about what had taken place there or perhaps it was the rumors of the ghostly screams that could still be heard inside the place at night. But the house was eventually repaired and not long after it was sold and resold through the mid eighteen hundreds. Over the years that followed, it would transform into a music conservatory, a furniture store, a bar, and even high end apartments but the first thing that was used for it stopped being home in the years following the civil war was. A. Girls of color. And there are stories from that period in the mansion's life. There had already been tales of unusual activity in the building, but these schoolgirls seem to have experienced more than their fair share. oftentimes, the activity was benign like that opened and closed on their own or the sound of footsteps in the empty halls. But every now, and then according to the tales. Experiences were more violent. In fact, one of the more mysterious things to happen wasn't isolated to one or two of the students and it wasn't easy to ignore. It seems that a good number of the girls approached their teachers privately to complain of abuse and every time they would pull up their sleeves to reveal large bruises and vicious scratches. Horrified the teachers would naturally ask the girls who did this to them. And their answer was always the same. With fear there is each girl would give the same inexplicable answer. Inexplicable that is. If one, did it know the history of the house? Described their attacker as. That woman..

Madame Lowery New Orleans Laurie Martineau Gore Spain Marie
"madame lowery" Discussed on Lore

Lore

07:44 min | 2 months ago

"madame lowery" Discussed on Lore

"Was born well connected. Her Uncle Esteban Rodriguez Miro was the governor of Louisiana in the latter years of Spanish control man her cousin served as mayor of New Orleans to say that she had powerful role models would be an understatement. or first marriage was to a Spanish royal officer named Don Ramon Lopez. Guela, although it seems to have been controversial I, she was only thirteen when they were married and second is seems Ramon neglected to ask for permission from the King of Spain My guess is that he knew that the answer was going to be no. So he went with the old adage it's better to beg for forgiveness. Then to ask for permission his disobedience earned him a post in a small unimportant town. But within a couple of years, he was able to smooth things over but five years into their marriage tragedy struck. A pregnant eighteen year old Marie was traveling by ship with her husband when there was an accident off the northern coast of Cuba in January of eighteen o five Marie survived. But Ramon did not leaving her a widow before many women would even have been married. So she headed back to New Orleans to begin rebuilding her life. Three years later in eighteen o eight, she married for a second time. This husband John Blunk was a prominent merchant and banker as well as an attorney and legislator in the new American version of Louisiana. He was a match for Marie in terms of connections, but also added a lot of new wealth to her name together they had four children, but within eight years of their wedding he to passed away. Marie, of course, inherited all of that money but she also inherited hundreds of slaves apparently blocked died with a lot of death and so to preserve the wealth that she had left, many of those slaves were sold off but not all of them and that was a decision she would later come to regret although for all the wrong reasons. In the wake of the death of her second husband in fifteen years instill not even thirty years old yet. Marie had already established a powerful reputation for herself part of it centered around her business acumen and ability to make wise profitable decisions with her growing fortune. But a bit of it also involved her treatment of the slaves she kept locked up at home. It was public knowledge that she had emancipated a number of them over the years and though she didn't release were treated kindly at least in front of guests most people in her social circle, a very powerful and very wealthy circle mind you viewed Marie as generous caring person. But they couldn't bend moron. Eighteen twenty eight Maria married for a third time her new husband Louis Loud three was twenty, two year old physician who specialized in back pain and physical abnormalities. They built a gorgeous new mansion on Royal Street with three stories full of all the trappings that came with life in the upper class and of course. They're slaves. But just four years in the couple separated