7 Burst results for "Madagascar Asker"

"madagascar asker" Discussed on TeeVee

TeeVee

12:01 min | 1 year ago

"madagascar asker" Discussed on TeeVee

"Doc Doc look back to the doctor who flash CAST JASON SNELL back with you here to talk about season. Twelve twelve episodes six practice and joining me from. We're forming two points of a triangle across the globe is Antony Johnston. Hello Hello Jason. I'm so relieved that this was overall a good episode because often last week take off really jealous Erica and Steven got right to the flash past because obviously last was so good in so many years and I was really it because let's be honest. It's not unknown. I was really dreading this week. would be a complete let down by comparison. So I'm very happy it wasn't I mean and I agree with you. We'll get it out of the way right here. I was relieved as well. The same feeling which is Not that I don't have some quibbles with this episode but it was good episode like if that other episode hadn't happened And this was episode five. I would have said look at that like because I haven't loved I love the first you know for you episodes of the season but this one I feel like is almost the archetype I think of what Chris chip no wants doctor who to be which is it looks great. It's globetrotting there's action. There's lots of dialogue. There's lots of. It's actually good. I think funny jokes and there's a and and it is. I think true doctor whose history it has a point which is it's sort of educational and couching the educational aspect of it and they kind kind of social aspect of it in science fiction like all of that. I actually think like yeah. I see what you're going for here and I enjoyed it. I thought it was. The pacing is amazing. Right like the the number of scenes and shots and locations. Even though it's mostly South Africa it's still is locations the by the beach and they're in the city and all of those things like there's a lot in this episode and it moves so fast I really enjoyed it. What some of that gets to one of the very specific the reasons that I liked this episode? which was the in media res- opening but I wish I if you're right that this is more the archetypal all kinds of episode chip? No wants to do. I wish he would. Yeah I really really wish they would because the first twenty twenty eighty five minutes of this episode were almost flawless from only as as so often happens with who it was only when we started to get to the resolution of why this thing was happening and how we were going to solve the problems suddenly it was like then okay. Things started to fall fall apart but up until that point it really was almost flawless. It's so well directed and yeah like I say one of the very specific things that I liked about it. Just just because this really appeals to me and the kind of on just the kind of stories alike but also specifically the kind who are like started completely comedia- res- adventure already happening And so we get to see the companions. 'cause obviously we always see the companions onions in comparison to the doctor and then not as competent as the docks who because who is. That's Kinda the point of it. That's how it works but because we're a step further down the chain as it were and now we get to see the companions through the lens of people who don't even know that doctor. The doctor exists. It's like their own companions right right but they suddenly also appear as if they're highly competent well-informed knowledgeable daring. Aaron do adventurers which was really Nice. Made a nice contrast but also yeah just the fact that barreled through with people going wait. Wait what's going on companions and like Yay. There's this thing going on. We haven't got time to tell you. Yeah it just really that together with the direction which was very horror movie like almost. I'm sure that was deliberately with you. Know because of the kind of episode that it was trying to get across this feeling of dread and and You know impending doom was really successful. I thought I mean absolute all credit so the DP the camera on the director. Everybody involved in that really set the mood. Yeah I agree completely the the way the story gets told they did TAC. There's a moment of the very very very end of last week's episode where there's like. Oh there's a thing it's weird it's happening on three continents we should go do and that it's funny because that basically provides this episode with all the setup you really need and the gap is the boring boring stuff that we don't need to see. which is I'm going to drop you off here and I'm going to drop you off here? The audience will learn that along with all the characters that they find in Peru Madagascar and Hong Kong. And you know whatever that store is where the the the cop on the edges rest is rugby-tackling shoplifters and I just yeah you're right. It puts the companions in a in greater positions. Because they're the they're the doctor they're the positions of authority authority. It uses the fact that there are three companions right like I know. It's sort of Ryan's over here and Graham and Yaser over here but like the splitting them all up and then the doctor's got her mission like I thought that was really good. They mentioned earlier but I want to say it again shooting in South Africa like yes. I I love that Dr that that Black Mirror episode that semi eighties that is literally the same shot the the same mountains. It's in Cape Town right like whatever but it looks so good and it's varied enough on a doctor who budget that this like. We're in we're in Madagascar Asker. We're in Hong Kong. We're in you know in the in Peru were in all these places and like it feels like a globetrotting adventure. Sure in a way that I like doctor who to feel I. I wanted to feel like the doctor can go not just anywhere in time and space but also anywhere on earth and have in this case like because we have a target here and they don't even need to show it like they say doctor. This thing is happening in Peru and she just POPs up and the load people onto the CARDIS. Let's go back to Hong Kong load people off of the artists and the and like I loved it. I kind of love that it ends up being kind of the doctor and the crime solving gang and they keep collecting people as they go and yeah I thought it was. I thought it was really fun. And that the added characters made it that much more fun than that it really like the scenes and locations. And you're right the first half hour basically. I thought this is perfect. This is this is fun and looks great and is taking me on an adventure. And that's what I want from doctor who wasn't Hong Kong. There is no way that that street was it was. It was a narrow street and there was they Hose down the roads. Do when it's night and the roads are hose down because they look better and all that but it was like you know that. Yeah okay. That's fair but that beach each relative. That looked really good beach but what you said about them not explaining non over explaining what was going on the star. Because it's like you say set it up at the start of sorry at the end of the previous episode. That's I mean you know who all too often it does explain probably too much to spend too much time explaining things that we can kind of figure out now some of that. Obviously he's because it is a family. Show you go Barry Mind. They're all going to be young kids. What Jin sometimes you know? Yes you're going to need to sort of help to bring them along for the ride but but at the same time I really appreciate when. Sometimes they don't do that and they're just like yeah you'll figure it out you know you've seen this kind of thing before you've watched the show before we know how it works folks you'll figure it out it's fine and I that helps them create a more mature style of storytelling. The I really appreciate shape and as I understand why they can't do it all the time but when they do do it and the and they pull it off then it really works I think yeah I don't I I don't necessarily need and you're right. Maybe maybe is necessary from time to time but I don't necessarily need the all right. Everybody where where should we go. Why don't we go to this place? Kirk Doc oh here we are everybody. Let's go out. Oh here's a strange person. I wonder what's going on. Oh there's a mystery will be solved and here. None of that is necessary. The mystery is being solved. Everybody is on the case and instead as an audience member I love because it really doesn't make any sense and you're trying to put it together of like wait a second so there's the spaceship and the astronauts texting that he needs help and which doesn't really make any sense but whatever and how does he have a cell phone with him and he's not? There's going to be a twist right that it was that it was a bait that it was lured by the aliens to get for some reason that cop out to Hong Kong. Yeah no maybe there's a dropped scene there where he explains that he tried to escape and stole a phone and then they dragged him back and they didn't want to show him before that but it is never explained but still. It's like the hiker the two bloggers who go to the river in Peru and there's garbage everywhere which again and it's not actually a weird thing that's happening. The garbage is not the aliens the garbage is the humans who have turned this beautiful natural thing into a spoiled location location which is part of the message of this episode. But still it's like what does this mean and then Ryan pops up and meanwhile one of the one of the women is gone and then you know. There's the the the mystery of of the sailor floating face down in the water and Madagascar. And what does that mean. And how and this episode goes really deep where there I had literally no idea I was like. Are you ever going to resolve the story. Because I felt like we got about forty minutes out of fifty with very very little idea of what the resolution was going to be an all the whole time I was thinking to myself. This resolution is going to be really abrupt because they have run out of time and like literally there is a moment where the doctor stands there and we see her thinking which is it can be good but it also can be very spur three after Colin scrapie and ex positional and. I can't decide where this episode falls down but we're she's basically like oh it's plastic caustic. It's like okay and and there's an aunt's reference and she's there's a funny me laugh and it's followed by come on brains move it along and Graham says did she say say brains with slamming. There's that time later when she's when she's like you are only in this episode once we're literally just straight after it's been on but when she's I think at gunpoint from the scientists and she says like Oh wait half off all all that one cycles oh like you say very stagey very theatrical bar this is this is the kind of quality that you look for in adopter. Ada Ask somebody who is going to be playing. That character is somebody who can pull that off. I haven't say doctors do that. They all it's part of the character is part of the show. You've gotta that'd be able to sell that. Yeah that's actually the moment that I was sold on David tennant in his first episode. There's that moment where he tastes the blood on the alien spaceship spaceship and he goes. Oh blood control I remember this. I haven't seen this for years and I was like okay. I believe I believe that. He's the doctor now..