Louis moved out of the new mansion while Marie carried on business as usual except there were rumors that her pretty facade covered up darker truth whispers that the Oso kind madame lowery who freed slaves and gave them wine was not in fact treating them well at all. Backed by a law that stated that slaves who were shown to be cruelly treated could be taken from their master. An attorney was hired to visit Marie and gather evidence but it seems that she hit her secrets well and the lawyer left empty-handed a year or so later more accusations of the same led to an appearance in court but her money bought her a powerful defense and she walked away unscathed. Not long after that though a neighbor witnessed something terrifying. According to the earliest accounts, it said that the neighbor looked out their window to see Marie chasing a young slave girl through the yard then into the mansion as Marie and the girl passed by various windows, the neighbor was able to follow their pursuits all the way to the top floor. And then they watched in horror as the girl was thrown or forced to jump plummeting to her death below. When the authorities arrived they found enough evidence to take nine, of Maria slaves away. But almost immediately, she had them repurchased by members of her extended family and I can't begin to understand the despair. Those nine human beings must have felt they're hopeful rescue from an abusive husband all erased by the power of money. It was a precarious situation that was building toward collapse and day arrived in April of eighteen, thirty four. That was when a fire broke out inside Marines mansion there on Royal. Street at the time, the caused the blaze was unknown although interviews after the events made it clear. It seems that Marie kept one of her slaves chained to the kitchen stove and rather than go on living under the abuse of someone. So cruel the cook set the room on fire, a fire that quickly spread to the rest of the mansion. It said that Marie and Louis who happened to be in the House that day worked furiously to save their precious belongings, but their slaves were unaccounted for. So a neighbor saw what was happening. They rushed to help specifically looking for human lives that needed saving and it was during this frantic search efforts that they found something that shook them to the core. Behind the locked door of the slave quarters, a portion of a mansion that was set off from the rest neighbors found nine men and women chained to the floor and ceiling. Some of them were covered in fresh wounds and some even worse spiked collars designed to keep them from lowering their heads. All of them though were starved emaciated and close to death. One of the original documenter Harriet Martineau wrote about the aftermath just four years after the events in her book, she included what she discovered about Marie typical morning routine. Breakfast each day she would step into the slave quarters were her captives were chained locked the door behind her and then whip and beat each of them until as Martineau wrote her strength failed. One description in particular has caused even the most resolved historians to Shudder Contemporary newspaper accounts of the discovery claim that one of the men was found chained in a kneeling position his head. So badly beaten that open wounds revealed portions of his brain although he was still alive when rescuers found him, those wounds were said to contain live maggots. Slowly, feeding on him. It's a lot to take in I know. It would be nice to believe that one individual couldn't be that cruel. But Marie, the seems to have broken expectations. She embodied the drastic change in attitudes in New Orleans toward the value of human life and the autonomy of a person's body a change that she carried even further over the line. To her enslaved human beings were not just her personal property. They were the sole targets of her abuse and cruelty. In the nearly two centuries since the events took place, many people have speculated as to what her motivation might have been, and some people always seem to land on insanity that only someone who lost all touch with reality could do such a thing that sort of excuse paints over a darker reality while Marie lowery might have been an edge case the brutal abuse of slaves wasn't atypical. In fact, it was sadly. The norm. and. Marie knew this. In the moments when her mansion was ablaze and neighbors were rushing to help her and the rest of the people inside Marie attempted to send them away claiming that they needed to mind their own business. She feared discovery more.

Marie New Orleans Don Ramon Lopez Louis Loud Louisiana Esteban Rodriguez Miro madame lowery attorney Spain Guela Harriet Martineau Cuba officer John Blunk Maria Shudder Contemporary Oso
"madame lowery" Discussed on Lore Premium

Lore Premium

06:36 min | 2 months ago

"madame lowery" Discussed on Lore Premium

"Marie was born well-connected connected. Her Uncle Esteban Rodriguez. Miro was the governor of Louisiana in the latter years of Spanish control than her cousin served as mayor of New Orleans to say that she had powerful role models would be an understatement. or first marriage was to a Spanish royal officer named Don Ramon Lopez Guela although it seems to have been controversial I, she was only thirteen when they were married and second is seems Ramon neglected to ask for permission from the King of Spain? My guess is that he knew that the answer was going to be no. So he went with the old adage it's better to beg for forgiveness than to ask for permission his disobedience earned him post in a small unimportant town. But within a couple of years, he was able to smooth things over but five years into their marriage tragedy struck. A pregnant eighteen year old Marie was traveling by ship with her husband when there was an accident off the northern coast of Cuba in January of eighteen o five Marie survived but Ramon did not leaving her. Before many women would even have been married. So she headed back to New Orleans to begin rebuilding her life. Three years later in eighteen o eight, she married for a second time. This husband John Blunk was a prominent merchant and banker as well as an attorney and legislator in the new American version of Louisiana. He was match for Marie in terms of connections but also added a lot of new wealth to her name together they had four children, but within eight years of their wedding he to passed away. Marie, of course, inherited all of that money but she also inherited hundreds of slaves apparently blocked died with a lot of debt in. So to preserve the wealth that she had left, many of those slaves were sold off but not all of them and that was a decision she would later come to regret although for all the wrong reasons. In the wake of the death of her second husband in fifteen years and still not thirty years old yet. Marie had already established a powerful reputation for herself part of it centered around her business acumen and ability to make wise profitable decisions with her growing fortune. But a bit of it also involved her treatment of the slaves she kept locked up at home. It was public knowledge that she had emancipated a number of them years and Oshii didn't release were treated kindly at least in front of guests most people in her social circle, a very powerful and very wealthy circle mind you viewed Marie as generous caring person. But they couldn't bend moron. Eighteen twenty eight Marie married for a third time her new husband Louie La Three was at twenty, two year old physician who specialized in back pain and physical abnormalities. They built a gorgeous new mansion on Royal Street with three stories, full of all the trappings that came with life in the upper class, and of course. They're slaves. But just four years in the couple separated Louis moved out of the new mansion while Marie, carried on business as usual except there were rumors that her pretty facade covered up a darker truth whispers that the. Oh, so kind madame lowery who freed slaves and gave them wine was not in fact treating them well at all. Backed by a law that stated that slaves were shown to be cruelly treated could be taken from their master. An attorney was hired to visit Marie and gather evidence, but it seems that she hit her secrets well and the lawyer left empty-handed a year or so later more accusations of the same led to an appearance in court but her money bought her a powerful defense and she walked away unscathed. Not, long after that though a neighbor witness something terrifying. According to the earliest accounts, it said that the neighbor looked out their window to see Marie. Slave girl through the yard then into the mansion. And the girl passed by various windows, the neighbor was able to follow their pursuit all the way to the top floor. And then they watched in horror as the girl was thrown or forced to jump plummeting to her death below. When the authorities arrived, they found enough evidence to take nine of Maria slaves away. But almost immediately, she had them repurchased by members of her extended family and I can't begin to understand the despair. Those nine human beings must have thought. They're hopeful rescue from an abusive home all erased by the power of money. It was a precarious situation that was building toward collapse and day arrived in April of eighteen, thirty four. That was when a fire broke out inside Marines mentioned there on Royal Street at the time the caused the blaze was unknown although interviews after the events made it clear. It seems that Marie kept one of her slaves chained to the kitchen stove and rather than go on living under the abuse of someone. So cruel the cook set the room on fire a fire that quickly spread to the rest of the mansion. It said that Marie Louis who happened to be in the House that day worked furiously to save their precious belongings, but their slaves were unaccounted for. So a neighbor saw what was happening. They rushed to help specifically looking for human lives that needed saving and it was during this frantic search efforts that they found something that shook them to the core. Behind the locked door of the slave quarters, a portion of the mansion that was set off from the rest. The neighbors found nine men and women chained to the floor and ceiling. Some of them were covered in fresh wounds and some even worse spiked collars designed to keep them from lowering their heads. All of them though were starved emaciated and close to death. One of the original documentaries author Harriet Martineau wrote about the aftermath, just four years after the events. In her book, she included what she discovered about Marie typical morning routine apparently after breakfast each day she would step into the slave quarters were captives were chained locked the door behind her and then whip and beat each of them until as Martineau wrote her strength failed. One description in particular has caused even the most resolved historians to Shudder Contemporary newspaper accounts of the discovery claim that one of the men was found chained in a kneeling position his head. So badly beaten that open wounds revealed portions of his brain although he was still alive when rescuers found him, those wounds were said to contain live maggots. Slowly feeding on him. It's a lot to take in I know. It would be nice to believe that one individual couldn't.