Hong Kong Peru Kirk Doc Madagascar Ryan Graham Antony Johnston JASON SNELL Chris chip comedia- res Erica David tennant Madagascar Asker Cape Town South Africa director Aaron Steven
"madagascar asker" Discussed on Mt. Rushmore Podcast

Mt. Rushmore Podcast

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"madagascar asker" Discussed on Mt. Rushmore Podcast

"And that's why they look and act like they do because they were the Beatles essentially running around. Doing Fun. Never would've got that from the Madagascar movie. Yeah yeah they must have ditched out at some point in the production of it and get that they see where they go. They pulled him out of the development of this other thing and put them in into Madagascar. Asker yeah cool anybody's seen Joe Rabbit united it opens up with a kind of a up Para Para Ra allegory of the esteem with which One certain Fascist dictator was held by the people of Germany as being on par with Beatle Mania Helmet. Kohl that's right So it's it's kind of cool. Cool all right right. Let's wrap this sucker. Got Another weather exploitation. A podcast twenty minutes. Well I definitely approach which this topic from someone. That didn't spend a lot of time within the exploitation film community. Oh you don't watch ton. I didn't have that sort of less lucky you you but what I did find interesting was just the phenomenon of the two thousand seven film Grind House. Oh yeah okay. Phenomenon is a word that I'm sure they. They wanted to have push it forward. I loved the idea that these people spend Quentin Tarantino and Robert Rodriguez spent so so much money to lose so much money. Yes and it felt so fitting that the thing that you guys fell in love with as this behind the scenes or or like you know low-quality terrible movies that are you know zeroed in on a very specific community. People WanNa see it. Yeah or pinpoint you know. People want to see a black crime movies or they WANNA see like sex movies movies and to go out and get an all star cast to do two films do bill as a double feature and just run the gamut of having all these special fancy trailers for other potential films that will never exist Hobo with a shotgun. Although I think it was a shotgun was Michelle was made thanksgiving. Thanksgiving don't white meat. I loved it that they are love. They tried to push out out as an event. Nobody wanted to see it. Was it really a flop. Apparently a cost between fifty three Rian. Sixty seven million dollars and may twenty five million costs a lot of money cheap to quote unquote Dolly. Parton big cast you. You don't star studied. That's the one thing that traditional Exploitation films don't have they don't have an expensive. Yeah Litany of people that are in them they have. Nobody's former playboy playmate star. Yeah if you don't want to lose your shirt don't don't bring one but the the films were so very true to form to see what film would be that you rented over and over. The film was damaged and they kept that kind of damage quality. Hollywood in the film where they had cut scene poorly edited. Roy You just take the basic revenge plot of death proof of these women. Are these these these women getting revenge on stuntman Mike Very basic plots except planetary kind of kind of us us but as you know. Rose McGowan with machine-gun leg. Like crazy stuff that you net we would never see. I don't know I just like the idea of films that were made by people who genuinely loves this thing and that those were a failure. Yes I think. That's that's that's the most ironic thing you could possibly have the fact that this Johner that was designed to just make a little bit of money went up costing them a lot of money That's great all right. Time to make some choices. Boys and girls So I'm going to go with blacula primarily because we never did the kickball team black hills balls. Yeah it was also going to be cut. Potenza called Account Blacula LS. I can't remember if I ever settled on an actual name. Whether it was gonna be killers balls or the Count Dracula's we definitely went back and forth. I love the idea of have mad. Max Okay. Sweet I love a hard day's night being a rocks plantation film. That's not. It's not something that you normally think of SPL tation job but it absolutely was one and my favorite movie out of this list at least one favorite movie but favorite most representatives spy tation movie out of this list death race. Two thousand the one that I would have chosen if I did aborbs bag would have been ill. So she wolf put the S S share the Nazi station film. Also a little bit of a mixture of the women in prison. Is that a war enough to know that was no boy. What's her name? I can't remember the actresses name but she was like a Russ Meyer's okay type okay. So this has been fun. Guys enjoyed sitting on the throne throne. Now it's time for me to gingerly step off all right. Thank you guys for listening and check back next week. We'll Michael we'll be sending to such great heights to alert. Oh Lord of all over us. The topic next week is Vanity Projects Lou. See See what you guys come up. One hundred percent Mount Rushmore. poject podcast is going to be so anyway. I think you offer listening this. Has I've been Richard. This is Jeff..