Marie Louis New Orleans Don Ramon Lopez Guela Louisiana Esteban Rodriguez Harriet Martineau attorney Spain Miro Shudder Contemporary madame lowery John Blunk Louie La Three officer Cuba Oshii Maria
"madame lowery" Discussed on Today in True Crime

Today in True Crime

05:54 min | 7 months ago

"madame lowery" Discussed on Today in True Crime

"The fire at the long remained on April tenth. Eighteen thirty four did not destroy the enslaved woman who said it in an act of suicide nor did it destroy her enslavers who she hoped would die beside her and the flames. It didn't even destroy the house. The angry mob did that day through armoires out the windows and pianos off the roof. They took out their anger with uncouth graffiti and stole the sterling silverware even the lowery's carriages demolished by the time the mob finished the once. Enviable home was barely more than four bloodstained walls. By some estimates the opulent French quarter mansion sustained about forty thousand dollars in damage or about one point two million dollars today and while the be noted this as the first act of this kind in the city. It couldn't blame the citizens for their reaction to the lowery's crimes. New Orleans had a long and complicated history with race after its settlement by the French. The city was home to a thriving community of free black people. In France slavery was more about class than race and that continued in the by you but in the wake of the eighteen. Oh three Louisiana purchase. The newly American city imported slaves to serve the wealthy creole upper class by eighteen thirty four. The dichotomy was starting to rankle and the city wouldn't stay safe for free black people much longer. The lowery's abuse highlighted the growing discomfort many had with slavery. It's unclear when exactly the couple's started their sadistic acts. They did their best to keep the abuse a secret. But delphine and Leonard Lowery married in eighteen twenty five and moved into the infamous mansion in eighteen. Thirty two that November delphine filed for divorce claiming. Her husband beat her in a cruel manner in front of witnesses. She was not granted a divorce a few months later and enslaved girl died after jumping off the roof. It seemed apparent that madame lowery had chased her up there. The Laurie Mansion was right in the middle of the French quarter. It was impossible to hide what had happened. But it's not worthy that. The neighbors reported Madam Laurie not for the death on her property but for burying the girl in her yard. The police investigated this report. But what they didn't know was this wasn't the first illegal burial at Lowery Mansion by one survivor's account at least twenty. Four slaves died at the lorries hands. Newspaper reports confirm that bodies were found buried on the premises after the fire but in eighteen thirty three there was only one known death. One that could be written off as an accident negligence. Instead of malice the lorries faced. No trial served no jail time. They were fined three hundred dollars and forced to sell their nine. Enslaved servants within weeks. The lorries friends bought the enslaved servants back and delivered them right to the mansion. They thought they escaped. There was no recourse for these enslaved folks that were no laws to protect them. They were trapped over the next year. The lorries performed twisted experiments on their enslaved servants keeping them chained in kneeling positions wrapping their waists in their own still functional intestines breaking bones and resetting them off kilter. It appeared the doctor wanted to see what horrors the human body could survive. No one could blame the enslaved woman who set the fire especially after they saw the condition of the victims. Once the rescued slaves chains were removed. They were taken to the mayor's Office for medical care within hours. A reported. Five thousand people descended on the Laurie House. They attacked the building because they couldn't attack the lorries. The demon couple had already escaped to Paris where they continued their lives of wealth glamor and presumably sadism while this is horribly unjust. It was among the better outcomes for the survivors of the fire even with the public outrage and the atrocities committed there was no law that prevented the tortured victims from falling. Back into the lorries. Possession yet again. It's unknown how the rescued people fared one would hope judge can own jr who rescued them from the fire used his legal power to set them. Free that the free victims moved north found a fresh start and dictated their own futures. But it's equally likely they were once again sold at auction. Even after the fire. Unable to escape their chains there would be no true justice until the end of slavery. And that wouldn't come for over thirty years given this history. It's no surprise. The lallera mansion is now considered the most haunted place in New Orleans..