Madagascar Beatles Potenza Kohl Joe Rabbit Germany Quentin Tarantino Grind House Rose McGowan Michelle Rian Parton kickball Robert Rodriguez Mount Rushmore. Roy Michael Jeff Russ Meyer
"madagascar asker" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

09:29 min | 1 year ago

"madagascar asker" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Alfred was not at all the first person to notice that the eastern coast list of South America and the western coast of Africa. Look like they fit together like puzzle pieces. I mean this is an observation that children make the first time they experience globe or an atlas that shows all of that and people had been spotting that similarity starting as soon as there were maps showing both of those coasts in fifteen eighteen ninety six Dutch map-maker Abraham or telling US wrote that the Americas looked like they had been quote torn away from Europe and Africa by earthquakes and floods. Francis is Bacon commented on it in his novum orgasm or true suggestions for the interpretation of Nature in sixteen twenty in a passage on similarities found in the natural natural world. He wrote quote similar. Instances are not to be neglected in the greater portions of the world's confirmation such as Africa and the Peruvian continent which reaches which is to the Straits of Magellan both of which possess a similar estimates and similar shapes a circumstance not to be attributed to Mir accident by the nineteenth century entry naturalists had also started to document animals plants and physical features seem to exist on both sides of oceans in a way that seemed impossible title or at least really improbable given that the ocean was there to separate them there were rock formations on one side of the ocean. That seemed to pick up again. On the the other side. Meszaros fossils were found in both Brazil and South Africa and there are freshwater trial bite fossils from the genus paradoxes. He's that were founded. Both North America and Europe naturalists found living animals to like lemurs which live in southeast Africa the island of Madagascar Asker in Southeast Asia. Even though there's a lot of water separating all of those there were also coal beds on both sides of the Atlantic and seemed to be a part of the same system and physical evidence of glaciers that had once existed in parts of the world now have tropical climates and fossils of tropical plants in areas. That are now polar. The list went on and on and on so people started trying to come up with all kinds of possible explanations for how all of this stuff came to be so so for the animal fossils and the living animals maybe they swam really was one but kind of briefly. That was easy to discount. It seemed incredibly unlikely likely that the animals in question could have swum that far. Or maybe I dunno clung to a floating log all the way across the ocean the maybe they swam explanation. Also they didn't account for things like rock formations and glaciers that seem to have existed in what seemed like the wrong place. Another popular idea. was that at one time. There had been land and bridges connecting the continents but that those had ultimately sunk into the ocean. This tied into another prevalent idea that the earth had once been molten in was contracting being as it cooled and solidified. It was a little like the surface of a plum as it dries into a prune which could explain the existence of both oceans and mountains that that land bridge idea still had some problems though. It didn't explain the rock formations. That seem to stop at one coast and then pick up again on the other side of the ocean unless maybe you those formations had been part of these land bridges that were now underwater. But then they're also wasn't a clear answer to what could have caused the land bridges to think if they had ever existed in eighteen fifty-eight Antonio Snider Pellegrini argued that maybe Africa in South America had been one continent at some point in the past asked he suggested that the continents had been forced to part in the flood that is described in the biblical Book of Genesis then a few decades later when radio-activity nobody was discovered in eighteen ninety six that raised more questions about this general idea that the earth was molten just contracting as it cooled. How how could that be happening if there were radioactive materials within the earth that were giving off heat on December twenty ninth nineteen eight American geologist? Frank B Taylor gave a presentation to the Geological Society of America in which he suggested that the continents were moving and had been pulled apart by lunar gravity. He thought that the collisions allusions of the continents had pushed mountains into being and that the continents movement had also left deep tears in the oceans. He published a paper in one thousand nine hundred ten and other papers I followed. It is definitely possible to read. Taylor's nineteen ten paper or one of the ones that followed and for a while. The theory of continental drift draft was actually called the Taylor Wagner hypothesis in nineteen. Thirty two though Taylor said that his name should be dropped off from the scripture because other than the basic idea the continents were moving. His ideas. Were really different from. There's here's what I thought was going on. He thought that the planet was made from concentric layers of material. which were denser? The further down you go. And the outermost layer with the continents on it was not contiguous oceans fill in any gaps the continent layer was made of seal material that's largely silicon and aluminum and the ocean floors were sima that silicon and magnesium seal was was less dense than seema so the seal continents could float along the Sima Ocean floor kind of like icebergs float on the ocean. Vagner thought that at some point about two hundred entered million years ago all the continents had been connected into one landmass that he called Panja and then something had broken them apart and allowed them to migrate around around the Earth. He thought this motion explained how mountains formed. It wasn't that the earth was cooling and shrinking a prune or that mountains were being pushed up by the force of colliding continents. He thought they were formed by the resistance that the continents experienced as they were sort of Palau ing through the Ocean floor beneath them. Sort of like like the way tablecloth wrinkles if you try to push it across the table vagner also thought the islands were pieces that had broken off the continents. As they were moving Vega. There was not entirely sure what was providing the energy needed for the continent's to move. He proposed several possibilities. And the one that he focused on the most was that it was some I'm kind of energy related to irregularities in the planet's rotation on its axis Wagner detailed all this in two papers published in nineteen eleven and nineteen twelve wolf both titled The origin of Continents. He's cited evidence from several different fields including geology paleontology geophysics and geodesy and on January six nineteen twelve. He spoke about these ideas before the Geological Association in Frankfurt and then he presented on it at the Society for the advancement of of natural science in Marburg Germany. If days after that this was just dramatically different from how most scientists understood the world at the time and to be clear. It's really really not how we understand today either. But it also wasn't the only hypothesis out there. Other geologists had also put forth various ideas about how the earth's continents might have been joined together at some point in the distant past basically. It was clear that the whole model of the earth is a molten object that was cooling and contracting just wasn't correct so a lot of scientists were trying to figure out what really was happening had some supporters or at least people who thought he might be onto something. These were people who had personally seen or already knew about some of the evidence that he had cited but he also had plenty of detractors. Some of this was rooted rooted in the details of his work. For example he said that Greenland was moving at about one hundred twenty feet or thirty six meters a year that was an error her and it was easily disproved. It also didn't seem like slight. Irregularities in the Earth's rotation could have provided nearly enough energy to move entire continents knits especially if there's continents were plowing their way through a less dense layer of the planet underneath them. Some of the people who disagreed with Vega were particularly scathing anything about it for example Doctor Rollin t chamberlain of the University of Chicago said Quote Vegas Hypothesis in general is of the footloose type in that it takes takes considerable liberty with our Globe and is less bound by restrictions or tied down by awkward ugly facts than most of its rival theories. So this wasn't really a case of one man. Alfred Wagner against the whole of science enough people thought he was at least partially correct that they became known as the mobilised while people. Well you disagreed were called the anti mobilised or the fixes this was not the end of editors work on his continental drift theory. But he didn't keep working on lots of other stuff during his career career. And we're going to talk a little bit more about that. After we pause for a sponsor break the future is closer than you think and it all starts in the palm of your hand you may have heard the news. Five G. is coming but what does that really mean. How will it impact me in this new IHEART series? This time tomorrow presented by team above business join me as well often and my co host characterize as we will you through the true revolution immobility. That will change the way we interact with the world around us from environmental science to law enforcement. Entertainment Healthcare and travel innovation.

Alfred Wagner Frank B Taylor South America Africa Europe Straits of Magellan Sima Ocean Taylor Wagner US Atlantic land bridge Abraham Francis Mir Brazil southeast Africa North America Geological Society of America Southeast Asia
"madagascar asker" Discussed on Dear Sugars

Dear Sugars

11:32 min | 1 year ago

"madagascar asker" Discussed on Dear Sugars

"We tapped into our own child like energy when we greeted. Amy Amy. Yes it's Benny Ben. Johnson Ameri hi how are you. I'm well how are you guys. Pretty good. Good Gamey was well hungry. I'm sorry you haven't had lunch yet. That sounds rough. Oh no no. That's okay maybe maybe if you had progeny they would have served you you some lunch by now right. I know one of many reasons. I made such a huge mistake. Amy Blackstone is a sociology professor at the University of Maine. And she's child free but that's not how she thought things would turn out if you asked me. I had a plan when I was ten or eleven. I knew that I was going to start having children when I was twenty. Honey I would have to kids boy and a girl and I would be the cool mom who pick my kids up at school and you know showed up with Capri Suns and in my leg. warmers and mini skirt. This was the eighties so I had this real vision fast forward a decade and a half from the kids. Drink era of Capri Sun to the nineteen nineties. Vaca- the brief but glorious rule of the drinks sunny delight. Amy had married her high school sweetheart. She had a PhD fulfilling career and no children yet by the time. I hit my mid thirties and was still answering with the. I'm too young. I'm not interested yet. Maybe maybe later I realized maybe something else is going on. Maybe I don't WanNa have kids and and That was the point at which I really really started thinking more deeply about parenthood as a choice. So Amy did what you might expect doctor of sociology to do. She started looking into the topic. I went to find research to sort of answer. That question of what's wrong with me. Why am I not feeling that maternal instinct and I discovered there was less sociological work on the the experience of being child free and on the process by which people make this this decision than I expected to find? Amy started doing her own research and she and her husband Lance started a blog called. We're not having a baby. Maybe they share research rants means and stories including the one about how they quote came out as child free to Amy's family a a lot of child free people use that expression by the way. Amy Says it's not intended to take away from the LGBTQ experience of coming out it's meant to draw parallels between the ways in which people push back against what mainstream society sees as normal and natural and appropriate for amy her coming out took her by surprise lance and I were happened to be hosting my nephews first year birthday and at his birthday party my sister asked so. When are you gonNA give Joshua cousin and I like I just had this very visceral reaction to that question and you know had been thinking for a while at at this point that I didn't want to be a mother And felt uncomfortable in that place and so when my sister asked question I just blurted out out never and room just sort of went silent. Amy says this was a really really uncomfortable moment and it felt like an outsized reaction but it felt right so it was freeing to declare loudly that she really was not going to have kids. Amy declared her decision even louder this year when she published a book on the topic. It's called child free by choice and probably the first first step in understanding what it means to be child. Free is understanding what the term child free means. I chose to use that term And you know the other term that people talk about his childless voluntarily childless and for many child free people the term childless doesn't accurately or adequately represent their experience. It's putting the emphasis on a thing that we don't have because we've chosen not to have it. Incomplete right right. Opting out of having kids isn't new but the concept of it being a movement or a political choice child free voluntarily childless. Whatever whatever you call it it seems to be growing and the conversation about it in more recent years can probably be traced back to a couple of movements in the nineteen sixties and nineteen seventies? I up the second wave feminist movement which is connected to the FDA approving the birth control pill nineteen sixty also roe versus wade which came thirteen years later legalizing abortion. These two landmark events gave people more control than ever before in their decisions about parenthood. We're all better her off. When women have equal access to healthcare to the work place to education when they're able to control and make their own own decisions about their reproductive lives and their bodies next up something called the zero population growth movement focusing on you guessed it our expanding population post baby boom and then the zero population growth movement really raised our awareness about humans impact on the environment particularly in and Western nations with you know different consumption patterns than other nations around the world according to Pew Research Data From Twenty fifteen about fifteen percent of women in the US reached their fortieth birthday without having given birth. But Amy is quick to point out that the data is far from perfect. A woman who doesn't have a child is not necessarily a child free woman I mean we know what proportion of women end their lives without ever having children but we we don't have good data on what right exactly among those women which of them is childless which of them wanted to become parents but didn't or couldn't for any number of reasons and which of them is child free. What demographers do know is that? We're in an extended era of declining fertility rates in this country which is strange because there are more women of childbearing age these days than there were a decade ago. But we don't know how many of the people opting out or delaying. Parenthood are doing so because they're choosing in to be part of this child free movement and so we don't know how big the movement is while you can't currently measure the growth of the entire child free movement. You can measure it on reddit where there's a child free community. That recently has been going gangbusters. Currently we're growing at more than one thousand two hundred subscribers per day. You heard that right and you heard it from Chris. I'm Thirty five year old German guy. On currently in Soochow China why not mom actually one of the moderators of the Chug. Free Form. These days. Chris Lives in China but before that he lived in Kenya. Madagascar Asker Nigeria Tanzania Liberia Norway Luxembourg. We get it. He's well traveled. Guy Makes Jason Bourne look like a homebody. Chris says worked in banking tourism transportation medical device technological. Right we get it. He's also Swiss army man and Chris says his career hopping globe trotting lifestyle his become a bit of a joke between him and the friends of his who have kids when they see me posting on facebook and instagram. I'm no in violent. I'm in Vietnam I'm doing a coffee roasting workshop in Bali and stuff like that and they're like yeah and I'm just taking the little one to the park and here I am with with the little one going to the doctor to the dentist and whatsoever. Chris says there's always a boom in growth of the sub. Read at this time of year. Probably because the the holidays mean family gatherings and family gatherings mean an onslaught of unsolicited comments questions and opinions about your life choices. Things is like what you don't like kids. Well it's different when it's your own you know. Don't you WanNa give your parent's grandchildren. Who will take care of you? When you're old you're young you'll change your your mind but you two would make such cute kids together? And how about this one straight from the pope no Nevada fee. Hey initiate translation. Not Having children is a selfish choice. The child free have a term for these kinds of statements bingos bingos. Yeah well Bingo is basically coming from the old Bingo game. Where basically that you have a A square piece of paper. And did you have a couple of common expressions that that you're going to see your that you're going to hear over your lifetime simply meaning you hear it so many times that You're bound to have five hundred zero someday and then you're GonNa win the price there's no actual prize in the child. Free Sub Reddit while while. But there's a wealth of information reading materials. Faq's best of discussion threads and a compilation of comebacks to all lows bingos in response to the whole. You're too young to know for sure. Argument one comeback reads. I'm too young to decide. I don't want children but somehow somehow I'm not too young to decide. I do want children to pope. Francis is selfish argument. Take your pick like I'm selfish for not wanting to bring in an unwanted child into this world or how my selfish for putting my own happiness over a non existent being a place for people to post arguments and snarky archy comebacks might sound unproductive. Then again there are four babies born every second so people in the child free community and feel like it's a refuge for a minority that faces intense cultural pressure even with seven hundred thousand subscribers. That will just about approaching Compared to two seven billion people in the world that still next to nothing and Tim that means if you want to get any kind of support from like minded people Um than the Internet is the best place to find such support community. This is really interesting. Interesting to me because Emory I've mentioned this quote from author William Gibson that gets repeated all the time in the tech and Scifi world. Which is the future is here? It's just is not evenly distributed. Yeah you mentioned that a lot so I think that in a similar way. That child free conversation is here. It's just not evenly distributed. Did and what I mean by that is how and whether people are having this conversation and their ability to have it depends a lot on where you are in the world and what kind of community. Maybe you're living in. This is especially true when you live in a place where being child free isn't just a typical. It's practically unheard of the don't get. How can you not one shooter? That's crazy this is summer AKA on a summer on Reddit who you heard from at the top of the show. The twenty seven year old woman. Who sent us a voice memo from Nairobi? Kenya become joking..