madame lowery Lowery Mansion Laurie Mansion New Orleans lallera mansion Leonard Lowery Madam Laurie France Laurie House delphine Paris
"madame lowery" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"madame lowery" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"Number one until nineteen twenty four discovered an old cracked copperplate in the alley four cemetery rally force gives me that cemetery. The inscription the plate read reads, Madame Lowery born Madame born Marie Delphine McCarty died in Paris, December seven th eighteen forty two at the age of sixty something that final number was apparently missing a road it. But you know, if she died in eighteen forty two then she would have been well, she would have been quite sixty. She would have been like a fifty seven. All the numbers a little little fish. But it, but these are all all the things that are said, where's she buried? We don't know gene block the block daughters and Madame lottery all rest unknown burial sites. But there's lots of speculation. There's speculation that she's in one of those, you know, New Orleans cemetery. There's a couple of throwing around is possibly one of the number the number two crypt in the forestall plots one of the forestall plots in Saint Louis cemetery. What about the house where the slaves were probably tortured will after a lotteries death. It was it was purchased and at some point prior to eighteen eighty eight it was restored over the following decades. It was used as a public high school conservatory of music and apartment building a refuge for young delinquent bar has written a furniture store a luxury apartment building. And then as I said earlier, nNcholas cage bought it in two thousand seven, and then the current owner is, you know, someone with the regions financial corporation is last record that I found. Okay. Sorry that there's one who was a little bit all over the place. We actually spent more time on this one than than a lot of recent ones man when you look into this tale, it is super super hard to decipher folklore from actual facts. You know, the court records themselves are hard to read because people spoke in fucking weird formal crazy ask krill version of English. Here's my final thoughts. You know, they're made knob anybody's in the attic, you know. But they did supposedly up skeletons from the yard. There is evidence of a lot of mistreatment for sure including the controversial death of twelve year old Leah was the abuse worse than what other slave owners were probably committed to the time. I think it was I think it was probably quite a bit worse even even here internally. And to suck dungeon, there's some disagreement on this. But I think I think a lot of the legend actually is true. I think it's going to be impossible to determine if you abuse came at the hands of either Dr Lori or Madame del fi lottery, but based on the lease tail and the fine. She was given a does seem. Madam dolphin might have become quite cruel in her later years. I mean, there's also you know, this. I mean, you know, the the possibility that a lot of that was under the influence of Dr lottery because again, none of this stuff happened at least, documented wise until he came into the picture. I don't know. Maybe it was his influence. Maybe she was covering for him. Most the time there's I witness accounts of her, you know, not carrying slaves were trapped in a burning structure, you know, many witnessed or slaves in a poor physical states in again how much of that was her and how much of it was her husband. I I do think that he was probably a much bigger monster than she was, you know, could some of this been false testimony. Yes. We'll never know. But we do know that they both were run at a town because of tales of mistreatment, you know, tales started being printed the day after the fire not necessarily years later. People got so mad about her treatment slaves, an angry mob attacked your property. You know, two decades before the civil war. I don't think that happens unless you've gone fuck and way outside the bounds of what was acceptable to time and a certain level. Of abuses slaves was acceptable that time. So to receive the press she did to flee town like she did to flee the whole country as her and her estranged husband who ended up in Cuba. Did that leads me to believe that, you know, the two of them or at least one of them were terrible. Terrible. Terrible people. Do I think you raise a devil baby and broke people's bones to reshape them into crappy? Fuck no. But I do think she may have done shit that was equally horrific. I mean, as we learned doctors really did do horrific medical experiments on slaves. You know, the rumors of abuse didn't begin until after she married a doctor. That's a weird.