Amy Amy Chris Lives Amy Blackstone Kenya Capri Suns Gamey Johnson Ameri Benny Ben Nairobi US Lance Vaca University of Maine Vietnam facebook FDA Joshua Asker Nigeria Tanzania Liberia Soochow China
"madagascar asker" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

11:58 min | 1 year ago

"madagascar asker" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Of the environment in the system okay well by the same token then I think they their descendants were better off to because of that. If that's the way you're gonNA argue and so still it's not clear to me that there's a case for reparations operations. Nowadays your point about productivity. I think answers the whole point is what we're trying to do is do a kettering parapets overview of slavery as an economic system you know of having people enslaved versus having them not enslaved and this this kind of argument him at like but slavery the system of slavery involved bringing people from Africa to the US where they were more productive so you can't leave that it kind of reminds me of people people who say well. It's seems too clever by half when people say well World War Two really did get us out of the Great Depression because you know after the war everybody was exhausted from all the planning and nobody had the nobody really felt like engaging in any big economic initiatives and whatever and so it it kind of die down because okay but that's not what people are saying when they say World War Two of the depression they're saying all the spending got us out of the depression so it's it's kind of off topic to go into stuff like that and I think likewise the but you know hey they were brought over from Africa. It's not the question is if if somebody is employed against his will or not does that give you so in other words when we're trying to analyze that aspect of the question we have to hold other things equal and so if you if we are going to bring in in this extraneous point about people being moved from one continent to another then at the very least that has to be one of the things that's held equal we have to we have to be looking at continents where they're of similar productivity because otherwise you're not really evaluating slavery. You're just evaluating the effects of moving people from a low productivity to a high productivity and that's not what we're trying to do. We're trying to evaluate slavery so when you say the majority enslaving the minority I don't see why it wouldn't also hold if slavery is is is a system that leads to too impressive economic growth. Why wouldn't it be the minority enslaving the majority like why couldn't we extend it to that and say if we had ten people enslaving the population? Why wouldn't that yield as an even better outcome but I think the reason nobody tries that thought experiment is that it instantly becomes obvious that if you did that it would be very bad for everyone it would it would be as if in some ways the the effects would be the same as the effects of living in a pre division of Labor abor society where it let's say everybody had to be agriculture because not because the the thought experiment I'm proposing would involve everybody being in agriculture but in a pre division of Labor society where everybody happens to be an agriculture think about all the people who are geniuses who were the outliers who were the creative people who are the ones who are going to change the world all that knowledge is totally wasted because they're spending their time picking cotton or something you know this is stupid for them to be doing that if they were in a free economy we as a society would be able to reap the benefits of their amazing brains and that would hold true? Even if the ten people in a modern society were directing the everybody everybody else to go do things but who knows where they should all go and it's not just the central planning problem. It's also all the untapped human capital all that untapped genius or if some guy would be droning away doing accounting for some firm when he could be changing the world with the internet or something yeah I. I think you're exactly right there again so it's I think people need to realize when we talk about the the opportunity pretty cost. If you want to think of that way of of slavery it's that yeah there's all these you know millions of people at its height who they have no incentive to go discover where their Labor Abra ought to be employed right even just e within the narrow tasks what they were doing some it looks around and has a great idea like you know what we're doing it this way and occurs to me. Maybe if we rearranged how we did it. We boost output when you know nobody has any incentive to volunteer that sort of information where I thought you were gonNA say. Tom Is the more we extended. I'd like to say it's fewer and fewer people enslaving greater and greater proportion of the population that approaches socialism economically speaking and so at some point when you realize is the you know the economic calculation problem and how even of Stalin could have everybody completely at his Co.. Back in call and everyone faithfully carry out his orders. There's there's a sense in which you know that that's the output of that system is going to be much lower even according to Stalin's own preferences then again you see the the fundamental problem with using coercion rather than voluntary exchange to organize society all right. What's the next one okay the next one? Let's go ahead and tackle. This is the trickiest one and I'm not even sure exactly what my answer is here but I'll go ahead and summarize the position of maybe time you can take the first crack at it so it someone has pointed out that it seems there's at least attention in the way that Standard Libertarians address two different issues and in each particular issue. We've used these arguments even so often that I wouldn't even think about it but if you step back it looks like there's at least attention if not an outright contradiction so when it comes to government welfare support it's it's pretty standard to say stuff. Okay not only is it immoral the tax some people in order to give checks to other people because hey it's involuntary. It's violates the AP but they also tried to make arguments showing how destructive it is to say things like Oh and you know the the system of welfare that we've had in the US has destroyed. The family right certainly is an inner city communities in particular. It's broken up the family. You have single mother. Households primarily is what we're talking about. The has been subsidizing encouraged encouraged by the welfare state and that's a horrible ramifications and it's encouraged with call. You know intergenerational poverty so it's it's really that it just setting up a system where the you know the kids grow up in that environment they don't know differently than normal and then you know it's harder for these families. Get stuck stuck in this and they can be there for generations. At a time clearly we can see this destructive system is not just unfair to the tax payer but it's also hurting the very people people that ostensibly you're helping with these welfare payments right so that's pretty standard right winger critique of the welfare state with then when it comes to protectionism the standard libertarian position has hey even if the Chinese government is subsidizing their exports and they're sending us. TV's way below cost that's not hurting us you know that hurting particular the US manufacturers of TV's but that's making America I mean what are you going to say that the sunlight's making us poorer I mean come on if if you're saying in foreign goods coming in that are real cheap destructive within certainly the free gifts of nature are really destructive but nobody's stupid enough to say that so therefore I don't care if the Chinese government subsidizing subsidizing their exports that makes America richer to be getting more stuff and just think of it this way. How was it hurting us to get more options if they're sending US really cheap? TV's you know we could just not accept them but the fact that consumers are accepting the shows that that's you know that's benefiting Americans and we just re optimize in light of this program okay so okay it. Does you know yeah. I think you're going to see where this is going. Wait a minute you know why isn't it so how come welfare from the Chinese government isn't encouraging dependency in a the lack of effort that sort of thing on the part of US manufacturers or it doesn't seem like there's at least a tension there between those two different arguments okay. I think the main thing is that in the first I case in order to get yourself eligible for the programs you have to be in a if I may say so really pathetic situation and the argument that Charles Murray has made is that it becomes more attractive to be in that situation to place yourself in that situation and stay in that situation so as to remain eligible whereas if the Chinese are just sending US stuff. They're not they're not going to your house and saying well is there. We'll give you a free TV as long as there's no husband in the household they're I'm not saying that they're not saying we'll give you a free. TV as long as you haven't worked in two years it's it becomes an effect like a gift of nature so I don't say to myself. I'm I'M NOT GONNA record my podcast this morning because the sun exists and I'm getting free light anyway you know that's just a part of the backdrop of my life at this point so I think that's that's unless unless I'm missing something. That's the clear difference between them right. I think that you're right. Tom and that's that was one of the things I was gonNA. Say That certainly if we're going to be realistic people here are not not just total like Chicago school type economists yes. That's that's a huge in an important difference between the two another. I mean so you you could push it and say okay. Hey but you know the the where the economists will often say something like hey. You don't hurt somebody by giving them more options okay so there is some paternalism involved there where you're you're. You're saying that yes I mean in other words why wouldn't be if it really is bad to take Jackson to not get married to raise kids living in that environment then then why all of these mothers refused the checks. You know if it's if it's in other words if you're arguing welfare actually hurts the recipients to then well gee you know who are you you to judge you know so in other words normally we libertarians might make that kind of an order to say Oh as the the credit the leftist critic is complaining about payday loan businesses and how they charge really high interest rates to give an advance on your check in typically what we'll say is oh you pointy headed intellectual leftist notice the the people who do think these businesses are good. Are they actual customers. So who are you to come in and second guess the preferences of these people in dire situations. You know they're situat- you know what I'm saying so I'm not saying you're wrong. I'm I'm just saying it does seem like in some cases we totally reject any kind of paternalistic argument and say no the the the recip the people down in the trenches. They know what their situation isn't. Who are are we to judge but that another time it's like even though they were taken those checks and cashing them? AFDC checks actually it's hurting them. I guess part of the difference is is that in the first case they're getting my money and then the second case they're making a decision with their own money and so yeah when they get my money yeah you're darn right. There's going to be a little little bit of string attached there. We're going to say you are getting taxpayer money so blah blah blah. You're we're I it seems more legitimate for us has to be critical of decision might make so I think I think that's a that's a good chunk of it. Okay yeah that's I think you're raising indecent objections bigger and also it's like it's like when people say why do you. Why do you focus so much on on on Israel? You know you must be an anti Semite if you're always focusing crossing on the problems of Israel well. It's because Israel get so much money. You know if if it didn't I'd focus on Chad more maybe you know maybe it'd be talking about Madagascar Asker but the fact that Israel gets this money and all this other stuff. That's Kinda. Why I WANNA say to Israel well? It might be better or if you did this rather than that whereas I wouldn't really say that to. You know Switzerland Door Finland or you know wherever Camara Tena I I wouldn't I would because I I don't feel like I have any skin in the game there okay that's fine but again if to the extent that you're not just just saying hey this is my money. Don't waste it on something bad to extend that you're saying no. This actually is hurting the recipients that that's that's the minor point that there does seem like there is some I think it's fine. I think you could say yeah in some cases. paternalism is correct and so maybe that's you know that the bill and say yeah the whole more than other people. Some people make better decisions than other people. I'm not a gala -Tarian Yeah and also to even on the you know the payday loan stuff too yeah..

US Israel Chinese government Tom Africa depression Stalin kettering Labor abor society Switzerland Door Finland Chicago Labor society America Charles Murray Jackson Chad
"madagascar asker" Discussed on Criminal

Criminal

07:17 min | 1 year ago

"madagascar asker" Discussed on Criminal

"Was released from prison on parole in September nineteen eighty-three. He went back to Wisconsin where he grew up. He wrote in letters to friends that he spent his time baking cakes gardening and taking trips to lake superior he wrote that he planned to return to Madagascar and that he was applying for a grant grant but no university would hire him and for some time he was sort of an intellectual Hobo sleeping keeping on people's couches house sitting pats and then about four years after his release. This is the second crime on February nineteenth nineteen eighty-seven BJ went to an opera the met he saw Mozart's La Clemenza ditoto an opera about revenge and attempted murder. After it ended he headed home. He was hosting for a friend in Greenwich Village. When he arrived at the door he was met by group of police officers and arrested a few days earlier on Valentine's Day. A woman had received a box of Godiva chocolates in the mail. They were addressed her husband federal judge Charles Bryant inside the package. There's a hallmark card signed only with a question mark the judge's wife eight eight four pieces of chocolate and became extremely sick she lost consciousness and wasn't found until Judge Bryant came home from work and rushed rushed her to the emergency room choosing critical condition for several days but survived the FBI determined that in each piece of chocolate in the box had been poisoned with the different toxic substance one piece uneaten by the judge's wife could have kilter told her in when the F. b. i. tested the outside of the Godiva box they found a fingerprint he started making these candies and he always fashioned himself as a gourmet cook and he made these candies he also fashioned these these poisons from fairly esoteric substances and he made these candies and put them all in a Godiva chocolate box and sent them to the judge judge had in West Chester on Valentine's Day in one thousand nine hundred eighty seven so it's been about four years since he'd been released so it just goes to show how long he could hold grudges police later learned that BJ had sent boxes of chocolate to several other people he felt had wronged him including someone who'd wants deny him tenure in the end everyone recovered at Bj's arraignment the New York Times reported he was weary looking apparently ill and wearing a hearing aid he pled guilty t- to the attempted murder of Judge Bryant Peter Club for wonders. This was all part of some kind of plan to take that he wanted to get caught. Oh there's no doubt in my mind it was inviting. I mean this was a this is a brilliant man. Whatever else you may say about you don't send poison chocolates to a federal judge and Steve Freon Street to talk about it now if you send them in a way that invites discovery and arrest which is what he did of course a practically has returned address on the parcel in the apartment kitchen all of the poison paraphernalia and the chocolate's there were laid out as if on on display that furthermore the package was mailed from a mailbox at the corner or his apartment was. Why did he want to get caught. My guess is that they just Lena's dead. My life is over. Let's let's let's ended and so he sends his poisoned chocolates knowing that that's going to send him up for life because he did it. No way which invited why did discovery and arrest this is not a mistake. BJ was sentenced to forty years in prison. He was sent into the supermax prison. In Marion Illinois the prison that had been built to replace Alcatraz he started working on a new book about the lemurs of Madagascar and like before BJ stayed up to date on the latest scientific journals subscribed oppor news and exchanged letters with his friends ends especially with Peter Club for what was his mood in those letters he was clearly despondent but nine still actively working still coming up with ideas kept asking me to look up particular papers summarize the contents since for him. I did ask him what on Earth led you to do this and he said I really don't have any recollection recollection of having done it but if I did do it I deserve to be in prison even though Bj had tried to implicate Peter Leader in his quay lude making scheme and had attempted to murder a federal judge. Peter says he wasn't angry at his friend. He felt sorry for for him and says. BJ needed to be protected from himself. They'd write long letters reminiscing about their trips to Madagascar Asker Peter would update. BJ about what the lemurs were up to in Durham one day Peter got a different kind of letter from Bj and so he wrote me one day and said. I've just discovered that I'm HIV positive and probably have AIDS. This was back when there was no antiviral medication and you had aids. You had a death sentence. BJ died at the age of sixty seven in a prison hospital. He was cremated and his ashes were spread on cranberry. Lake in Wisconsin near near where he grew up was the last time you heard from him. Just about the time he entered the hospital with his final bout of pneumonia just before he died. What was what did he say he was in. He knew he was dying is either severe pneumonia and I don't expect to recover and then he went on to talk about scientific issues. We've been discussing.

Bj Judge Bryant Peter Club BJ Madagascar Charles Bryant Wisconsin lake superior pneumonia La Clemenza AIDS Greenwich Village Steve Freon Mozart Peter Leader New York Times FBI Lena HIV Peter Club
"madagascar asker" Discussed on The How-To Heretic