Dr Lori Marie Delphine McCarty Madame Lowery Madam dolphin Saint Louis cemetery New Orleans cemetery Paris Leah Cuba twelve year two decades
"madame lowery" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"madame lowery" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"And discomfort in the target whenever they slander the who doer, and there's you know, ten tons of other spells that are done the do. And who do they get even more popular when yellow fever is brought on by mosquitoes and that ravages Louisiana region while slaves and free blacks get sick. They're able to get better while white Europeans die off and many attributed this to voodoo and who do as opposed to African-born people's immunity to the virus. Okay. Besides a culture of do and who do another cultural situation factions, Madame FINA Lowery legend was growing pushback against slavery and new law seeking to protect life's Madame ollery. With someone who owned a lot of slaves. Made a lot of money office lays came from a family who owned a lot of slaves hung around people who a lot of slaves and a lot of other people in New Orleans around the time. We're starting to think you know, what I don't know about this whole sleigh riding. It's it's almost like when you really think about it. It's super fucked up an anti-slavery movement have been alive in America's since the very beginning. Even some of the founding fathers, despite being slave owners went on record against it, a communists and business owners from the north would argue that slavery impeded economic growth when hiring cheap workers, you know, would actually be more practical since he didn't have to feed some Irish fellow when he was young you'd have to take care of him when he was old as as again, many southern slave owners actually did once they retired nations like England put their money and their lives of their own. Own soldiers on the line to end slavery throughout their empires. And beyond by the mid to late late nineteenth century for all intent and purpose of slavery was all but a radically did virtually everywhere except US the specifically, obviously, the south in Brazil treatment of slaves and laws dictate in the treatment range from state to state the Louisiana, code Noir or code of ethics relating to slaves. Read as follows we also forbid all of our subjects in this colony was ever there. Conditional ranked may be to apply on their own private authority the rack to their slaves under any pretense whatsoever. And to mutilate said slaves and any of their limbs or any part of their bodies under the penalty of the confiscation of said slaves in and said masters, so offending shall be liable to a criminal prosecution. We only permit masters when they think that their case requires it to put this lives in irons and to have them whipped with rods or ropes Louisiana, Noah seventeen twenty four. Now that's way back in seventy. Twenty four. How how crazy is that Louisiana? Legislators felt the need to pass a law forbidding physically mutilating, people, right? You don't pass a law like that in a staunch pro slavery area, in my opinion, unless a shit ton of mutilation is already going on which is starving. Like if Madame lottery herself did not mutilate slaves. I if if no one in her household mutilated her slaves. Other slaves were for sure mutilated in Louisiana was which is owned haunted tour worthy horror story. Okay. Now, all the cultural context has been laid out. So so how did Madame Lowery truly become known for being a torture of slaves? It all started with a fire on April tenth eighteen thirty four fire broke out in the lottery resonance on Royal street starting in the kitchen when the police and fire marshals arrived. They supposedly find the cook a seventy year old woman chained to the stove by her ankle. This cook allegedly later said that she had set the fire as a suicide attempt. Because she feared being punished. She said that slaves taken to the uppermost room of the house. Never came back as reported in the New Orleans be the very next day. April eleven to eighteen thirty four bystanders responding to the fire attempted to enter the slave quarters to ensure that everyone had been evacuated upon being refused. The keys by the lotteries. The bystanders broke down the doors to the slave quarters and found quote, seven slaves more or less horribly mutilated suspended by the neck with their limbs apparently stretched and torn from one extremity to the other who claimed to have been imprisoned there for some months..