The How-To Heretic

14:36 min | 1 year ago

"madagascar asker" Discussed on The How-To Heretic

"Uncle dan. Have you been on any interesting trips lately or are you on one now i <hes> as a matter of fact i am on the island of victoria. Nope right is not where you are. I am nope. He nearly got thrown out of the airport because that was insulting and it's a it's a city and the islanders. There's vancouver island but let's let that go all right. I slept. I flashed my american passport and everything was fine that you were going to say something else and that was going to be ah i had locked and loaded but i didn't have to use it. I sent doug definitely needs a little bit of of a geography lesson clearly i have. I have one today guys raw yeah and it's it's it's one we've talked about before so let me get into through it. As you know from time to time in the course of human events it it becomes necessary to hack deep into the wild untamed territories of human stupidity eighty and the unmapped balderdash that haunts the credulous mind to forge paths to explore strange new worlds to seek out absurd new cryptic words and nonexistent ancient civilizations and to boldly go where no real man has ever been so that was actually the original name of our podcast before we settled on the how to heretic doc it was what was it that all thing you just saw that yes i tuned said no it is into that wilderness alertness of the disheveled human mind we shall press today into new territory or rather an old territory or rather a totally never was a territory but it's the only anything made up to explain a thing then the thing was disproven and so then it got picked up by some moon bats and it got even dumber so i'll go mark. You're surely yelling by now. Oh enough indeed let's set of course due west then south then straight down to the long lost not a continent of lamoureux now as you may know as we've talked on this show a little about the a a little of about the little known not a continent more than a couple of times already and we'll touch on those again going forward today but every stupid thing has a beginning so how did the legend of lemere begin also. That was the second name of our podcast. Every stupid thing has the beginning. It was already taken. That's right there's ten of them and two of them are in portuguese weirdly so it began as a way to explain some baffling biogeography in the mind of phillips glaister a perfectly not crazy person person and he wasn't in eighteen sixty four slater was an accomplished and well respected naturalist and ornithologist his studies of the leaders of madagascar and the discovery of fossilized leaders but no living ones in india and mainland africa led him to rather grandly theorize that perhaps the remaining levers and the fossilized populations were connected by land in eons past and so named this new atlantis after the strange creatures of the forests of madagascar asker. Are you kidding area now. Yes yeah what's called and it turns out. He was right kind of they. They did indeed share a common landmass. It was called the supercontinent of gondwana which began to break up about one hundred and eighty million years ago his named after an iguana it was named after the yes doug thanks for his theory of of a weird ass noodle light continent continent linked africa madagascar to india when they had actually not required a newly land bridge to touch them at all since they we're very much touched each other along with antarctica australia asia and south america so good job being right in the wrong way lord sq later and for those me onnly maria where the continent touchdown and for those where the subcontinent touch those wondering what the difference between the o._j. Supercontinent panja and n. gondwana is gondwana. What was left after europe and north america broke off to form their own band that they your america and of course all good people no no penalty as most famous native son cement gunnery burns as he was revealed to the world when his safe room security system asked his place of birth to to permit entry so what i think was probably the funniest simpsons joke of all time so anyway the working theories of plate tectonics incontinent continental drift soon displaced slater's theory to the bottom of the indian ocean where it should have stayed submerged forever next to osama bin laden low allegedly until until q. and on twitter soon exactly right but as we know it has not this ultimately ultimately silly but scientifically postulated idea was soon discovered by none other than the mysterious russian emigre helena vat sqi whose weird world we discussed in episode assode fifty four well. That's was writing the same late nineteenth century wave of spiritualist fervor that swept along under such luminaries. We've discussed as alister crowley and of course russia's greatest love machine rasputin soap levesque's claim to be the receiver of or channel four several ancient mystics six including one called kutumi kutumi it. It should be every time i read. It makes me giggle. One called mahatma's who told her about the root races that occupied the planet in pre human times one of which the la- mirian's as luck would have it lived on the long lost noodle continent luria as we all know according to the upon inhabitants of the lost continent where around seven feet tall which is a little taller than than moon quakers for those not keeping cracking they were egg-laying and mentally underdeveloped what we've been missing from the fossil record record is the egg-laying humans as the poopers ed because it's impossible to ever talk about any religious belief without some startling level of racism levesque's also expounded on how australian aboriginal people were the descendants of these feeble minded over people but only after they they further polluted their dimwitted g._m. Gene pool with the regular practice of bestiality of course yeah nicer still as further proof if that bad ideas can only get worse this garbage was picked up by australian white racial nationalists and leaked oliver the literature of the time as a justification for and as is a bomb for whatever pangs of consciousness white australians might be feeling for the decimation and brutality carried out on the continent's original inhabitants. Nobody tells tells stephen miller about this faulk right so our friend helena vat ski had some weird ideas about racism sunken continents. She also believed her masters is on the other side of the vale had once lived as pets for higher beings that