Louisiana US New Orleans Madame FINA Lowery Madame Lowery Madame ollery fever America Brazil England Noah seventy year ten tons
"madame lowery" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"madame lowery" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"I can't do it. I can't do it. It's too hard to hard to combine one really distinct. Melody with another very distinct voice, I'm not the one who so far fucking. Thank you for that. One silly guessing you're still playing paying your bills that nine hundred ninety nine Diddy his everything about that. Like, I do some yards a song twenty five years ago royalty checks pay for their life the rest of their life. Okay. Food who is a religion. That was brought to the west by slaves originated from Africa hailing from the West Indies and late eighteenth century. It's believed to have started in Haiti in seventeen twenty four has deeper roots in the much older African practice of of ood moon, practiced by many different African cultures for very many for many centuries. Gives me a vote on a voodoo has a number of God's rituals and practices that can be found in today's vote do through slavery of Odin traditions spread out to places as distant from each other as Cuba. Brazil Haiti the Dominican Republican North America. When slaves were brought to the states many were forced to convert to Catholicism. By their new slave masters in order to keep a connection to the religion of their homelands. The slaves had to hide their gods. This is a classic example of religious syncretism. Right. Uniting of different religions into one new school of thought into a religion, the slaves integrated Catholicism into their voting beliefs merging, their ancestor gods and rituals with Catholic saints and practice and created a new hybrid religion foodie was practiced and displayed publicly in New Orleans during Madame Lowery's life so much. So that laws were passed to keep it in check due to its increasing popularity in seventeen eighty two Louisiana's then governor Galvez prohibited. The importation of of black people for Martinique explained that they quote or too much given to them and make the lives of citizens unsafe. This ban was lifted in eighteen zero three but the Christian fear of voodoo remained plantation owners fleeing the revolution in the West Indies began arriving a few years later, bringing with them considerable numbers of West Indian slaves when Haitian. Activities of arrived in New Orleans became even more popular even more public of voodoo became more popular still after the signing of the Louisiana purchase nature. No three the relationship between blacks and whites was less volatile under American rule than it was previously at least in New Orleans that time of voodoo flourished and the sect gained a significant number of converts. Some of the imagery that we are familiar with is is a snake sacrifice. Right. The drinking of blood before looked into this. I remember some some samba shit too. All right. There's definitely some zombie stuff voodoo has all kinds of energy rituals. As you also might imagine a bunch of aboard, Louisiana debutantes took a liking some of them to the exotic forms of spirituality and acts that were generally seen as taboo, some of them became a bit obsessed with them, right? Made for good gossip few Louisiana whites publicly practice voodoo, but many gleefully observed and spied on the proceedings, right? I can picture that. Just oh my goodness Marie. They're cutting head. Head off a chicken. Oh, how dreadful and look at that man dancing. How sinful oh that dark man with the chiseled apps and all the muscles in his chest and arms in that high tight, but on a strong JAL line. Look at those soulful penetrating sinful is why it's all just so dreadful. Did it just get a lot more humid in here prior to any voodoo activity a common ritual was the is to raise the power. This is when all worshippers press raises the power of all the worshippers present for this ritual for this ritual. Imagine a voodoo Queen and king stand on a box containing the snake. They join hands. The people this ritual. They literally transmit the power of the snake, everyone in attendance. Sometimes he fastened bells the outside of the box would shake it to produce a tinkling sound bewitching, the whole congregation in the midst of the gathering, there would be a boiling cauldron in which were thrown chickens, frogs cat snails. Maybe maybe some squirrel balls. We'll fuck we don't know for sure we weren't there. Always a snake? All these offerings were brought by various attendance. And this is where we get zombies. The dead brought back to life by the power of dark voodoo rituals..

New Orleans Louisiana West Indies Diddy Haiti Africa Cuba North America Madame Lowery Martinique governor Galvez Marie twenty five years
"madame lowery" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"madame lowery" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"These strong men used to gore and carnage backed out of the room, shaking and wretched some could not stop themselves from vomiting at last the firemen claimed calmed themselves along with some of Lowery's neighbors. They went into the attic to save the poor wretched creatures that they had discovered everywhere. The firemen look they saw chain slaves. Some were naked in some nearly dead. The stench of fear, sweat and human waste with stomach-turning. But what the firemen saw was infinitely worse all of the slaves have been outrageously mutilated abused or starved one woman had her skin peeled in a spiral around and around her body. So she resembled Macab, Caterpillar one. Man and one woman appeared to have had crude a crude sex change operation performed on them her breasts were sloppily sewn onto his chest and his penis sewn to her crotch another man chained to the wall had a hole drilled into his head maggots crawled in and out of an open wound a woman had Oliver bones broken and reset at different angles. So that she resembled a nightmarish crab when the doors burst open. She scuttled to a corner to hide shrieking out a high hideous barking sound buckets of body parts litter the room several of the slaves perished when rescuers tried to move them. Others fainted from the shock one woman blind with terror jumped to her death from the window. Well, fuck is going on in the lottery home. These firemen stumble across the, you know, some evidence of maybe the worst treatment of slaves or just human beings in general in American history, which is saying a lot or. Or is the tale of Madame Delphine Lowery. You an example of one of the worst cases of slander in American history as some historians suspect which would also be saying a lot or the truth as it often is somewhere in the middle. We're gonna find out today today, we dive into the folklore surrounds the life of Madame Lowery, which leads us into an examination of life in New Orleans in the early nineteenth century and sends us into the world of voodoo hoodoo laws regarding the treatment of New Orleans slaves. The war of eighteen twelve and much much more while we may never know exactly where the line between fact and fiction is drawing detail the dark tale of Madame lottery. We know for sure that her story is an interesting one, which is why she is our topic of the week today on time suck..

Madame Delphine Lowery New Orleans gore Macab Oliver