lived on the moon where they were eventually killed in an attack by furry moon crocodiles so yeah. It's if it gets back to the moon. I'm always going to be happy never single time. You're disappointed me. If you get to the moon clearly we should take what this woman has to say to the moon bank but our friend levinsky was hardly the only medium in touch with the other side who had something to say about the sake continent. That wasn't no our friend jay z. Night says quite a lot about maria because her thirty five thousand year old warrior warrior physicists boyfriend on the other side ramtha on told her all about it. Oh that's awesome yeah see luria was ramp this homeland and it was occupied by those rat fuck atlantans so at the tender age of fourteen he led an army of two point six million in warriors that is more than the estimated population of the entire earth at that point to liberate it as night is a resident of washington state eight. It was a stroke of pure luck that ramp the told her the sunken continent that started on the southeast coast of africa then extent all the way to india stretched a little further other still ultimately connecting with the northwest united states. Does that feel like a very long way to you. Guys do the maps and listeners if you haven't done it treat yourself and go back and listen to episode fifteen where we discuss ramtha and his inebriated gateway to this dimension at great length it will make you feel like when the new well indeed and what the bleep do we know that anyway the fuck yeah and please spare yourself watching that movie because we love you so the rosicrucians of all people also beloved of the idea of maria. We'll talk about those bearers of of secret wisdom and secret hand shakes and other time but just know these numbers of hidden truths have published several books on the for real place limits area and that is exactly how seriously the rosicrucians should be taken so less stupidly has a has been a great resource for writers of fiction and film and comic book makers acres for decades as well. It's been featured in a godzilla movie a bela lugosi film and h._p. Lovecraft story thomas pinch novel inherent vice <hes> a transformers cartoon and inspired tons of music and scores of video games so at least some people are having the sort of fun with myriad that not taking it seriously yeah where wonder woman <hes>. What's that called lesbian no. I think that it's an island. Let's let's just pause. Pause for a minute and think about the possibility that maybe that island is all that remains of bloomberg malaria and bought a boom. It's all dc cannon now well i have. I have a dismount. That's just for you then because let's end this bizarre little real world this little thing with a a real world coda to this sub oceanic gobbledegook doc there is a tiny little group of islands that are very remote in the indian ocean this archipelago thousands thousand tiny islands and medium size islands is called old the british indian <unk> tori of course so the british kicked out very original the british kicked out the tiny native population or who are known as the chagas sonian in the late sixties in order to use their homeland as a naval airbase in the heady days of the cold war so from the mighty empire that once controlled old half the world this little place the falklands bermuda and something called rock hall are about all that's left of their once giant overseas territories and with boris johnson now in charge them here and these tiny he's stolen lands are off limits not only to the forcefully displaced chess czechoslovakians but to the likes of you and meteorogical. 's the these restricted military sites include include the joint military base of diego garcia. We're not only countless. Millions of tons of bombs were loaded to drop on afghanistan and lord knows where else but it also so houses a c._i._a. Black site where an unknown number of people will never will never get a day in court are abused and god knows what else in our ongoing american crusade called the war on terror so strangely like area the extra legal torture complex diego garcia legally doesn't exist but there's an odd little twist that ties ties these two oddities together in a way i find just a little unsettling so i'm not often unnerved by heraldry and coats of arms but maybe we'll be more often as i am at the moment in nineteen ninety the twenty fifth anniversary of the brits forcibly dislocating the locals minding their own damn business the british the crown granted the british indian ocean territory its own coat of arms. It's both very british and very weird so it's to sea turtles kinda holding up a shield with a union jack a crown in palm tree on it weird enough but not the distressing part beneath the two standing turtles is a little scroll scroll with a latin phrase written opponent into tele nostra a limited area and that translates to liguria is in our charge. Wow this is an official government symbol for some tiny stolen almost unknown islands where human beings disappeared to avoid perhaps forever and doug. I feel like this is a very cunanan thing for me to have noticed and become slightly obsessed with and i do not know what to do that feeling but there it is so i'm looking at this thing right now. In the first thing i thought was oh. It's a turn their bellies people are tortured and perhaps perhaps as dan was speculating the last remaining above water tip of great lamoureux. Let me let me just postulate out there doug. I know that you're in the industry. Can we start in salt lake city. A place called the turtle bar with this as our big. He'll be realized all of our listeners deserve this. I i'm gonna put all my money there because we we need to we need a place. We can have a meet up. That's cheap yeah and a bar. That won't kick like me out so you can have all my money for the turtle bar. We're doing. We're doing it. I i'd like to say that's the last we've heard of myriad did your ankles but we all know that it will not be the case as it bobs to the surface time and time again as an unsinkable derp from the deep back i can guarantee that at the end by the end of this podcast liri will be part of the cunanan conspiracy theory if not already. I'm sure it has already so <hes> with that little drop. I've left behind. Why don't we move.

doug india madagascar Uncle dan africa levesque slater vancouver island diego garcia maria Supercontinent panja alister crowley bela lugosi jay z osama bin laden afghanistan stephen miller south america russia luria